XII Boar – Beyond The Valley of The Triclops

zz6t_xiiboarband_1_RingMasterReview

Last year metallers XII Boar made a compelling statement that British heavyweight rock ‘n’ roll was in safe and eager hands with debut album Pitworthy. It was a slab of dirty, primal stomping announcing the arrival of the Aldershot hailing trio on the frontline of UK metal. Hindsight though, and the release of its successor, shows that the impressive encounter was just an appetiser for a bigger thunderous roar and charge of creative mischief, for Beyond The Valley of The Triclops.

Formed in 2010, XII Boar caught the attention of a great many with first release, the Split Tongue, Cloven Hoof EP. Unleashed in 2012, it thrust the band’s thumping invasive sound into broader attention to back up a growing live reputation. Since then, the threesome of guitarist/vocalist Tommy Hardrocks, bassist Adam Thomas, and drummer Dave Wilbraham have shared stages with the likes of Corrosion of Conformity, Crowbar, ASG, and Karma To Burn, made praise luring appearances at Bloodstock, Desert Fest, and Hard Rock Hell, and signed a film licensing deal with Troma Films editor Dylan Greenberg. In the mix was the release of the critically acclaimed Pitworthy, it all leading to the band’s finest moment to date, Beyond The Valley of The Triclops.

Recorded with producer Chris Fielding (Conan, Electric Wizard, Winterfylleth) at Skyhammer Studio, the new album sees the band’s Motorhead, Black Sabbath, High on Fire inspired blend of stoner, doom, blues, and southern metal find a new devil in its heart and revelry. There is a mischievous grin on its creative face, a fresh inventive debauchery which gives Beyond The Valley of The Triclops a diversity and adventure not heard in the already imaginative XII Boar sound before. The album opens with Prologue, a brief slice of rhythmic voodoo setting the feral landscape the album and first track proper, Beyond The Valley commands. From a delicious dirty bass groove with guitar flames in the air, the track strolls through ears with the infectious swing of winy grooves surrounding jabbing beats. The raw and grizzled tones of Hardrocks enjoyably growl, challenging as the track rouses ears and an already keen appetite for the band’s sound. It is an easy invitation for newcomers too, one already showing a new maturity and confidence in songwriting and sound whilst rousing the spirit in the individual XII Boar way.

zz6t_xiiboarbeyondthevalleyofthetriclops_1_RingMasterReviewThe Hustle leaps at the listener immediately its predecessor departs, fiery riffs and the sultry shimmer of harmonica coaxing attention as the song shows itself an old school meets stoner stomp with plenty of punk rock attitude and blues rock spicing. It is an epidemic of infectiousness as sturdy and intrusive as it is virulent and matched in success by the bluesy rock ‘n’ roll of Strange Kinda Lonesome. It too is a canter which whips up body and spirit, involving the listener with swift ease as Lemmy and co like influences make their presence known not for the first or last time in the XII Boar sound. There is a touch of Dr Feelgood to the song too, a dose of heavyweight R&B adding its flavouring even when the song explodes in a tirade of heavy rocking half way.

There is no time for exhaustion already resulting from listening to the album to recover as the outstanding El Mucho Grande flirts and roars on the senses straight after, the song a tapestry of twisting grooves and catchy hooks woven with fun and inventive relish as full of variety as the vocals.

A moment to catch breath is allowed as the narrator of the album is given thirty seconds to give his Welcome To Your Doom warning before Penetrator whips up its energies and grouchy aggression in a superb corruption of a track again openly wearing its Motorhead cape as it has body and vocal chords in league with its own in no time. There are no real surprises in a song which feels so good to throw body and soul into, that adventure given to the likes of the imposingly heavy Abyssal Lord with its spidery grooves and cantankerous nature and the country twanged Black and Blues to exploit. The first of the pair also seamlessly slips into some magnetic and sultry jazz funk shuffling while its successor is a smouldering fire of blues and country rock crooning given a weight and intensity which rumbles on the senses. Both tracks have an unpredictability and volatility which alone seduces attention and real enjoyment, an enterprise just as rampant within the predacious rock ‘n roll of Jupiter Aligns if not with the same strength of zeal.

Album highlights continue to arise as it nears its end, Beggars Roost one such potent proposal with its dark and imposing presence with the excellent Triclops concluding the release with a rhythmically gripping and sonically muggy stalking of the senses. The fact that neither track is arguably the strongest and most explosive things on the album shows the might and quality of Beyond The Valley of The Triclops as a whole.

