The Moods – Missing Peace

Let us start with the bottom line about Missing Peace, the debut album from UK collective The Moods; and that is be sure to make another space on your list of album of the year contenders because quite simply it is one essential exploration for ears and thoughts. Offering twelve slices of virulently infectious, politically sharp incitements bred in a fusion of drum & bass, reggae, hip-hop, and EDM with more besides, Missing Peace relentlessly grabs body and imagination with its unique tapestry of sound and creative contagion.

The album’s release caps off an already potent and successful year for the ten-piece of producers, poets, and musicians from Manchester and the North West. Their debut single, Joy, was a critically acclaimed outing sparking hungry attention from media and fans alike while live the 2014 emerging project has thrilled and increasingly elevated their reputation and sound, the latter with the addition live this year of classically-trained violinist Alice. That first single also spawned a video featuring Steve Evets (Looking for Eric) which has been entered for the BFI London Film Festival while two of The Moods’ songs have been grabbed for the sound track of British movie Strangeways Here We Come, a film starring Michelle Keegan, Elaine Cassidy, Lauren Socha, and Nina Wadia set for release in the spring of 2018. Missing Peace though is the pinnacle of the band’s year and indeed their rise within the UK music scene to date; an attention demanding, spirit rewarding proposal seriously hard to pull away from once infested with its viral sounds.

Cored by the four pronged temptation of vocalists Mark Cunningham and John Horrocks alongside rappers Kolega and Explicit, The Moods instantly gets under the skin with their new single P.O.P (Profit Over People). The album’s opener throbs in ears with vocal prowess and electronic bubbling, beats soon adding their thick pulse to the rousing coaxing. The keys of Paul Holmes continue to entice as insight loaded rapping strides through the atmospheric catchiness, melody throated tones following as the song magnetically twists and turns; every moment suggestive bait to greedily devour.

The following Inception is no different, the flames of brass and reggae/ska kissed keys smouldering lures upon the rhythmic shuffle of drummers Phil Horrocks/Chris Barrett and Dave O’Rourke’s darkly toned bass. The vocal unity once again simply captivates, words and expression a snappy reflection matched by the crackle of the sounds around them whilst the song’s chorus is pure listener involvement enticement.

The misty entrance of next up Keep Your Powder Dry breeds a pulsating trespass of electro punk, another strain to The Mood sound fuelled by instinctive infectiousness. Its raw instincts and tone is masterfully temped by the interrupting harmonic turn and the electronic shimmer which glistens throughout, casting an irresistible spell before Bad Boy with its haunting piano within a streetwise stroll enthrals. Caught in the golden glazed tendrils of Will Earl’s trumpet, the song has something of Dizraeli and the Small Gods to its lively evocative adventure.

The shadowy saunter of Black Triangle taunts and entices next, Kolega and Explicit exchanging their lyrical contemplations before Cunningham and Horrocks merge their harmonic intimation; this all within a psyche haunting smoulder of sound and suggestion. The song with a whisper of Lazy Habits to it is delicious, dramatic and seductive and sharing yet another aspect to The Moods sound and imagination, a multi-faceted proposition expanded again by the pop infused and insistently compelling Gotta Get A Hold.

Joy as ever is a beacon of the band’s sound and invention, a flirtatious wave of warm melodies and skittish rhythms within a climate of floating harmonies, all over a rhythmic throb which alone arouses feet, hips, and spirit. Some songs are destined to haunt the memory and passions; this is decidedly one with addiction in its hands.

The unpredictable nature and ever turning sound of Atmosphere is more of a slow burner on the appetite but simply grows in persuasion and potency with every eventful listen while Hidden making a similar initial impression with its individual pop infused sway equally grows in strength over time if never quite to the heights of those around it in personal tastes.

Speaking Tongues though needs mere seconds to get under the skin. It too rises from gentle electronic dew on the senses; a rhythmic pulsing driving things with its dark thud as vocals provoke and suggest. With a dirty lining to its heart and drama, the track imposes and arouses; its subsequent intrusive canter an instinctive stirring of body and emotions.

Missing Peace concludes with firstly the reggae courting Together We Will Fight Them, a sultry defiance nurtured suasion with teeth to its nature and fire to its heart, and finally its title track, a similarly woven companion in style and tone but with its own individual and highly irresistible lobbying of body and mind. The track is superb, sharing everything magnificent about The Moods sound and creativity in its own original anthemic adventure.

We can easily carry on waxing lyrical about Missing Peace but will leave with a full and lively suggestion that you check it and The Moods out with haste; you will not be disappointed.

Missing Peace is out now via A1(M) Records digitally and on CD/Vinyl.

http://themoods8.wixsite.com/themoods    https://www.facebook.com/themoodsmanc    https://twitter.com/themoodsmanc

Pete RingMaster 02/10/2017

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

The Klik – Find My Way

The Klik_RingMaster Review

The Klik sounds like it should be the name of some indie pop band, even a bland boy band, but it is thankfully the moniker of a rather fine rock band from Essex in the UK. Creating a vibrant and transfixing fusion of rap, hip hop, and melodic rock, the sextet of Toggz (rapper/ vocals), Cobez (rapper/ vocals), Ellis (vocals), Ross (guitar), Rob (drums), and Nat (bass) are releasing their new single Find My Way early December. It is a masterful temptation that twists and seduces with craft and enterprise, creating a weave of flavours and textures that quickly dance with the imagination whilst just as swiftly exciting the body.

