The Glorious Rebellion – Euphoric

 

Live at the Haven 05/30/2015. Photo by Sandy Rushing. — with Zeke Rushing, Wade Scianimanico and Billy Myers III.

Live at the Haven 05/30/2015. Photo by Sandy Rushing. — with Zeke Rushing, Wade Scianimanico and Billy Myers III.

Euphoric is the kind of bully no one can have a problem with. It is a release which harries and bruises the senses as if it was created to do nothing else, though truthfully, the debut mini album from US noise rockers The Glorious Rebellion is just as uncompromising and seriously compelling with its range of intrusive hooks within an infectious swagger. The band creates corrosive rock ‘n’ roll with a bite and attitude as virulent as the imagination that fuels it.

Formed and driven by vocalist/guitarist Billy Myers III, the Florida hailing band was soon lighting up their local live scene, that success stretching further afield as their dirtily rapacious noise rock ferocity and sonic rabidity grabbed attention. As rich in almost savage melodic mischief, their music seemed to easily spark crowds as The Glorious Rebellion shared stages with the likes of Jucifer, The Phuss, Black Tusk, Ken Mode, Lo-Pan, Black Cobra, Child Bite, Holly Hunt, Hollow Leg, and Destroyer of Light amongst many over time, successes luring new fans whilst enhancing the band’s reputation pushed again by the release of their two track single I in 2014. The years have also seen numerous line-up changes over the years; in fact it seems any page you look at and info found has a different line-up suggested. Importantly for the album though, it is Myers igniting ears with everything apart from drums which the impressing dynamics and swings of Wade Scianimanico takes care of. With additional vocals provided by Dan Manata, Euphoric is a sure-fire ball buster of sound, attitude, and intensity, which predominantly leaves pleasure emulating the album’s title.

The album opens with It’s A Sucker’s Game, Kid and straight away has ears under sonic and rhythmic siege whilst already sparking an eager appetite for what is to follow. What do badger the senses next are thick and predatory grooves around just as grouchy riffs and rhythms.  Already a heavy catchiness is laying potent bait, lures reinforced by the excellent attitude sculpted roars of Myers and an even strong spice to the grooves. In full aggressive stride, there is a Pigs meets Unsane feel with a tasty whiff of Motorhead to the track, though to be fair, all are passing essences in the band’s distinctive animosity of sound.

Glorious rebellion euphoric_RingMasterReviewThe great start continues with the equally infectious and fearsome Emmett Brown Has Never Met A Scott That Wasn’t Great. From a more low key start, a thick tide of riffs and rhythms descend on ears before stepping aside momentarily for that great initial coaxing to grip attention all over again. Throughout, the song makes for an intrusive and abrasive proposition but digs into the psyche just as potently with its unpredictable and inventively twisted web of noise and ear gripping adventure. It’s easy to offer Melvins as a hint to the song’s escapade whilst the even more outstanding Benaquyl and its enslaving rock ‘n’ roll nudges thoughts of bands like Gruntruck and The Great Sabatini in the course of sculpting another pinnacle within Euphoric straight after. The song also highlights more of the variety of spices in the band’s sound, stoner and punk as open as this slab of noise rock breeding.

The brilliant Have I Told You Lately That I Loathe You? snarls and rages next with vocals and guitars as irritable as each other and just as pungently enticing around the rancorous grumble of the bass. Within that hostility though, band and songs cast some of the most addictive and infectious essences to be found on the release. They are elements which turns hunger into a lust for more which The Dirtiest Dream Jobs feeds with its cantankerous tone and sonic enterprise soaked in melodic acidity. Admittedly personal tastes are not quite on fire for the song as for its predecessors yet it is nothing less than a highly enjoyable and in turn lingering tempting drawing attention back onto band and release.

The album closes with Bitches Hate Misogyny, an ill-tempered and tempestuous blaze of sound and vocal incitement which tells you all you need to know about the band in noise, craft, humour, and thrilling adventure. It is a hellacious mouth-watering end to an equally impressive release which was our introduction to The Glorious Rebellion but the beginning of a major kinship between ear and sound we suspect; something hard to see us being alone in.

Euphoric is out now via Magnetic Eye and @ https://thegloriousrebellion.bandcamp.com/

http://www.facebook.com/thegloriousrebellion   http://thegloriousrebellion.bigcartel.com   https://twitter.com/TGRnoise

Pete RingMaster 18/04/2016

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

For more exploration of the independent and promotional services check out http://www.zykotika.com/

KEN mode – Success

photo Brenna Faris

photo Brenna Faris

Predictability has never had a presence in the sounds and imagination of Canadian noise wreckers KEN mode, though that in itself is something to be expected. Their caustic and furious brews of post-rock, hardcore, metal, and noise, to mention just some of their flavours employed, have ignited ears and imaginations with a tempestuous almost petulant creativity ensuring the band’s propositions are some of the most persistently and highly anticipated treats. The Winnipeg trio’s new album Success is no exception but this time it has taken a detour which definitely takes assumptions by surprise.

The band has gone back to explore the sounds and invention which were fermenting and fuelling the late 80s/early 90s when KEN mode began to sow its own sonic explorations. The album’s press release lists the album as paying homage to “both their Canadian Prairie roots, and a time when they first started to care about making music; the burgeoning grunge; and Touch Go/Dischord scenes of, with bands like Nirvana, Big Black, Cop Shoot Cop, The Cows, Circus Lupus, and Drive Like Jehu warping their teenage minds.” Listening to Success though you can go back further and find the seeds in predominantly post and noise punk with the album persistently sounding like a primal version of Gang of 4 on steroids. It is the band as raw and aggressive as ever, probably even more so at times, and still lyrically stirring up thoughts and emotional involvement, but it shows a new character and new compelling designs from the band which might not quite work for all but here is being greedily devoured.

KMSuccessCover_Reputation Radio/RingMaster Review     Recorded with Steve Albini (Nirvana, the Jesus Lizard, PJ Harvey) and recorded as a fully live and analog session, KEN mode’s sixth album opens with Blessed, a track which from its initial sonic whistle turns into a heavy bestial prowl. Simultaneously a swagger emerges in the grizzly tones of Scott Hamilton’s bass as magnetic jabbing lines the beats of drummer Shane Matthewson. Intimidating restraint replaces their predacious aggression at this point, the vocals of guitarist Jesse Matthewson crawling syllable by syllable with open ire over the addiction igniting web now in place. The song’s volatile instincts soon return to take rein though, almost insidious discord and hostility invading whilst binding excited senses in inventive and mischievous rancor.

The outstanding start kicks up another notch with These Tight Jeans, a song which roars and excites like an illicit union of Nirvana, Black Flag, and Pretty Girls Make Graves. Of course that is a mere hint to something unique to KEN mode, the track a rumbling, grumbling contagion of wiry hooks, spicy grooves, and rhythmic badgering. As ever the song is driven by fury loaded vocals but this time assisted by the excellent punk lures of guest Jill Clapham who just adds richer colour to the slimline unbridled furnace on the senses.

The Owl… follows the brilliance of its predecessor with its own gripping dark beauty. A sinister noir lit intrigue escapes the growling bass groove, its drama escorted by the similarly potent landing of drum sticks as vocals dangle their raw tone and narrative over the imagination. An air of Bauhaus wraps the absorbing lure and agitated swing of the song as guitars and bass spring an inescapable menace of a flirtation which only gets darker and more imposing as the emotive intimacy of cello from Natanielle Felicitas returns after first gracing the opener. The solemn gentle passage hugging her enterprise is soon a brawl of noise and intensity again before regaining control in a mesmeric finale which leaves ears and emotions in lustful bliss

The grungy turmoil of I Just Liked Fire explodes next, it too a rebellious blaze for ears and appetite to get lustful over as twisted discord and carnal noise collude to abrase and infest the senses whilst its successor Management Control, with greater restraint crowds ears with a thick resonating bassline and a tangy vining of guitar endeavour. The beats of Shane once again provide disorientating yet anthemic bait aligned to the predatory and contagious groans of bass but sonically the song is more involved and less instant with its catchy hooks and grooves. This is not to say the track is any less virulent than the previous songs, just a more intensive exploration with layers of waiting rewards.

There is a feel of Psychic TV to the following A Passive Disaster as its carnivorous basslines and caustic bellow gets right under the skin and into the psyche whilst Failing At Fun Since 1981 straight after, is punk belligerence at its blisteringly sonic and primitively rhythmic best. Both songs are a jungle of menace and bracing invention, individual noise riots to thrill and linger though they get outshone a touch by A Catalog Of Small Disappointments and in turn closing song Dead Actors. The first of the final pair is an uncompromising persuasion, its stalking rhythms and vocal angst entwined in the rabid theatre of guitar and lyrics. The track enslaves body and emptions with ease, threatening and seducing with every snarl and raw fingering of the senses before its successor takes over with a psychotic and darkly elegant Gang of 4 meets Wire like meander of sound and distress lined emotional reflection. The song is spellbinding, a long term journey taking itself and the listener on a traumatic and turbulently fascinating adventure.

It is hard to say yet if Success is KEN mode’s finest hour such its big enough departure to previous encounters reveals something openly and strikingly different but the seriously thrilling encounter is definitely a contender.

