Lifetight – Self-Tightled EP

Barely into their second breath as a band, emerging just a handful of months back, UK hardcore mob Lifetight have swiftly lured eager attention with their debut single and now a first EP which merges new adventure into an original hardcore heart. It is four slices of honest and uncompromising intent delivered upon an emotive roar and quite simply rather tasty.

Emerging from the ashes of melodic hardcore outfit Lock & Key, Lifetight’s have already earned eager support and radio play for recent single Energy and it is easy to hear why as the track opens up the Self-Tightled EP From an enticing guitar lure, the song launches at ears with rapacious riffs and striking rhythms with the agitated tones of vocalist Thomas Smith leading the way. Wiry hooks and a great bass grumble soon increase the song’s early grip on attention whilst lyrically a hope fuelled suggestion lines the growing snarling confrontation. With Elliott Black’s bass a constant growling pleasure in the increasingly impressing encounter, there is no escaping all the reasons it made a strong impact a few weeks back.

Those qualities are just as bold within the following Misguided. With Smith to the fore, it instantly consumes the senses before casting a hostile web of grooves and rhythmic predation; an aggression as instinctively infectious as it is imposingly cantankerous. As in the first, guitarist Danny Reeves weaves an imaginative ear gripping incitement; a collusion of riffs, hooks, and grooves which captivate as they shape the metallic punk proposal.

Just as enterprising is the swinging animosity of drummer Josh Murphy, but an attack again bred with rock ‘n’ roll virulence which in turn gives next up Big Boy House a rousing nature and energy to get the body bouncing. With a host of twists and turns in its irritable defiance, the song rumbles and grumbles with heart bred intensity and catchiness; each of the quartet sharing their inescapable craft and energy to the trespass before Dreams closes things up. The final track is an anthemic blaze of sound and discontent but once again full of encouragement as it stirs physical and emotional reaction. Old school yet as fresh as it comes, the track is a heavily pleasing end to a striking debut from Lifetight.

It is an introduction as rife with potential as it is quality and a powerful next step in the emergence of one appetite sparking band.

Self-Tightled is out now via Crooked Noise Records.

https://www.facebook.com/lifetight/     http://www.lifetight.co/    https://twitter.com/lifetightuk

Pete RingMaster 08/11/2017

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Light The Skies – Human

light-the-skies-promo-shot_RingMasterReview

It seems that there is a sudden swell of excitement around British quartet Light The Skies primarily because of their new EP, Human. Creating an attention luring sound built on a fusion of post hardcore with melodic metal influences, it maybe that the band has been on the radar of a great many before now but it is with their potential fuelled new release that the rest of us might just be catching on.

It is hard to say there are many major surprises within the six songs making up the EP but each is an accomplished and imagination built proposal easily enticing ears. Since forming during their college days in 2013, the Birmingham band has grown into a potent live force, sharing stages with the likes of Ghost Town, Palisades, Boy Jumps Ship, Alverez Kings, Scream Blue Murder, Lock & Key, Beyond Recall, and Templeton Pek along the way. The Human EP is a new step up in their ascent, a release sure to be nudging national awareness of the band’s dynamic sound.

The EP opens up with Animals, a track which promises much but does not always deliver yet leaves a definite intrigue to hear more. Its muscular opening with the probing beats of drummer Sam Hemus make a potent coaxing, escalating as just as intensive riffs and grooves from the guitars of Will Douglas and Charlie Elliott grip the senses. With the heavy tones of Conor Browne’s bass seducing it is a formidable start capped by the raw throated cries of Douglas. A sudden slip into mellow climes with clean vocals is a less potent move for personal tastes though redeemed by the great band harmonies which lead back into the tempestuous roar of the song.

light-the-skies-cover-artwork_RingMasterReviewContinuing to switch between its increasingly imaginative stages the song is ultimately a powerful and pleasing start to the release and soon matched by Distractions. Its gentler melodic opening paves the way for a tantalising mix of Douglas’ clean vocals and a web of guitar enterprise speared by the shadowy yet flirtatious nature of the bass. With a lighter climate throughout compared to the tempestuous air of its predecessor, the song is a radiant tempting with keys and melodies as suggestive as the emotion lining the eventful song.

Acclimate uncages its own irritable storm of sound and intensity straight after, a challenge nicely tempered by warmer vocals and melodic endeavour as rhythms intrude upon the senses. It many ways it is as poppy as it is aggressively raw, veering more towards the latter the further into its creative and emotional turbulence it ventures though still it makes room for more welcoming ideas.

Looking Back unites the same kind of contrasts in an infectious stroll with a forcibly anthemic chorus and heavier textures which prowl its body throughout while its successor Ourselves is an acoustic caress with Douglas showing the strength of his harmonic tones. The first of the pair is a certain highlight of the EP with the second increasingly beguiling, their individual qualities combined by the closing drama of Distance. As its start, Human ends with a song which fully satisfies if without finding all the ingredients which ignite other tracks but each nurtures an appetite to hear more from Light The Skies; a success in anyone’s book.

