Slipping through the Plastic Barricades

Just recently we had the fun of exploring Mechanics of Life, the new album from London alt indie trio Plastic Barricades, finding it a ‘collection of melody spun songs which entice with craft and warmth’. Offered the chance to get to the core of album and band we had the pleasure of quizzing Dan Kert, the Plastic Barricades vocalist/guitarist/keyboardist and one of the band’s founders, exploring the heart of their writing, sound, and album amongst many things…

Hi Dan, can you first introduce the band and give us some background to how it all started?

I had several different line-ups under Plastic Barricades moniker over the good part of the last decade, the current line up with Daniele Borgato on bass and Frazer James Webster on drums is active for 4 years. We’ve met through mutual friends at the ICMP (Institute of Contemporary Music Performance) in North-West London and dived straight into gigging and recording.

Have you been or are involved in other bands before? If so has how has that impacted on what you are doing now?

We’ve all played in different bands before, still mainly rock music. All those experiences definitely find their way into our current sounds, helping us to explore new territories.

What inspired the band name?

We’ve once built a fort out of plastic cups in the studio, the rest is history….

Was there any specific idea behind the forming of the band and also in what you wanted it and your sound to offer?

[The] Desperate need to write, record, and perform music. You cannot really do it on your own, unless you are called Ed.

Do the same things and desires still drive the band from when it was fresh-faced or have they evolved over time?

Pretty much…We are in a band because we always wanted to be in a band. But we’ve learned a lot of life lessons along the way and try to find fresh angles to approach certain things, like tour booking, recording or songwriting, for example.

Since those early days, how would you say your sound has evolved?

This is very hard for us to judge. But if you go to our website (http://www.plasticbarricades.eu/ ) you can hear everything we’ve ever released over the last 10 years, there is a lot of diversity in there.

Would you say your sound organically grows and evolves or moves more because the band deliberately goes out to try new things?

I would say it’s both. We all tend to get bored very quickly, so we do like to experiment. At the same time we are growing as musicians and people, so that reflects in the music for sure.

Presumably across the band there is a wide range of inspirations; are there any in particular which have impacted not only on the band’s music but your personal approach and ideas to creating?

Kurt Cobain and his sincerity definitely had a big impact on me personally and on PB as a band. But also the staggering emotional intent of The Shins, Death Cab for Cutie, Razorlight, Coldplay, Muse, Biffy Clyro and others.

How does the songwriting process work within the band?

There are two main approaches…record the jam, then edit the bits we like and rework them into a song. This is how several songs on Mechanics of Life LP were conceived. But most of the time it is a chord progression and a vocal melody with lyrics. The song has a title and the meaning well before it is finished musically.

Where do you, more often than not, draw the inspirations to the lyrical side of your songs?

The world around us has so many inspiring and thought-provoking stories, that all you have to do is just let them in, absorb and breathe them into songs. But some songs of the Mechanics of Life album have been inspired by the genius of Hemingway, Orwell, Huxley, Murakami and others.

Could you give us some background to your new album?

Mechanics of Life, released digitally worldwide on the 14th of September, is a culmination of about 3 years of work in our backyard Shed Studio. It is a collection of 11 stories that take the listeners through the world we live in today, gently poke them and ask them to step up their game, go out and make a difference. Like our dear Dani (bass guitar) once said – “Humans didn’t come with a manual, so we came up with one“.

How about a closer insight to the themes behind it and its songs?

The album starts with the song we usually end our gigs with called How Goldfish Grow. It is based on a simple fact that if you take a goldfish and you find a big tank for it – it will grow BIG! The environment affects the size of the goldfish, the same way as our environment affect our own growth. There is a funny animated music video for this song on our YouTube channel. Then we sing about artificial intelligence helping humans get their s**** together (Singularity-2045), being able to reinvent yourselves again and again (Our Favourite Delusions), caring about the environment and throwing all the mindless consumerism away (Be the Change), looking back and overthinking it instead of moving forward (Around the Sun), searching for meaning (Needles in Haystacks), shining a light to show others the way (Shine!), finding the one intended for you (Half of your Soul), Big pharma conspiracy (Medicine Man) and mental illness (Voices). The last song of the LP – Masterminds – kind of summarises the whole experience, reminding everyone that they are the ones responsible for the things happening around them – and they can take back control!

Are you a band which goes into the studio with songs pretty much in their final state or prefer to develop them as you record?