The Klik cover_RingMaster Review   Approaching three years as a band this coming January, The Klik released their debut EP Stress Levels mid-2014, a three track encounter awakening new appetites beyond their local scene to their captivatingly imaginative sound. With Find My Way now ringing in our ears, expectations are that the band’s upcoming single with stoke up a more national spotlight and hunger for their creative adventure. Its sound lays somewhere between Great Imitation and Lazy Habits but with its own character the prime temptation, and on the evidence of its lively persuasion alone, thoughts are that The Klik are ready to entice far bigger spotlights.

From an opening caress of voice and guitar, the song has ears enticed with full attention just as swift. As the song opens up into a swinging stroll, dark throaty bass lures collude with melodic expression from the guitars. Blossoming in strength and attraction through the impressive mix of vocals across its three frontmen alone, the track is an infection of striking textures courted by tenacious tones and enterprise. Rhythms flirt and melodies entice throughout; each as perpetually engaging as the vocals, whilst a subsequent essence of By The Rivers adds a little something more to the seriously tantalising mix

As suggested, the new single has the potential of breaking The Klik into a broader and hungrier spotlight, attention easy to suggest Find My Way more than deserves.

Find My Way will be released on December 7th via Myrmidon Records with pre-ordering available @ https://itunes.apple.com/gb/album/find-my-way-single/id1056677080

https://www.facebook.com/TheKlikUK

Pete RingMaster 17/11/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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The LaFontaines – Class

The LaFontaines_ Reputation Radio/RingMaster Review

Tagged as Scotland’s biggest independent band, there is no doubting that anticipation for The LaFontaines’ debut album has been in full swing on the back of acclaimed releases and a live presence seeing the band headline shows in New York, tour the UK and Europe with Watsky, and play their biggest headline sold out show to date at Glasgow’s ABC amongst numerous successes. The majority of that happened in a triumphant 2014 for the band but it is easy to expect bigger, more forceful spotlights upon the band in this with the release of the thrilling and fascinating Class.

static1.squarespace.com_ Reputation Radio/RingMaster Review   Formed in 2010, the Motherwell hailing quintet first snatched attention with the All She Knows EP in 2013, following its success the following year with the similarly eagerly received Under The Storm EP. The absorbing diversity and sounds of the Matt O’Grady (You Me At Six/Don Broco) produced Class now blends the qualities of those previous releases with a new adventure of invention and enterprise. It is at times a startling release, persistently a striking one, and even when its persuasive energy slips a touch, album and indeed band just enthral as they brew up an impassioned and tenacious incitement. The words of frontman Kerr Okan probably describes it best when he says, “We’ve spent the past 3 to 4 years leading up to this point. Everything we’ve seen on the road or experienced together as a band has finally made its way onto record. It’s guaranteed to shock those who assume we’re simply just the best live band in Scotland. There’s so much depth to these songs, a load of pain and struggle, but underlying throughout all of the writing, is some real grit and determination.

There can be few albums this year with as rousing a start as Class offers through Slow Elvis. From a distance the song looms on ears, hitting them on arrival with pungent anthemic rhythms and fiery riffs. It is not particularly aggressive or explosive yet within seconds the opener has ears and appetite seriously aroused and hanging onto its swing. Spatial sonic endeavour fills air quickly too, surrounding the swaggering vocal rap of Okan as bass and drums intensify their bait with a snarl and punchy attitude. Additional vocal calls and melodic revelry only adds to the incendiary brew, the track evolving into a Rage Against The Machine meets Lazy Habits encounter wrapped in the sultry hues of Muse.

The sensational start is quickly backed by the similarly electrifying Under The Storm, a burst of guitar sparking handclaps and melodic vocals with fire in their breath. The track is soon shrugging off any restraint and with sinews flexing, it strides resourcefully through ears behind scythes of guitar and bass which in turn are led by the stirring mix of clean and rap cast vocals from bassist John Gerard and Okan respectively. Though openly unique compared to its predecessor, that description of references again applies, and like the first song is twisted into something unique to The LaFontaines. Unpredictability also is a ripe asset to both songs, and indeed the album, that and the great Scottish lilt fuelling the jabbing potency of the rapping.

     The album’s title track comes next, a gentle caress of melodic temptation crooning over the senses as rhythms fling their enticement around in a robust dance. Once more the mix of vocals is a magnetic tempting in the indie seeded and lively serenade of the song, the melodic lure of Gerard as potent as the creative jangle of guitar from Iain Findlay and Darren McCaughey. Revealing more of the depth and imagination in the band’s songwriting and sound alone, it is replaced and emulated by Castles. This too has a reserved touch yet its heart is a blaze of sonic expression and evocative intensity. A sizzling start slips into a mellower embrace around Okan’s delivery, both taking ears and thoughts by the hand and leading them into new eruptions of emotional drama. Without quite matching the plateau of the first few tracks, the song easily steals full attention with its Biffy Clyro meets The Kennedy Soundtrack like canvas evolved into something distinct to this new breed of Scottish rock ‘n roll.