You always hope to say that the latest release from a band is their finest moment yet and with XII Boar it has been a theme realised almost song by song as they seize UK heavyweight rock ‘n’ roll in their big salacious hands.

Beyond The Valley of The Triclops is out now @ http://xiiboar.bandcamp.com/

http://www.xiiboar.com/   https://www.facebook.com/xiiboar   https://twitter.com/xiiboar

Pete RingMaster 29/09/2016

Tess of the Circle – Amplify

TOTC_RingMasterReview

Though a trio of exceptional singles have already provided a powerful and thrilling insight into the new album from British band Tess of the Circle, it still has not stopped Amplify from surprising and impressing beyond expectations. The eleven tracks making up the band’s second full-length offers virulent roars and irresistible croons, and a collection of rock ‘n’ roll fuelled songs which leap with zeal and passion at ears and imagination.

Rising in 2013 within the British Independent Collective, an artistic union of friends and talent in various mediums formed by singer/songwriter/guitarist Tess Jones, Tess Of The Circle soon sparked potent attention from fans and media alike with debut album Thorns. Jones’ songs soon found regular airplay which has continued since, especially with those recent singles. The past couple of years have been especially busy and successful for the band; that national radio support leading to a double figure amount of live sessions backed by a stage presence which has seen the band play five shows at Glastonbury, sub-headline the 2015 Acoustic Festival of Britain’s second stage, and headline Bear Gryll’s Festival in London. Such the might and majesty of the Gavin Monaghan (Editors, Robert Planet, Lemmy, Ryan Adams, Grace Jones) produced Amplify, all before seems like just being the prelude to bigger and bolder things for the Oxford hailing band; bigger success sparked by a release which it would not surprise if it emerged as an album of the year contender for a great many come December.

With guitarist Lee Clifton, bassist Ben Drummond, and drummer Paul Stone, alongside Jones, Tess Of The Circle get right down to business with opener Love Is the Drug That You Crave. As potent and contagious as first time heard as a single, the song is soon filling ears with the distinctive voice of Jones and scythes of guitar within an electronic shimmer. The relatively controlled start soon erupts into a feisty burst of energy and bait soaked hooks; a two prong coaxing repeated before the track hits a tenacious and rousing stroll. It is quite simply a blaze of melodic and rhythmic infectiousness; a bracing stomp only given greater depth by the great backing vocals around fiery textures cast by guitars and keys.

It takes little time for the variety within Amplify to emerge; from The Cars meets John Butler Trio feel of the first song, a Gary Numan air colours the following I’m Not Ashamed, though it is a spice predominantly cast by the vocal tone of Jones. Nevertheless, a great range of emotive and rhythmic shadows wrap the energetic canter of the song, adding weight and intrigue to the hazier lures of guitars and harmonies. As its predecessor, it takes little time to get fully involved with the grungy encounter, a swift persuasion matched by You Take Me Out of My Head and its thumping slice of bullish hard rock and anthemic rock ‘n’ roll. From its fiery jangle and imposing rhythms, the song demands attention, rewarding the submission with addictive hooks and beguiling grooves courted by the delicious throb of Drummond’s bass. Riffs are equally as formidable and persuasive; the track the perfect blend of aggression and seduction with blues enterprise for further drama.

A chance to relax is provided by the emotive croon of Believe (Into Her Arms), though ears and imagination are as busy as ever in being beguiled by the outstanding encounter. With blues hues lacing the guitars and a gravelly texture enjoyably coating Jones’ vocals, the song mesmerises as skittish rhythms entice. Even in its balladry, the track offers a catchiness which is impossible to resist as our hips and throats can attest to before they are given an even greater workout by the Nirvana-esque incitement of Mother Daughter Son. The track leaps and pokes with matching intensity; stirring up appetite and spirit with its slightly volatile revelry in a persuasion more than matched by Digging At My Bones. Like a tango, the song twists and turns, ebbs and flows in its unpredictable drama and enterprise. Emotionally more than physically tempestuous, the track uncages a theatre of sound and invention which gets right under the skin, tapping into the instincts for heart rousing rock ‘n’ roll.

