Trash – Urban Glow EP

TRASH 1 PROMO_RingMaster Review

Consisting of six cheery yet melancholic indie pop tracks, the Urban Glow EP from British noise popsters Trash is a captivating jangle of sound and enterprise quickly giving big hints as to why there is a buzz brewing around the band and indeed the reason that UK label Clue Records has taken them to their bosom. There is simplicity to the Trash sound yet sparkling invention which lies behind that deceptive quality, that union alone resulting in songs which dance with the senses as the band offer lyrical propositions which may wear an alluring smile but look into the shadows and disappointments of finding things are never as rosy as they seem.

The EP’s press release reveals more in its description of the theme behind the band’s new release; “The tone of Urban Glow encapsulates anxiety, breakdowns and a typical British summer; glimpses of hazy sunshine, optimism and hopes of neverending highs, brought back down to earth by a rain shower on the horizon and the realisation that work/school/college/uni/love/life isn’t quite what you’d hoped it would be.” It is an open melancholia which is as magnetic as the warmer hues of the Chesterfield quartet’s inviting and infectious sound. Fair to say Urban Glow does not take the listener by the scruff of the neck with its impact and presence but instead entices with a seductive prowess to its character that only leaves thick enjoyment as its legacy.

TRASH - Urban Glow[Artwork]_RingMaster Review     The opening Intro does its job right away, is forty odd second a charming coaxing which lays out the melodic foundations for the feistier stroll of the band’s latest single 4 Miles to spring from. The song instantly casts a rhythmic enticement to involve feet and ears, that lure teased and stroked by slithers of expressive guitar and less sparky but potently evocative vocals. It is a tempting mix which just blossoms as fresh adventure fuels the guitars and rhythms breed more tempting shadows, whispers of pop punk also joining their revelry as additional nostalgic hues recall an eighties/nineties lo fi/high essence.

It is a catchy proper start which continues with the excellent Drift, its mellow but keen swing feeding off essences to be found in bands likes the House Of Love and especially The Mighty Lemon Drops. It is an infectious shuffle of a song which smiles with melodic tenacity and atmospheric warmth yet again has that gloomier tinge to its lyrical and emotional underbelly; a combination of character which lights up the EP’s title track right after.

The EP just gets better with every passing song, its fourth offering aural magnetism that simply captivates as it spins a creative and inventive web of sound and ideation. Once more there is that simplicity to its hooks, harmonies, and fuzzier lining, but all aligned to each other with adept and imaginative prowess. Ending in a wonderfully rousing climax, the song departs to leave Sad Boys (All I Wanna Do) the opportunity to close the EP off in similarly fine style, which it does with ease though maybe the keenness for its predecessor remains slightly richer. As virulently contagious as anything on the EP but with its own individual festival of tangy grooves, spicy hooks, and infection loaded invention, the song gives Urban Glow an enthralling and fiercely enjoyable finale which alone lives up to the general sense of the EP’s title.

Just as each song seems in varying degrees to eclipse the one before, each listen of the Urban Glow EP impresses more than the one before. It is heavily enjoyable stuff and the fact that at the same time as getting involved in its success, you feel that the band is barely tapping into the potential of their creative depths only breeds real excitement bred for what is to come from the band.

The Urban Glow EP is available now digitally and on Ltd Ed CD via Clue Records @ https://cluerecords.bandcamp.com/album/urban-glow

https://www.facebook.com/trashhband

Pete RingMaster 28/09/2105

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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Min Diesel – Mince

Photo by Lori Wilson.

Photo by Lori Wilson.

Mince, the debut album from Scottish band Min Diesel, is a clash on the senses and for some maybe a car crash as certainly their sound is not going to be an easy fit for many. It is a challenging proposition, and at times has even keen ears unsure but its real potency is in luring back regular attention which shows album and band are doing plenty right.

Aberdeen bred Min Diesel take inspirations from late-80s/early-90s punk, lo-fi and math-rock bands into their abrasing cacophony of sonic enterprise. They are a trio also becoming used to strong support and praise, through a live presence which has seen the band play with the likes of Errors, Acoustic Ladyland, Joan of Arc, Johnny Foreigner, Playlounge, Tuff Love, Hot Club de Paris, Sky Larkin, and Paws since forming in 2009 and a clutch of EPs. Two splits with Sidca and Pinact respectively in 2013 lured potent acclaim whilst last year’s Puzzle & Activity EP gave an enticing teaser to Min Diesel’s debut album now uncaged and prowling the psyche.

The threesome of Zippy, Stu, and David state inspirations come from the likes of Fugazi, Pavement, and Shellac whilst others have compared the band to artists such as Dinosaur Jr. and Stapleton. They are all understandable references though you can add many others, for us at times thoughts of Pere Ubu emerging in certain places across Mince. Equally though there is a freshness to the band’s sound which puts them at least one step aside of the crowd. Opener War Band swiftly entangles the senses in a healthy scrub of guitar and thumping beats, their union with the throaty lure of bass a magnetic invitation for ears and attention. The vocals come from within the thick mesh of sound, laying deeper in their textures than expected but working enjoyably as contagion brews within the enjoyable encounter. A searing spearing of guitar erupts in its closing moments, its acidic aggression imposing and magnetic as the track leaves with impact.

a2445096622_10   The following Pagan Pageant opens with a folkish air and quaint melody wrapped in caustic ambience, the blend further coloured by raw and often wandering vocals. Slightly deranged and openly wrong-footing, the song swings from good to not sure regularly but already there is that captivation at play meaning you want to indulge in its confusion and incitement again and again in response to its increasing persuasion. Next up Trail of T-Shirts is a more immediate tempting but also reveals stronger enticing over listens. Sharp hooks and spoiled melodies provide an appealing enticement whilst the energetic rhythms quickly bait ears and appetite, but it is the delicious discord coating the clang which steals the passions, another mighty aspect across the release backed as here by potent guitar craft and rhythmic juggling.

Kirk Session reveals a mellow though no less concussive quality to songwriting and sound next, the band casting a jarring croon of sound and vocal prowess which again will work for some and not others whilst Down on the Green straight after, goes for a more predatory intent for its pop rock cacophony. The bass discovers a bestial growl over which voice and guitar dance with brash yet warm resourcefulness. As it continues the track seems to turn a little mellower though ears are still resonating to the sonic jangle and rhythmic confrontation by its close.

The album hits its high spot with the next trio of tracks, starting with the virulent swagger of dB where again the bass is wonderfully bestial against the melodic ferocity around it. The song emerges like a tart mix of Swell Maps and Asylums though there is also a strong whiff of Josef K and very early Orange Juice to the encounter, all spicing adding to the invention of the best track upon Mince, though it is quickly challenged by Last Bus (Emm Es Bee ). The new encounter sways whilst caressing ears with citric melodies and a tangy sonic tempting, musically playing like a raw lemon on the tongue, making the senses pucker at its touch but sparking a hunger for more. Again though, it is the inventive discord trespasses which steal the show, adding greater intensity and weight to the thrilling croon.

Another song which half thrills but leaves questions in its wake, Musskulls is a psyche pop/noise rock tangle of sound and ideation. It twists and turns through coherent and deranged scenery with seamless and ultimately enticing adventure though vocally something goes a little astray. That said without finding the same spark as the last two songs, it still engages ears and thoughts forcibly and as the album grows with every listen.

Mince is brought to a close by firstly the volatile energy and aggression of Bastards, an encounter with a catchy melodic spine of infectiousness, and finally North-East Soul, a dark and raw serenade which sparkles with the Scottish lilt of the vocals, the first time the accent really comes into play within the album. Stray twangs and off kilter noise add to the drama and lure of the enthralling end to the encounter, the band almost exploring improvisation with sonic relish across the turbulent landscape.

We are on safe ground suggesting that Mince will not be a tasty offering for all but it is a release which needs time and focus to explore and come to terms with; for us as an example, it making an ok first impression but with regular engagement turning into a vat of increasing persuasion and thorough enjoyment.

Mince is available now via Struggletown in association with AlbTwo Records and Cool Yr Jets digitally and on Ltd Edition 12” cream or red/white vinyl @ http://mindiesel.bandcamp.com/

https://www.facebook.com/pages/Min-Diesel/122142337808269

RingMaster 12/05/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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Boyracer/Hulaboy/The Safe Distance

Boyracer Pete Shelly Cover Art

For a change we are clubbing together a trio of releases to look at in one go, the reason for this being the common denominator of musician/songwriter Stewart Anderson. The 7” releases from Boyracer, Hulaboy, and The Safe Distance are three early propositions of new indie label Emotional Response formed by Anderson and wife Jen Turrell. Having also run 555 Records and Red Square over the past couple of decades, the pair set up their new project with the intent of recording and releasing new music with friends, the outcomes limited in availability, produced on coloured vinyl, and only available right now through their website http://jenandstew.com/.