King steps up next, its great bluesy guitar twang an immediate tasty enticing to which a throaty bass groan from Gerard and the punchy spits of Okan bring their own irresistible tempting. Featuring guests Luke Prebble and Michael Sparks, the song whilst wrapped in the tangy keys of McCaughey and vocal harmonies prowls rhythmically and emotionally. Gospel like in ambience, mischievous in imagination, the track has ears and appetite hungry, their need fulfilled by Junior Dragon. Not for the first or last time, drummer Jamie Keenan stirs up body and emotions with his skilled incitement from which the song exposes an even grittier and volatile side to the band’s sound. Arctic Monkeys like in devilry, Freeze The Atlantic like in energy, and Able Archer like in creative grandeur, the track grows into a rich bellow of voice and sound for another major highlight of Class.

A fiercely shimmering persuasion comes with All Gone next, another with a predacious edge to its rhythms and character backed by a great rapping stroll from Okan but maybe for the only time on the album a strong impact slips as the melodic and harmonic side of the song flows. Nevertheless the track captivates and solidly pleases if without finding the spark which ignited earlier songs, an ingredient the outstanding Window Seat has in strength. A more smouldering persuasion, it takes time to reveal all its rich levels and qualities but over time becomes a mighty peak of the album. It is an intense slice of emotional balladry built on a muscular frame, this draped in quite superb and mesmeric vocal strengths. It might be ballad like but there is a tempest at its heart which makes the song a volcanic croon and just irresistible.

Enjoyable but less dramatically engrossing is All She Knows, an easy going and arguably formula song in respect to the band’s songwriting. It is relatively unique to outside references but finds it difficult to stand out in the richness around it, though again to be fair the track is only enjoyment for ears, something which again applies to Paper Chase. Its eighties indie pop essences definitely add something fresh but once more the track struggles to linger like the insatiable successes elsewhere upon Class.

The album closes with the thick and shadow enriched caress of Pull Me Back, keys a melancholic but dramatic expression against the anthemic beats of McCaughey. They are a mere moment in the ever evolving landscape of the excellent song of course, every second, note, and syllable from across the band just inventive theatre.

It is a fine end to a thoroughly exciting release. Certainly there are moments when Class slips from its loftiest perch but it is generally down to the brilliance of some songs in comparison than the failures of others. As suggested, the first album from The LaFontaines has been long and greedily awaited and now here it undoubtedly lets no one down.

Class is available now via 889 Records from most online stores

http://www.thelafontaines.co.uk/   https://www.facebook.com/thelafontainesmusic

Ringmaster 17/06/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard on Reputation Radio @ http://www.reputationradio.net

 

 

 

The Talks – Commoners, Peers, Drunks and Thieves

The Talks 2014 photo SJM 2 landscape

You may have already found your feel good encounter of 2014 but it is never a bad thing to keep looking right up to the closing days, especially when as winter opens its eyes you get a treat as irresistible as Commoners, Peers, Drunks and Thieves, the new album from UK ska rockers The Talks. Bringing eleven tracks to infest feet, the body, and the imagination, the release is a stomp of addictive revelry which cannot fail to put a smile on the face and emotions.

Since the release of their debut single Picture This in 2008, The Talks have been on a steady climb with the past couple of years seeing a fevered acceleration of attention for their fusion of ska, punk, reggae, and two-tone. First album Live Now Pay Later! in 2012 awoke a fresh spotlight on the Hull quartet which last year’s Westsinister E.P and singles Can Stand The Rain, which featured Neville Staple from The Specials, and Friday Night swiftly pushed to new levels. Alongside the releases, the band’s live presence has been just as dynamic in garnering acclaim and luring the passions, the foursome of Patrick Pretorius (vocals/guitars/sax), Jody Moore (vocals/guitars/keys), Iain Allen (bass), and Richard Lovelock (drums) sharing stages with the likes of Madness, The Specials, Rancid, The Beat, and The King Blues, as well as playing festivals such as This Is Ska, Mighty Sounds, and Rebellion over time. The previous EP was a highly anticipated encounter with Commoners, Peers, Drunks and Thieves finding itself more eagerly awaited, and again the band has surpassed hopes and expectation with their contagious exploits.

The band’s sound lies somewhere between the provocative roars of The Vox Dolomites, the punk causticity of The Members, the melodic reggae and ska charms of By The Rivers and The Beat respectively, and the virulent devilment of The Jellycats. It is a proposition though which whilst embracing familiar essences develops its own unique devilry as swiftly shown with album opener Don’t Look Behind You. The initial warm embrace of keys has ears and thoughts engaged immediately, especially as riffs chop and rhythms start leaping as keys open up a new inventive flirtation whilst the pulses and strokes of the song work on the passions. Loaded with bait feet cannot resist, the song spreads its seduction further with the mischief of vocals and bass alongside the jagged majesty of guitar stabs, hooks, and beats.

The brilliant start is emulated instantly by recent single Radio, an insatiable two tone fuelled escapade with the delicious whiff of The Selector to it. Within moments its chorus is leading the Picture 156anthemic stroll, the song’s swagger as virulent as the brass flames and exotic keys colouring it. There is a punkish air to the vocals which again reminds of The Members whilst the punchy rhythms consume the vivacious dance of the encounter like an epidemic. The track is aural addiction, a breath-taking protagonist of body and emotions leaving a tall order for the following Tear Us Apart to match up to. With sultry keys and warm harmonies its first breath, the song is soon stirring up ears and imagination with its reggae bred enterprise and melodic summer. It mesmerises with its caressing canter of sound, reminding of fellow Brits Shanty as it floats and immerses the senses in its mouth-watering adventure.

Both Fire and Ceasefire keep the thrills ablaze, the first a muscular slab of ska provocation with bulky bass lines and feisty riffs pouncing on ears with antagonistic intensity and infectious rigour. The track has its nostrils flaring from the first second but the increasingly impressive vocal melodies and dramatic brass hues tempers the roar for another riveting big boned incitement; think King Prawn meets Lazy Habits and you are somewhere near the potency of the song. Its successor which features Jonny ‘Itch’ Fox of The Kings Blues, is an immediate blur of sonic drama and rhythmic provocation, a great dirty baseline aligned to agitated beats the frame for combative vocals and smouldering melodies. Teasing with dub enterprise over a ska crafted canvas, the track bounces with confrontation and climatic resourcefulness, every twist a striking reward for ears and a spark for thoughts to match the lyrical impact.

The gentle warmth and catchy romance of Light Up replaces the previous exhilarating tension of its predecessor, the swaying proposition a melody rich call with keys and harmonies embracing another irrepressible earthy bass temptation. Its masterful charm and joy is followed by the pop punk infused All in a Day, the band regaling the album with yet another thrilling slice of diverse and creative magnetism. A mix of Less Than Jake and Reel Big Fish but unique again, the song bounds along with a recognisable air around a creative humidity which fires up into an irresistible persuasion, especially once the outstanding escape of deranged keys occurs.

It is a track, as all to be fair, which feet and voice of the listener are unlikely to resist, a lure across the album which is no more inescapable as in the brilliant Hacks. New wave soaked pop punk meets the spicy flirtation of Bad Manners, the track is an ingenious enslavement of ears and passions based on a ridiculously captivating rhythmic enticing and spicy guitar tempting, all matched in expression and allurement by the punchy vocals. The song tells you all you need to know about The Talks, their inflamed imagination and diverse sound, it all encapsulated in two minutes of instinctively seductive alchemy.

The equally thrilling Tune In steps up next to seize the passions, its opening jangle of chords the lead into a melodic coaxing straight out of the Martha and The Muffins songbook ,which in turn shares its space with swipes of feisty rock and ska sculpted endeavour. As punk as it is ska and adrenaline fuelled rock pop, the song stalks ears with a predacious ingenuity before making way for the smoky presence of Sam, reggae and indie rock embracing in a humid embrace, which in turn leaves for final track Alright with Me to close things up. The last song has blues flair to its keys and a choppy texture to the guitar enterprise shaping the expressive musical narrative, a transfixing croon to bring the album to a fine end and show yet more of the variety and creative depths of The Talks.

It is impossible to listen to Commoners, Peers, Drunks and Thieves just once in one sitting, and certain tracks many more times on top. As stated at the start it is a feel good album but more than that, it is a release from a band to which invention and uncompromising adventure is as instinctive as the rapturous infectious sounds they seem to have stockpiled up inside them.

Commoners, Peers, Drunks and Thieves is available now via All Our Own Records now @ http://www.thetalks.co.uk/store/4575625721

http://www.thetalks.co.uk

RingMaster 25/11/2014

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard from

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G.R.I.M – Answers

GRIM

Having laid down their web of devilish temptation with the Sounds Like These EP, UK experimental rockers G.R.I.M return to increase the irresistible toxicity of their mouthwatering revelry with new single Answers. Again the Manchester hailing quartet twists the essences of numerous styles into their own unique and virulently compelling contagion as the single builds on their striking debut. Creating a stronger and more startling canvas of sound upon which the band sets free a riotous maelstrom of anthemic rhythms, imposing textures, and a psychotically charming inventive seductive, the track is a demon puppeteer to feet and psyche. It unleashes merciless bait throughout, a tempting which holds more unpredictable turns and deranged enterprise than to be found in the dark corridors of bedlam, a proposition which just inspires similarly raucous reactions

Formed in 2011 Great Riddims In Mind, better known as G.R.I.M, took little time in recruiting a fervour soaked local following with their fusion of styles such as dubstep, hip hop, dub, metal, and drum and bass to their sizzling noise rock core. To be fair any labelling is redundant when the foursome of vocalist Lance Hargreaves, guitarist James Glenn, bassist Nathan Larkin, and drummer Kyle Larkin cast their creative net of intensive rhythms, scorching guitar blazes, and vocal chants, and that is just simplifying their songwriting. With a serious reputation for thrilling live performances around their home city across renowned venues such as DryLive, Roadhouse, Sound Control, Antwerp Mansion, and Retrobar, the band certainly raised potent attention with their first release but it is in the outstanding Answers where you feel the trigger to wider recognition lies.

The single opens with a restrained stroking of guitar which is soon aligned to pumping beats and coaxing vocals. It is a skittish recruitment Answersof attention and appetite, sounding out the senses ready for the imminent expulsion of wantonly swinging grooves and wildly adventurous beats ridden by feistily enthused vocals. In full flight the track twists and flirts like a rapacious lap dancer as melodic toxins and hypnotic rhythms veining and puncturing the swerving rampancy. Playing like a meshuga planted by a union of Hadouken!, Lazy Habits, and Great Imitation with the extra relish of Swound!, the track soon has passions enslaved but it is only the start as it swoops into an atmospheric deviation, glorious orchestrated flames reaching to the sky as a Shrikes like disorientation and experimentation works on the senses. That exploration then evolves into a hip hop shaped lunacy, the song lifting its knees to its creative chin to wrong foot assumptions before moving once more into a delicious Mike Patton like invention.

The song continues to entwine those characters whilst adding new aural voices across its riveting climactic body, all the time sending waves of contagion and anthemic fuel into the passions. Seemingly increasing its thumping stride and urgency as it nears its conclusion, Answers is a predatory enticement with cracked intentions and irresistible weaponry which not only realises the promise suggested by the band’s last EP but uncages even greater potential for their sounds and an impending spotlight coated stature which you just know G.R.I.M will be exploiting ahead.

The single also comes with an equally dramatic and thrilling video directed by Joshua Leo Dorfman and produced by G.R.I.M and Fallout Productions. It brings its own enthralling premise and larger than life colour to the song, its story and cast as dynamic and energetically agitated as the thrilling song itself.

G.R.I.M is one of Britain’s most exhilarating and exhaustingly inventive secrets though Answers might just make that a soon to be well recognised mystery.

Check out the Answers video @ https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=k13smeVyrLw

https://www.facebook.com/GRIMcr

https://twitter.com/GRiManchester

10/10

RingMaster 07/05/2014

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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Molotov Jukebox – Carnival Flower

Molotov Jukebox pic

It has already been firmly established that if you want your feet and body exhausted but blissfully contented then colourful UK revellers Molotov Jukebox are your puppeteers, their previous pair of EPs already the launch pad for riotous hips and gaping grins. Now the band parade their debut album, Carnival Flower, an eleven track festival of lyrical adventure and lustful melodies framed in a rhythmic escapade which frees inhibitions and ignites the raw dancer inside. It is a release which tempts and smoulders, caresses and incites as it takes the imagination on boldly hued and energetically fuelled romps. Unlike their previous releases there may be no real killer tracks at large, songs which virulently ignite the passions, but instead the release has a perpetual seduction which just as potently brews an enraptured submission.

Molotov Jukebox is a six-piece celebration of passionate aural festivities merging styles such as Latin soul, calypso, gypsy, swing, and dubstep into a unique revelry which has been tagged as gyp-step. Led by the distinctive sultry tones of Natalia Tena (an actress renowned for her roles in Harry Potter and Game of Thrones), and comprising of guitarist Adam Burke, bassist Tom Wilson, drummer Max Burnett-Wain, trumpeter Angus Moncrieff, and violinist/vocalist Sam Apley alongside her, the band has constantly garnered acclaim whilst inspiring an ever growing and feverish fanbase with their vibrant sound and equally vivacious live shows. Both their debut EPs, Double Dare and especially its successor Bang thrust the band into a concentrated spotlight feistily backed by unrelenting festival appearances, certainly in the past eighteen months or so. Now with the release of Carnival Flower there will be no surprise to see the London based band taking country and bodies further afield by the scruff of the neck and leading them to filling streets and dance halls with swerves and sexual dance moves, all to the sound track of Molotov Jukebox.

As soon as rhythms hit to mark the entrance of opener Tread Softly, an itch begins in the toes. The punchy beats of Burnett-Wain hold a Mol juksmile to their swing which is as infectious as the soon to join warn embrace of strings and the vocal persuasion of accordion caressed into life by Tena. It combines with whiffs of sonically crafted guitar and a percussive coaxing into an even tempered but inciting romp brought further to life by the seducing vocals of Tena within sober blazes of trumpet. It is not a riotous start but an eager persuasion which twists and flirts with sound and ideas to waken attention, appetite, and imagination with ease.

From the slightly annoying fade-out of the song, just a personal gripe in a liking for proper finales to songs, temperature and bait is increased thr0ugh Don’t Wanna Know. A vocal croon by Tena courted by excellent group harmonies beside her, kiss the ears initially providing a sexy flirtation which evolves into an agitated stomp with melodic skirts swishing over the senses as pulsating bass riffs use salacious tempting under the climactic flames of trumpet. As its predecessor, the song is not a full-on stampede of aural diablerie but holds an irresistible anthemic lure which enlists body and passions without resistance. The song simmers and at times almost taunts with rhythmic enterprise and string plucking, everything combining to design an evocative and humid template for addiction.