Human is out now via Snowhill Records @ https://itunes.apple.com/gb/album/human-ep/id1154785404

http://www.lighttheskiesuk.com/   https://twitter.com/LightTheSkiesUK   https://www.facebook.com/LightTheSkiesUk

Pete RingMaster 04/11/2016

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Idols Of Apathy – Life Lessons

Idols Of Apathy Promo Shot_RingMaster Review

Truly standing out in the vast horde of metal bands with a hellacious bully of a sound seems to get harder and harder with every passing year and diversely brutal release. Originality is a premium numerous touch upon, often impressively, and few rarely blossom to something which really does stand alone and become the inspirer rather than the inspired. British extreme /tech metallers Idols Of Apathy fall into the former with their sound, but equally strongly impress with their five track tempest of fury and raw ingenuity, the Life Lessons EP. The release is a volatile and skilfully invasive proposition which never leaves a moment dulled by a lack of imagination and passion, qualities woven in with recognisable hues to suggest that influences breed as much of the band’s invention as their own explorations. At the same time though, the highly enjoyable Life Lessons leaves ears and appetite fiercely attentive as a rich fuel of potential hints of even bigger and individually bolder things ahead as Idols Of Apathy evolve.

Idols Of Apathy Cover Artwork_RingMaster Review   Bursting from the Essex landscape in 2013, Idols Of Apathy were soon stirring up a potent local fan base, spreading further afield once they swiftly released debut single Deceiver. Its success was backed by first EP Unheard Words, which was recorded by Dan Keer. Picking up strong national and media recognition, it was the spark to the band sharing stages, to continuing acclaim, alongside the likes of Climates, Canvas, Lock & Key, Shields, Sworn In, Continents, Create to Inspire, Carcer City, and Falling With Style amongst many more. It is easy to see similar and bigger responses to the release and persuasion of Life Lessons coming up, and though it might not roar from that plateau of major originality it powerfully gives the already strong reputation of the band a new shot in the arm.

The release opens with Bipolar, a song inspired by vocalist Jack Dervish’s own condition and living up to its title in sound and character from its first evocative breath. In no time the inviting coaxing is an anger driven and heart spawned tearing of the senses, with a sound seemingly drawing on the savage intensity and hues of a Slipknot, Devil Driver, or As I Lay Dying. The lethal swings of drummer Stuart Roche resonate like masonry through ears and bone whilst the raw vocal invasion of Dervish, backed as strongly by guitarist Dean Chignell especially with his eventful clean tones, abrase and entice simultaneously. It is the web of invasive grooves and technical imagination from Chignell and fellow guitarists Tom Johnston and Joe Gregory that majorly helps turn a very decent track become a striking offering, their entwining enterprise helping the EP get off to an immense and impressive start.

The great creative irritability and hostile dynamics of the first song continues in the following Addiction, its trespass an insatiable incursion into the senses but bolder in its embrace of provocative ambiences and ‘mellower’ textures led again by clean vocals. The song itself jerks around at times like it has creative Saint Vitus Dance, twisting and lurching from idea to carnivorous intent with seamless and eventful prowess. The bass of Elliott Black is a predator in the mix, his lines and lures bestial, and though not always as open in the mix as in the first song are always there tempering or inciting the calmer and fiercer moments.

Once A Cheat / Always comes next, smothering ears in an atmospheric angst around similarly driven vocals before spilling its own animus of sound and emotion. The scything strokes of one guitar collude with a net of off-kilter sonic from another as the track blossoms a turbulence which merges moments of rich catchiness with winds of blustery causticity; the technical craft and ideation of the band from all angles ensuring predictability is an unused issue.

The scent of Whitechapel meets Revocation of the track merges with the rancorous intensity of the following Backstabber too, lining the melodic expression lighting up a track which maybe does not make the same initial impact as earlier propositions within Life Lessons but comes into its thrilling own over time and listens. It is an increasingly virulent tapestry of crippling rhythms and spiky guitar intrusiveness bursting with resourceful vitality and physical tenacity from across the board before leaving Lessons Learnt to bring the EP to an imposing like-minded and pleasing close. As well as essences which savage as old friends, there is an element of similarity between songs in certain areas but always saved from dominating things by the turbulent adventure the band builds each track upon. Whereas its predecessor’s assault was sonic and lyrical venom, the final track feels like it is an understanding incitement, melodic and harmonic essences a hug around the shoulder giving a reassurance echoing the words shared, though it still snarls and bites like a rabid beast too.

Idols Of Apathy is a band destined to more and greater attention, a suggestion hard to resist making on the evidence of the excellent Life Lessons, and if they can find that real element of originality too, the real potential of big things ahead.

The Life Lessons EP is available from December 4th.

https://www.facebook.com/IdolsOfApathy   https://twitter.com/idolsofapathy

Pete RingMaster 04/12/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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Virtue In Vain – For All You Know Is The Mask I Wore

Virtue In Vain Promos

Virtue In Vain Promos

Though it makes a strong impact first time around, it is with further intensive attention that For All You Know Is The Mask I Wore from Welsh progressive metalcore band Virtue In Vain wins out and defuses any initial doubts or uncertainties. To be fair there is little about the band’s debut EP which raises any major disagreements between ears and proposition from the start, but being as brutal as it is creatively uncompromising, there is plenty to try and take in which needs time to explore and appreciate. The potential of the band within the release is especially exciting, and fills any moments which do not quite work as well as other elements, with assumptions of greater things to come.

Hailing from Cardiff, Virtue In Vain began in 2012 sparking and spicing their sound with inspirations from the likes of The Devil Wears Prada, Napoleon, Whitechapel, and August Burns Red. Their impact and sound has led the quartet to be regarded as one of the strongest upcoming bands in the UK metal scene, backed impressively by shows alongside bands such as Napoleon, Demoraliser, Dead Harts, Astroid Boys, Ready Set Fall, Lock & Key, Fathoms and many more. Now they are poised to explode upon the nation attention with For All You Know Is The Mask I Wore, a release with more than enough to leave a hungry appetite in its ferocious wake.

virtue in vain     The EP opens with Prologue, a decent enough short instrumental soaked in drama and portentous ambience. Its dark tones do have the imagination supposing something predatory and intensive coming to examine ears, and so it proves to be once Martyrs emerges. A heavy snarling riff is first point of provocation, backed swiftly by uncompromising rhythms and a winy sonic lure of guitar. It is a gripping entrance, enticing bait which subsequently gathers its opening elements together to forge a more direct and slimmer raw incitement growled over by vocalist Hywel Thomas. Venom and antagonism spill from his gutturally bred syllables whilst the guitar of Emyr Thomas dances over the hellacious attack with sonic endeavour. Additional squalls of vocals add good variety whilst the guitars scythe through their attack and the corrosive potency of rhythms with addictive and acidic enterprise. The vicious swings of drummer Luke Sullivan bruise and tenderise the senses whilst the bass of Ryan Jones is a perpetual stalking of song and listener. Continuing to twist and show plenty of imagination in its varying gait, sonic trespass, and creative hostility, the track is an impressive full start to the release.

In Faith, In Ruin leaps in next and immediately has a great almost swinish texture to the vocals to shuffle things up there, whilst riffs and grooves again snarl with almost toxic intent. The more formula tones of Hywel Thomas provide the rawest challenge but variation again ensures that their alluring violation matches the persistently shifting landscape of the song. The intensive and busy nature of the track, as across the EP, means the technical and deeper layers within the encounter are often smothered but given time reveal the strong depths to songs, as shown again with the erosive persuasion of Left Behind. Its more restrained opening subsequently kicks up a gear though still reining in the violence and unleashing an addiction forging groove which lures the listener swiftly into the sonically cancerous and turbulent heart of the song. Aspects like that simply bewitch as does an unexpected and calm passage of melodic beauty which leads to a tempestuous climate, though the more expected sonic raging in the song does feed expectations and enjoyment equally. The potential even in the less striking elements though is inescapable and only adds to the anticipation for what comes next.

My Heart Is Bruised But Never Broken is another which takes longer to reveal all of its persuasion. Its technical and imaginative layers within the less attention sparking storm raging around them, are again the song’s major potency but once more needing time for ears to explore and revel in. It is nevertheless an intrigue and satisfaction igniting offering revealing more of the inventive songwriting within the band and their ability to skilfully create ruinous and inhospitable landscapes or scenery of pure melodic beauty as evidenced by the brief instrumental Relapse which follows. Like the oasis within the savaging of Left Behind, the piece is enthralling, spreading its elegance and charm into the EP’s title track which evolves out of its embrace.

The closing track is soon slipping into the darkest, ravenous depths of despair and sonic confrontation with a rhythmic battering to match, but still blending in the transfixing invention of its predecessor. The song slips from fury and violence to gentle seducing impressively and seamlessly, another aspect to the band’s creativity which it is easy to expect greater exploits from.

For All You Know Is The Mask I Wore is a strong and impressive introduction to Virtue In Vain, not one which declares the band as the future of British extreme metal but certainly with the potential to suggest they could make that kind of impact as they grow and evolve.

The For All You Know Is The Mask I Wore EP is available from May 11th through all digital platforms and at http://virtueinvain.bigcartel.com/

https://www.facebook.com/VirtueInVain https://twitter.com/VirtueInVain

RingMaster 11/05/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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