We usually have basic parts in place (guitars, bass, drums, vocals) but we do add textures and layers on the go, depending on what the actual song needs. It is interesting how different the same song can sound live vs. recorded. We try to work with the recording, giving the song everything it deserves. Sometimes it is pretty hard to figure those things out, so this arrangement process can take months.

Tell us about the live side to the band, presumably a favourite aspect to the band?

We try to gig as much as we can, playing shows all around the country. I believe that any band needs to go through a lot of Level 1 gigs before they will be capable of playing bigger stages and appreciating the unique opportunities they are getting. It is like building a structurally solid house from the ground up – you can only start working on interior design when the rest is in place. Unlike so many other bands, each gig we tell stories, because we want our audience to think about certain things, then come home, go to sleep and wake up with this brilliant idea, maybe a purpose, maybe just a promise to oneself. Our gigs are less about drinking and jumping around and more about the inner dialogue.

It is not easy for any new band to make an impact regionally let alone nationally and further afield. How have you found it? Are there definitely the opportunities to make a mark if the drive is there for new bands?

I do believe that nothing worth doing in life is ever easy. Music needs to come from the heart. You also need people around you with big hearts and bright shining eyes. Then even if you are lost in the dark, they will illuminate the way. It is not easy at all – but it is still the best job in the world!

How has the internet and social media impacted on the band to date? Do you see it as something key to increasing success with those which fail to make it work are simply lacking the knowledge and desire to keep it working to their advantage or is it ultimately more of a curse?

Knowledge is key obviously. My friend was recently talking to me about SEO (Search engine optimization). For years I thought that is all about putting the right keywords to the right articles. It is so so so much more than that. Internet is a vice and a virtue, and it all depends on whether a band can accept that all that social media work is part of the deal. You can write brilliant songs and even record them nicely, but if you need to share them with the world – you have to work very hard for it.

A big thanks Dan for sharing your time with us; anything you would like to add or reveal for the readers?

It is a very special time in Plastic Barricades camp. Our Mechanics of Life album finally came out and we will be touring UK on and off till the end of October. We will be very happy to see you guys there! Meanwhile, here are all the links:

And here is how a goldfish can conquer the world: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pYpBYXMzwOg

Mechanics of Life album OUT on iTunes and Spotify on the 14th of September!

You can hear the album here: https://open.spotify.com/album/71tNyY0qX5fNgTsoXD0r3t

You can download our full press-kit with 320kbit mp3s, artwork, lyrics and HQ pictures at https://goo.gl/ogBdjm

Tour dates: http://www.plasticbarricades.eu/index.php/live

http://plasticbarricades.co.uk    https://www.instagram.com/plasticbarricades/

https://facebook.com/plasticbarricades    https://soundcloud.com/plasticbarricades

Check out our Plastic Barricades album review @ https://ringmasterreviewintroduces.wordpress.com/2017/09/26/plastic-barricades-mechanics-of-life/

Pete RingMaster 28/09/2017

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Raising Jupiter – Standing in the Light EP

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Around this time last year British rockers Raising Jupiter were catching ears and attention with the Chrome EP, a release which confirmed that previous debut album A Better Balance  of 2014 was no flash in the pan in offering highly flavoursome melody rich  rock ‘n’ roll. Now they have the Standing in the Light EP luring old and new appetites with two tracks which enjoyably grumble as they seduce the senses.

Cored by vocalist/guitarist Dave Aitken, the Cork outfit sees drummer Kieran O’Neill linking up with the songwriter for the again Beau Hill mixed and mastered new EP. It has resulted in another duo which seems to just click and breed rock ‘n’ roll that feeds natural instincts for fiery and melodically blazing sounds.

raising-jupiter-ep-artwork_RingMasterReviewLead track Drive On (I Wanna Know) opens up the release, a song inspired by and in homage to members of the 27 Club, artists like Jimi Hendrix, Janis Joplin, Amy Winehouse, and Kurt Cobain who have all passed away in tragic circumstances aged 27. Straight away the track grips ears and imagination with a growling bassline which just ignites the passions. Its irritable but fiercely alluring texture is joined by firmly swung beats before Aitken adds his melodic vocals and flames of fuzz lined guitar. Swiftly a Queens Of The Stone Age feel blossoms but equally hard/classic rock hues emerge as the song grows, captivates, and only increases its impressive presence.

Easily the finest song from the band’s songbook to date, it is accompanied by Take The Fall, a more mild mannered proposal but no light weight on snarling riffs and forceful rhythms alongside searing melodies and infectious hooks. It too has a catchiness which needs little time to show its persuasion as Aitken fills the melodic rock canvas of the track with his potent sonic enterprise and vocal expression. O’Neill is equally a striking element with his rhythmic prowess, each providing nothing flashy but openly accomplished craft combining for a highly enjoyable slice of rock ‘n’ roll.

With a fuller version of Drive On (I Wanna Know) completing its line-up, the Standing in the Light EP is Raising Jupiter hitting a new plateau in their alternative/melodic rock invention and reminding all that they are a band deserving of close attention.

Standing in the Light is out now via iTunes and Amazon.

Upcoming Live Dates:

November 11th – Luna Lounge London

November 12th – Opening for Ellipsis (Venue TBC) UK

November 18th – The Live Room Bru Bar, Cork

http://www.raisingjupiter.com    https://www.facebook.com/raisingjupiter   https://twitter.com/raising_jupiter

Pete RingMaster 04/11/2016

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Freaks Like Me – Philosophies For The Modern Ant

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It is probably no surprise that there is a healthy essence of Kurt Cobain and co to the Freaks Like Me sound, considering its members also make up the world’s No.1 Nirvana tribute band Nervana, but that is only part of what is a rather compelling and enjoyable proposition on offer in the trio’s debut release. The Philosophies For The Modern Ant EP is a contagious and rigorously captivating encounter which has body and imagination leaping in tandem with its energetic and invigorating enterprise. As mentioned there is no escaping the rich familiarity of the band’s main inspiration across the songs but with its grunge sounds merged with punk ferocity and melodic rock tenacity, what emerges is an admittedly less than original but easily more than richly satisfying incitement. Think Nirvana meets Sick Puppies in the embrace of early Bush and you get a great hint of what is on offer.

Consisting of vocalist/guitarist Jon O’Connor, bassist Dave Eve, and drummer/backing vocalist Steve Kilroy, Freaks Like Me emerged when the threesome decided it was time to explore and offer something different and fresh from their highly successful and acclaimed Nervana presence which has been going since 2009. The seeds of their union go back much further though, Eve and Kilroy meeting in the early 2000s in London while recording an EP with Gods Little Joke. Playing together in Ireland in 2007, the pair met O’Connor in Dublin after a show, reconnecting with him later when looking for a vocalist for their new project. The rest is history, with a new turn and direction in its narrative coming with Freaks Like Me.

1. FLM EP - COVER_FRONT - FINAL   Recorded in London, Boston and Holland, Philosophies For The Modern Ant, on the back of successful shows in Europe and the US, instantly has ears and attention gripped as opener Better Off Blind sets things off. Hefty riffs and similarly intensive grooves encase ears initially before the song relaxes into a more familiar grunge bred tempting. Melodies and a snarl equipped bassline court the slightly grizzled tones of Jon O’Connor, his voice sharing the raw essence of again Cobain and similarly Gavin Rossdale, it all creating a restrained but open drama to the song. It is fair to say that the EP starts with a recognisable and unsurprising offering but equally a captivating one which like the warm up act to the main show, gets anticipation and appetite in the mood.

All In A Lie is a different beast of a proposition, its instant almost predatory splatter of riffs and sonic discord within a carnivorous assault of bass led rhythms, immediately irresistible. It is a riveting and thrilling entrance loaded with rugged hooks and ravenous grooves. Submission to its raw and imposing suggestiveness is swift, especially with the effect drizzled vocals which are soon riding the tempestuous and aggressive onslaught. Bearing down on the senses with seemingly increasing creative turmoil, urgency, and seduction, the intoxicating tempest is quite outstanding, sparking as its successor at times thoughts of UK based band Feud along the way.

If the bass exploits of Eve have already seduced the passions across the first two tracks, he steals them outright within Cynical. A dirty repetitious temptation from his manipulation of strings is simply irresistible as it provides the start and spine to the raucous and fiery encounter. It is an old school punk lure in many ways, a resonating simplicity which steers song and its creativity to striking endeavours. It again has many recognisable twists and aspects to its adventure but this time of a more post punk seeded comparison a la Gang of Four.

Both Down and Idol Fall keep EP and pleasure blazing, the first with virulently infectious expulsions masked as choruses. As in the previous song there are glimpses of a post punk flavouring, hints of Flesh For Lulu spicing the melodic radiance spilling from the heart of the otherwise thickly Nirvana-esque swamp of abrasive rock ‘n’ roll. The second of the two is again drenched in the flavours of the band’s other project, but it is spicery twisted and woven into fresh and inventive imagination which easily enthrals thoughts and ears, especially in its unexpected and transfixing psyche rock detour.

Closing song Poppies and Rain provides an absorbing croon to end on, but a shadow wrapped one with portentous rhythms and haunting sonic suggestiveness crowding its melodic and melancholic elegance. The song is a bewitching finale to an excellent debut from Freaks Like Me. Certainly there is little startling new about Philosophies For The Modern Ant but it is potently fresh and stirringly invigorating, and most of all thoroughly enjoyable. What more could anyone want?

Philosophies For The Modern Ant is available from April 7th via Pavement Entertainment through most online stores.

https://www.facebook.com/freakslikememusic

RingMaster 07/04/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard on Reputation Radio @ http://reputationradio.yooco.org/

In A Nutshell – Quandary

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Hailing from Rennes, French alternative rock band In A Nutshell gives little away it seems about their background, certainly in English text for us linguistically challenged individuals, but what we can certainly tell you is that the band has just sculpted and released one highly appetising album. Created by the quartet of vocalist/guitarist Yannick Dilly, guitarist Alexis Bouvier, bassist Gaëtan Costard, and drummer Camille Carte, Quandary is a thoroughly captivating slab of alternative and melodic rock bred from nineties grunge. At times it roars with brilliance and at other times merely boldly simmers whilst persistently grips ears and appetite, but from start to finish the album is a potential flooded and increasingly impressive encounter.

The album’s title track is the first persuasion on ears, the instrumental a slowly dawning piece with an immediate sonic portentousness and atmospheric shadow. It is a drama drenched offering, every riff and swiping chord heavy in effect and attitude matched by just as heftily swung rhythms. It is an imposing and slightly deceptive lead into the album where not until it’s fiery and energetically driven finale does the true flavour of the band’s sound break-through. Eventually a spicy scent of grunge makes its statement of intent increasing its hold further with the following Again & Again. From the start guitars expel flames of melodic enticing as rhythms crisply frame their endeavour. That alone makes a vibrant lure but with the throaty invention of a thick bassline and the sandy vocal tones of Dilly, the track becomes a fascinating roar with a forceful nod to Foo Fighters.

The More I Learn is next and digs into Nirvana essences for its certainly vocal and sonic expression. Riffs and beats again make a sinew driven bait whilst Costard’s bass holds a more gnarly INTREPID FOX oct[1] copyvoice this time, everything courting the imagination as potently as the subsequent slips into mellow melodies and emotive reflection. Cupping this invention though, the song is a constant turbulent tempest of passion and energy which whets the appetite perfectly for the outstanding How & Why which follows. From the first breath Carte hungrily swings his sticks to cast a web of anthemic rhythms which in turn seems to incite a similar contagion in riffs and hooks. There feels like a Josh Homme whisper is inspiring the passage of the song, every beat and chord offering a sonic and creative mischief which grips ears ease, whilst the sonic adventure of the song is certainly Queens of the Stone Age seeded. It only adds to making the mouth-watering encounter even tastier as it romps with an emotional snarl and energetic tenacity.

Both the heavy weight and emotional shadows of Can’t Wait and the raucous Go Ahead keep senses and emotions inescapably engrossed, the first of the two once more favouring the recognisable canvas of Nirvana for its own unique and evocative portrait of sound and passion. The track is another major peak in the album, every melancholic expulsion of angst and vocal intensity as dramatically alluring as the searing melodic hues colouring the song. Its successor is a predacious blaze of sonic causticity and tangy melodies ridden by a punk bred vocal raging. In this tempest though the band explore intriguing twists of varied styles and atmospheric flavours, an almost raw Muse like hue seeping into the evolving landscape of the song.

A breath is allowed as the emotively elegant and restrained Ask comes next, the song a pleasing embrace of the senses if lacking the spark to truly light the passions as its predecessors. It is still a magnetic slice of emotion fuelled balladry but soon forgotten as the excellent Out of the Rules prowls ears with a mischievous lilt to its opening tones. Once rhythms explode in an addictive rumble it is only a matter of time before the song erupts in another Foo Fighters brawl, not that they have created a song as invigorating and anthemic as this for a fair while. With a great flame of spicy keys, the track is pure passion driven rock ‘n’ roll infesting ears and feet.

