Buster Shuffle – I’ll Take What I Want

As you shiver over the winter months, body and energy needs something to keep the cold at bay and spirit stomping and Buster Shuffle have just the right tonic in the shape of their new album, I’ll Take What I Want. Bursting with their most virulent and imaginative sound yet, the UK quartet’s fourth full-length mischievously swings and devilishly strolls as it grabs limbs and soul like a rascal puppeteer.

I’ll Take What I Want casts more of the fusion of ska, pop, and rock ‘n roll Buster Shuffle has increasingly pushed and established since emerging back in 2007. Each of their previous albums has added a fresh lick of enterprise and adventure but the street carnival of their latest offering is a whole new ball game and easily the band’s most unique and thrilling proposal yet. Debut album Our Night Out of 2010 swiftly lured acclaim and attention the way of the London outfit subsequently backed by a live success soon seeing the band share stages with the likes of The Holloways, The Wombats, Goldie Lookin’ Chain and Chas ‘n’ Dave, a list which Buster Shuffle over the years has added artists such as Lee Scratch Perry, Frank Turner, Drop Kick Murphys, Madness, The Blockheads, The Rifles, and Flogging Molly. The albums Do Nothing and especially Naked has increased their presence and reputation with unerring fun and craft something I’ll Take What I Want can only vigorously escalate.

With their street wise/reflective lyrics and multi-flavoured sound, Buster Shuffle instantly infest ears and appetite with album opener I Don’t Trust a Word You Say. Straight away a rousing wave of vocal and musical temptation surges through ears, vocalist Jet Baker leading the way with his tones and equally potent piano revelry as rhythms swing. Hitting an impossibly contagious stroll part ska, part old school punk with a dash of fellow Brits The Tuesday Club to it, the song instantly has the body bouncing and passions greedy with its boisterous antics.

The forcibly captivating start only continues as We Fall to Pieces steps in with its folk ska rascality, the song like a fusion of Blur and Tankus The Henge around the throbbing lure of Tim Connell’s double bass and the crisp beats of Terry Mascall. Again Baker’s piano and James Stickley’s guitar collude in creative chicanery as the former’s tones and words tantalise across two minutes of instinctively bold rock ‘n’ roll before Pretty Boy swaggers in with its own infectious dynamics and enterprise. Imagine Television Personalities and again Blur bursting in on Bad Manners and you get a flavour of the track’s gorgeous recipe of enticement.

There is no escaping a rich Madness spice within next up See You Next Week, its determinedly infectious canter pure instruction to the body to dance and ears to greedily devour before The Estate takes the listener into the danger and shadows of modern city life with its spunk pop manipulations. Set across two stages, the day light vivacity of its initial stomp is a darkened night lit rush by its departure, song and imagination running with instinctive eagerness to only increase the already rich impact of the release.

I’ll Be in Peckham has a touch of gypsy to its virulent amble next, its seductive yet off-kilter street  waltz manna to these ears as pretty much the whole of I’ll Take What I Want to be honest but especially manipulating as it sets up the warm gallop of the album’s madness soaked title track. It is ska pop to get frisky with, hips getting a keen workout as melodies and hooks unite in an irresistible web of catchy temptation.

With a throbbing tuba-esque hook to swing from, Your Mommy Is So Hot for Me is simply ska impishness so easy to devour, the band’s constant humour as virulent as their sound as too their lyrical prowess as shown yet again in the predacious flirtation of The Tables Have Now Turned and the indie punk pop jangle of Take Them All. Both songs tease and tempt with their creative twists and unpredictable turns, all lined with the never relinquishing infectiousness of the Buster Shuffle sound.

The album is completed by the folk littered contagion of Banana Thief, its ska spun carnival also embracing a country twang as tasty as its other infectious ingredients, and finally the instrumental skanking and harmonic seduction of the Outro Song. With its sixties espionage/sci-fi TV theme tune air and not for the first time, the golden hues of backing vocalist Carrie Griffiths radiating, the track is a masterful end to a real treat of an album. Also featuring the keyboard and vocal enterprise of Pete Oag, I’ll Take What I Want is sheer pleasure and addiction in one; quite simply another year high for music.

I’ll Take What I Want is out now via Burning Heart Records on iTunes, Amazon, and other stores.

https://bustershufflemusic.com/     https://www.facebook.com/bustershuffleofficial

Pete RingMaster 29/11/2017

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Ash Walker – Six Eight / Noodle

Ash Walker_RingMaster Review

Following the success of his acclaimed debut EP Agnostic, producer Ash Walker shows another side to his instrumental adventure with double A-sided single Six Eight / Noodle. Whereas the EP caught ears with a more unconventional trip hop led fusion of sound, the new release explores smokier jazz bred landscapes again spiced by varying textures and flavours. The two songs create individual immersive strolls which are more hints rather than forceful suggestions for thoughts to run with, but each suggests a sultry lazy day with smiles and warmth are made for their presence.

cover_RingMaster Review     Previously, Ash has supported the likes of The Specials, Lee Scratch Perry, and David Rodigan as a DJ before signing with Deep Heads, this in turn allowing his increasingly acclaimed productions to entice strong attention. The Agnostic EP incited strong radio focus with the likes of Gideon Coe, Don Letts, and Tom Robinson supporting its release whilst the single Round The Twist, which features The Specials’ Nikolaj Torp Larsen quickly lured individual support of its own. Now with the assistance of bassist Marc Cyril (Joss Stone, Dennis Bovell, Jr Walker and the All Stars) and keyboardist Jason Moe, Walker takes the listener through fresh scenery from his imagination starting with Six Eight.

The track ambles in on a delicious bassline and scratchy percussion quickly washed with enticing horn like bellows and the reflective charm of the piano. Additional keys stoke the ambience of the song with richer, though reserved, flames whilst a ska/dub swagger and enterprise courts the increasingly attractive character and body of the song. With a cosmopolitan feel to its atmosphere and texture, Six Eight has the feel of busy summer kissed streets full of bodies carrying a calm smile reflecting the air around them rather than the impatient voracity generally found on city landscapes. It is an enchanting piece of music, a companion to swing your hips to whilst immersing in its warm embrace.

Noodle is a mellower hug of melodic elegance but again with infectious temptation and an underlying lively gait. The bass once more captivates, its darker emotive tones adding shadows and intrigue to the melodic glow and atmospheric chimes blossoming from the enterprise of the keys. The track in a way is like the night view of life shown in the day time revelry of Six Eight, its presence a noir draped look at a still vibrant but closely intimate world echoing the heart of the first song and its lively energy.

Though the release did not incite the imagination to run away with itself in expansive adventures, both songs tantalise and ignite nothing less than warmth and full enjoyment which we expect to be wrapped in its own acclaim very soon.

Six Eight / Noodle is available now via Deep Heads.

Pete RingMaster 21/09/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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