With their first release coming in 1991, Boyracer has been a constant source of excited punk pop, releasing over 800 songs since that first exploit with records unleashed through labels such as Boyracer 1Sarah, Slumberland, Blackbean, and Placenta. Coming off a four year hiatus, the Anderson founded proposition offers the Pete Shelley EP as their final release, with Turrell and Sarah Records era guitarist Matt Green joining Anderson for four irrepressible pop escapades. The EP opens with its title track, a bass and guitar drama with jabbing beats and expressive vocals. The song is lightly stomping from the off, beats punchy in a weave of politely jangling guitars and potently alluring hooks. It is not much more than a breath over a minute in length but provides pure contagious revelry for feet and imagination to greedily devour.

The following 3nd Wave Mod is similarly parading a fleet of inescapable hooks and quaint melodies within this time a rawer frame of rhythms and chords. As infectious as the first and with a great concussive crescendo in its middle, the song provides a tasty alternative pop adventure which the following The Kind Of Man You Really Are emulates with its tangy melodic clang and the brilliant Jump surpasses with its twee pop devilry. Led vocally by Turrell this time, the fourth song swiftly reminds of seventies UK bands like The Chefs and Girls At Our Best. Bouncing with a mischievous melodic grin enhanced by the summery caress of keys, and a rhythmic incitement which again has feet instantly engaged, the song is an anthem for the passions. The release comes with two bonus tracks which were not on our promo but it is hard to imagine them being any less thrilling than the four songs already treating ears.

Hulaboy BW     The Hulaboy EP, He’s making violent love to me, mother, is the celebration of a twenty year friendship between Anderson and Eric M. Stoess, a three track vinyl offering which plays ears with melodic charm and citrus sonic flavouring. As shown by first track Exes and Enemies, there is a sharp tone to the melodies which caress the senses but comes wrapped in a mellow and engaging elegance which is almost whimsical in its breath and temptation. Rhythms are firm though, giving the endeavour depth and muscle in all the right places and through the quirkily enterprising croon of the song.

Napalm Heart flares with lo-fi tenacity and melodic flaming from the first second, its undiluted catchiness and crispy resonance like a blend of The Freshies with a more cheerful Josef K, which for a minute and a half has ears inflamed and emotions wrapped up in sonic devilment. The flirtatious track is followed by Kids Under Stars, a raw blaze of sonic rapacity and garage rock causticity soaked in sixties pop colouring. The blistering encounter completes the impressive vinyl version of the single whilst the download comes with an additional seven tracks, with I find your topsiders and beard amusing and a great cover of Echo and the Bunnymen’s The Cutter particular standout moments.

Final release, the Songs EP from The Safe Distance, is the global link up of American Anderson on bass and organ with vocalist/guitarist Crayola Sarandon (Sarandon / A Witness) from the UK and Australian drummer David Nichols (Cannanes / Huon). Casting quirky dark pop clad in gripping shadows and brought with rippling sinews, the band uncage four tracks for the vinyl release of their EP. Hey you sets things off, probing beats aligned to guitar jangles and great monotone delivered vocals the initial delicious bait. The song proceeds to roam with a predatory glint in its sonic eye and bracing flames to its melodic hue, the imposition tempered by the flowery charm of keys and the addictive lure of the vocals. The song isSafe Distance Songs Insert 1 pure drama and quite infectious, a description also suiting the more restlessly contagious Soap. Tastily scuzzy but retaining a warm glow to its raw sound and invention, the track swiftly has thoughts and appetite gripped, whilst A bigger splash with its sultry smouldering of melodies and keys takes a little longer to draw a healthy dose of satisfaction but has ears and imagination fully involved by the time of its final fuzzy note.

The punkish Sandpit concludes the quartet of tracks, its bluesy roar and caustic energy colluding for a thoroughly thrilling slice of dirty rock ‘n’ roll, keys and guitars especially kicking up a dust storm with their sonic voracity. Completing the vinyl version, it is just part of another four original tracks on the download as well as a trio of covers featuring Hawkwind’s Silver Machine, Adam and the Ants’ Young Parisians, and the excellent take of Bogshed’s Fat lad exam failure.

Perfectly diverse but united in the songwriting prowess of Anderson and others involved, all the singles make an impressive entrance into the independent and underground scene by Emotional Response Records.

The releases from Boyracer, Hulaboy, and The Safe Distance are all available on coloured 7” vinyl and digitally now via Emotional Response Records @ http://jenandstew.com/

RingMaster 27/11/2014

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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Dignan Porch – Observatory

Dignan Porch 1

Returning with their third album and the first on Brighton independent label Faux Discx, UK band Dignan Porch reassert themselves as one of the more mesmeric and tantalising psychedelically wrapped indie pop incitements around. Observatory is a captivating collection of lo-fi presented, resourcefully sculpted songs which flirt and then simply run with the imagination. The release is an aural nest egg, an honest escape and comfort to fall back on in times of stress and just when you want good, heart bred music.

Starting out as a one man project for Joseph Walsh, Dignan Porch has evolved into a healthy complement of inventive and expressive musicians creating similarly potent music. The new album follows the well-received Tendrils of 2010 and Nothing Bad Will Ever Happen two years later, both released on the New York label Captured Tracks. Written and predominantly recorded in a cold and noisy flat above a used-carpet shop in South London in 2013, where Joe was living, Observatory is a seductive breeze of DIY invention and care. It has an intimacy which caresses the listener whilst providing the unpredictability and insight of life’s emotions, an often shadowed and dark sadness which entwines with the open radiance of the songs. Of the few tracks recorded differently to the almost jigsaw like piecing together of parts elsewhere, these were recorded as a full band in the moment with Henry Withers at Sound Savers studio. It all makes for a compelling and ultimately enchanting proposition but one with a raw and dirty edge which just as strikingly shapes the release into the triumph it is.

A rhythmic trap catches the ears first as opener Forever Unobscured enters the eye line, the percussive bait instantly gripping FAUX-031-600pxattention and an already awakening appetite. It is soon joined by the slightly mischievous and again wholly magnetic keys of Hayley Akins, which in turn is swiftly courted by the moody tones of Ben Goodwin’s bass and the guitar maze of Joseph and his brother Sam Walsh. It is a mouthwatering mix to which the mellow yet sultry vocals lay seductively, whilst around it all a fiery temperament and energy brews to further inflame the imagination. It is an engrossing start which the brilliant Deep Deep Problem takes to another level. It is the perfect pop song, hooks and melodies courting sirenesque harmonies by Joseph and Hayley as they take thoughts and emotions by the hand and lead them into an infectious waltz. There is a rich sixties psychedelic pop essence to the breath-taking union of guitars and keys which is punctuated by the roaming beats of Luke Walsh, but also a feel of psyc. It is a gorgeous encounter which tempts and abrases perfectly.

The acoustically crafted Veil of Hze strokes ears next, the hollow wrapped vocals a haunting enticement in an emotive embrace, before the wonderful discord kissed No Lies toys with the senses through smouldering keys and deliciously jangly guitar coaxing. Like vortices of sonic wind and vocal sun, the song laps over the senses simultaneously igniting passions with quirky grooves and quaintly cast invention. It is a seductive beauty which sparks a new hunger in the appetite which was less effusive with its predecessor, and just as vibrantly Between the Trees brings a seventies garage pop croon to bear on ears and heart for similar effect. It is a short bounce of a song but one which in its brief presence has the listener tightly gripped and subservient.

The start of Wait & Wait & Wait is excellent; a warped cartoonish lure which turns out to sadly be a false start in the entrance of the song. It is a shame as it would have made an irresistible start to the track. Nevertheless the song without admittedly drawing the same strength of reactions still provides a highly satisfying and elegant friendship before the punk infused crawl of Harshed and the minimalistic call of I Plan to Come Back bring the passions back to the boil. The first of the two strolls with a sultry swagger and Birdland like causticity in its melodic shimmering whilst its successor is a lean bordering on anorexic sonic web of humid melodies and streamline drama encased in a melancholic mist. The song absorbs the imagination like a sponge, inspiring fresh adventure as it expands its celestial colours.

Through the likes of the more than decently attractive Dinner Tray and the beefy evocative of Warm Welcome to Hell, the album continues to firmly engage if not quite finding that incendiary spark of before, though that fuse is soon lit again by the outstanding Got to Fly. Like in the opening song, a rhythmic enticement brings initial slavery before guitars paint thoughts with sonic hues as vocals push forward the developing addictive canvas of the song for a greater feisty bewitchment. It is a tremendous provocation before the final mellow sunset of Swing By, a soothing encounter enriched with varied emotive shades and acidic melodic veining. The song makes a fine end to Observatory, an excellent immersive closing which lingers and wraps the listener impressively.

Dignan Porch has crafted the perfect companion for sullen moments in heat bred summer nights with Observatory, an enticing vehicle through which explorations of evocative realms and personal corners bring a wealthy dose of pleasure.

Observatory is available now on 12” vinyl LP and digital download @ http://fauxdiscx.bandcamp.com/album/observatory

https://www.facebook.com/dignanporch

8/10

RingMaster 17/06/2014

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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Candy Says – Not Kings

candysays

Not Kings, the debut album from UK electro-tinged pop collective Candy Says, is a bit of a puzzler but a mesmeric mystery you cannot help being entranced by. Minimalistic and lo-fi whilst wrapped in flourishes of melodic charm and seductive harmonies, the release tantalises and enthrals from start to finish but you end up wondering why the attraction does not spark a fire in the passions as successfully as it does in the imagination. Usually both go hand in hand and certainly at times the band offer a fuse which is just irresistible but the ebbing and flowing of the album seems to escape a constant supply of that rich reaction. Nevertheless Not Kings is an absorbing flight of sound and adventure which increases its temptation with every venture.

Candy Says is the project of lead vocalist/guitarist Juju Sophie and keyboardist/vocalist Ben Walker, a duo from Oxford who sparked strong attention with a pair of sold out cassette singles via Cool For Cats last year. Recorded entirely in the garage of lead vocalist Juju Sophie’s bungalow, Not Kings confirms all the promise of and buzz around the band and even without setting a blaze inside, gives potent evidence of the real potential of the pair.

The title track gets things in motion with an initial coaxing of handclaps and restrained electro caressing. It is a welcoming start but one a4253926693_2which is pale until the sirenesque tones of Juju Sophie lay their warm glances and bewitching charm over ears and imagination respectively. Like a hint to the album as a whole, the song laps over ears like a gentle sea, its aural waves coming and going in strength and relish to offer a persistent suasion which captures thoughts with ease. There are no climactic moments or startling textures to the track just an on-going inviting glaze of synth and vocals aligned to magnetic surges of guitar. It makes for an intriguing proposition with plenty to spark an appetite for the release, a taste soon reinforced by the delightful Favourite Flavour. As the first its touch is reserved and tender without raising a temperature but like a summer breeze the song swarms around and engages the senses with perpetual ease and warmth. The backing tones of Walker add another texture to the golden voice of Juju Sophie whilst musically the song brings potent adventure to instantly lift the profile of the album.

The following C’est Pas Comme Ca is a provocative folk tinged slice of balladry pop with a sixties voice to its seductive temptation which continues the strong and varied start to the album. There is drama and evocative emotion to its absorbing sounds and harmonies whilst the vocals which already guarantee a seductive embrace to the album make no exception here or in the next up Lord’s Mistake. The fourth track is the first major peak of the release; its funk bred stroking of guitar immediate contagious bait which is enhanced by the vocals and the eager dance of the keys. Like a mix of The Mouth Of Ghosts, Tom Tom Club, and Propaganda, the song is a glorious vivacious stroll with more colour and richly exciting hues than the previous trio of songs put together.

Hummingbird graces ears and air next, its pungent beats and fluid keys a potent canvas for the vocals of the band members to contrast and unite in a poetic painting which smooches and flirts with the imagination. There is an additional celestial tone to the ambience of the song which adds to the vivid incitement of the imagination, as most of the tracks achieve, but like its predecessor the croon also works as potently on the passions.

Both the resourceful dance bred Dreamers and the similarly sculpted Melt Into The Sun provide a pleasing presence to immerse within but neither explore the emotions beyond mere satisfaction either even with their superbly crafted and intricate weaves of synths and harmonies whilst Chad straight after unveils a captivating atmosphere of melodic reflection over a rich evocative palette but again that earlier mentioned spark which certainly is burning feverishly in the likes of Favourite Flavour and Lord’s Mistake merely smoulders.

The simultaneously melancholic and vivacious Dead On Arrival brings the release back to an irresistible peak; its sultry climate and emotional elegance an invigorating infection upon the woven scenery of flowing keys and vociferous and alternately mellow vocals, Juju Sophie once more revealing the quality and depth of her voice.

A wonderfully dark and seductive tempting wraps the following Understand The Night, its noir kissed Parisian shadows under street lamp spotlights another enthralling premise to bask in and investigate. It is impossible to resist, leaving a lingering call from the album which the inviting but underwhelming Cool Sensation cannot match. To be fair the song shimmers and lures like a summer soaked lake, its surface a refreshing glow but its depths lack the potency to take the listener into deeper waters of pleasure, an issue the closing Camilla has no problem with. The best track on the album with ease, it makes a gentle offering initially though the vocals have a greater power and passion to them than previously found on the album. It is a striking and lip licking entrance which only deepens its potency with the restrained but wholly infectious almost anthemic stroll of the chorus. The track goes from strength to strength the more it courts ears and thoughts, harmonies and keys alone smouldering kindling to the respectfully flaming heart and expression of the outstanding encounter.

If the album was full of songs like the last it would be a certain classic, but it has enough to make itself a tremendously appealing treat which sounds better the more you venture within it. As we said at the start, the passions might not be set ablaze by Candy Says but the imagination is happily fired up which can only lead to a solid recommendation for Not Kings.

Not Kings is available now digitally, on cd, and on vinyl @ http://candysays.bandcamp.com/album/not-kings

http://candysays.it/

7.5/10

RingMaster 09/05/2014

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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Kristy And The Kraks – Self-Titled EP

kristykraks

Casting a seductive web of sixties and garage punk, Kristy and the Kraks has a sound which sidles up to the imagination with lips pouted and provocatively swaying hips before adding a sonic glaze to the affair which permeates psyche and passions with equal tenacity. Hailing from Vienna, the band has just released their debut self-titled EP, a release consisting of four songs said to be inspired by Le Tigre and Julie Ruin. It is a raw and enchanting blaze of punk enterprise which croons and teases as its scores the senses in a presence which for us is best described as The Cramps and The Creeping Ivies meets The 5 6 7 8’s and The Crystals.

Kristy and the Kranks is the creation and union of Kate Kristal (Rabe, Dot Dash) and Ana Threat (The Happy Kids, Bretzel Krake Hoffer), the two coming together for the project in the spring of last year. Providing a temptation of two sets of vocals, a single guitar, and a basic stand-up drum set, the pair alternating instruments for certain songs, Kristy And The Kraks mesmerise with their sound. Like the best strains of garage punk the band makes a startling first impression, one which challenges and intrigues predominantly but it is not long before their lo-fi wiles and simple melodic toxicity become an irresistible and captivating temptress.

A resonance of drums opens up the EP as I Don’t Love You No More steps into view, the initial beckoning soon joined by sultry calls of coverguitar, both aspects gentle in their persuasion and gait at first. As the vocals come forward a more flaming voice emerges in the guitar strokes, their acidic tempting deliciously raw edged as they align with the smouldering harmonies which skirt the similarly heated vocal lead. The chorus brings a flush of urgency behind its melodic enticement which then switches to and fro with the previous more even tempered but fiery narrative. The song and sound is quite compelling, like a humid union of The Shangri-Las and The Fall and thoroughly absorbing.

The following Twentyone is forty two seconds of irresistible addictiveness. It is simply a hypnotic stride of beats inflamed by scuzz grilled guitar with intermittent vocal shouts striking across its bow. There is very little more to it but boy is it effective and inflammatory for the passions, riling and lighting them up for the next up No No No No No. The third song, which has also been the source of the band’s debut video, opens on a sensational throaty twang of guitar, its resourceful baiting of the imagination complemented by harmonic waves of vocals and a courting percussive coaxing. The song flirts with its moves and sounds, its swerves and tempting as raw and seductive as you could wish for. There is something primal about the song and the overall sound of the band, an instinctive lure which you cannot tear yourself or emotions away from, with this track arguably the most naturally bewitching of the four.

The just as masterfully magnetic Suicide completes the contagious incitement, the song veining its shadows with sirenesque harmonies entwined in rich guitar colour as well as a rhythmic punctuation. It all combines to provide a gripping drama with a healthy whisper of The Slits to its invention.

The EP is a magnificent debut, a release which increases its persuasion and beauty over each dive into its vibrant uncluttered depths. A release for garage punk, post punk, and lo-fi melodic punk fans, Kristy And The Kraks has announced themselves with one lingering fascination of a debut. Expect to hear and enjoy a lot more of this charismatic band.

The EP is available as a limited edition 7″ as well as a digital download via Totally Wired Records now!

http://totallywiredrecords.bandcamp.com/album/kristy-and-the-kraks

http://www.facebook.com/kristykraks

9/10

RingMaster 19/04/2014

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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Louis Jucker – Eight Orphan Songs

louis jucker pic

It is hard to define exactly what it is that Louis Jucker conjures on his new EP Eight Orphan Songs which creates such an emotional impact and connection but the eight raw lo-fi temptations which make up the release manage to seduce and ignite the imagination with ease through its almost primal craft and persuasion. Certainly the strength and creative ingenuity of the intimate reflections and incitements does not surprise coming from a member of The Ocean, Coilguns, Kunz, and The Fawn but the DIY sound he sculpts on the EP might you suspect unless previously aware of earlier solo efforts. It has an abrasive experimental intent which can be aligned to that of Coilguns but other than that the anti-folk seeded musical endeavour is a unique and haunting examination of thoughts and feelings.

Eight Orphan Songs is the first actual official solo release from Jucker via Hummus Records but follows previous releases including the EPs Spring! Spring! Spring! and Chinese Sketches, all of which are available as free downloads via the label’s Bandcamp profile. The new release continues the exploration started on earlier experimentations, a fusing of bontempi beats, raw almost caustic acoustic guitar, and haunted leaning on traumatised vocals which simply wrap the lyrical narratives in a potent lingering evocation. Written whilst Jucker lived in an old flat in Switzerland in 2012 and inspired by the experience and feelings of that time the EP is an extraordinary aural journal; in the words of Jucker “The odd beauty of the words and melodies of the record is an echo of the days I had there.

The release opens with Feathers, its rhythmic enticement a perpetual hook into the heart of the moment represented. A strong a3645567050_2scuzz kissed guitar provides the landscape which Jucker with his distinctive and startling vocals colours with magnetic intrigue and emotive hues. His delivery with the track, and the release to be honest, has not exactly a schizophrenic feel but definitely an emotional and visual discord bordering disturbed breath which makes it scream in invention and uniqueness whilst immersing the listener into a striking new world and innovative passion.

People Are Noises is the next to transport the senses to a passage of time it sparking the imagination to visualise a speeded up stroll through crowds of rapidly passing emotion clad lives. It is a musically poetic and lyrically inciting venture, one deceptively simply but made of rich textures sonically and emotionally which just captivates as does its successor We Lived A Mountain. The song has a deeper throat to its sound and presence, a darker temptation with an unfussy but effective hook which carries a punkish lilt, especially within the infectious fiery moments. It is a glorious psych rock bred incantation for the passions and the best track amongst an octet of impressive and riveting suasions.

Sleepwalkers continues with the intensive atmosphere, the heavier sonic blaze of the guitar a stirring and burning melodic flame over the simplistic rhythmic frame. The track has a touch of garage rock to its lilt, a rougher predation though one only spicing the enthralling unrefined sirenesque call of the song and the ever provocative vocals. It is another pinnacle in a row of peaks which is emulated in quality and endeavour by The Girl That Left You At The Bus Stop. The track tantalises and stirs thoughts, the acidic guitar and vocal harmonics a sultry caress within a raw production which tempers but equally accentuates their beauty and elegance. There is drama in all songs upon Eight Orphan Songs but this song has the strongest descriptive narrative of all in many ways, it casting a scene in the imagination all can find a reflection within.

Both I Curse You and You Are My Glasses coax the passions further, the first of the two having a seemingly familiar melody which persuades like an existing friend whilst inciting the sense of an emotional unknown Its successor is an evocative electrified consumption which seduces and riles the senses beautifully, the song another riveting example of the rich songwriting and its under-baked yet incredibly informative and adventurous realisation.

Completed by the excellent acoustic and thoroughly stimulating Major Chords Solve Minor Problems, Louis Jucker’s EP is a deliciously honest and expressive slice of invention. Eight Orphan Songs is ingenious lo-fi alchemy and something fans of his other bands and projects should want to explore; they will not be disappointed.

http://louisjucker.ch/

http://hummusrecords.bandcamp.com/music

9/10

RingMaster 15/11/2013

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