Success is available via Season Of Mist now @ http://shop.season-of-mist.com/predefined-search?id_list=102, http://kenmode.bigcartel.com/, or https://kenmode.bandcamp.com/album/success

http://www.ken-mode.com/

Upcoming KEN mode dates with Fight Amp

June 16, 2015 – Toronto, ON @ The Shop (Parts & Labour) w/The Great Sabatini

June 17, 2015 – Montreal, QC @ Turbo Haus w/The Great Sabatini

June 18, 2015 – Brooklyn, NY @ St. Vitus w/Pyrrhon, Couch Slut

June 19, 2015 – Philadelphia, PA @ Kung Fu Necktie

June 20, 2015 – Columbus, OH @ Ace of Cups w/Lo-Pan

June 21, 2015 – Chicago, IL @ The Burlington w/GOBO’S CVIT

June 26, 2015 – Winnipeg, MB @ The Goodwill w/Pop Crimes, Teethmarks *no Fight Amp

RingMaster 16/06/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard on Reputation Radio @ http://www.reputationradio.net

Mothership: Self Titled

Mothership Live

    The bio for the self-titled album from US rock band stated the band Mothership had a sound which ‘satisfies like a steaming hot stew of UFO and Iron Maiden, blended with the southern swagger of Molly Hatchet and ZZ Top’. Now that statement is enough to send an army of classic rock fans across battlefields and sultry deserts to grab an ear full of the promise suggested and in this instance they would not be disappointed upon arrival. The trio from Dallas is a formidable and impressive unit which knows the richest essences of rock n roll and how to brew them into feisty and fiery melodic encounters.

Founded by brothers Kelley (guitar) and Kyle (bass) Juett, the band fuses stirring elements of hard rock, stoner, blues, and classic rock into a thrilling guitar driven sound all of their own. The pair grew up on the seventies record collection of their father John, who they recruited on drums as their rock project emerged in 2010. Creating songs bursting with raucous riffs and melodic flames, the band knowing the contribution of their father was temporary began searching with his help for a permanent replacement who came in the shape of Judge Smith late 2011. The following year saw the band enter the studio to record their debut which was then self-released later in the year. Now given a re-release though Ripple Music, and following a successful end of last year supporting bands such as Prong, Red Fang, Gypsyhawk, Earthen Grave, and Lo-Pan, Mothership is set to ignite 2013 for all heavy rock fans.

The album opens with the mesmeric instrumental Hallucination, a track which emerges from a spacey ambience through firm Ripple Music - RPL2188beats and a sultry guitar glaze upon the ear. Its early presence is a slow smouldering enticement of sonic caresses and sinewy rhythms which equally burn and kiss the ear to capture the imagination, a union which goes into overload once the track instantly shifts up a couple of gears to rock the air out of the passions. It is an enthralling encounter to announce the album and ensure only a riveted focus is at play for the rest of the release.

With barely time to lick the lips of the prospects to come the following Cosmic Rain engages the ear with punchy rhythms and spires of sonic persuasion. Within seconds it has feet and emotions in league with its passionate gait and heated expanse. As the fine vocals of Kelley launch from the musical fire to add to the already anthemic stoner swing, the track rampages as a delicious agreement of blues and rock wrapped in heart driven energy. Mid-way the song takes a step into an aside full of bass beckoning to intrigue and elevate the already submissive senses further before returning to its uncomplicated and fully enthralling revelry.

As the songs City Nights and Angel of Death open up their hard rock hearts with craft and eagerness there is a continued variety under the overall pulsating lick and hook raining skies of the album. Though neither song steps onto the same lofty plateau of their predecessor, both crowd the ear with inciting blues guitar mastery and refreshing winds of instinctive and satisfying rock n roll, with the second of the two especially rife with a seventies brilliancy recalling the likes of Thin Lizzy.

Adding another step into new avenues Win Or Lose is a strolling treat of heavy rhythms and unavoidable intensive energy veined by a niggling sonic insistence and melodic elegance. Within its expressive stance the track moves through levels of pace and creative heat whilst offering moments of simmering beauty, rampant guitar crafted pulses, and heavyweight rumblings all delivered with invention and passion. It is a tremendous track which makes way for the equalling spellbinding and explosive Elenin and the towering closer Eagle Soars.

The final track is a masterful treat of lung bursting energy driven by robust rhythms and scintillating sonic seduction. The song rides the passions with majestic ease and accomplished skill as it immerses the senses in searing sonic bait and wickedly tempting melodic glamour. It is a final triumph which directs one straight back into the arms of the album, the lure of diving right back in to the release too irresistible.

Mothership, band and album, are encounters any fan ranging the likes of Red Fang to Orange Goblin and Black Sabbath to Thin Lizzy will find an ardour for as the band primes itself for a massive year.

http://www.facebook.com/mothershipusa

8/10

RingMaster 12/02/2013

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright