The Decline – Resister

The decline_RingMaster Review

Third album in and Australian skate punksters, The Decline, continue to offer contagion fuelled stomps that simply rouse up the spirit. Resister is packed to the rafters with imagination crafted and wholly magnetic propositions, tracks which only want to offer a good time whilst uncaging a lyrical substance easy to get involved with. Pop/skate punk boundaries are certainly not worried too forcibly by the thirteen track adventure but any resistance to its unstoppable virulence is swiftly dead in its invigorating waters.

Formed in 2006, the Perth hailing quartet made its first strong attention grabbing mark with debut album I’m Not Gonna Lie to You in 2010, an encounter straight away pushing the band towards international awareness. Its acclaimed successor of the following year, Are You Going To Eat That, helped spark the opportunity for The Decline to undertake a headlining tour of Europe as well as a Japanese tour with Israeli pop-punkers Useless ID and So-Cal 90’s super band Implants. Across the years the band has continued to share stages with the likes of Descendents, Unwritten Law, Frenzal Rhomb, Propagandhi, Bodyjar, Bouncing Souls, Anti-Flag, Lagwagon, No Use For A Name, No Fun At All, Guttermouth, and The Flatliners, they amongst a great many others. 2014 saw the release of the crowd-funded Can I Borrow A Feeling EP as well as another hectic tour schedule whilst after a line-up shuffle earlier this year, The Decline set about recording Resister, its immediate unveiling coming just before the band hits the festivals Punk Rock Holiday in Slovenia, Munich’s Free and Easy Fest, and Rebellion, the latter one part of a UK tour running through August. With further global shows in the offing too, Resister provides the most potent incentive to check the band out and make this a summer of insatiable romping.

Resister Artwork_RingMaster ReviewThe release opens with New Again, a short, punchy encounter which quickly sets the creative scene for the album. Jangling melodies flirt with muscular rhythms whilst the potent vocals of guitarists Pat Decline and Ben Elliott unite and entwine across the tenacious start to the album. There are no surprises but plenty of fiercely flavoursome sounds setting up ears and appetite for the following Giving Up is a Gateway Drug, the first single from Resister. With the thumping beats of Harry steering the song into view, his drums a blur of activity, the song twists and turns with emotion and energy. Every second is a tempestuous and easy persuasion for ears, vocals again slightly outshining the sounds, but all aspects crafted with inventive and unpredictable elements.

As strong as its start is, Resister kicks up another gear or two from I Don’t Believe onwards. Featuring guest vocals from Cameron Baines of Bodyjar, the third track boldly enters on rolling anthemic rhythms, they in turn laced with sonic spicing from the guitars before it all colludes in one seriously infectious incitement. A whiff of older schooled punk embraces poppier exploits resulting in a rigorous and pungent anthem swinging punches at the music scene and stirring up new hunger for the release. It is an appetite fed just as healthily and fully by Almost Never Met You, a song littered with tangy riffs, sparkling hooks, and the ever impressing vocal combination. The throaty bass twang of Ray Ray as good as steals the show but is matched all the way by the spices just mentioned and a Green Day meets Bodyjar essence coating the excellent encounter.

Both The Blurst of Times and You Call This A Holiday? keep the album’s new levels roaring in ears and thoughts, the first with fiery atmosphere and attitude to body and voice, and the second through its seamless and magnetic passage from a riveting acoustic/vocal lure into another throttle to the floor ball of creative and physical energy. Each, but especially the former, has an air of The Living End to the full-blooded tempting whilst Camberwell Street straight after, explodes with a richer hardcore but melody drenched escapade. It does not quite live up to its predecessors, but again with skilled endeavour and ideation spicing every aspect the song, hits the spot nicely before making way for the similarly successful Broken Bones.

The thickly pleasing Wrecking Ball fires up the passions, even with its opening barbershop skit. Subsequently into an unbridled bellow of aggression and explosive energy, the track is an easy persuasion of rippling rhythms, inescapable hooks, and more potent vocal combinations. But as good as it is though, it gets over shadowed by the outstanding You’re Not The Waitress, another pop infused punk tempest which is pure contagion.

The thirty second Little Voices is more of the same, revealing a similarity to the previous track and others around it without losing its individual potency during a short tenure of ears. It stirs the emotions nicely which Underworld Tour takes on a thrilling ride straight after with its NOFX/Motion City Soundtrack/ Set Your Goals like fusion of sound and imagination. Again rousing is the best word to describe its heavy satisfaction breeding character as it leaves the listener on a high ready for the closing catchy onslaught of Start Again. The song sums up The Decline sound perfectly, melodically hot, energetically sizzling, and creatively lively in a gripping finish to a fine album.

As suggested earlier, major surprises come in rare batches across Resister yet few moments truly feed expectations and every song is a galvanic exploit hard to turn away from. That certainly works for us!

Resister is available now through Pee Records (Australia) @ https://peerecords.bandcamp.com/album/resister, Bird Attack (USA) @ https://birdattackrecords.bandcamp.com/album/resister-4, and Cargo Records (Europe/UK).

The Decline UK tour dates:

Sat 8th – The Maze, Nottingham

Sun 9th – Rebellion Festival, Blackpool

Mon 10th – New Cross Inn, London w/ MDC (Millions of Dead Cops)

Wed 12th – Brudenell, Leeds w/ MDC (Millions of Dead Cops)

Thu 13th – The Hope And Ruin, Brighton

Fri 14th – Owl Sanctuary, Norwich w/War On Women

Sat 15th – Nice N Sleazy, Glasgow

Sun 16th – Exchange, Bristol w/ Teenage Bottlerocket

Mon 17th – The Fighting Cocks, Kingston

https://www.facebook.com/TheDeclineMusic   http://www.thedeclinemusic.com/

RingMaster 03/08/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard on Reputation Radio @ http://www.reputationradio.net

 

Versus The World – Homesick Roadsick

LORES Versus The World _Reputation Radio/RingMaster Review

If you are already a fan of US punk rockers Versus The World, new album Homesick Roadsick probably holds few major surprises and if a newcomer to the band, it will be found to healthily recall the pop punk exploits cultured and famed within California over past decades,. For all though, it will be a thoroughly magnetic proposition containing the most rounded and mature songs from the band yet. The release rumbles and strolls along with open contagion and undiluted passion to whip up attention and rich satisfaction, and though it might not prove to be the best punk release this year, it certainly reveals itself as one of the most enjoyable and memorable.

The third album from the Santa Barbara quintet sees the band returning to Kung Fu Records, the home of their self-titled debut full-length of 2004. As its predecessors, Homesick Roadsick was recorded with Bad Astronaut guitarist and producer Thom Flowers and as last album Drink.Sing.Live.Love in 2012, mixed by Ian MacGregor (Katy Perry, All-American Rejects). Fair to say that Versus The World has boldly and inventively grown in presence and songwriting since those early days, honing a vivacious sound setting them apart from the pop punk crowd, even with its recognisable inspirations. Now the line-up of band founders, vocalist/guitarist Donald Spence, bassist Mike Davenport (ex- The Ataris), guitarists Chris Flippin (Lagwagon) and Tony Caraffa (Murderland), and drummer Bryan Charlson have explored new depths and potency to it with Homesick Roadsick and conjured up another treat

It opens with The Santa Margarita, a song written by Spence for Tony Sly, the late frontman for No Use For A Name. Featuring guest Dave Hause, the track quickly has ears in a fiery embrace of raw riffs and sonic tempting driven by the forceful beats of Charlson. Hooks, musically and vocally, stir ears and attention, the song swinging along with an infectious manner and an incendiary energy in its builds to and eruptions of mini crescendos. The song is rich captivation, a rousing start continued by the less urgent but swiftly as flavoursome stirring of The Black Ocean. Heavy scythes of riffs pounce on the senses first, their inviting bait bound in tangy tendrils of guitar as the impressive tones and delivery of Spence croon with expressive passion. More a smoulder than the kind of roar expressed by the previous song, it rises to breach the same creative and gripping plateau before A Storm Like Me unveils its controlled but rousing anthem. Its chorus is an inescapable lure soon involving the listener whilst the guitars, as the vocals across the band, whips up the imagination and appetite with ease.

HSxRS_Vinyl_Front_Reputation Radio/RingMaster Review     Seven Thirty One bounds in expelling emotive flames and tenacious exploits like a mix of The Ataris and Billy Talent next. It quickly sets another peak in the landscape of Homesick Roadsick, the bass of Davenport a dark seduction speared by the volatile swings of Charlson as the guitars of Flippin and Caraffa ooze spicy enticement and fiery persuasion. Further fuelled by the excellent vocal delivery of Spence, the track is raw flirtation followed by both the inventive A Brooklyn Rooftop and the addictive qualities of A Sight For Sore Eyes. Neither song can quite match up to their predecessor but each grips ears and enthrals attention with their dramatic and skilled propositions, especially the latter with its initial and lingering Ruts like jagged riff. It also has one delicious shadow rich bassline amidst a web of melodic and harmonic drama, a combination as fascinating as the songwriting bearing them.

The album’s title track is an initially headstrong rampage setting emotions and appetite aflame, and even though it dips slightly once evening out its attack as melodies and vocals emerge to climb all over ears, it remains a raucously emotive and physical tempest leaving pleasure full and greedy for the just as sizeable and persuasive presence of Bullet Train. Expectations are fed a little by the structure and invention of the track, but with another grouchily incendiary bassline, swirling guitar enterprise, and a vocal resourcefulness which only wins plaudits, the song makes a highly satisfying proposal before being overshadowed by the excellent Detox Retox. Davenport’s bass is carnivorous in tone, his adventurous and thrilling designs increasingly open and potent in the second half of the album, whilst guitars spiral from ravenous riffs into fiery entrails of sonic imagination driven by the energetic whipping of beats. It results in, as the album, an encounter which does not shake the boundaries of punk and maybe the band’s existing originality but leaves the listener encased in fresh enterprise

There is no lessening of enjoyment in the closing pair of songs either, Self Preservation Is Killing Us All first to flame with sonic and melodic dexterity before Our Song offers one final thick bellow of rock ‘n’ roll. They ensure a fine end to another invigorating offering from Versus The World. Homesick Roadsick is undoubtedly the band at its best, though there are times across the album where it seems to hold check on invention heading towards new and potentially startling doorways. It is an album to constantly please and enjoy nevertheless, and a highly pleasing success in anyone’s book.

Homesick Roadsick is available from June 23rd via Kung Fu Records digitally and on Vinyl/CD @ https://versustheworld.bandcamp.com/album/homesick-roadsick

Versus The World Summer UK/EU Tour Dates w/ Strung Out:

30.06.15 DE Berlin – Cassiopeia

01.07.15 DE Cottbus – Gladhouse

02.07.15 DE Erfurt – Eburg

03.07.15 CZ Mighty Sounds Festival

04.07.15 DE Aachen – Musikbunker

05.07.15 FR Paris – Le Petit Bain

06.07.15 UK London – Underworld

07.07.15 UK Manchester – Ruby Lounge

10.07.15 UK Brighton – The Haunt

11.07.15 BE Ostend – Elysee

12.07.15 DE Saarbrucken – Garage

14.07.15 IT Milan – Circolo Magnolia

15.07.15 CH Geneva – Usine

+ More TBA Soon!

http://www.versustheworld.com/   https://www.facebook.com/vstheworldmusic

RingMaster 23/06/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard on Reputation Radio @ http://www.reputationradio.net

 

Gone By Friday – Quarter-Life Crisis

GlamourByFriday

Having grabbed attention with debut album Noisetank in 2011, New York pop punksters Gone By Friday have taken their time with its successor, whether by choice or not, but now return with Quarter-Life Crisis and it is fair to say that the band has upped the ante in sound, adventure, and fun.

The Queen’s quartet has discovered a new vivacity and energy in songwriting and sound, and they were no slouches there anyway as their last album proved. The eight tracks making up Quarter-Life Crisis simply leap at ears with a creative and imaginative vitality yet still retain the raw touches and essences which helped the band stand out in the first place. There is a maturity to the release which translates as contagious invention and whilst the release is still pop punk in its core form it captivates with raucous charm and fevered enterprise.

Formed in 2009 and tapping inspirations from the likes of Bouncing Souls, Greenday, Lagwagon, Rancid and Blink 182, Gone By Friday soon found their feet in the New York underground scene. The FreEP, a free to get EP and their live presence soon gripped ears and appetites, as well as establishing a base for their sound which Noisetank potently built upon. Now with another leap, Quarter-Life Crisis is here to re-ignite their tempting of new and broader awareness, and it gets off to a stomping start with The Hadean. The track opens on a blaze of guitar riffs which instantly has an old school punk/seventies R&B persuasion before muscular rhythms and scythes of sonic colour add to the heavily enticing start. There is a heavy rock essence with a touch of Sum 41 to it also, though it is not long before the pop punk heart of the track is romping with melodic infectiousness. The throaty basslines of Sean Ho provide their own striking bait within the encounter, but only matched in potency by the swinging beats of drummer Chris Berardi around the guitar enterprise of Peter Berardi and Billy Kupillas, with the latter’s vocals similarly bringing rich lures.

GBFcover   The strong start is swiftly matched by the raucous revelry of It All Starts With Me, a thumping stomp of a song with grouchy basslines and addiction forging hooks galore. At only a handful of seconds past a minute in length, it is far too short but still provides a tsunami of contagion and energy to exhaust and thrill without reservation. The sigh of disappointment at its brief tenure is soon forgotten once the clunky riffs and anthemic tenacity of Poison Jam steps up to ignite ears and energies all over again. There is an open familiarity to the song yet it matters little as its catchy devilry embraces body and emotions with insatiable energy and creative appetite, a mix driving the release as a whole.

600 Miles opens on a delicious acoustic enticing next, guitar and voice an immediately engaging proposal backed by the percussive and broader sonic imagination brewing away within the energetic croon of a song. Though it does not quite generate the more heightened reactions of its predecessors, the song leaves satisfaction full and appetite greedier, wants fed with gusto by Say My Name and the album’s title track. The first of the two is another acoustically opened encounter but straight away has rawness to it, a scowl of sorts which bursts into a fiery and aggressively melodic provocation. Its successor soon outshines it though, its opening dance of once more acoustically bred riffs carrying a Latin tempting which in turn ignites a voracious and welcoming tempest of compelling hooks, anthemic vocal harmonies, and irresistible nineties inspired persuasion. The song is a glorious rampage which alone sums up all you need to know as to why Gone By Friday makes for a thoroughly fulfilling feel-good proposal.

The album closes with The Story So Forgotten, a track like the last which feels like an old friend in familiarity but a brand new acquaintance in sound and temptation. It’s increasingly building and almost volatile anthemic intensity brings Quarter Life Crisis to a mighty conclusion, followed by another sigh that it is all over before fingers twitch and submit to pressing play again.

If the likes of Goldfinger, The Bouncing Souls, and Blink 182 whet the appetite then Gone By Friday have a treat for you, but equally they offer plenty to entice and please all pop punk fans within Quarter Life Crisis, so off you trot…

Quarter Life Crisis is available now @ http://gonebyfriday.bandcamp.com/

https://www.facebook.com/gonebyfriday

RingMaster 01/04/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard on Reputation Radio @ http://reputationradio.yooco.org/

Zoo Harmonics – Business In The Front…Party In The Back

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Creating a flavoursome and captivating fusion of alternative and punk rock with a power pop vivacity, Israeli rockers Zoo Harmonics may not set the passions blazing but certainly with new album Business In The Front…Party In The Back, they leave a very healthy and hungry for more appetite in its wake. There are no major surprises within the sound and body of the release but equally there is plenty which is refreshingly inventive and individual to the Tel Aviv quartet to make them a compelling work in progress.

Written and recorded across 2012 with producer John Goodmanson (Blond Redhead, The Blood Brothers), Business In The Front…Party In The Back contains eleven tracks which roar and mischievously tease with accomplished invention and slightly warped imagination. It instantly and continually backs up the reputation the band has forged since forming through their live presence at home and across the UK and Europe. The band’s sound has been referenced to the likes of Bayside, Brandtson, No Use For A Name, and Lagwagon, something the album does confirm though we would suggest they are more akin to Russian punks/rockers Biting Elbows with a devilish squeeze of System Of A Down for good measure.

The album swiftly slams into ears and attention with Stemweder Open Air, the opener rife with scythes of acidic riffs across thumping rhythms ridden by the strong vocals of Dror Goldstein. It is potent and infectious bait which subsequently relaxes without losing its urgency and lure into a melodic shuffle with country twanged banjo. It is a mild twist though in the relentless stomp and energy of the song, the guitars of Goldstein and Ron Minis expelling catchy riffs and hooks whilst the bass of Tal Levi provides a great throaty tempting and enterprise. It is a song which dares feet and emotions to remain unaffected by its irrepressible contagion, something neither is able to do of course.

The great start is matched by Henry & Claire, another catchy web of spiky hooks aligned to anthemic rhythmic enticement from drummer Priel Horesh. Equally there is a melodic mellowness and warmth which has its say within the 10264299_512940428834136_3915992718798314287_ntrack’s otherwise riveting agitation of sound and ideation, everything combining for a second thrilling and potent anthem to put the pressure on the next up Awake At Night to emulate. Though it lacks the spark of the first pair, the song still strolls with an unrelentingly catchy and inviting countenance to capture ears and imagination before the slightly rawer presence of Ipek makes its play for attention. It is a strong and pleasing track but offering little to set it apart from the pack, unlike its predecessors. Nevertheless it is a thoroughly enjoyable tempting to feet and appetite just as its successor Bring Me Back, a pop punk canter with quickly accessible charm and energy cast in a less intensive presence which as the previous song, keeps the album’s party feistily alive.

The opening of Butterfly does not quite convince, guitar and vocal alone attempting to lure in the listener but once the band explodes with a blaze of sinew driven beats and fiery riffs, the track is a fiercely enticing proposition wrapped in the rich individual and group vocals of the band. It twists and flirts with intriguing ideation and open enterprise to make an enthralling and impressing imaginative offering, a triumph straight away matched by the excellent Club Sin(atra), a song with a loud whisper of Red Hot Chili Peppers, certainly to its entrance, and a feel of Smashmouth to its emerging creative tango.

On My Own launches its engrossing drama and ingenuity with immediate agitated relish. Its entrance charges into the passions with an urgent addictiveness lying somewhere between My Chemical Romance and Fall Out Boy, before weaving and flirting with a stunning mesh of ideas and gripping adventure right up to its final note. The best track on the album, it leaves a lofty benchmark for the rest of the album to match and the band to emulate in their journey ahead.

All Amazing Songs takes the touch task to follow the peak in its stride and straight away forges its own heights, bass and vocals from an opening bright flame of sound, prowling with emotive tension and drama over thoughts and passions. It is a bewitching track with aggression and elegance all boiled up into another unpredictable and anthemic tempest. As the earlier mentioned Biting Elbows, Zoo Harmonics have the knack and ability to write and sculpt truly magnetically unpredictable and inventive songs just not on the same consistent level. What they can do with unrelenting skill is create attractive and infectious propositions as shown by their album and the final pair of songs. He Wishes He Knew is a radiant and melodically seductive croon which holds full reign over ears and emotions from start to finish whilst closer Romania is simply an addictive stomp regaling in the exploits of touring the source of its title.

Both make a varied and highly enjoyable finale to an album which from start to finish leaves a heavily satisfied pleasure in its wake and at times reaches heights which suggests that Zoo Harmonics has the skills and ingenuity to become a big inspiring player in global punk. As suggested surprises may be rare on Business In The Front…Party In The Back but fun and thrills are bulging assets of the album.

