Inwolves – Involves

inwolves-front_RingMasterReview

In music the imagination needs feeding as much as ears and that is certainly what Involves masterfully achieves. The new album from the dark cinematic invention of Inwolves, the release takes the listener on a host of individual journeys and sonically eventful adventures which, whilst carrying their own suggestive dramas, sparks the mind to create its own imagined exploits in tandem. It is one of the most fascinating and provocative collections of aural experiences and sonic explorations for thoughts and emotions to immerse in, and in turn one of the most beguiling listens in a long time.

The project consists of Karen Willems, previously a drummer for a.o. Yuko who has also worked with Dirk Serries on Cycle and the Zita Swoon Group among several side projects, alongside Jürgen De Blonde and Ward Dupan. Their sound draws on the inspiration of seventies “kosmische musik” as it ventures into explorations of electronic and spatial soundscapes drawn from the predominant palette of drums, guitars, and synths textures. To be honest listening to Involves shows that any attempted hint to their music is persistently redundant as each track comes, infests, and seduces the imagination with its own uniqueness. To put it simply, the band creates expansive tapestries of sound and styles which certainly our interpretations can only attempt to provide a clue to.

Involves opens with I Va Va Vimedoom, an initially shadow wrapped persuasion swiftly engaging ears and thoughts with its melancholic synth cast entrance. There is a childlike innocence to the single melody courting the darker hues, though it soon, as the senses, enveloped by the portentous electronic smog that rolls in like stormy invasive clouds. Peace becomes tempestuous, emerging finally again to stand as that lonely initial charm within an absence of everything which shaped its birth.

It is a magnetic thought provoking start, though further contemplation is put on hold as Minimal steps forward next to bewitch and seduce. From its post punk scented electronic opening, exotic melodies and rhythms jostle for attention; eventually sharing ears as a south west Asia flavoured tempting wraps the senses and imagination. Closing eyes and allowing thoughts to wander brings a personal flight across Abyssinian and Mesopotamian landscapes but one surrounded by lurking dangers and encroaching dark times which in turn leads to thoughts to the destruction of ancient sites by modern terrorism.

The track is irresistible, as too is the following sinisterly toned Vladimir. The track is again an imagination nurturing episode on the album’s creative narrative. It easily incites mental and emotional involvement as its popping beats become entangled in a dark web of sonic and suggestive intrigue which blossoms around them. There is a kinetic virulence to the rhythmic shuffle also gripping attention before the track suddenly turns on its head and swims with synths into a dark bluesy and increasingly intensive devouring of the senses. There is a sixties hue to its controlled yet intimidating new tempestuousness, Procol Harum coming to mind initially as streams of orchestral and gothic flames rise up to evoke further persuasion upon the listener.

Strange Waltz provides exactly what its name implies; its opening muggy sonic climate eventually descending into clarity and a slow and flirtatious but again sinister three step shuffle as darkly romantic as it is emotionally apocalyptic, and ridiculously compelling. Maybe not the intention but the instrumental plays like a death dance within the imagination, suggesting and enthralling before the cosmopolitan business of Intown takes the listener down a whole different highway. Krautrock and slimline but pungent industrial essences converge on ears, the analogue embraced romancing of the recording, as across the album, memory provoking as too the bordering on obsessively rhythmic prowess which invites thoughts of bands like Kraftwerk and Neu! to the hypnotic endeavour.

Involves is completed by firstly, the invasively dark and increasingly distressed and psychotic Dirty Monks, a track unleashing a maelstrom of tortured voices and souls within its cathedral spawned ravenously shadowed depths. Its suffocating majesty subsequently makes way for the closing suggestive alchemy of Be Kind. The track is a cosmically spiced venture with Devo-esque tones to its electronics and Landscape like mystique to its discord and melody woven spatial drama. It is also another enslaving attention as it leads ears into a revolving flight of intimate and broad aural stimulation, every turn fresh from the previous with vocals an extra stirring spicing to the array of captivating textures.

It is hard to accurately describe Involves or its individual temptations but fair to say each will feel a unique experience for every singular exploration into a band which specialises in creating, to borrow the last words of their press release, “a world of endless possibilities.”

Involves is out now via Consouling Sounds and @ http://inwolves.bandcamp.com

https://www.facebook.com/Inwolves-266399616750821

Pete RingMaster 30/03/2016

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Meter Bridge – It Was Nothing

Meter Bridge _RingMaster Review

It Was Nothing is the new single from Canadian duo Meter Bridge and a song which again shows the ability of the band to create a sound seeded in eighties synth pop but equally revelling in the genre’s modern invention. It is a quality which was already in evidence and acclaimed in the band’s debut album Slow Motion, from which It Was Nothing is taken, but it never does any harm to remind especially with virulent infestation of ears like this.

Meter Bridge single cover_RingMaster ReviewMeter Bridge is the pairing of Richard Kleef and Jill Beaulieu, a Nelson based duo which came together in 2011 and quickly began picking up a keen following. 2014 saw the release of their self-titled debut EP with Slow Motion coming a year later, both stirring up potent attention on the international electronica scene. The twining of their vocals within rich electronic caresses alone had ears enticed whilst the melodic simmers and livelier eruptions explored only added to the inviting drama of sound in especially the latter release, as now epitomised by It Was Nothing.

References to bands such as Kraftwerk and Ladytron are seemingly a regular comparison to the band, and understandable as the single strolls in with dour yet smiling bass pulses aligned with a flowery breeze of melodic tempting. The contrasting yet potent pairing of Kleef’s dark tones and Beaulieu’s warmer vocal caresses makes for quick magnetism, they enhanced further by a spice of variety which also tempts from within the music as a touch of Landscape smoulders alongside a Human League like air which bridges the two eras of the Sheffield band. Throw in a splatter of Thomas Dolby and Hot Chip and you get a scent of the rich enticement of It Was Nothing.

The single comes with a remix by Rodney Cromwell; a version which in many ways gives It Was Nothing a new side to its character rather than just a makeover. It opens with an Altered Images like electro shimmer which soon takes on a more Visage like nature musically and a Calling All Astronauts sounding adventure to the leaner vocal mix and rawer textures. Though not a big fan of remixes, the track certainly held the ears and appetite as firmly as its source and helps give a new nudge to those still unaware of the band’s synth pop adventure.

It Was Nothing is available now as a name your price download @ https://meterbridgeweatnurecords.bandcamp.com

http://www.meterbridge.ca/   https://www.facebook.com/meterbridgeband

http://twitter.com/meter_bridge

Pete RingMaster 05/02/2016

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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Serpentyne – Myths And Muses

Serpentyne band photo Reputation Radio/RingMaster Review

Listening to Myths And Muses, the new album from British Neo-Folksters Serpentyne, you initially come up with the idea that such its unique sound and individual character it is destined just to appeal to a certain segment of the music world. Yet as each bewitching piece of music spreads its irresistible seduction, there is nothing but a wealth of temptation for varied rock and folk fans through to dance and pop enthusiasts. The release is a spellbinding treat building on an already potent reputation earned by the band but taking everything from creativity to temptation to a whole new level.

Hailing from London and formed in 2010 by Maggie-Beth Sand (vocals, cittole, bouzouki, harmonium, nickelharpa) and Mark Powell (hurdy-gurdy, cittern, electric guitar, vocals), Serpentyne take inspirations from traditional music as well as folk, Celtic, world, and rock onto their own tapestry of adventure. Debut album Stella Splendens in their first year awoke keen attention and acclaim, their fusion of traditional tunes with modern atmospheric and ambient enterprise alongside dance bred vivacity drawing comparisons to the likes of Faun, Blowzabella, Steeleye Span, Gryphon, and Blackmore’s Night. As suggested Myths & Muses is another plateau in imagination and invention for the band with the creative differences between their two albums best offered by Sand, “On our first album, Stella Splendens we took traditional songs and texts in old languages such as Latin, Occitain and Old English, and arranged them in our own way. On our second album Myths and Muses apart from including some new-found traditional songs and tunes, we added original lyrics and music which are sometimes combined with the old tunes. I was particularly interested in writing about women warriors, and other muses that have inspired men and women through history.

CDDF-4P2V-001

CDDF-4P2V-001

Fair to say our knowledge and experience of mediaeval and traditional folk/ethnic sounds is as limited as honesty in government but there is no escaping what we like and it is a done deal between ears, pleasure, and Myths And Muses from the moment opener Boudicca pulsates into view. Its techno seeded start is swiftly a festive saunter of melodic gaiety and more shadowy rhythms. A rest drops in as Sand unveils the first tempting of her magnetic tones and the narrative but soon the song is swinging infectious hips, physically and melodically as an array of instrumentation and vibrant vocal enterprise breeds a riveting dance nicely tempered by the darker tone of keys. A celebration with tribal fuelling rather than maybe the war chant offering you might expect from the title, the track is simply incendiary to body and imagination, and a stunning start to the album.

There is no diminishing of quality and success either as Alexandria takes over, the song again spawned from a tribalistic seed but sauntering down a Middle Eastern landscape within the swish of a camel’s tail. Sultry and elegant, oozing mystique and warm temptation with every spicy melody, the song is as captivating as its predecessor and indeed the following Valkyries. As you would expect from its title, the track has a more urgent and robust nature which drives certainly its techno revelry and as its swings along with virulence, there is a feel of Landscape meets Arkona to the infection, veering more towards one or the other as it continues to entice ears and passions like the Pied Piper.

The medieval song of praise Gaudete is given the Serpentyne embrace next and initially is slightly reminiscent of the famous Steeleye Span version. It is a kiss on the senses eventually evolving into a bolder and busier chant again ripe with the band’s irresistible shamanic enterprise. Its beauty makes way for Hymn To Cynthia, an enslaving and hypnotic interpretation of the Ben Jonson poem of the same name. There is thick drama to the song, the music and vocals pure theatre alone and reinforced by the force of the words; thick forests and boisterous nature the scenery flooding the imagination. The track is sensational, surely destined to be used in a cinematic affair somewhere and when.

The Parisian chanter that is Je Vivroie Liement has senses and emotions basking in tradition and smouldering festivity next whilst the flirtation of Douce Dame Jolie is a romance on the senses with again a more cosmopolitan essence to the music. Both are enthralling interpretations of 14th century songs by French composer Guillaume de Machaut and sheer mesmerism for ears and passions.

Freya’s Firedance is as warm and sultry as its title suggests, a hymn of mystical suggestiveness and beauty crooning the senses before the poem/song A Rosebud In June is hugged and lit by the band. There is another definite Steeleye Span feel to the encounter, Serpentyne being possibly inspired by the formers’ own recording, yet as with all tracks there is little passing time before things develop their own personality and originality.

Myths And Muses is brought to a close by firstly Pastyme With Good Company, an English folk song written by King Henry VIII in the beginning of the 16th century, and finally the medieval sounding Les Garcons De Montagne. Both proposals separate reality from attention with a mystique of the sounds as the joyful and resourceful imagination of Serpentyne soaks every melody, rhythm, and inescapable incitement.

Myths And Muses is pure delight, a proposition everyone should disregard any inbred reticence over, ignoring any assumptions of sound and their seeding. It is basically a rock album from across the ages and without doubt one of the most enjoyable and thrilling encounters we have come across this year.

Myths And Muses is out now digitally and on CD through http://www.serpentyne.com/#!buy-cds/c2267

http://www.serpentyne.com/   https://www.facebook.com/Serpentynemusic

RingMaster 08/06/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard on Reputation Radio @ http://www.reputationradio.net

Machinista – Xenoglossy

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Having set a striking standard with their Arizona Lights EP barely five months ago, Swedish electro/synth pop band Machinista not only confirm the potency and potential of their sound with debut album Xenoglossy, but expand it with an even more rigorously captivating and enterprisingly inventive persuasion. Consisting of eleven tracks which are as boldly fresh and bred of a modern creative climate as they are seeded in an eighties nostalgia, the album is an irresistible blaze of electronic pop, quite simply persistent bait for body, imagination, and emotions to romp and bask in.

Machinista is the creation of Malmö/Kalmar based pair, vocalist/lyricist John Lindqwister (Cat Rapes Dog,Departementet, Basswood Dollies) and musician Richard Flow (ex.Vision Talk, Haze For Sale). Starting the project in the December of 2012 alongside their other bands, the duo instantly gripped attention and keen responses with a cover of David Bowie´s Heroes, which now closes up the new album. Its success and that of their first self-penned release, the single Molecules And Carbon, both accompanied equally appreciated videos, led to an eager spotlight soaking the band not only from fans but media too. Last year the band signed with the Juggernaut Music Group with the Arizona Lights EP their first release this past March. Recently and really before the dust of fervour around the EP could settle, Xenoglossy was uncaged to as mentioned not only reinforce their opening presence but cast a whole new mesmeric spell on the synth pop scene.

From the opening almost warning prod of first track Take Comfort In Being Sad ears and attention are wide awake breeding a just as immediate appetite. Punchy beats thump their coaxing next before keys relax into a melodic sway coveraround those persistently provocative textures. The equally as tantalising voice of Lindqwister is soon caresses the senses too around that jabbing rhythmic punctuation, the mix of forceful tempting and seductive soothing an enthrallingly magnetic proposition. As the song bounces along thoughts of The Cure, certainly vocally and in the shadowed essences which lurk within the bright sounds, and of A-ha musically make their suggestions. It is a masterful start swiftly matched by Arizona Lights. The second song casts a hazy yet crystalline ambience before eager beats and similarly feisty electronic grooves wrap around ears. As with the first track, and the majority of the album, there is a familiarity to the encounter but a recognisable spicing which only enhances the fun and potency of the offerings. Here a Thomas Dolby/Paul Haig like air makes hints as the song unveils its sparkling revelry.

Its lively presence and heart is followed by an initially more reserved and shadowed suasion through Molecules And Carbon, its first breath holding a melancholic spice before opening up into its own vivacious if still slightly reined in dance. Again it is hard to resist adding comparisons to Robert Smith and co, but it is only an appealing hue in the flowing imagination of Machinista. Though not as striking as its predecessors, the song satisfies a by now greed ridden appetite for the release before letting its outstanding successor, Salvation intrigue and seduce the passions. Sporting the irresistible charm and vibrancy of Landscape and poetic melodies of Zero-Eq, the track soars in elegance and beauty, keys and vocals a glowing smouldering climate to immerse in.

An industrial unpredictability and dark air brings the next up Summersault in to view, the track a stirring protagonist with military bred rhythms and an imposing atmosphere of stark and binding incitement. There is also the most vivid cinematic aspect to the song. Each track has that ability to work with the imagination visually it is fair to say but none as voraciously and enthrallingly as here. With drama clad keys and the ever impressing vocals, the song leaves thoughts reminded of Associates and in an evocative grasp before the equally thrilling Pushing The Angels Astray steps forward to sweep body and emotions to their feet for a perfect slice of synth pop. Melodies and hooks blaze away with harmonic resonance whilst rhythms steer the whole thing into the instinctive eagerness of feet and passions. It is the chorus where you lose self-control though, its contagion as toxic as a sunset and just as colourfully entrancing.

Ensuring that pinnacle is not a lone voice in what are nothing but peaks across Xenoglossy, next track Wasted sways and stomps with tenacious enterprise and pop infused vivacity. Featuring guest vocals from Toril Lindqvist of Alice in Videoland, the track is like a flaming collusion between OMD, Blancmange, and MiXE1, and ridiculously addictive. Maybe not quite as gripping but certainly a flavoursome and resourceful coaxing is Love And Hate Song. It has the unenviable task of following the two previous triumphs and does so with a unfussy and minimalistic march covered in a thick and enticing melodic weave which itself is coated in an unpredictable emotive suggestiveness. It is a gentle yet powerful tempting showing another strain of invention and intelligent variation to the album.

The closing stretch of the release is led by the heated emotion and climate of Crash. It is a strong and thought sparking encounter but lacks the spark of earlier tracks even with its Vangelis like flumes of epically honed melodies. It is also left looking pale sandwiched between the last song and slow burning success of The Blues And The Reds. Holding a feel of Pete Wylie to its provocative caress of electronic sound and floating harmonies, the song takes a while to warm up thoughts and emotions but does so to a lingering success.

Xenoglossy is completed by an excellent version of Heroes, and it is easy to see why the track made such a powerful impact with its band introducing release. The Eno/Bowie penned classic is not dramatically changed but given an insertion of electronic teasing and enterprise which brings new inescapable infectiousness to its charm. It finishes off the album in fine and thrilling style. With the fact that despite the praise it is also one of the weaker tracks on the album, it shows the might and impressive adventure across the whole release. Synth pop is an awakening inspiring genre it seems and it is fair to say that Machinista is destined to be one of its leading lights.

Xenoglossy is available now via Juggernaut Music Group @ http://music.juggernautservices.com/album/xenoglossy

http://www.machinistamusic.com/

9/10

RingMaster 08/08/2014

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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Machinista – Arizona Lights

Photo by Milla Randjelovic

Photo by Milla Randjelovic

    Laying out an irresistible invitation into their magnetic synth pop world, Swedish band Machinista provide the most mouthwatering pedigree temptation through their Arizona Lights EP. Consisting of four original tracks and an enterprising clutch of remixes, the release is a dramatically compelling persuasion leaving a rather healthy and greedy appetite for this new genre proposition.

    Machinista is the brain child of John Lindqwister (Cat Rapes Dog, Basswood Dollies) and Richard Flow (Vision Talk, Haze For Sale) who linked up together in the final weeks of 2012. Their first effort was a greedily accepted version of David Bowie´s Heroes followed to equal responses by Molecules And Carbon. Fresh from supporting Henric De La Cour and with a flurry of their own shows coming up this month, the duo seductively hits us right between the eyes in presence and sound with their EP, it one blinding incitement that simply wraps around the passions.

     The ten track limited edition EP through Juggernaut Music Group also makes a masterful teaser for the band’s forthcoming indexalbum. It flirts and plays like a sonic temptress, bringing the richest colourful hues of synth pop past and present into its smouldering depths. The title track swarms into view first with a celestial breath starting things off, a spoken vocal narrating the emerging ambience and golden electronic sun of vibrant sound. The song is soon into a warm and inviting stroll with synth caresses and similarly coaxing vocals embracing the imagination. There is an elegance to the melodies which accentuates the lure of the encounter and a dance in its heart which equally engages body and emotions. It is an undemanding but thoughtfully composed and easy to access electronic waltz, a mesmeric evocation which alone provides perfect bait for band and upcoming full length.

    The outstanding Wasted steps up next and features guest vocals from Toril Lindqvist of Alice In Videoland. Like the first, initial contact comes in an enveloping and this time a haunting almost sinister ambience which takes its time to enjoy its consumption of the imagination. As it explores and sparks those thoughts the song simultaneously breeds a contagion which erupts into the restrained but eager stomp which excites and enthrals. There is also a definite eighties essence to the song, thoughts of B-Movie and Paul Haig hinting along the way.

    The following Salvation ventures more to the scenery of Landscape meets A Flock Of Seagulls with its mischievous and refined croon, pulsating beats and electro throbs magnetising the passions as vocals and melodies wrap their expressive weaves around the riveting canvas of the song. Again there is an energy and appetite to the song which similarly invigorates the senses as the track entwines its bait around the ears. Comparisons as everywhere are mere spices in something uniquely Machinista, their recipe certainly here mouthwatering and hypnotic.

     Pushing The Angels Astray completes the quartet of original songs, continuing the concept of the release which hints at UFOs and Abductions. The song trots through the ears with a vivacious heart and gait to its body as well as a virulently infectious chorus to match the charm of the electronic sculpting. It is a glorious enchantment and exploit for limbs and emotions, the pair at their most virulently persuasive and scintillatingly creative on the release which is confirmed by the delicious acoustic version of the song which swiftly follows.

     The release is completed by a quintet of remixes of its tracks, four of the track Salvation firstly by FutureFrenetic who give it a dancefloor friendly injection of energy followed by an atmospherically immersed treatment from Not Lars, a more chilling rendition through Tactical Module, and a vein throbbing interpretation from 2PM. In the middle of the four IIOIOIOII unveils his wonderfully invasive remix of Pushing The Angels Astray, the artist luring out the deepest textures and emotions of the song.

     With their debut album on the near horizon, Machinista could not have given it a better lead in than the Arizona Lights EP, a release which thrills and intrigues at every turn even through its remixes. Modern synth pop has found itself another exciting protagonist as the genre continues its thrilling revival.

http://www.machinistamusic.com/

http://music.juggernautservices.com/album/arizona-lights

9/10

RingMaster 07/03/2014

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Naked Lunch – Glow

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UK electric rock provocateurs Naked Lunch continue their impressive return with another delicious temptation of electronic enterprise and electro punk seduction through new single Glow. Since reforming in 2012, the band renowned as one of the most influential and provocative founders of UK’s electronic rock scene even in their relatively short presence originally, has already stirred up keen nostalgia and ravenous new adventure with their previous singles Alone and Slipping Again, Again earlier this year but Glow takes things up another step as the band’s most potent moment yet.

Consisting of band founder vocalist Tony Mayo with original members Mick Clark and Cliff Chapman alongside Paul Davies who was in one of the band’s earlier line-ups, and newest members Mark Irvine and Jet Noir, Naked Lunch have easily fitted in with the deeper wealth of electronic bred sounds and genres flirting with the ears today. Having been one of the original starting sparks to the scene way back in 1979, it is not unfair to wonder if the London sextet would struggle to rise above the constant flood of bands and numerous deviations spawned from that original eighties seed of electronic imagination. Their first pair of singles certainly dispelled any doubts whilst Glow shows and suggests there is real potential for the band again to inspire thoughts and sounds of those to come after their shadow.

The single opens with a dazzle of electronic spotlights sparkling within a brewing melodic ambience, an opening caress soon joined by pulsating beats and the grizzled tones of Mayo. It is an absorbing collusion of melodic beauty and the sinister menace of vocal expression, an instant recruitment of the imagination which is licked further into life by the seductive backing support of Jet Noir and the expanding exploratory keys and guitar. The song is a web of enticements and enterprise, never veering from its course but colouring the landscape with magnetic and smouldering creative radiance. The scything strokes of guitar and resourceful synth invention entwine to also enslave the senses from start to finish and with loud whispers of Yello and more so Landscape to the unique voice of the song, it is pure addiction making contagion.

The single also comes with two remixes, the first a riveting interpretation from Farmacia bringing a darkly flowing sinister breath to the track and the second an expansive techno version provided by Technomancer. Though neither matches the original, both and the first of the two especially, crafts a new pleasing facet to the songwriting and composition of the song.

Glow is Naked Lunch on a pinnacle, debatably their loftiest since day one many decades ago and another reason why it is easy to assume the band will be again leading new bands and artists into musical temptations to embrace and help fuel their own invention.

http://nakedlunch.org.uk/

9/10

RingMaster

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PREHUMANITY- Death Wave

Prehumanity 2

A crawling intensive examination of the senses and psyche is the best way to describe Death Wave, the second album from industrial/electronic/rock band PREHUMANITY, or as it is also tagged death wave. It is a striking and deeply pleasing encounter which is as impressive as it is abrasively uncomfortable, and thoroughly compelling.

The band is the project of Alexander K. Harris, an artist who before PREHUMANITY fronted numerous punk and metal bands, flavours which also add their harsh essences to the album. Starting up the project in 2008, Seattle based Alexander primarily took influences from electronic and death rock bands and released three EPs though they were only available at live shows and online which grabbed the attention of a great many. Continually assessing and writing material whilst performing live with additional musicians, the debut album Not So Becoming was released in 2011 to strong responses. Moving to LA the following year, Alexander wrote and recorded 70% of the follow up as well as recruiting percussionist Seage to the mix for live shows in the city. Completed after additional refining and re-recording of some vocals once he had moved again, this time to Raleigh in N Carolina, Death Wave had its release at the tail of the year. The album has a horror tainted heart and sound which is soaked in the new wave and gothic spices of the eighties and a modern harsh electro/industrial imagination. It is a feisty and bruising confrontation with constant rewards from its intensive violations.

Better Broken opens up the encounter with pulsating beats and a prowling intimidating synth pressuring the ear. Soon into its Prehumanitydefined step the track then brings in a melodic hook which immediately reminds of eighties band Visage and as the track spreads its sonic touch and melodic caresses it takes one back to those vibrant times three decades ago with one foot still firmly entrenched in the powerful wells of today’s sinewy sounds. The track is best described as Specimen and Alien Sex Fiend, a band the album often harkens to, caught in an uncompromising position with Landscape whilst Cease2xist is looking on adding its own intrusive thoughts. A compelling and infectious assault the track is an excellent start to the release soon matched by its successor.

As soon as the stomping strokes of Pills breaks the brief silence between tracks the senses are under an electronic barracking from within a thick cloud of energy. As with the opener the vocals of Alexander are a caustic lashing upon the ear. Expressive and impassioned they are an uncompromising grazing which opens the gateway to darker shadows to join those already lit by the again contagious sounds. Taking a more Skinny Puppy/Ministry gait with a hungry blackened intent the song alongside its predecessor makes one greedy for more and more from the release which of course the album happily and spitefully provides.

The doom encrusted Calling with its brew of Sex Gang Children and Nine Inch Nails like erosive melodic squalls and the thick predatory consumption provided by the metallic Bad Things ignite further intrigue and passion for their inventive contention sparking carriages but it is the track which splits them which almost all alone ensures PREHUMANITY and the album has a permanent stature in our personal playlist. Blood Soaked Suits disorientates with dazzling sonic expulsions before unleashing a rampage of insatiable intensity and invigorating energy, though it erodes as equally as it sparks the body and emotions into unreserved life. With towering rhythms, further caustic vocals, and a wonderful unsettling discord wash to the melodic imagination to the track, the song is a memorable and irresistible bruising with only its briefness a niggle for the hunger it incites.

The excellent Single File with its cavernous depths and ravenous breath not to mention viral sonic teasing is a weave of thunderous energies and heavyweight textures which leaves one exhausted and glowing under its blistering heat. It is only the appetizer though as the equally oppressive and intense Vote With Your Dollars brings further aggressive rage to the canvas of the album. The closing track though offers a warmer melodic coaxing to its rampant storm of stomping dynamics and destructive layers. Like early Young Gods if it also contained Marilyn Mansion, Gary Numan, and John Foxx is a way of describing the expansive sound of the track and it makes for a riotous and challenging end to an outstanding release.

PREHUMANITY wears its influences openly yet turns them into something new and refreshing. Death Wave is an album which all from electronic through industrial to metal fans will find plenty of pleasure from, it is just immense.

http://www.prehumanity.com/

http://facebook.com/Prehumanity

RingMaster 11/01/2013

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright