Seven Stories High – Take The Long Road Home

Seven Stories High Promo Shot_RingMasterReview

Take The Long Road Home is the new mini album from British quintet Seven Stories High, an encounter which finds the band’s already ear pleasing pop punk with even bolder infectiousness and melodic enterprise to tempt national awareness. Take The Long Road Home hits the ground running and continues to offer variety and creative tenacity throughout. Admittedly it might often avoid the uniqueness which certain moments within it suggests is there within the band’s imagination, but from start to finish the Swansea hailing band successfully ensure enjoyment is at the top of the agenda.

Formed at the beginning of 2014 with inspirations said to include the likes of Blink 182 and Sum 41, Seven Stories High soon made their mark on their local and increasingly the national live scene. Line-up changes and inner positional shuffles have been part of the band’s earlier times, as too and since, the sharing of stages with bands such as Moose Blood, Decade, Altered Sky, Light You Up, and Kids Can’t Fly. They released their self-titled debut EP on the January of 2015 to potent responses which now Take The Long Road Home threatens to turn into a stronger national recognition of their emerging presence.

The release opens proper with CTRL, a rousing slice of raucous pop punk with thumping beats and wiry riffs around the potent tones of vocalist Rhys Hyett-Ferrier. There is a great rawness to the song too, bringing a touch of Millencolin to it at times but equally a rousing energy which especially equips  the group roars and the irresistibly catchy enterprise shared by the guitars of Matt Davies and Charlie Porter.

The potent start continues with the similarly tenacious and lively That’s No Moon, another which takes no time in firing up ears and appetite with its raucous pop punk dexterity. Framed and driven by the throbbing bassline of Kallum Brain and the swinging beats of Dave Bevan, the song soon reveals a sonic and emotive fire in its belly. Admittedly, as its predecessor, there is something very familiar to the encounter but more than made up for by the adventurous hooks and a vocal strength which simply captures the imagination from Hyett-Ferrier with resourceful backing from Davies and Brain.

Seven Stories High Cover Artwork_RingMasterReviewIt is that aspect of the band which most consistently impresses across the release, with no negative reflection on the potent songwriting and skilfully woven sounds, the vocals making a constantly striking impression repeated on the feisty canter of Working For Wednesdays and following it, the excellent Wait For It. The first of the two also bears some great scything spicy grooves to keep ears and appetite busy, if without quite living up to the first pair while its successor, which features Charlotte Gilpin from Dream State, explores a more alternative rock canvas for its melodic seducing of ears. It still has a punk essence in its spirited flame, though it could be called more post hardcore scented; one of many textures in the emotively fuelled drama of sound led by the powerful vocal union of Hyett-Ferrier and Gilpin.

It is a track which becomes increasingly potent with every listen as too the acoustic stroll of Skin Me Alive. It is an immediately alluring proposal which further blossoms in ears the more time given to it. Its melodic serenade simply leaves a lingering impression before making way for album closer Fool’s Paradise, a boisterous tapestry of melodic suggestiveness around rapacious rhythms and expressively strong vocals. There is little surprising about the highly accomplished song, but it leaves enjoyment full so, as the release, warrants only recommending.

Seven Stories High have taken another potent step with Take The Long Road Home, and indeed their sound and its growing maturity. The band might not yet be in touch will major uniqueness but the signs and potential is there in some cracking tunes. A fan of bands such as Kids in Glass Houses, A Day to Remember, and All Time Low then Seven Stories High will be up your street.

Take The Long Road Home is released May 20th through all stores and at https://sevenstorieshigh.bandcamp.com/album/take-the-long-road-home

https://www.facebook.com/sevenstorieshigh/   https://twitter.com/7storieshigh

Pete RingMaster 19/05/2016

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Beaumont – Nothing

Beaumont_RingMasterReview

Creating alternative rock with a nice line in pop punk to it, Beaumont is a newly emerging proposal for the British rock scene to contemplate. The beginning of May saw the Birmingham-based quintet release their debut EP, Nothing; a five-track romp of infectious energy and melodic tenacity which quite simply commands attention. That is not to say that Beaumont have come across major uniqueness in their sound yet but with strong potential fuelling its presence, it certainly is something easy to take a real shine to.

Taking their name from a character in Shakespeare’s Henry V, Beaumont is a creative union of friends mixing the melancholic heart of their lyrical exploration with the vibrant catchiness of a melody rich sound. 2015 was a busy year for the band with shows alongside the likes of Light You Up and WSTR a particular highlight to add to individual experiences seeing members touring and playing with bands such as Four Year Strong, ROAM, State Champs, and A Loss For Words over the last few years. Produced by John Mitchell (Lower Than Atlantis, You Me At Six), Nothing is the band’s introduction to a broader national spotlight, and such its vivacity alone, easy to see an invitation rewarded with new fans and keen praise.

With songs which in the words of vocalist Spencer Edmonds, “…cover a range of emotions from hatred and greed to loneliness,” adding “It’s a snapshot of how we were feeling at specific times over the last two years…” , Nothing swiftly entices and pleases with opener Cheapside. An initial melody coaxes ears before thumping beats and spicier melodies join its welcome in league with an already throatily potent bassline. Edmonds’ vocals complete the creative scenery, quickly impressing in quality and expression as he shares the melancholic angst of the song. As mentioned previously, the solemn reflection of word and voice comes bound in lively sounds around a swinging gait driven by the contagious bassline of Reece Aleksander and Mitchell Dornan’s scything beats. It is a web, with guitarists Jake Murray and Chris Inston tenacious in riffs and grooves, which refuses to be ignored as it provides a potent start to the EP soon matched by the excellent Boys & Girls.