Business In The Front…Party In The Back is available via Pet Harmony Records now @ http://zooharmonics.com/?audio=business-in-the-front-party-in-the-back

http://zooharmonics.com/

RingMaster 14/10/2014

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard from

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Frost Giant: When Myth and History Merged into Mystery

Cover

Though it has been out a few months digitally and now physically, When Myth and History Merged into Mystery the debut EP from Pennsylvanian rock band Frost Giant has only just surged to our attention and thank goodness it has as to miss something this good would have been a travesty. Forging a sound from a merger of Viking metal and nineties hardcore, yes you read that right, the release is simply sensational. It is wholly unique and works on every level for an encounter which is engaging and thrilling. It just ignites the heart and recruits the senses into a full and energetic compliance to its imaginative and insatiable storm.

Formed by vocalist/guitarist Matti Frost in late 2005, Frost Giant has been a solo and at times a full band project merging European folk metal with melodic hardcore and So-Cal infused punk rock.  It is a stunning sound which can be best described as Tyr and Korpiklaani in a drinking contest riot with Biohazard and Agnostic Front whilst the melodic cheers of Billy Talent and Lagwagon egg them on. It is an exciting and stirring mix which offers great diversity and originality and the EP which basks in it, easily one of the best releases this year.

Released through Blasphemour Records, the release finds Frost joined by guitarists Jonathan Smith and Scott Breustedt, bassist Jason Esbensen, and Rich Berends on drums, and consists of five slabs of muscular delight which take no time in lighting up the ear and beyond. First to barge through to the senses is My Life for Yours, a thumping weight of stretching sinews, barracking rhythms, and heated melodic grandeur. It is an instant lure for the passions, its classic rock groove veining intense energy and a predatory urgency hungry for a kill. The vocals are a contagious mix of clean and growling might with the often joint tones of Frost and Smith anthemic and harmonically glorious. The unrelenting charge of the song drops midway to bring an expansive wrap of intense and tempestuous atmosphere scorched with an epic guitar solo fire. Ending in the same drinking song style as it started and recalling the cold wastelands and warrior honour, the track is a titanic start to the release and equalled continually.

A Common Son opens with outstanding vocal harmonies before sending weaves of sonic invention and gentle melodic coaxing through the ear. It is a trick though, a wicked aural sleight of hand as soon the band explodes from another teasing melodic stroke into a brawling confrontation of hardcore vocals and surging flesh lashing power metal type riffs. That is not the end of it though as Frost Giant insert masterful and inciting melodic vocals and sirenesque sonic charms across the raging sky of the song. Not as infectious as the first it is still an impossible to resist bruising which leaves one breathless and wanting so much more.

The magnetic stirring rhythms of Heathen’s Lament are just one seductive lure of the song, its rampant and inventive presence a magnet for heart and mind. The consistent quality of the guitars with their barbed melodicism and mischievous manipulations hold the passions tight whilst being buffeted by raucous basslines and beats, the combination an irresistible taunt. Imagine Bad Religion and Ensiferum linking up and you get a whisper of the genius going on within song and EP.

The release is completed by the punk rock tempest Not While I Draw Breath and a cover of the Adele song Someone Like You. The first of the pair again is an insatiable pleasure which flays the senses whilst swamping them with rich rewards. It is like being serenaded whilst being dragged into the bedlam of a ravenous maelstrom, the harmonies and melodic enterprise soothing and offering safety against the scurrilous intensity and rampant hungry sounds. The closing track did bring a slight groan when reading the track list, a moan which turned into awe within mere seconds. The band turn the song into a skate punk treat with fiery muscles and snarling energies pulling essences from the likes of Danzig and especially Volbeat into the mix. It is an excellent end to a staggering release, simple as.

If you want something new and innovative out of your folk metal or melodic hardcore than Frost Giant and the When Myth and History Merged into Mystery EP is a must investigation which will leave you drooling at the mouth. This is one release no one should miss.

https://www.facebook.com/frostgiantkills

RingMaster 18/12/2012

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright