The Ellipsis – Wasted Potential Me

The Ellipsis_RingMasterReview

The Ellipsis is a young British band with a very easy on the ears ability to weave melodies which sing in the imagination while a virulent catchiness springs upon the body. The evidence is in their recently released debut EP Mind In The Sky and now their rousing new single Wasted Potential Me. Taken from that EP, it is a spirit raising, energy enticing wake up call to newcomers and a confirmation for those in the know that the Coventry hailing indie rockers are the real deal.

With its seeds sown when guitarist John Connearn and drummer Ben Eardley formed their first musical project as twelve year olds, The Ellipsis, with bassist Harry Green and vocalist/rhythm guitarist Henry Bristow completing the line-up, has become a potent presence not only on their local live scene but spreading across the UK. Their emergence has been more than helped by potent tracks like debut single White Feather and impressive live performances at the likes of the Wychwood festival, when headlining Coventry OxJam, and in front of 30,000 rugby fans at the Ricoh Arena. Radio play has been a courting support too and it is easy to expect the band to have more with Wasted Potential Me stirring up ears and further attention.

From its first seconds and a great bait of eager guitar, the song is soon in command of ears and appetite, the swinging beats of Eardley and strolling dark tones of Green’s bass alone thick temptation. Into a seriously catchy stride and character, with the rhythms continuing to jab and incite feet and hips, warm harmonies and Bristow’s engaging vocals soon enjoyably collude with spicy grooves and flirtatious melodies.

At times there is a touch of The Vapours to the song, The Farmer Boys meets Lightning Seeds too; a slight whiff of nostalgia which only adds to the captivation and inescapable addictive roar of the song.

Wasted Potential Me is no one off in The Ellipsis sound, having checked out their EP on the back of it for proof, but it is one of their most dynamic slices of distinctive pop rock which all should think about adding to their impending summers.

Wasted Potential Me is out now @

Upcoming Live Dates

Sat 4th June – Coventry, Motofest

Fri 1st July – Coventry, Godiva Festival

Fri 7th July – Napton Music Festival

Sat 8th July – Nuneaton, Nunfest

Check out the video for Wasted Potential Me @

Pete Ringmaster 12/05/2016

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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Postcards From Jeff – Modern Language

Postcards from Jeff _RingMaster Review

Modern Language is the name of the new single and album from UK artist Postcards from Jeff, and both propositions which capture the imagination in a mix of dusty Americana, alternative rock intimacy, and dreamily emotive atmospheres with cinematic landscapes. Killing two birds with one stone, we are taking a look at the ten-track full-length, a serenade of reflective charm and melancholic isolation which takes the listener into the heart of relatively undisturbed scenery as calm and rich in beauty as it is loneliness.

Postcards From Jeff is rural Yorkshire hailing, Manchester based Joss Worthington, the band a project living and breathing between the artist’s work in the studio producing for other artists. Last year Worthington released Postcards From Jeff’s self-titled debut EP, it and the pair of award winning filmmaker Steve Glashier directed videos it spawned, sparking potent attention towards the band. With the single Suburban Girl already successfully making its mark on 2015, and another trio of videos, again with Glashier at the helm, to accompany the album, Modern Language brings a fresh and alluring escapism for ears, imagination, and most likely the artist himself from the mundane of every day.

Postcards from Jeff - Modern Language _RingMaster Reviewart   That previous single opens up the album, Suburban Girl quickly engaging ears and appetite with its caress of eighties bred melodies and keys honed tempting. Soon joined by the plainer but no less persuasive vocal tones of Worthington, the song wraps around and tenderly engulfs ears and attention with its warm catchiness and emotive substance. Guest drums appear courtesy of Chris Smith, his rapier like beats an organic prompt within the flowing charm of the song where not for the last time on the album, musically the song invites thoughts of bands like China Crisis and The Bluebells whilst the songwriting and rich layer of hooks and melodies within the track have an Ian Broudie like feel, essences which only add to the captivation of song and release.

The following Japanese Man O’ War is similarly infectious and gently energetic, additional vocals from Clare Stagg adding to the provocative warmth soaking the rhythmic drama crafted by Smith. Worthington’s keys provide an emotive narrative which is a worldly as it is personal within a song simultaneously projecting out of the way life and cosmopolitan business in the imagination before making way for the fuzz dreamscape of A House. With electronic beats almost primal in their organic presence, the track is a sonic soundtrack to a sepia clad outlook with tantalising glides through shimmering radiance triggered by provocative keys. More of a smoulder initially compared to its predecessors, ears and thoughts are nevertheless firmly and eagerly involved.

The country scent of Tired Wings brings a clearer, less fuzzy ambience with it which accentuates the tang of the guitar and the inviting rumbles of rhythms. Stagg also returns to kiss the senses with her reserved yet siren-esque harmonies, the combination a glow within the romancing, very slightly Smiths like, body of the song. It is a masterful tempting swiftly backed by the same potency of Goddess Of The Sun, its enterprise as resourceful and adventurous as its voice is sublimely persuasive.

New single Modern Language comes next spreading an oriental/worldly flirtation from its first touch on ears. Keys again conjure a hug of multi-cultural reflection whilst the Mike Doughty like texture of Worthington’s vocals provide a great grounding to the melodic flight leading the imagination and emotions into bold and insular adventures. The song is spellbinding, simply a fascinating and infectious doorway into the craft and world of Postcards From Jeff.

Both Samaritans and Wide Eyed Wonder keep satisfaction rich, the first with its enthralling Lightning Seeds like melody fuelled ambience around punchy rhythms and spicy hooks and its successor through a more of a low key but no less hook stocked tempting. The second of the two misses the spark of the first but is still only pleasing and the same can be said of Lay Low, a croon which gets under the skin emotionally and atmospherically but fails to whip up personal tastes in the same way as those before it.

Modern Language comes to a close with Awake, a pulsating dance of crystalline keys and shadowy rhythms infesting feet and ears with relaxed zeal against the contrast of the plainer dustier delivery of Worthington’s vocals. There is also an undefined familiarity to the track which adds to the pleasure and brings the album to a potent conclusion.

Postcards From Jeff creates songs which manage to be as visual for the imagination as they are vibrant for the ears, the band name itself the perfect representative to the emotional travelogue of the songwriting and indeed Modern Language.

Modern Language is released on October 23rd.

Pete Ringmaster 21/0/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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Best Not Broken – Falling In EP

Best Not Broken

A virulently contagious and warm adventure to infect ears and feet right through to a swiftly bred appetite for its magnetic sounds, the Falling In EP from US alternative rock/pop band Best Not Broken is a perpetual party to romp with. Casting a fluid and compelling mix of power pop, melodic rock, and new wave vivacity over intimate yet world embracing lyrical reflections, the release is a captivating excitement and even as our introduction to the band easily shows why the New Hampshire trio has earned a fine and keenly supported presence at home.

Consisting of five vibrantly enticing songs, the EP firmly puts the Manchester threesome of Eric Jackson (lead vocals, guitar, keyboards), Nik Farr (guitar, backing vocals, programming), and Carlo Carluccio (drums, percussion) on attention’s radar. Formed in 2007, Best Not Broken has grown from a local favourite into one of the more exciting and spotlighted emerging bands in the Northeast of America. Sharing stages with the likes of Jason Derulo and Matt Nathanson has only increased their reputation whilst their 2012 debut EP, Somewhere Good which was produced by Boston music legend David Minehan, pushed the band into a wider arena. Falling In now threatens to take Best Not Broken before the gaze of their widest audience yet and with its invigorating quintet of stirring songs, it is hard to expect anything less than a new tide of fans embracing the band’s incendiary sound.

The potent lure of the release ensnares ears right away as first track I Won’t Stop Loving You confidently sidles in with a melodic haze from which jagged coaxing riffs emerge. It is a quickly binding persuasion which only accentuates the tempting with strong vocals and harmonies alongside gentle yet incisive melodic exploration. The song as it infuses dramatically vocal hooks and smoothly flowing enterprise across its evolving body grows in strength and suasion. Every one of its twists is a delicious spice to the full-bodied slice of rock pop with an eighties seeding, thoughts of Lightning Seeds and Modern English and on the electronic side which also works impressively on the ears, Paul Haig coming to bear on thoughts.

It is a very potent start soon reinforced by the following Breaking My Heart, another track happy to almost amble through ears whilst expelling impossibly infectious hooks and warm hearted melodies. Again that older seeding Best Not Broken coverblossoms within the masterful caress of heat induced melodic and vocal expression, as well as essences which reminds of The Super Happy Fun Club and at times Weezer. Irresistibly enthralling with a punchy weight to its rhythms which only accentuates its anthemic bait, the song smoulders and glides engagingly into the passions from start to finish before making way for the balladry of Listerine. From slow reflective opening vocals surrounded by a sultry atmosphere, the track sways with an increased energy and emotive flame as the guitars and keys shower ears with an evocative cascade of aural tenderness with dramatic pronunciation. As its predecessor, the song is unstoppable in its intensive persuasion and provocative colour.

Tell Me That You Want Me opens up with a wash of sonic hues clad in a Latin temperament before throwing on an eighties synth pop cloak of mesmeric melodies and hypnotic enticing. It is soon working on feet and hips, baiting their resistance to join its enthused swagger with an epidemically cast electro tempting. As with most songs there is a definite familiarity to the offering which only adds to the fullness of its insatiable allurement. The encounter has lungs breathless and feet flagging by the end of its romp, though there is no time to draw breath as the excellent Anarchy is there right away manipulating things like a devilish puppeteer. With reggae spawned guitar stabs and a great dark bass lure, the song strolls with eager revelry under an electro bred sunset. The song continues to keenly but gently entice until exploding with its ravenous pop infused chorus, a quite impossible to resist contagion It is a glorious end to a great release, a final slice of potent rock ‘n’ roll which leaves a lingering toxin for band and EP in thoughts and passions.

If you wanted to be over critical than a lack of originality to the songs would be the only comment but such their superbly crafted and infectious might it barely registers as feet and emotions dance to the EP’s tune. Whether Falling In will make Best Not Broken a household name outside of the US is debatable but it has certainly laid down powerful seeds to that eventual outcome.

The Falling In EP is available now @


RingMaster 03/07/2014

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theLights – Dust and Stone


Whisked from the forthcoming successor to their acclaimed debut album Teenager Of The Century, UK melodic alternative pop band theLights begin tempting anticipation with new song Dust and Stone. Building on the sound and presence established and keenly received by media and fans alike with their previous album, the Birmingham quintet make a rather potent and captivating invitation to check out their impending arrival with the single. It is not a song which leaves you breathless or reeling from something exceptionally unique but with a sound which is distinctly theLights and a rich infectious breath to its full bodied melodic colour and structure, it is an invitation which lays down a bait simply impossible to ignore.

The band has returned to the studio for the single and upcoming album with renowned producer Gavin Monaghan (Bloc Party, The 1378147_10151925055689793_265662188_nTwang, Kings Of Leon) who also worked on its predecessor. The result with Dust and Stone is a song which makes easy work of drawing full attention and inspiring up strong intrigue for what the band has in store. From its opening seconds the track dances gently with ears and thoughts, the guitars of Dan Tombs and Shaun Kelly weaving an elegant pattern around the expressive vocals of Kelly backed by the smouldering vocals of Liz Sheils. The rhythm section upon the track is respectful and generous to the woven melodic beauty and though relatively understated veins the adventure with evocative dark lines and firm beats from Gaz Worton and Woz Meadows respectively. There is a country rock tease to the song throughout which adds to the rich hues of the song but equally the guitar invention and enticement provides a sense of Lightning Seeds and in little ways, The Farmers Boys which only enhances the flirtation with the passions.

Dust and Stone is an extremely satisfying track which though it does not spark the passions into any rigorous activity, enjoyably simmers away inspiring a keen appetite for the arrival of theLights’ new album. If you are looking for some folk seeded melodic pop which is a little different and beautifully crafted this single is a gateway to a new melodic exploit to get very excited over and it is hard to imagine the band providing anything less with their sophomore full length ahead.


RingMaster 25/10/2013

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