The band’s new single, Neon Lights steps up next, again gentle sexually inviting suasion starting things off before trumpet and vocals soar gloriously across the ceiling of the song. Veining the flight the bass strolls with inviting shadows whilst keys and accordion add their intrigue and mystique to the noir shaded scenery. It is a sumptuous blaze of colour and sound, a track which just grows and grows in the psyche and memory the more it infests the ears. That is true of the album to be fair, first impressions impressed and keen but a new breed of appreciation and ardour emerges given time; previous releases were an instant lust but the album takes a different longer route but with the same result.

The following Can’t Find You is another slow starter on emotions though a swift temptress of ears and thoughts. Almost like a formula for the album, the song also opens up with reserve and a melodic flutter of its lashes before throwing off its hood for a fleet footed waltz of provocative melodies and wanton hues. A mix of pop and swing, it moves around imagination’s dancefloor arm in arm with flailing hooks and elegant harmonies casting a robust yet sensual toxicity over the senses.

The jazz lounge like bred Punchlines weaves and glances across ears with a rich and soulful fondle lighting up thoughts. It is a graceful flame of emotional melodies and sixties harmonies which leaves satisfaction bulging if passions simmering, though they are soon aflame with the brilliant House Fire Smile. The first surprise emerging from the heralding blaze of trumpet and electro additives is that the lead vocals are taken by Apley, an inspired move as his vocals are impressive and make a brave and successful twist to the album. There is a feel of Lazy Habits and Dizraeli and the Small Gods to the song, a whisper of hip hop toying with the heart of the song as a reverse of the norm vocally throws a deliciously unpredictable and magnetic new coal in the fire of the album. The song has a bounce and swagger to its relatively considered stroll though there is always the feeling it wants to explode. Tena’s voice and a niggling guitar toxin only add to the riveting call of the song, an encounter which steals top honours on the album.

Both the frisky Sexfoot and the smouldering Nina keep hunger lively though both are openly pale against certainly the previous triumph. The first of the pair is like a tempered foxtrot with moments where it unleashes its inner devil whilst its successor with the smokey voice of Tena stroking every syllable and the senses in a steamy seduction courted by a classically bred Latin hearted acoustic guitar sends the imagination into a romantic encounter.

From the exotic gala of Tropical Badboy where even the dead could not resist its carnivalesque voracity, the album comes to a close with firstly the dynamic and atmospheric jubilee of No Lady, a track which finds an eighties whisper of bands like Pigbag to its determined sway of melodic curves and rhythmic hips, and lastly a reworking of Trying, a song previously on the Bang EP. The song is a masterful tempting which just has that instinctive lure to inspire full allegiance and union with its potent musical poetry but it has to be said that the new treatment does not quite work as well as the original. Despite that the track is outstanding and the perfect end to a quite impressive and incendiary release for body and heart.

Though Carnival Flower does not quite live up to definitely Bang, it is an open and thrilling doorway into Molotov Jukebox, both a proposition you need to explore at least once in your life, though be warned as one bite is all it takes to be lost to the temptation of the band.

The self-released Carnival Flower is available now!

http://www.molotov-jukebox.co.uk/

8.5/10

RingMaster 28/04/2014

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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Fuzzy Logic Baby – Glow In The Dark EP

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We suspect that like us Fuzzy Logic Baby is an undiscovered thrill for a great many but with the release of their simply brilliant new EP Glow In The Dark, that surely will change and very soon. The five track thought and passion provoking dance of invention and imagination is with ease one of the most vibrant and exciting releases this year, one that challenges and deviously ignites mind and soul whilst leaving the body exhausted from an impossible to resist temptation to participate in its mighty call.

Combining more flavours than a Michelin starred chef, the London quartet conjure sounds that work on every level leaving an intense temptation which seduces and does naughty things to primal urges. Formed in 2007 from according to their bio, a chance meeting, Fuzzy Logic Baby have developed and honed an innovative brew which is best described as hip hop and grime meets ska and reggae before flirting with punk and rock, or an easier way to imagine is they are like the insatiable hybrid of The Specials and Misty In Roots meeting Dizraeli & The Small Gods and Lazy Habits with The Karma Party whispering in their ears. It is a unique and compelling union of ideas and sounds that sets the band as one of the best emerging talents in the UK, if not anywhere.

Consisting of vocalist Darwood Grace (former member of Poetry collective 3+1 and film maker with the movie It’s A Lot released in cinemas in July), guitarist Jack Hearne, bassist Nicodemus Leo, and drummer James Thackery, the Hackney hailing Fuzzy Logic Baby have left a trail of fired up loyalty through their live performances which has seen them ignite venues around the capital and across the UK as well as sharing stages with the likes of Tinie Tempah, Katy B, Random Impulse, Mikill Pane, Wretch 32, and Professor Green. 2011 saw their impressive debut release, the GoodTimesDotCometh EP an acclaimed and well devoured by the media introduction.  Glow In The Dark is another animal, taking all their promise to new levels of hungry imagination and intrigue and presented with a fluency and skill that makes it all look so very easy.

The release opens with its biggest triumph, though every song and minute of the release walks the heights vertigo sufferers would sweat over. Howling Wolves is pure lyrical and musical alchemy, rhythms, notes, and syllables cast into a spellbinding romp that persuades feet, voice, and emotions to rush to its call with rabid lust, just like a fourteen year old boy to an abandoned copy of Knave (I think that is the name of one of those types of books…). From its first second tempting rhythms are coaxing out total attention as the vocals with a narrative that is impossibly absorbing feed their awakening. The vocals of Grace are outstanding in all forms of delivery and just as impressively backed up by others in the band, though no clarity to whom is found in info accompanying the release. A mischievous stroll that switches gait with every energetic swaggering step, the song is as delicious and richly flavoursome as Cornish ice cream, the mix of funk pressed ska and indie sculpted rock just one glorious aspect.

The following Gangsta In Da AM sidles in with a blaze of trumpet from Gary Annells and guitar teasing before expelling a flame of melodic energy to spark another canter of rhythmic suasion and seductive vitality. There is a Bang Data like sultriness to the reggae tinted amble whilst the vocals again unveil a lyrical tale that captures the imagination as unerringly as the colour soaked sounds. It is like its predecessor a track which has little trouble in leaving thoughts and emotions ablaze but when it kicks out with a punk bred confrontation evolving into a smouldering melodic hue of vocals and stinging guitar play nearing its end, the track is a beacon of excellence and invention. It is a stunning song that with its previous companion alone makes the release an impossibly important addition to the musical year.

There is no let-up though as firstly the current single March On brings another distinct and absorbing landscape to traverse closely followed by the outstanding title track. The first of the pair almost floats across the senses with a moody bass and shimmering melodic haze holding hands with the fine vocals of Grace. There is a firm and commanding lure to the track brought by rhythms and led by voice and bass, its dark charm wrapping a provocative almost intimidating caress around the ear. With the blaze of guitar and the subsequent carnivalesque swing adding extra sustenance to the climax, it all combines to create another unforgettable and thrilling moment in time. Its successor is a stirring mix of gentle melodies and punchy rhythms kissed by vocal harmonies and dazzling imagination that like all tracks on the EP teases and tempts further with a perpetual twist of changing ingenuity and imagination. A slow burning furnace of majesty, the song is arguably the most creative slice of scintillating composing and realisation on the release, standing high amongst nothing but startling invention and craft.

The closing No Problems is a dull and uninspiring track…oh do not be stupid there is no chance of that with Fuzzy Logic Baby on this release, the band once more sculpting a riveting course of musical and vocal juggling that spawns from numerous nefarious mischievous spices and unbridled devilry. It concludes a quite dazzling piece of aural imagining that steps up to challenge any release anywhere as one of the finest in 2013. With a UK tour on the near horizon, Fuzzy Logic Baby is about to take country and continent by storm; watch out world after that.

https://www.facebook.com/fuzzylogicbaby

http://www.fuzzylogicbaby.com/

10/10

RingMaster 04/08/2013

 

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The Karma Party: Dark Matters EP

KP

Standing eye to eye with and snarling viciously at governments, corruption, and the sea of injustices in society and then lyrically ripping their throats out, UK punk-steppers The Karma Party is an emerging force to call foul on the world whilst igniting passions with a fire of irrepressible sounds and electric energy. With debut EP Dark Matters the quartet from Blackpool has set the first aural landmark in their rise towards becoming one of the best incendiary creative confrontations in the country.

Consisting of vocalist Merc, guitarist Scummins, bassist Punkins, and drummer Luke, The Karma Party brews a heady tempest of hardcore, punk and dub-step with flames of electronica burning within the combative storm. It is a distinct sound but take pinches of Sonic Boom Six, King Prawn, Lazy Habits, and the Janice Graham Band with extra spice from Pendulum and you scratch the surface of their invigorating volatile antagonism.

The release takes its first bite with This Is Britain, an attack on the broken country brought with contagion and aggressively 1616807321-1sculpted conciseness. An instant scrub of heavy rhythms and scarring riffs led by the excellent vocals of Merc attach to the ear with a Dead Kennedys like hook entwined around the sinewy core of the track. The song questions and provokes in sound whilst simultaneously challenging with razor sharp lyrics delivered with a bite and accuracy which grips tightly. Melodic keys flame and caress in the skies of the song to add a melodic weave to the muscular senses barracking triumph beneath. As anthemic as you can wish and virulently infectious the song is a dramatic and impressive start.

An opening height easily matched by the following Collapse, the track another insatiably energetic and forceful welcome intrusion on thoughts and passions. From its first breath the song is stomping with purpose through the ear with sonic shots exploding within the brawling energy, openly furthering the already impressive diversity to the imagination of the band. Like all the tracks on the EP, the song is direct and uncompromising but the band ensures that there is a full capture of the listener through heated invention and a delicious maelstrom of ideas and sounds.

Push Forward continues the outstanding conflict whilst expanding the depth and diversity to the songwriting and creativity. Oriental blooms of sounds wrap the ear first to fix attention and intrigue steadfastly before Merc begins the descriptive voice of the track, again a potent statement with unreserved sounds to match. Another punk riot ensues with that oriental seduction continuing to set passions aflame, the song twisting and barging through its purpose with provocative skill and a chorus which resonates with electro pulses. It has an impossibly viral vocal call for which there is no remedy and is proudly another sensational instigator for mind and heart which with its eastern ethnic winds and verbal strength reminds of Asian Dub Foundation at their best.

Completed by They Tell Me, a mesmeric song with drama inspiring keys and sonic mists which stretch across the sound to further the evolving soundscape of the release, and the punk driven defiant riot The Opposition, the EP leaves the listener a churned up and riled force of thought, emotion, and pleasure. Dark Matters is a towering triumph ready to soundtrack and advocate change, something you feel The Karma Party will find an even stronger depth and potency to in the future. A must have release of 2013 which will apply to every year and decade thereafter.

Grab the Dark Matters EP for free @ http://thekarmaparty.co.uk

9/10

RingMaster 05/03/2013

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard from

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Lazy Habits: Self Titled

If there has been an album as inspirational and dynamically outstanding as the new self-titled release from Lazy Habits then we must have missed it. It is simply immense, a release which unleashes energising provocative songs to engage the senses but also one to party to without inhibitions or restraint. Whether the intention, the album plays like a glorious wake to us, a celebration of modern British culture and urban life top and tailed by the opening soulful crawl of Processional and the celebratory feast of Recessional. In between the album unveils honest tales of life with all its barbs and warmth, lyrically and musically, through a sensational mix of hip hop, New Orleans jazz, soul, and Big Band majesty spawned in the 50’s. It is unique and quite brilliant.

The 8 piece Hackney, London based Hip-Hop collective began in 2007 as the brainchild of one MC. Now a formidable and giant imaginative octet, the band has lit up stages alongside the likes of Mos Def, Soulwax, The Specials, Bonobo, Chali 2Na (Jurrasic5), and Beardyman, their onstage energy a colossal live experience once tasted never forgotten, as well as thrilling festivals such as Glastonbury, Bestival, Secret Garden Party, and Electric Picnic with their renowned insatiable energy. Debut EP On the Wagon put them on the radar of the media whilst following single Even Out took them further than ever into radio and TV awareness and attention. The new album is going to bring them national if not further afield recognition or quite simply justice just does not exist.

It would be wrong to say that The RR has a deep knowledge of hip hop but we, like a moth to a flame, never escape the lure of the genre when it is as unique and instinctively adventurous as with this release. The year has treated us to adoration evoking experiences from Shrikes, Janice Graham Band, and Dizraeli and The Small Gods, all showing a conjuration of aural alchemy from a multitude of flavours which is irresistible. Lazy Habits with their own one of a kind magic stand by their side and deep in the heart. The band calls their sound as “Beats, Rhymes and Brass of the highest caliber.” No argument here.

Released through Run ‘N’ Jump Records, the album as mentioned opens with the slow gait of Processional, the breath of the track an emotive warmth brought through the emotive wiles of the brass to leave the senses captivated and ready for the following Ashes. The new engaging treat teases the ear with stabbing melodic strokes as the vocals lay their lyrical prowess across the heated sky of the song. The jazzy gait is a smouldering weave which ebbs and flows like a melodic tide from the horns, at times a soft tender kiss and in others a more playful companion. It is an openly delicious appetizer for what is to follow.

The whole of the release is titanic but two of the loftier peaks come with next up Surface Dirt and aforementioned single Even Out. The first is a smoking blaze of jazz scorched ambience and hip hop preciseness which again leaves the senses in a smouldered embrace. The rhythms and percussion incite a disorientating compliance without losing sight of the licking sonic flames whilst the frenetic climax leaves one breathless with no respite coming from the unbelievably infectious Even Out. It is no surprise the track brought such acclaim for its energetic yet carefully primed viral beckoning. It is a song where one coaxing of the chorus has you in tandem with its flow and intent to join with a sure stance from there on in, and a track which is a lingering joy from there on in.

Every track deserves a mention to be fair, the likes of Perfect Sentence, The Road, and the striking current single Bulletin to name just three, all inventive glories, but personal highlights come with the sumptuous Memory Banks which features the mesmeric tones of songstress Babysol, the titanic Starting Fires, and the magnificent Please People. The first is a delicious dessert of harmonies, provocative bass lines, and elegant passion. It is a seductive love affair for the ear and heart brought through a sharp and finely honed mesh of lyrical licks, distinctly different vocals, and melodic expanse which you can just not let go of. Starting fires has an infamy from having been controversially pulled from national radio playlists last year due to its release unfortunately coinciding with the London riots. It is a beaming storm of aural supremacy with the union of vocalists Babysol,arguably at their finest moment on the album and the fire of the band musically and inwardly at its fullest height. The third of the trio is a spiral of insatiable hooks and orgasmic teasing, a song as catchy as the deadliest virus and as thrilling and senses enlightening as the recovery.

The album will be tagged as hip hop no doubt but it is so much more, that genre one spice in a maelstrom of invention and unpredictable heart fuelling imagination. If mischievous and swinging melodic enterprise with a cutting edge and inciting endeavour appeals than Lazy Habits is your only destination.

http://www.facebook.com/lazyhabits

http://www.lazyhabits.co.uk

RingMaster 25/11/2012

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright