Codex Alimentarius – The Infinite Growth Paradigm vs Finite Resources (Mk II)

June 1st sees the re-release of The Infinite Growth Paradigm vs Finite Resources, the debut EP from British metallers Codex Alimentarius. Going a big way, alongside their imposingly potent live presence, in earning them an immediately loyal fan base, the band’s introduction has been “re-fired and re-forged” in such a way that it not only commands but simply demands fresh attention. Like a great many we are sure, Codex Alimentarius evaded our radar first time around and indeed with its successor The Hand Of Apophis. Listening to the MK II version of The Infinite Growth Paradigm vs Finite Resources though, it feels more like destiny than annoyance that the Exeter outfit has taken to now to grab ears and an immediate appetite for their melodic death metal nurtured roar, the EP a searing wake-up call to the world of one fiercely exiting proposition.

Formed in 2009 by the quartet of vocalist Stephen Bending, guitarists Stan Kemble and Tim Wright, and bassist Andrew Dicker, Codex Alimentarius were soon making a strong imprint on the local live scene in their first year before expanding the line-up with the addition of third guitarist Elliott Alderman-Broom and drummer Frank Dennis in 2011. The Infinite Growth Paradigm Vs Finite Resources in 2010 only added to their growing reputation and appeal, its release followed by the band going on to tour with the likes of Vader, Krisiun, and Furyborn as well as share stages with bands such as Sonic Syndicate, Malefice, Evile, Revolker, Ted Maul, Demonic Ressurection and many more over the next handful of years. The well-received release of The Hand Of Apophis in 2014 followed the recruitment of Ray Arrell as the band’s new vocalist and the From Hell To Oblivion UK Tour with Enemy Reign the previous year. Despite all that, Codex Alimentarius was still a passing name for many but it is hard to see that remaining the situation as the revamped The Infinite Growth Paradigm vs Finite Resources resets and re-energises the inevitable emergence of the sextet to the fore of the European metal scene.

Mixed and mastered by Alderman-Broom and wrapped in the artwork of Dicker. Mk II opens up with Baptised and swiftly gets down to catching the imagination with nagging riffs and suggestive melodies within an electronic mist. It is an enticing start which does not force attention but teases and seduces it, coaxing intrigue into the venomously lined tones of Arrell and richly toned grooves just waiting to make their impact. Becoming bolder and in many ways even more toxically attractive, the song blossoms in presence and adventure with Arrell the source of animosity and rhythms the seed of imposing trespass; all bound in the simultaneously seductive and predatory adventure of the guitars.

It is a potent and quickly enjoyable start but one soon eclipsed by the mighty proposal of Collapse. It too harries the senses with riffs and flying beats, their rapacious intent matched by the brooding antipathy of bass. Yet there is a swing and hunger to it all driven by almost rabid grooves and gutturally celebratory vocals which simply enslave ears and imagination. With tinges of thrash and folk metal in its dynamic assault, the track is glorious; only growing to greater heights with reserved passages of melodic endeavour and craft woven into a web of senses entangling temptation.

Good Slaves swaps the boisterousness of its predecessor with a more controlled state but still with a heady drama of energy and portentous suggestion. Sweeping melodies add to its dark edge and cinematic climate, grooves and riffs colluding to provide a heart as rousing as it is invasive as the song ignites body and thoughts with ease before passing its success over to the infectious almost envenomed charm of No Return. It feels calmer and physically kinder than those before it yet makes up for it with a tonal animus which infests vocals, melody, and imagination alike. If missing the extra spark of the previous pair of songs, it is a compelling journey through impressing craft and aural discontent; a merger of light and dark, melody and antagonism which heightens an already keen appetite for band and sound.

There is a bait of real catchiness within the quickly persuasive Symbiosis which follows, a devilish grooving which has swift control of body and attitude as the track grows in virulent contagion and emotional jaundice. It is a beast of a tension strapped, malignant stomp providing another major moment within Mk II, a peak matched by the closing mystique cloaked Arise. With Middle Eastern hues flirting with ears and thoughts from within its feudal proposal, the song breeds and widens its tapestry of creative and physical dexterity; guitars weaving a net of emotional and expressive suggestion around plundering rhythms and vocal causticity. It is a gripping affair which though a slow burner compared to earlier tracks leaves the listener provoked in thought and greed to hear and explore more.

With hindsight now available, Codex Alimentarius have not only given their first EP a new lease of life but released and developed its true character as indeed that of their keenly adventurous and eventful sound. Infinite Growth Paradigm vs Finite Resources (Mk II) feels like the moment that the band will truly step out from the shadows or certainly stoke a fire of awareness and attention; the former most likely such the striking presence and also potential found within the release.

Infinite Growth Paradigm vs Finite Resources (Mk II) is released June 1st.

http://www.codexthemasses.co.uk/    https://www.facebook.com/codexalimentariusband/    https://twitter.com/codexthemasses

Pete RingMaster 23/05/2017

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Thunderous Proposals: Exploring Endrah With Vocalist Relentless.

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We all know that there have been some mighty and fiercely inspiring bands which have emerged out of the Brazilian metal over past decades but its underground scene is no lightweight either. It is a seriously thriving landscape bubbling with an array of impressive bands across the whole array of metal based styles. One such proposition is Sao Paulo Deathrashcore quartet ENDRAH, a band which formed in 2002. Since then they have become one of the major roars with the Brazilian underground, one increasingly nudging thicker and broader attention. Just becoming aware of them ourselves now, we seized on the chance to learn more about Endrah and future plans with vocalist Ryan Raes (Relentless).

Hello and many thanks for sparring your time to talk with us.

Can you first give us some background to how it all started and when you got involved?

ENDRAH is based out of Sao Paulo, Brazil. The band was formed by several Brazilian pro musicians and American Billy Graziadei of BIOHAZARD fame. My name is Relentless and I am the vocalist since 2005. I travel to Brazil for tours yearly, and we meet up at other locations around the world to tour.

I first heard of the band Endrah on a Blabbermouth.net post saying Project of Biohazard member looking for new vocalist. I checked it out and was blown away by the raw heavy sound. The band formed when several Brazilian members were playing together and Billy Graziadei married a Brazilian lady and they all got to jamming; things became Endrah eventually.

Have you been or are involved in other bands outside of Endrah?

Yes, I have been in California based metal band, VENGINCE for 21 years now. The band started in school, and we still play to this day. The band is more melodic than Endrah though still tough and heavy.

What inspired the name Endrah?

Endrah is a sort of twist of The Hindu God Indra and a person’s name from what I gather. I was not in the band or present during that time of the name process but each guy references Indra when asked.

endrah2_RingMaster ReviewSince the early days, how would you say the band’s sound has evolved?

Our sound has become less desperate than the beginning, but Endrah is a very heavy and technical. We still bring our trademark sound to the new songs being recorded today and I think we have grown as musicians and song writers and still have a lot to show people.

Has it been more of an organic evolution of sound or has the band deliberately tried to bring in new things?

The bands recordings have become more polished, but I know we are letting it happen and not forcing anything. The band is not “commercially viable” to most people and we have spent most of our time in the underground hardcore and metal scenes.

Presumably across the band there is a wide range of inspirations; are there any in particular which have impacted not only on the band’s music but your personal approach and ideas to creating and playing music?

Life is a journey and we have learned a lot while walking down these dirty streets. We have similar goals as humans and musicians even though we are living a half a world away most of the time. Endrah is very good at we do and we deserve good things to happen. We have had all sorts of behind the scenes adversity to overcome already.

What things drive the voice of the band in its early days and now?

The band has a strong political and social voice, along with very thought provoking lyrics that deal with revenge.

So this is the main inspiration to the lyrical side of your songs?

I always write song idea notes whenever something comes up. Watching the news, and reading American Free Press Newspaper will get enough and then visits to Brazil’s poverty stricken areas inspires social change and awareness.

Is there a process to the songwriting which generally guides the writing of songs?endrah art_RingMaster Review

Covero the guitarist writes the riffs and then the bassist, Adriano, and drummer, Bruno add their parts and they tweak the song arrangements until it all flows good. Then they send to me videos of the rehearsals and demos to guide me for the lyrics and vocal mapping process which I do in my home studio in California. After that, the guys record their parts in Brazil, I do my vocals in the USA and then we mix and master somewhere. It’s all thanks to the internet that Endrah can truly thrive and communicate properly for a band.

Please give us some background to your latest release.

We are recording now for a May 2016 Release. The latest is a single titled Cadaver Na Barragem available online, and we did that for a Brazilian Compilation album. It rips! Give it a spin.

Can you give us some insight to the premise behind it?

This song is about our buddy Felipe who was stand up boarding on a reservoir in Brazil and he saw a bag floating on the water with tons of insects all over it. The smell apparently was horrific. He opened the bag and inside was a dead woman chopped in pieces. We wrote a song about what may have happened to her. It’s brutal!

You mentioned the writing process and with band members being so far apart presumably songs are pretty much finished going into the recording itself?

We try to be close as possible when entering the studio. We don’t have the luxury to pussy-foot around and waste money like the biggest bands do.

Tell us about the live side to the band, presumably the favourite aspect of the band?

I am all about the live show. I thrive when it is live. I prefer touring over studio work. Endrah makes people go crazy and our crowds are wild and violent. It is a total pleasure to perform for our fans. You got to see an Endrah show yourself. Check us out!!

It is not easy for any new band to make an impact nationally let alone further afield. How has Endrah found it and are there the opportunities to make a mark if the determination is there?

Yes. In fact I think there are more “pro” Brazilian bands now than ever before in the metal genre. They have a couple dozen amazing heavy bands that are well known on social media and draw good [support]. Endrah knows most of them personally, including members of the biggest Brazilian heavy bands like Sepultura, Krisiun, Angra, etc.

How has the internet and social media impacted on the band to date? Do you see it as something destined to be a negative or a positive as a band grows and hopefully gets increasing success?

The fact that Facebook charges bands money to post to all our fans is total bullshit! They can make money in other ways, but now that they are a public company, they got to pull in more money every quarter. So, I see bands like our friends Biohazard who are only getting 10% of their audience reach when they post and it is apparently about 10% for any level band over 1,000 likes. So you have got to pay hundreds just to have your fans that follow you to all see the post. It’s some shit.

Endrah had to change our profile page when we switched record labels and we restarted the likes count, so it is not nearly as high as it should be, and it is difficult to grow the social media numbers when the companies want more and more money for artists who already have 90% of their music listeners illegally downloading the music to boot. That only leaves us with a few limited means of income and yet we are artists so we are not going away.

Once again Sir, thank you for sharing time with us; anything you would like to add?

Please check out ENDRAH and give us a like, drop us a comment, and share our pages. Also of course, please come to see us when we tour through your city next!!

Check out the band and their music further @ https://www.facebook.com/endrah/http://endrah.com/

Pete RingMaster

The RingMaster Review 10/02/2016

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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Karnak – The Cult Of Death

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Uncompromising and ravenous, the new mini-album from Italian death metallers Karnak is a furious consumption of the senses but equally a deceptively rewarding one which with bravery and strong will before its ferocity provides a compelling and invigorating examination of senses and thoughts. Made up by five predatory tracks, The Cult Of Death is an annihilatory turbulence through the ear which consists of four new songs linked to a concept inspired by Aleister Crowley, as well as a cover of a Celtic Frost track.  With savage essences which put you in mind of the likes of Incantation, Pestilence, Nile, Morbid Angel, and Suffocation, the release is a potent and dramatic gnawing of the synapses marking the Monfalcone hailing quartet as a persistently formidable proposition.

Formed in 1993 by drummer Stefano Rumich, the band released numerous demos before making a strong impression away from their local area with debut album Perverted, the first release under the name Karnak. This was successfully followed by Melodies Of Sperm Composed, an album which saw the band evolve from their initial pure grind/death metal stance exploring elements of jazz, samples and more to add flavour and colour to the still destructive tempest of sound. Third album Tutti I Colori Del Buio was released in 2002 before the band went on a break provoked by line-up changes. 2009 saw their return and the signing with Casket Records with the release of fourth album Dismemberment coming the following year. A tour supporting Krisiun and Kataklysm pushed the band out further in 2011, though by now having supported the likes of Impaled Nazarene, Suffocation, Nile, Decapitated, Avulsed, Necrodeath, Pyogenesis, Destruction, Fleshgod Apocalypse and more over the years, Karnak was no longer a hidden secret. Last year the band supported Malevolent Creation, Krisiun, and Vital Remains on another European tour followed by another with Deicide. Currently working on their next album, the line-up of vocalist/guitarist Francesco Ponga, bassist/vocalist Lorenzo Orsini, guitarist/vocalist Marco Polo, and Stefano Rumich raise real anticipation and hunger for said release with The Cult Of Death, its bestial creative assault wholly persuasive.

The opening Intro just lays out a simple rhythmic beckoning but its temptation is irresistible and almost tribal as it evolves into The cover_karnak_thecultofdeathConstruction Of The Pyramid (The Demon’s Breath) who replays its offering before opening the gate to an intensive exhausting technically honed riff driven blaze which scorches the senses with the brewing animosity of the song and its breath is not far behind in carnivorous intent. With vocals roaring like the oldest colossal predator imaginable, the track lurches at the senses with insatiable energy aligned to a more restrained but unreserved sonic and rhythmic stalking. Furies of technical and acidically melodic guitar do initially wrong foot emotions after their submission to the easy to devour onslaught, but soon persuade craft and evocative hues.

It is an impressive start repeated and then surpassed by The Construction Of The Pyramid Beta (Invocation), the Meshuggah like web laid down around the passions at the start over run by the torrential thick sonic mass of intensity and suffocating ambience. Doom oppressive and sludge lumbering, the shift bleeds the air of light and oxygen but equally ignites thoughts with shards of melodic light and colour before the nightmarish soundscape with its heaviness and rabid vocals seems to claw like a swarm of patient demons at the psyche. As with the release it is not at times the easiest or most comfortable listen on first impressions but beneath the barbarous surface and many deeper levels there is a magnetic and superbly crafted well of invention and skilled temptation.

The nagging chugging which leads the song to a dissipating climax is immediately thrown aside by the sadistic entrance of The Construction Of The Pyramid Gamma, a start which is only built upon and intensified the further the track chews at the ear with the drum attack of Rumich unrelentingly and impossibly thrilling. Also unafraid to bring a potent melodic and sonic adventure to the striking narrative of the release, the track is a frequently changing and provoking treat concluding and summing up the new songs and strength of the album perfectly.

Completed by the cover of Celtic Frost song Jewel Throne, the release is an enthralling malevolent engagement. The final track is more than decent but as accomplished as it is it is not a match for the previous trio of songs. Quite simply The Cult Of Death really gets the appetite aflame for Karnak’s forthcoming album whilst making a thoroughly satisfying meal right now.

http://www.karnakdeath.com/

9/10

RingMaster 02/08/2013

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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Centurian: Contra Rationem

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    Formed in 1997, Dutch death metallers Centurian were one of the formidable forces in underground metal up to their demise’ in 2002, a band which was to the forefront of the second wave of death metal which included the likes of Angelcorpse and Krisiun. Now they have returned with their first album in twelve years in the destructive storm that is Contra Rationem, a release which in many ways just continues where the band left off but equally forges a fresh presence with an intensity and spite derived from current inspirations.

Started by Rob Oorthuis (guitars) and Wim van der Valk (drums) with the intent of creating death metal based on memorable riffs, one-foot blastbeats and lyrics that celebrate Choronzon333, Centurian fronted by vocalist Seth van de Loo grabbed attention with their demo Of Purest Fire in 1998. The same year bassist Patrick Boleij joined to complete the line-up and the band signed to Full Moon Productions who then re-released their demo before in 1999 the debut album Choronzonic Chaos Gods. The following year saw the departure of van de Loo and Boleij to be replaced by vocalist/bassist Jerry Brouwer and guitarist Oskar van Paradijs as the band began writing their follow-up album. Signing with Listenable Records the band unleashed Liber Zarzax in 2001 to great acclaim but by the end of the year due to Oorthuis wanting to explore other realms of extreme metal with a new venture NOX, the days of Centurian came to an end leading to its closure in 2002. The new avenue for Oorthuis also found strong success if at times hampered by line-up changes and by 2010 after the release of Blood, Bones and Ritual Death again via Listenable who also release this returning beast of a Centurian release, Nox was put on hiatus and the former muscular guise returned to action. Consisting of Oorthuis, Boleij, and van de Loo (on drums this time around) once more with vocalist Niels Adams adding his magnificent vocal scourge, Centurian leaps at the senses with an appetite and brutality which instantly harks back to their former presence whilst bouncing off the boundaries firmly entrenched in current violations.

Thou Shalt Bleed for the Lord thy God assassinates the senses first, its lethal rhythms and teasing sonic lashing sunk within anCENTURIANcontra1400x1400 OK onslaught of ravenous riffing, instantly contagious and intimidating. The vocals of Adams expertly scowl and scar the ear to match the intensity forged elsewhere and though barely two minutes in primal length the track is a declaration that the band is back mightier and more sadistic than ever.

The following of Crown of Bones and Feast of the Cross explode with sadistic hunger to continue the impressive start. The first of the pair courts and prowls the listener with unbridled malevolence fused within tightly infectious grooves and abrasive sonics carried on a further brawling tempest of vocal excellence. You cannot say Adams offers anything in his delivery which others have also not explored but there is a compelling element to his style and expressive craft which like the music grips firmly and magnetically. The second of the two songs is a maelstrom of back snapping rhythms from van de Loo which demand respect and attention and a rapacious attack of accomplished sonic venom and annihilatory bruising.

Into the heart of the release the band pull out their finest moments starting with Judas Among Twelve. Veined by spiteful grooves and further rhythmic violence, the song crowds the ear with intensity and passion whilst forcing through rabid sonic seduction and bestial riffs which chew and rampage across the senses until they are black and blue. Virulently contagious and equally corruptive the song shows the full potency drawn from the band recording the tracks on Contra Rationem as single takes fired by their intense passion. The outstanding demonic Antinomian and the tempest of malicious vehemence that is The Will of the Torch both raise a further greedy ardour with their commanding accomplished statures to leave a lack of easy breath in the lungs.

Ensuring the savageness continues to the final note of the release tracks like Sin Upon Man and Damnatio Memoriae unleash further irresistible barbarity, violence and persuasive grooves wrapped in impossible to refuse corrosive dynamics. Arguably Contra Rationem does not venture in to new territories but such the quality and irrepressible inducement on offer it is not an issue to make a dent in the pleasure it delivers throughout.

www.centurian333.com

www.facebook.com/Centurian333

8/10

RingMaster 25/02/2013

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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Corpus Mortale – FleshCraft

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    FleshCraft the new album from Danish death metallers Corpus Mortale is quite simply a monster, a colossal beast of intensity, sound, and quality, and a release which could be a new defining signpost in Danish death metal if not extreme metal as a whole. The album clenches the listener firmly in its jaw throughout, each track a ravenous chewing and crushing of the senses which drains energy and lungs of fight and leaves the deepest rewards in the sonic charnel house installed. The band has built a fine and acclaimed reputation over the years but without doubt FleshCraft is easily their finest moment.

Formed in 1993 it was ten years later with the release of their debut album With Lewd Demeanor,  supported by a 20 date European tour with fellow Danes Konkhra and Illnath, that a wider appreciation of the aggressive sounds of the band began growing to build on the already strong local following Corpus Mortale had drawn. Second album A New Species of Deviant elevated their strong underground stature further with its release in 200, powerfully followed up the following year by a successful European tour alongside Nile, Grave, Krisiun and Ulcerate. With line-up changes across the years the trio of vocalist/bassist Martin Rosendahl, guitarists Carlos Garcia Robles and Brian Eriksen wrote and recorded their third album across 2011. The Copenhagen based threesome evolved their sound into the destructive pleasure found on FleshCraft in this period taking to a mix of studios to record the album which was mastered and produced by sound engineer Jacob Olsen. Released via Deepsend Records, the towering creation leaves the listener a breathless and exhausted victim in the wake of its inventive devastation, but a grinning invigorated and thrilled victim.

The album brews its introduction through wastelands of sound and chilled atmosphere as opener Weakest Of The Weak emerges from its coarse ambience. In full view the track unleashes a tirade of barbaric rhythms and inciting guitar caresses before taking the cap off their energy and exploding into a furious storm of destructive intensity and accomplished aural violence. The ever immense and impressive vocals of Rosendahl spreads malice dripping guttural violation from within the fluctuating brooding and annihilatory surges of the , it is a direct and corrosive attack, low on complications but as skilled and focused in writing and delivery as you can imagine. Like a leering predator overseeing its prey before turning it to blood soaked devastation the track is an intensive force and outstanding start to the album.

The following carnivorous storms The Unwashed Horde and A Murderous Creed elevate and accelerate the pleasure and inspiring presence of the album further, the first a hungry canker of impressive drums and scarring guitar sonics speared by tumultuous riffs and verbal malevolence and its successor a brutal tsunami of rabid intensity and inhumane masterful sounds. Both tracks rip bigger fissures in the wounds left gaping by the first track with the second of the pair especially savage and compelling. The bass on A Murderous Creed is exceptional, a sadistic entity on its own venomous mission within the cancerous unforgiving breath of the song and thoroughly irresistible alongside the equally contagious insidious waspish sonic grooving.

Truthfully there is not a weakness on the album, the likes of the excellently truculent Scorn of the Earth and the brilliant Love Lies Bleeding equally irresistible aggressors to what come before and after them. The latter of the two opens with a rapidly emerging feast of organic bass growling and cagey rhythms which is sheer primal manna before twisting into a voracious unrelenting wall of intense creativity and nastiness. It is the best track from the album if it is possible to choose any over another and one powerful reasons out of ten as to why the album already is looking good for best of year heights.

If things were not impressive enough the album sets free further mountainous surges of defined and perfectly sculpted brutality in the unreserved gaits of the expressive Enthralled and the uncompromising rankle Tempt Not the Knife, just two more highlights in a release of nothing but pinnacles. Closing on a reworking of Seize the Moment of Murder, a track which was only previously available on a limited 7-inch vinyl, FleshCraft is a stunning and sensational start to the year for death and extreme metal. Corpus Mortale is a band you should and need to know about and their new album the perfect malefaction to begin the submission.

http://www.corpusmortale.net

RingMaster 10/01/2013

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Dreaming Dead: Midnightmares

There has been a lot of eager anticipation for the second album from US melodic death metal band Dreaming Dead. The follow up to their acclaimed 2009 debut Within One on Ibex Moon Records, the new album Midnightmares was originally planned for the latter part of last year but after a delay it finally sees its unveiling April 20th as a self release by the band. The wait will be soon be forgotten once the stunning nine tracks fuel a deep rooted satisfaction in their fans and the release sure to draw in many more attentive followers to their mighty and expressive sounds.

Formed in 2006 as Manslaughter and releasing a demo of that year, the band evolved and emerged as a formidable creative unit by their debut album. Shared stages with the likes of Morbid Angel, Immolation, Krisiun, Nile, and Exhausted Prayer led them to stronger attention in the US. April 2011 saw the Californians going into the studio to record Midnightmares, the result an album that stirs up the senses into a very raw and excited state.  Though classed as melodic death metal their sound offers much more, the added progressive metal, thrash aggression, and other varied flavours making it a full and rounded flavoursome beast that offers an imaginative and compulsive experience.

Opening on the crawling death metal instrumental Wake the band explodes into aggressive intensity with the following Overlord. The opening piece of music shows the strong expressive creative guitar work of Elizabeth Schall whilst the darkened basslines of Juan Ramirez are revealed as an inspiring shadowed presence here and throughout the album. Overlord gives evidence of the harsh energised side of the band as it tramples the senses with a thrash veined rampage whilst enticing them with a strong progressive design to the song. The drums of Michael Caffell form a mighty and controlled network of rhythms for the other pair of the trio to explore and expand their ideas within, whilst his guttural additional vocals make a powerful companion to the coarse and caustic lead vocals of Schall.

Though a very strong and pleasing start the album gets better the further it progresses. The following title track raising the level immediately as it blisters the ear with venomous intent from vocals and bass whilst the acidic guitar manipulations scorch with their tight sharp groove and intrusions. The song is a mesh of inspired ideas and riffs that feast upon the senses as equally as they fed them.

The wonderfully niggling and persistent Exile, the stunning mesmeric and majestic  In Memoriam, and the violent addictively grooved Into the Depths, all step by step add more and more infectious and compelling elements to the sound, each superbly crafted and diverse without losing any of the intensity or nastiness the band do so well too. The second of these three rivals for best track on the album only matched by the excellent Lapse and the closing instrumental Departure. In many ways this is the most surprising thing about Midnightmares in that the instrumentals outshine the other songs somewhat. This is not because the vocal led ones lack any quality or satisfaction giving skills, it is that the band finds extra freedom on the instrumentals to explore and take us to even deeper depths. In Memoriam is magnificent, a vibrant and eager mischievous collection of ideas and emotive sounds that flow with ease and confidence down new and adventurous avenues. Departure too shows this side of the band and their instinctive and skilled craft. The song opens with a slowly dawning progressive saunter through its soundscape, guitar and bass bringing rivalling but companion tones. The track expands into a wider intimidating prowl before finding more expressive angles to inflame the senses with. The piece provokes imagery and ideas as it moves towards its leaving and though not with the infectious urgency of In Memoriam it is just as deeply provocative.

Midnightmares is a mightily impressive album and well worth the extra wait for their fans old and new. There are many corridors and rooms within death metal as a genre and Dreaming Dead provide one of the most appealing and exciting of them all.

www.facebook.com/DreamingDeadBand

RingMaster 16/04/2012

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