BEAUMONT NOTHING EP COVER_RingMasterReviewThe second song makes a bolder entrance, keeping its boisterous character going as it slips into a pop punk infused stroll with nagging riffs and eagerly prowling rhythms. Edmonds again impresses as great harmonies soar around him at times, it all gaining greater energy in the track’s rousing chorus which just tops the thrilling encounter perfectly before it hands ears over to the emotively shadowed and musically vibrant Miserable. Riffs and hooks have a bite to them, backed by the rapier swings of Dornan, which accentuates and gives greater character to the melodic endeavour surrounding them. With its predecessor, the song provides the pinnacle of the EP, though the ‘step down’ is barely noticeable as Art School manages to simultaneously croon with emotive flame while whipping up a feisty physical involvement. It might lack the extra spark of adventure of the previous pair, but in no time it tempts with throbbing riffs from bass and guitar amidst the contagious nature of hooks and group vocals, and a blaze of a chorus.

The Springsteen referencing E Street brings Nothing to a strong close, it too missing that final piece of the jigsaw yet has ears and enjoyment hungry for more whilst showing fresh aspects to the songwriting and sound of Beaumont. As catchy as anything on the EP, it makes a fine end to a thoroughly engaging and satisfying first look at and listen to a band with promise and imagination which alone could see them make great strides ahead.

The Nothing EP is out now via Reclaim Music through most online stores.

https://www.facebook.com/beaumontuk   http://www.twitter.com/beaumontuk   http://reclaimmusicgroup.com/artists/beaumont/

Pete RingMaster 06/05/2016

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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Death Kindly Waits For Me – Wire Iron Blood

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Let us cut to the chase right away and suggest that Wire Iron Blood might just be the best and certainly one of the most exciting post hardcore debut in recent times. An introduction to UK quartet Death Kindly Waits For Me, the three track release is a striking and dramatically captivating protagonist for ears and imagination, and the fact that it suggests there is plenty more in the creative tank of the band yet to be explored and developed only increases its impact. Expressively provocative with a sound coming from the At The Drive In/Fall Of Troy end of an ever broadening genre, Death Kindly Waits For Me is a dramatic fresh breath in the British post hardcore scene.

Northamptonshire bred, Death Kindly Waits For Me began towards the beginning of 2014, taking inspirations from the likes of Thursday, Being As An Ocean, Finch, and Taking Back Sunday into their emerging invention. Their melody rich and aggressive sound was soon drawing potent attention locally and even further afield as their increasing live presence saw the foursome sharing stages with bands such as Decade, Light You Up, Devil Sold His Soul, Terraform, Emp!re, Our Hollow Our Home, Hey Vanity, Attention Thieves and Flood Of Red. Now a national attention is on the radar as Wire Iron Blood is uncaged, and it is fair to say that expectations are already confident in the band’s success in luring a wider spotlight.

The EP opens with the outstanding Cutting Room Floor, a sonic lure swiftly thrusting ears into the impassioned vocals of Adam Fitch, his clean and earnest tones instantly magnetic. Alongside him the guitar of Max Freeston slowly spreads a coarsely melodic lure whilst the heavy bass tones of Adam Cator, just as quickly adds dark haunting shadows. Pierced by the controlled and reserved but rapier like strikes of drummer Josh Miller, it is not a dramatic start yet thoroughly intriguing and awakening an appetite to hear more. Soon into a steady stride and still employing the creative weave which set things off, the song increasingly impresses as it expands its presence musically and vocally, Fitch superb with his distinctive angst fuelled tones whilst the DEath KIndly...more punkish offering of Freeston is a potent backing and the raw roars of Cator nicely caustic. An additional anthemic strength emerges in the song and though musically maybe it does not blaze with startling originality there is nothing but freshness and adventure to the opener.

The same strengths flows though the following Best Friends. It character is shadowed and emotionally dark yet it flames with a contagious energy and a rigorously exciting imagination. Vocally once more the track shines whilst riffs and melodies create an infectious proposal which, as the EP, becomes more addictively enjoyable over time. That Fall Of Troy feel is a bright whisper across the song, whilst other elements hint at the more experimental adventure of The Mai Shi at times, but as the song evolves from a raging stomp into a melancholic croon in its finale, the track is thrillingly individual to Death Kindly Waits For Me.

The closing Decade Of War continues the excellent temptation, its emotionally sober but energetically impassioned heart a canvas for great rhythmic enterprise and colourful guitar endeavour to wrap with craft and tenacity. Vocally of course the song continues a weighty persuasion amidst impressive sonic imagination and by its end it is hard not to sigh in disappointment that there is no more and to swiftly go back to the beginning again and ensure there is.

As mentioned at the beginning, Wire Iron Blood is a starting point for the band which shows that they have plenty to discover and push within themselves. There is little nothing to shade the potency of the release though, with no reflection on Cator, personal tastes would like to see a diminishing or loss of the aggressive vocal squalls as they often feel at odds with the rest of the vocal delivery and at times songs. It is a very minor thing of course in a potential drenched start by Death Kindly Waits For Me, a band hard not to get rather excited over.

Wire Iron Blood will be available from 2nd March through all digital stores.

https://www.facebook.com/deathkindlywaitsformeuk

RingMaster 02/03/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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