The excellent Face the Changes flirts with a REM scented adventure next, its rock pop contagion a gentle but inescapable tempting, whilst Drowning Without You as good as steals the whole show with its dark and swampy rock ‘n’ roll. The brooding twang of the guitar is manna for the ear with extra spice provided by the provocative mystique infested melodies. The song nags the senses, seduces the imagination, and flirts with body and soul from start to finish, standing as album favourite with consummate ease even in the company of seriously impressing companions.

The heart blues serenade of Summer Rain is next, holding ears and enjoyment firm before allowing The Waves Break Us Down to share its intimate ballad wrapped in emotive strings and vocal melancholy. Both songs make compelling persuasions whilst adding fresh shades of creative colour to Amplify; one final hue offered by the closing beauty of This Higher Ground and its folk rock embrace of intimate sentiment and lively endeavour.

Amplify is quite sensational, not only living up to the promise of its temptation laying singles but revealing numerous more sides and imagination to the songwriting and sound of Tess of the Circle. It is not a must check out album recommendation we offer but  a must have suggestion.

Amplify is out now via Vintage Voice Records on iTunes and other stores.

http://www.tessofthecircle.com   https://www.facebook.com/TessOfTheCircle/

Pete RingMaster 26/04/2016

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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Spunk Volcano & The Eruptions – Shit Generation

SV_RingMasterReview

As news that the next always highly anticipated Dirt Box Disco album is scheduled for a 2017 release, thoughts eagerly reflect on the fact that we now have a whole year to bask in and romp with the new and just as eagerly awaited Spunk Volcano & The Eruptions full-length. The side but equally essential and compelling project of DBD guitarist/co-songwriter Spunk Volcano, the band has already become one of Britain’s punk favourites through their previous EP and album, but with Shit Generation they have hit a whole new plateau with a sound revealing bigger and broader rock ‘n’ roll shoulders to cast energy inciting punk rock incitements from.

Bursting into view in 2014 with a self-titled EP, Spunk Volcano & The Eruptions quickly showed a more old school punk rock tone and ferocity to the band’s music compared to the anthemic punk ‘n’ roll of his ‘day job’. It was a boisterous and bruising flavouring which later that year helped drive debut album Injection into a waiting horde of greedy hearts and appetites within the UK punk scene. It also began revealing the variation to the band’s sound which did not have quite the room to show its prowess in the EP. Within Shit Generation it is in full flow, relishing the broad landscape of the songwriting. It is still prime punk rock, but bred with an array of anthemic twists and turns loaded with the spice of many flavours.

Alongside lead vocalist Spunk, The Eruptions consists of DBD colleagues in bassist/vocalist Deadbeatz Chris and drummer/vocalist Maff Fazzo, lead guitarist/vocalist Ste Lingard (Flat Back Four), and guitarist/vocalist Tom G Force Batterbee. Together they have created a tour-de-force of rock ‘n’ roll with Shit Generation, it getting off to a rousing and compelling start with Massive Mistake Masterclass. Fair to say, the opener had these ears from its first second, a grouchy bassline and equally gnarly riff instant seduction as jabbing beats move in alongside Spunk’s vocal introduction. In short time, the track is a blaze of aggression and incitement, a Stooges like flame colluding with the predatory nature of the song and its subsequently emerging melodic shimmer of a flirtation.

SHIT GENERATION - COVER_RingMasterReviewARTIt is a storming entrance into the album which is matched by its title track straight after. Mixing strains of garage and hard rock into its seventies punk toned defiance, the song as the first, has feet and voice involved in no time, a quality all tracks present with unwavering success as shown by the outstanding XR3. This is a track all certain car owners are obliged to blast out whilst on the road. It is a web of gripping grooves and emotions arousing vocals and simply another best friend in waiting within the release. Within the first four words of its chorus, vocal participation is a given, a quality which is repeated throughout Shit Generation as shown by DNA Failure and after that Send The Boys Round. The first of the two stomps in on another virulent chorus built on band chants; that same infectiousness infesting verse and the tenacious song’s cantankerous punk ‘n’ roll confrontation whilst the second uncages even thicker aggressive sinews to sculpt a heavy rock spawned challenge.

TV God reveals a glorious nagging on the senses with its predacious riffs and rhythms, the bass alone irresistible animosity. The song relaxes its intimidation a touch as Spunk brings in the narrative, raising it again to greater toxicity for yet another enslaving roar soaked chorus within the album. Immediately installing it as a favourite amongst favourites, it still gets eclipsed in ears and emotions by X Factor and its declaration of something we have all voiced with zeal over the past decade alone. As the diversity in sound has expanded between releases, so has the potency and design of the hooks gripping attention. The band has never been lightweight in that department, but as this song shows, Spunk and co have honed their invention into something as intrusive and lingering as a virus.

Through the feisty pop punk infused romancing of Tattoo and the snarling Motorhead-esque rampancy of Fist Fights, band and album has limbs flinging and throats bursting whilst Satisfaction Guaranteed brings a crabby yet fiercely catchy punk ‘n’ roll badgering into play before Shut Up Or Fuck Off takes control. From its first breath, the track is a brawly proposition; sonically fractious and quickly backed up by quarrelsome tones from the vocals. Of course allegiance is a given by the time the contagiously pugnacious chorus arrives and imagination seized by the wiry classic rock lined sonic enterprise which spreads throughout.

For all the might of each and every song, favourite honours eventfully go to I’m Not Sure. A canvas of infection loaded hooks, sultry grooves, and again surly riffs; the song is manna for the ears. Deadbeatz’s bassline is an irritable enticement which aligns perfectly with the harmonic tone of the vocals and Maff’s ever incisive anthemic beats. Add seduction lined melodies and another flush of pop punk suggested catchiness and you have a near on perfect piece of punk rock.

The album is brought to a mighty close by firstly the equally resourceful and creatively eventful Let’s Go With Your Idea. Baiting the passions with Lemmy like spicing to an UK Subs-esque adventure, the track leaves enjoyment full to bursting and energies exhausted though no time is allowed to regroup as its successor Together Forever As Ghosts, swoops instantly on the senses with another Class-A bass lure aligned to barbarously swung beats. As the song broadens its invitation and character, keen involvement is unsurprisingly inescapable and it is hard to think of many better ways to finish up what is, from start to finish, an embracing of rock ‘n’ roll across the ages with punk passion at its core.

Shit Generation is the album that guarantees a thrilling time and proof that punk/rock ‘n’ roll is best served hard, heavy, and with adventure in its heart. We predict that 2016 will be the year of Spunk Volcano & The Eruptions.

Shit Generation is released March 17th through STP Records @ http://www.stprecords.co.uk/page4.htm

http://www.facebook.com/svate

Spunk Volcano & The Eruptions embarks on the RELEASE THE BEASTS – ALBUM LAUNCH TOUR in March alongside Born To Destruct and Skurvi.

Dates are…

Sat Mar 12th – Abertillery – Dolls House

Fri Mar 18th – Cambridge – Corner House

Sat Mar 19th – Brighton – Prince Albert

Fri Mar 25th – Rotherham – Bridge Inn

Sat Mar 26th – Gateshead – The Black Bull

Sun Apr 2nd – Nottingham – The Maze

Fri Apr 8th – Birmingham – Flapper

Sat Apr 9th – Lancaster – The Yorkshire House

Pete RingMaster 01/03/2016

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

For more exploration of the independent and promotional services check out http://www.zykotika.com/

I Am Duckeye – Commando Too

pic Michael Reynolds

pic Michael Reynolds

Those insatiable Australian riff stalkers I Am Duckeye have returned with second album Commando Too and if you thought they could not exploit and distort the classic cacophonous swipe any more than they did on debut album Husband, then stand corrected as the Melbourne quartet has bred and plucked a whole new tsunami of belligerent riffery and merciless revelry. Consisting of fourteen tongue pressing slabs of salacious devilment and unbridled wickedness, album two spreads the toxins birthed in its predecessor into new insatiably irreverent and seriously compelling brawls.

From the first day of their rampage in 2008 it is probably fair to say that the quartet of guitarists/vocalists and brothers Sam and Matt Haycroft (who also play in Sydonia, Afterwhite and Chico Flash respectively), bassist Jules (also in Dirty F), and drummer Sean (Sydonia), has had the good clean living people of Melbourne drenched in nightmares and the hellacious basking with broad grins. They are a band that once assaulted and thrilled by lustful hunger is inevitable, as with us after their inescapable Punching Dicks EP. It was a release which told us all about the mischief and intent of the band whilst Husband revealed beneath all the humour and sexual antics, I Am Duckeye takes their music seriously and with a plentiful of skill and imagination. The Duckeye riff mobile has been taking on steam to match its weight and with the release of Commando Too, it can only be a matter of when and not if the tea bagging reprobates infect and bring down the world.

The crowd-funded album opens with the towering ‘offspring’ of first album’s track The Riff, well certainly a closely bred cousin. Son of a a3551119337_2Riff reveals its intent lyrically and musically within its first breath, scraping guitars teasing ears as the vocals provide the source of the narrative in the bands as always one of a kind way. It is not long before rhythms are caving in on the senses whilst guitars turn up with searing flames and ferocity. The music growls like a woman giving birth, grizzling sonic endeavour adding to the heavyweight voracity driving on the track’s twisted rampage. It is a tremendous start given extra spice by the brief My Sharona like licks and swiftly matched by the just as ravenous endeavour of Grip It. Though distinctly different the song starts with the same intensity and scarring riffery of its predecessor but as it establishes itself soon unearths a hell of a demonic riff and throat which is plain rabid. Suddenly a juggernaut of rapacious urgency and spiteful dynamics, the confrontation tears down senses and ignites the imagination like a mix of Slayer meets Age of Menace meets Melvins, and is just brilliant.

Hi Viz comes next and though it has its moments just does not click overall. Steam punk expulsions and floating discord kissed harmonies drift into view first courted by a single guitar. It is an intriguing if not captivating start but one soon working once embraced by a torrent of scathing riffs and sonic antagonism. Sadly that is the best part of the song and only when it intermittently returns does, for personal pleasure, the song work. Nevertheless it makes a decent variation before the addictive punk- skat fest of Duckeye Boogie picks up ears and passions for a rhythmically hypnotic and sonically seductive romp. As always the band’s choice of words and lyrical adventure is irresistible but as with the last album it is the music which grabs the biggest plaudits, though combined everything is a destiny suiting fit.

The just as tremendous Windmills comes along next, again the band playing with their punk side (something their mother never warned them about). There is a sense of Dirt Box Disco to the feisty sinew driven punk ‘n’ roll incitement, where rhythms and especially riffs steal the honours once again though the infestation of hooks have their say also before the album takes another twist and venture into disco with Tuesday, I Go the Blues Way…only kidding. The song is a sweaty rather than sultry moan of the blues done Aussie style and as always with the band comes in an unpredictable soak of delicious taunting. Imagine Lemmy singing the blues after lessons from Sir Les Patterson and you get the drift to another great moment.

Things only get better and better as the album progresses, the noise rock mess of I Need Rehab just excellent and hilarious. Vocally distraught and musically deranged until its heavy rock needs escape, the track is just irresistible as is the following post/steam punk come electro orgy of What is Wrong with Me?, a brief self-reflection which is more pride than insecurities. Matching the pair in setting leakages in motion is Stool Bender, a fierce heavy stoner bred rocker of a mating with the ears which flirts, gnaws, and suffocates the senses, though not always in that order. Stalked by the bass and slapped around by the drums, passions are already aflame but sent feverish by the cruel causticity of the riffing and the ever engaging vocals. The track is another undeniable slab of evidence to the growing craft and intent of the songwriting of the band and their accomplished sounds, so much so that you just wonder if one day we will see a ‘serious’ rock/metal album coming from the guys.

This latest lofty plateau of the album continues with the stomping animosity of the blistering Meth is Death and the Black Tusk like avalanche Agonhymn, both adding rich fun, diversity, and might to the release before the angst drawn Headbutt. If persistence and sonic nagging is a sin than this band is going right where they want to with tracks like this their infernal anthem. It is a bestial and ruinous experience, a damnation of contagion.

The album finishes with firstly the exhausting blaze of Ayy Ayy, a savage and uncompromising fury which makes Mastodon look timid but a tempest which is just as gleeful mellowing in unexpected places with wistful harmonies and looks. From there the release closes on the sweltering climate and stoner sonic winery of Panchow, a final leviathan of proof in case you had any doubts left that this band can write exceptional metal/rock songs of varying spices. It is a smouldering stoner/psychedelic flame of acidic enterprise and evocative resonance which leaves a lingering fire for the imagination and passions to immerse in.

After Husband we were left wondering if I Am Duckeye could go much further in their invention and craft let alone devilment; well Commando Too is the evidence that not only can they but it is still blissfully early days…

Comando Too is available now @ http://iamduckeye.bandcamp.com/

http://iamduckeye.com

9.5/10

RingMaster 11/06/2014

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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Turbocharged – Area 666

Turbocharged_Area666_promopicture

Like being chewed alive by a pack of bestial behemoths whilst multiple jackhammers unrelentingly assault the senses, Area 666, the new album from death punk destructors Turbocharged, is one irresistible carnivorous tempest of unbridled intensity and sonic annihilation. Unleashing fourteen antagonistic predators with the energy and power to not only break down the sound barrier but ravage it with pure inventive spite, the album is pure ruinous intent and mastery. If there has been a hungrier violent fury released this year it is hard to recall but Area 666 is undoubtedly one of the most enjoyable and invigorating.

Formed in 2000, Turbocharged went from a trio at the start to having increasing and decreasing line-ups for the initial few years before finding itself back to a three piece again. This period also saw a demo recorded but it was unreleased. 2008 saw the band now back to a trio deciding to abandon the search for replacements for the lost members and the release of the Branded Forever demo. Its successor Arrogantus Metallus appeared the following year with the band also appearing at the Thunders over Miriquidi festival in Elterlein with the likes of Törr, Death SS, Kat, Interment, and Tormented. Debut album AntiXtian was recorded in the spring of 2010 though delays meant its release was not until December 24 that year, Lemmy’s birthday which in many ways listening to the new release is more than apt. Released on CD through Chaos Records a short while after, the release was well-received as the band continued to build their reputation with live shows which saw them sharing stages with bands such as Violentor, Sofisticator, Paganizer, Die Hard, Obsessör, Hell (Uk), Hammer, Children Of Technology and many more. The MCD Christ Zero of last year increased their stature again but you can only feel that Area 666 is the trigger to the fullest recognition and awareness. The album is bloodthirsty, nasty and at times plain vicious but it is a war on the ear you just do not want to stop or find mercy within.

The trio of vocalist/bassist Ronnie Ripper, drummer/vocalist Freddie Fister, and guitarist/vocalist Nick Shitstorm a.k.a. Old Nick, do not take Area 666 covera breath before sending a tsunami of riffs and rhythms crashing down on the ear with the title track, the scowling growls of Ripper instantly there to scold the senses. Soon into its stride the track is a punk infested scourge of guitar and drums with the bass adding extra unkind menace to proceedings. Littered with glorious anthemic gang chants and sharp bladed grooves the track also shifts through varied gait and intensity which seamlessly moves from breakneck adrenaline driven rampage to lumbering almost suffocating death throes and back again. It is a staggering start which is occasionally equalled but always challenged across the album.

Swarm does exactly as it says on the tin, just with more vehemence and vitriol than maybe hoped. An incessant scrub of sonic intrusion and rampant rhythms coated in a predacious riffing which leaves the body exhausted and cowering, the track is a blaze of ferocity and compelling maliciousness. Again like its predecessor, the song offers switches in attack and weight not forgetting hungry hooks and sonic imagination which tear at the passions to restrict escape. Standing toe to toe with the opener it is easily backed up by Christian Corpses and Worshipper, the first an almost sing-a-long like blistering where you can imagine Motorhead fans on extreme metal karaoke nights blissfully letting rip whilst the second is a darker rapacious malevolence, though no slouch on the fire searing energy and riff driven maelstrom front either. A scorching solo from Shitstorm sends the appetite into rabid hunger whilst the assault as a whole is pure addictive heavy-duty frenzy.

Through the likes of the brilliant sonic devouring that is Masses, Mortals and Maggots, where submission to its barbarous charms is instant, and the voraciously attentive Godfearings Cunts where senses are under a deluge of either heartless riffs or guitar majesty, Turbocharged pile on the intensity and pleasure whilst the crushing juggernaut of a murderous antagonist Scavengers Of the Light and especially the wonderfully severe Churchfire Commando take those same emotions into overload. The last of these is sheer scintillating toxicity, grooves and riffs make an insidious union to entrap and enflame the listener whilst the pestilent savage throat of the bass and the bone splintering rhythms are inhumanely lethal.

Every track on the album is a welcome bane, the further likes of noxious The Slut and The God and the fearsome closer Christcrawler making potent confirmation. Though across the album there is an open diversity, the surface assault of tracks means if the first couple do not do it for you than a run for the hills is in order as there is no change to the devastation pending. If like for us Turbocharged rip immediate subservience from the passions than Area 666 is a dangerously epidemic treat.

https://www.facebook.com/pages/Turbocharged/76137909752

10/10

RingMaster 07/09/2013

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Huntress – Starbound Beast

Huntress-Promo-1

Though not flawless, Spell Eater the debut album from US heavy metallers Huntress, made a strong impression, its potent sounds and in the face devilry receiving mixed responses but always sparking something. For us it bred a definite appetite for what was to follow, a keen hunger which new release Starbound Beast teases with, satisfies more often than not but also leaves a sense that maybe the album is resting on earlier laurels rather than forging its own unique and forward driving adventure. It is certainly an appetising and frequently thrilling collection of powerful multi-flavoured tracks but lacks the dramatic impact which its predecessor ultimately achieved.

The Californian band fronted by the always potently pleasing vocals of Jill Janus, a classically trained singer who toured Europe as a teenage opera starlet before moving onto performing with Dave Navarro in a project called Under the Covers, arrived with a wind of brewing excitement and recommendation with their first full length, the anticipation for that already seeded as the band signed with Napalm Records and helped intensely by first single Eight of Swords. Made up of guitarists Blake Meahl and Anthony Crocamo, bassist Ian Alden, and drummer Carl Wierzbicky, some of whom ex-members of Professor, Dark Black and Skeletonwitch, alongside Janus, Huntress it is fair to say split opinions with their debut and are sure to do the same with Starbound Beast. It is fair to say the band and release does everything you would wish for in a heavy metal release, its sound a constant blaze of barging rhythms, predatory riffs, and soaring stormy vocals drenched in passion, but throughout the additionally thrash, death and black metal spiced encounter something is missing or been allowed to escape which leaves the new album bringing up the rear to their first rampage into the world.

Produced by Zeuss (Shadows Fall, Hatebreed, Agnostic Front), Starbound Beast starts like a beast on heat, its opening full song 494_Huntresscoming after the brief chaotic tempest seared by the classical tones of Janus weaving harpy like harmonic toxicity across its sky, the instrumental Enter The Exosphere. The following Blood Sisters sets its dramatic walls from the start, flames of sonic taunting and melodic colour caging the attention whilst rhythms frame it all with deliberate prowling intent. Once secure in its entrapment the excellent vocals of Janus, with a husky growl to her tones, rides boldly on the cantering charge of eager riffs and probing drums jabs which then open melodic arms through the infectious chorus. Throughout there is a constant menace to vocals and sound which flares up and casts shadows over the rampant muscle clad energetic core. It is an excellent track which twists and turns through dark provocation and warm evocation, the perfect scenario for light and dark to wage physical debate within brewing thoughts and maelstrom courting imagination.

It sets a high standard and equally lofty hopes and expectations for the rest of the album which are immediately dented by the following I Want To Fuck You To Death. The song has already seemingly come under fire from many quarters and though we would argue that it is not as bad as many claim, in many ways it does not do the album any favours. Co-penned with Lemmy, the song has a power metal grandeur in intent and a rapacious hunger in certainly the breath and the delivery of the verses, but as the predictable and underwhelming chorus loses the established pull of the track it sounds like a weaker fish from another pond, not the devil spawn lake of Starbound Beast.

Destroy Your Life gets things back on track, its striking melodic and fevered guitar invention standing out as much as the fury that is Janus’ vocals. The solo within is a sizzling detour from the greed of the song, its flare and craft lighting up hot sceneries for the band to exploit with the returning vociferous appetite of the sound and intensity. It is another of the more prominent highlights which the title track, which to be honest took time to persuade but eventually did succeed especially with Janus at her potently sirenesque best, the thrash driven carnivorous Zenith, as well as the following tracks Oracle and Receiver all make very decent attempts in emulating. The second of these savages the senses with primal greed and air scorching intensity vocally and sonically to lift the album back to its highest plateaus whilst the others hold their own with inventive endeavour to undoubtedly leave strong pleasure.

Completed by the more than decent Spectra Spectral and the stirring Alpha Tauri, the album offers plenty to enthuse over and take enjoyment from, especially taking songs individually but Starbound Beast as whole does seem to lose an undefined something Spell Eater which had and feel like a lost opportunity. Despite that Huntress and album still secure a regular appearance on our playlist.

http://huntresskills.com/

7.5/10

RingMaster 28/06/2013

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard from

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