Great tracks keep rolling through with firstly I Don’t Care lurking and lingering in thoughts and emotions with its bluesy swagger and sonic twang before the virulent contagion of From Words stomps with belligerent rhythms and scarring riffs around an anthem of Cobain seeded vocals. Punk and grunge in one ferocious explosion, the song is the pinnacle of the album with Costard wringing the best sound and presence out of his bass yet.

The bewitching rock pop of Today with its grunge snarl keeps senses and hunger aflame next before the album’s final offering Afaune leaves the listener with a slow burning but thoroughly intriguing and sweltering climate of imaginative individual and united enterprise. It is honed into a soundscape of voraciously woven and diverse styles and flavours for a climactic end to a fine album which rarely leaves expectations fed, even with its openly worn inspirations, and provides the real potential to a new level of acclaim and awareness of the band. Quandary may not be breaking down barriers with its triumphant presence but it is destined to light fires within a great many.

Quandary is available now @ http://inanutshell.bandcamp.com/

https://www.facebook.com/inanutshellrennes

RingMaster 04/12/2014

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard from

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MONSTER JAW ‘Get A Tattoo’ on 30th June‏

Monster Jaw Online Promo Shot

NORTHERN ROCKSTERS MONSTER JAW UNLEASH COLOSSAL DEBUT RECORD!

 ‘Get A Tattoo’ is filled with solid guitar riffs and catchy choruses, making for a decent debut EP.’ 9/10 – Big Cheese Magazine

 

UK rock crew ‘Monster Jaw’ nationally release their debut EP ‘Get A Tattoo’ on Cobra Kitten Records / Code 7, Monday 30th June.

Spawned in early 2013 by charismatic front-man and chief songwriter Mik Davis, along with bassist Neil Short and tubthumper John Bradford, Monster Jaw hail from the gritty northern cities of Leeds and Newcastle. Drawing inspiration from their blue collar surroundings, the trio also pull influence from the songwriting wizardry of Neil Young and Kurt Cobain, through to the moody garage rock musings of The Jesus and Mary Chain and the post-grunge drive of Stone Sour.

Over the past year, the animated upstarts have toured throughout the UK serving up a resonant and atmospheric post-garage punk sound that is coupled with a tight, electrifying stage show. Successful supports with Stiff Little Fingers and New Model Army on their UK tours have only furthered the band, along with lauded acclaim from Big Cheese Magazine, heavy rotation from BBC introducing and widespread underground radio.

Monster Jaw also have a strong DIY ethos and decided to self release their debut EP ‘Get A Tattoo’ on their own record label ‘Cobra Kitten Records’. With national distribution set up for this and future releases, the band have the resources to take their music to the next level. The assiduous three-piece drafted in London-based Belgian producer Wes Maebe (The Libertines, Roger Waters and Robert Plant) to work on their debut EP and his expertise really shines on what is a formidable record. The EP’s namesake ‘Get A Tattoo’ gets things rolling, showcasing the trio’s deft ability to lay down an alluring slab of post-garage rock that packs a highly contagious refrain. The driving punk rock givings of ‘We Don’t Care About Anything’ is next up, highlighting the band’s raw sincerity and authenticity. Lastly, ‘Summer Girl’, with its atmospheric groove and soaring vocals, shifts gears and tips its hat to The Pixies in passing. Now armed with a killer record, Monster Jaw are set to raise the bar with further touring throughout the UK. Stay tuned for more.

++ MONSTER JAW RELEASE ‘GET A TATTOO’ ON MONDAY 30th JUNE THROUGH ALL STORES ++

Monster Jaw Cover

www.monsterjaw.co.uk       https://en-gb.facebook.com/MonsterJawOfficial

 

Sunshine Riot – A Fresh Bottle A Brand New Day

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It has to be said that initially A Fresh Bottle A Brand New Day, the latest album from US rock band Sunshine Riot, was an underwhelming proposition though it certainly kept attention rigidly in its grasp. The band brings a mix of country, rock, blues, and punk to their sound but across the album it is more a case of individual tracks investigating one of those flavours rather than merging them into one rich brew. In hindsight it was that which possibly restrained satisfaction the most for the album at first but given deserved time and focus it has to be said that the Americana glazed release has emerged as a rather pleasing proposition. It does not light any fires in the belly of passions but without doubt it is an easy to frequent and keenly digest companion.

The quartet from Boston began in 2007 at the creative hands of vocalist and rhythms guitarist Jonny Orton and bassist Jeff Sullivan. Completed by the more recent additions of lead guitarist Mark Tetreault and drummer Shakes Tvelia, the band has had their sound described as “Johnny Cash meets Kurt Cobain”. It is a description you can see in the band even if it does not really paint the inventive textures which ripple throughout their varied songs, certainly those upon A Fresh Bottle A Brand New Day. Renowned for their live performances and work ethic, Sunshine Riot’s bio say that things really clicked into place with not only the current line-up coming together but just before that the band linking up with 16 time Grammy nominated producer, multi-instrumentalist, engineer, and composer George Dussault. New to the band we cannot say if that was the key but certainly there is a craft and inventive heart to their music which suggests something has come to ripe fruition.

The slamming of a heavy door awakens the album and opening track Norfolk County Jail, its intensive provocation the starter for a wistful melodic caress before defiance and urgency bursts with striding guitar and rhythmic incitement. The vocals of Orton ably backed by those of Sullivan, unfurl the narrative of the song with the track lyrically and musically a steely and expressive encounter which sparks the imagination. Of all the tracks this is one which fits that earlier description of the band’s music, its melodic rock drama fuelled by a flush of punk and grunge like tenacity. It is a very pleasing start to the album setting up a ready appetite for things to follow though that hunger is given a bit of a false start by the following Natural Causes. Immediately soaked in a country blues twang and atmosphere, the song steadily strolls into view and provides an accomplished and emotive venture to contemplate. There is something openly familiar to the track which makes it accessible but does defuse any originality and thus the spark to excite ears and emotions. Nevertheless it is enjoyable and memorable.

Both the more than decent rock canters of Cotton Fevour and Old Soul Blues like their predecessor keep the album alive in pleasure if not excessive excitement. The first is a blues washed slice of Americana complete with a throaty twang and the second a sultry slice of reflective melodic rock. Again the pair pleases but fails to emulate the success of the opening track or the livelier gaited and magnetic Quicksand Love which follows them. There is a simple honesty to the song’s first persuasion which coaxes before the vocal blend and plainly attractive hooks make their bait known. The song in turn is then left looking a little pale by firstly the impressively catchy and deliciously soulful Elizabeth Stone which features the richly textured vocals of R&B singer Carl Smitty Smooth around a core of virulent temptation and then even more so by the outstanding Senorita Punk, which as its title suggests is a riotous temptress bred in prime punk rock. Both songs provide the pinnacle of the album, taking it to new heights, especially the second with its voracious attack and scuzz smothered energy.

The next up Margaret Mae with its deep bass growl and jagged guitar bait continues to keep album and pleasure high, the song a vivacious stroll with eighties new wave vibrancy and mischievous alternative rock enterprise. The track saunters with a gentle but bold swagger, teasing ears and thoughts with persistent relish before bursting with eager will in its chorus.

The climatic Boxcar Cowboy brings a spaghetti western landscape into a union with an Americana rigour to capture the imagination again with its individual drama before the fiery and more intensive rocker Sweet Kerosene spills its sonic energy and melodic flames over the senses. Both tracks reinforce the fact that the second half of the album is a more compelling and thrilling venture to explore with the band than across the first few songs. Whether by coincidence or by intent Sunshine Riot save their strongest explorations and dramatic creations to the rear of the album and it works a treat though you wonder if a different order of songs would have made the release more consistent in its suasion.

Closing with the acoustically guided and okay Home, Sunshine Riot and A Fresh Bottle A Brand New Day provide an entertaining proposition which took its time to fully convince. This it does though, even with a few moments still lacking the kindling to light the passions, and invites a definite interest in the band’s new full-length marked for later this year.

The self-released A Fresh Bottle A Brand New Day is available now!

http://sunshineriot.com

7/10

RingMaster 21/04/2014

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard from

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Jacob’s Mouse: The Dot EP / No Fish Shop Parking

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    Jacob’s Mouse was a band in the early nineties which stretched creative limits and ventured into unexplored sonic shadows but also escaped the deserved success and recognition less worthy ear friendly bands received. The trio brewed an instinctive and intrusive blend of indie rock, post punk, and various incisions of inciting noise and aural storms, a sound which explored the listener as much as its own corners and boundaries. Now for the first time two of their releases have a digital release, their debut EP The Dot and first album No Fish Shop Parking, and a long overdue treat for noise fans they truly are.

From Bury St Edmunds, the 1988 formed Jacob’s Mouse consisted of identical twin brothers Hugo and Jebb Boothby on guitar and bass respectively, and vocalist/ drummer Sam Marsh. Taking reported influences from the likes of Fugazi, Minor Threat, Big Black, Pixies, and Hüsker Dü, the band released by the vinyl-only The Dot EP through Liverish Records in 1990. The release grabbed critical acclaim and led the way to support slots with the likes of Nirvana, Suede, Th’ Faith Healers, and Manic Street Preachers, as well as enthused support from John Peel and Kurt Cobain. The following year saw the release of No Fish Shop Parking on Blithering Idiot, an imprint label of the band and continued the strong responses and acclamation surrounding the trio. As the nineties bred and flocked to the Brit-pop phenomenon, Jacob’s Mouse was found itself left out of the focus of an indie scene which was drooling over Oasis, Blur, and similar flavoured presences with a seeming tunnel vision. The threesome reacted in their own way by becoming even more experimental and creatively wilful, their following albums I’m Scared in 1993 and Rubber Room of 1995, released via Wiiija Records (home to Cornershop, Therapy? and BiS), testing and pushing their invention and craft to continually unappreciated responses. The year of their third and last album also saw the band call it a day to leave behind a legacy of unique and inspiring releases and songs which now finally have the chance to cast their magnetic sonic incitement once again.

Both releases come through Sturm Und Drang Recordings and make just as impressive an impact as they did first time around. TheJacobs Mouse Dot EP sleeve Dot EP musically is easy to describe though what you consequently imagine barely glances the reality of the sounds created. Like a searing fire of World Domination Enterprises, The Fire Engines, and Hüsker Dü, the five track release teases and taunts whilst creating its own eclectic character and originality. Opening track Signs initially plays with the ear with an inviting sonic groove before vocal squalls assault with abrasive passion. Unveiling up a web of mischievous delicious hooks and addictive discord driven melodies, the song is the strongest persuasion possible ably coaxed deeper into ardour by the wantonness of the basslines.

The following garage punk caustic brawl of Enterprise leads into the mesmeric Hey Dip Sugar with its dub infused charms and exhausting sonic adventure. Both tracks leave passions ablaze whilst Ho-Hum ignites the senses with insidious repetition lyrically and sonically for a full capture of the imagination and a grazing of their sensibilities. Closing on Microflesh with its blistered atmospheric radiance and gloriously acidic melodies, The Dot was and is an irresistible and deeply compelling introduction to the band and it is no surprise that the releases garnered such plaudits.

Jacobs Mouse - No Fish Shop Parking - front cover      No Fish Shop Parking shows the evolution in the ideas and sound of the band at the time. It still has the essences which made the EP so refreshing but expands to explore and extend the innovative design of the imagination reaped. Opening track Tumbleswan envelopes the ear in a sonic blaze veined with evocative spoken vocals, provocative bass taunts, and more defined melodies than found on the EP. There is a Gang Of Four breath to the track which opens up the attraction further whilst immediately standing as a step forward from their debut release. The following tracks Twist, She Is Dead, and A Place to Go to, entrap the passions further with their distinct stances, the first another Gang Of Four like provocation whilst the other pair search through garage rock seeds to breed their own senses confronting glories.

From the dub blossomed Carfish, a track which has a touch of Ruts about it, the best track not only on the album but arguably one of the best from the band ever sends one into orbit. Caphony is simply sensational, a psychobilly rhythm and simmering tease loaded into a hungry and devilish groove and energy. Though the song predates Th’ Legendary Shack Shakers they are a fair reference with slithers of Screaming Blue Messiahs adding extra spice. Justice and The Vase complete the exceedingly magnificent album with further unique enterprise, the whole release an inspiring sculpted maelstrom of invention and noise.

As more and more noise rock bands emerge you can hear the sounds and inspirations of Jacob’s Mouse within much of their creativity, whether they realise it or not and with this twin release maybe the band will now get the full recognition and awareness it so surely deserves.

www.facebook.com/jacobsmouse

The Dot 9/10 No Fish Shop Parking 9/10

RingMaster 12/03/2013

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