In Vain – Currents

Just a handful of weeks short of five years back, Norwegian metallers In Vain released the ear gripping Ænigma. It was a release which brought and honed all the potential and impressive attributes of its two predecessors to one seriously striking head. That triumphant encounter has now been swept away in the creative eddy of the band’s fourth album Currents, a proposal which lustily roars In Vain as being one of metal’s finest and most exciting propositions.

Since emerging in 2003, In Vain has grown within and persistently ascended the European metal scene with their adventurously imaginative progressive extreme metal. Their 2007 debut album, The Latter Rain, swiftly stirred keen attention and critical praise, and a reputation for craft and sound which the more variable Mantra nevertheless only reinforced.  The Jens Bogren (Opeth, Dimmu Borgir, Katatonia, Devin Townsend, Kreator) produced Ænigma simply sparked the imagination as it built upon and pushed the traits of those before. It all pales though before the majesty of Currents, a release which surprises at every twist and enthrals at every turn. Intricately woven yet as organic as the passion which drives it, Ænigma not only takes the In Vain sound to a whole new level, it brings progressive metal a fresh landscape shaping breath.

Seeing Bogren united with the band once again, Currents contemplates “the colossal shifts and changes of our time” looking at the currents behind major events and changes across the modern world from “Migration of people across continents and borders, cultures merging and the dramatic shifts in lifestyle from one generation to the next.” It also features guest appearances from the likes of drummer Baard Kolstad (Leprous, Borknagar), vocalist and former band member Kristian Wikstøl (From Strength to Strength), and vocalist Matthew Kiichi Heafy (Trivium) among various more.

Currents opens with Seekers of the Truth and immediately entwines ears in steely vines of guitar as beats bite. Andreas Frigstad’s raw throated vocals soon prowl the engaging lure, rhythms and melodies colluding in a web of threat and intrigue around him with the song’s climate imposingly bracing but equally infectious  as the guitars of Johnar Håland and Kjetil Domaas Petersen almost dance on the ear. The progressive nature of the band’s sound subsequently infuses the track’s aggressive intent, varied strains of extreme metal merging with melodic enterprise for a captivating trespass.

Even so it’s potent and ear grabbing entrance into the album is soon eclipsed by next up Soul Adventurer. Within its first breath as keys rise, grooves are writhing around the imagination, their earnest exploits matched by the superb clean vocals of keyboardist Sindre Nedland. It is instantly compelling, increasingly so as the song gets right under the skin with resourceful harmonies and rolling rhythms only adding to the richness as the guitars spin a web of creative temptation. It is the superb vocal blend across the band though which brings it all together for easily one of the best tracks ever spawned by the imagination of In Vain.

That is a height though regularly equalled from hereon in staring with Blood We Shed, the track a wall of predacious intent and tone led by Frigstad’s vocal threat. Riffs and grooves soon collude in their own menacing enterprise, the bass of Alexander Bøe a thick grumbling incitement but from within their dark nature a ripple of melodic suggestion becomes a heated, harmonic serenade. There is plenty more going on too as keys and voices take the stage before falling under the incoming rumble of those earlier imposing textures, an array of imaginative moments which seem to reveal more with every listen.

Currents comes in two editions, the Special Edition offering two additional tracks with And Quiet Flows the Scheldt the first. Like a developing landscape, the song grows by the second as vocals and guitars shape an atmospheric flight through suggestive sonic scenery. The track does not have the snap of its predecessor but infuses a drama which draws the imagination right into its heart, vocals again as stirring as the music with the flames of sax a captivating heat in its evocative climate.

The funkier tapestry of Origin and the inviting mystery of En Forgangen Tid (Times of Yore Pt. II) bring their own enthralling reflections to ears and thoughts next, the first a robust yet considerate confrontation masterfully blending contrasts in power, aggression, and tone not forgetting flavours. This is an ability In Vain have never been lacking but as so many other things it has breached a new pinnacle within Currents as the second of the two confirms. Sung in the band’s native tongue, the song is glorious. In no time melodies vein a portentous air, dark and light wrapping round each other as a kaleidoscope of vocal and atmospheric intimation entices from within the magnetically tempestuous vortex.

Ghost Path is the second song found only on the larger edition of the album, the track sharing its own mysterious shadow haunted realm. The imagination is taking on a stroll through an underworld of fear, despair, and increasing creative ill-intent which comes to a head in a rhythmically driven, rapaciously fuelled predation of sound and intensity. The song is pure creative theatre, and reason alone to go grab the bigger version of the album as you really do not want to miss out.

The album concludes with firstly the similarly enthralling infestation of As the Black Horde Storms. Its blackened assault has a folkish tinge to its melodic undercurrent, death bred traits soon as prevalent as the track consumes the senses and begins spinning another web of striking imagination and sound where, as throughout the release, every moment brings surprise and invention to absorb and impress. Its successor, Standing on the Ground of Mammoths, smothers ears with its dark air and slightly corrosive texture whilst again gripping attention with is aural enticement and vocal dexterity. More a song with its creative tenacity and enterprise understated compared with other tracks within Currents; every dive into it brings them closer to the surface though its slip in a thoughtful melodic seduction mid-way is a beguiling caress from the first moment.

It provides an end to an album which simply excites from start to finish. Setting a new marker for not only the band but extreme progressive metal, In Vain has become one of the most fascinating and enjoyable propositions within world metal.

Currents is available now through Indie Recordings digitally and as a normal and special edition on CD and Vinyl.

http://www.invain.org/    https://www.facebook.com/InVainOfficial/    https://twitter.com/invainofficial

Pete RingMaster 04/02/2018

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Saintorment – Defective Mind

Though are not exactly knowledgeable on the state of the Latvian metal scene bands like Skyforger, Trendkill Method, Relicseed, and Ygodehwh, those we have come across, all suggest it is rather healthy and it looks like the thrash side of its fury is in good shape too going by the new album from Saintorment. A ferocious roar of old school thrash with a penchant for speed and heavy metal, the band makes a very sizeable impression with Defective Mind, the release a thoroughly enjoyable fusion of the familiar and fresh.

Formed in Daugavpils in the spring of 2013, Saintorment took little time moving from a cover band playing Metallica, Kreator, Pantera, Exodus etc. songs to writing and performing their own propositions. A quartet since 2014 unveiling their debut album, Well of Sins, the following year, there is little more we can tell you about Saintorment. Worry not though as Defective Mind has all the reasons why they deserve plenty of your metal searching time.

The album opens with Physical Force, its destructive warning a portent of the ravenous riffs and senses plundering rhythms to follow. Unashamedly wearing the band’s inspirations, the track surges through ears, the contagious horde of insatiable grooves and riffs easily devoured. Unruly impassioned vocals only add to the persuasion, their controlled rabidity riding the fury of the sounds with zeal. Skilled breakdowns and keen twists bring new identity to the recognisable but greedily welcomed traits of the track, many sourced to those bands the band embraced in their first days.

It is a great start to Defective Mind continued by its hellacious title track. As its predecessor, the song goes for the jugular, riffs and rhythms a forcibly badgering invitation led by ferocious vocals and an enterprise which entangles and twists unsurprising thrash traits with the band’s own creative character and invention. There is drama in every breath of the song, even more so than the first, which adds to its compelling trespass.

There is also a great rawness to the Saintorment sound, one which is in its prime within next up We Are, an ears savaging predator with enmity in every swing and enticement in every resourcefully crafted groove and melody. Keenly revealing the appealing variety in the band’s sound which is sometimes understated but always teasing, the track left an already forming appetite for the album greedier and ready to seize the bodies of songs like Strong Enough and Never. The first has a punkiness to its animus, a cantankerousness which fuels its magnetic scourge while its successor has a great nagging quality to its riffs and grooves, a predation brought with darker intent by the vocals; both songs also rich in sonic and melodic dexterity.

Through belligerence soaked Zerofy and heavy metal nurtured …Dies at the Black Night, the album only accentuates its tenacious nature in sound and imagination where again familiar essences collude enjoyably with the individual ideation of Saintorment; Mood Pyrexia subsequently matching them in endeavour and success while building on the theatre of the song before with its tapestry of metal diversity over thrash instincts. An instrumental for ears and imagination, it masterfully highlights the skills and energy of all band members while casting its suggestive adventure.

The album finishes with Final Hour, a track as vicious as it is alluring as the band again casts a web of multi-faceted thrash bred metal, and finally bonus track Ai, kā man patīk. A raucous punk metal version of presumably a Latvian folk song with lecherous grooves and vociferous passion to the fore, it is quite superb and the perfect end to an increasingly addictive release.

Saintorment is a band all thrash fans should take time out to explore, their album a stomp which thickly satisfies each and every time, and their open potential something to keep a close ear upon. In reference to the final song, Oh how I like it!

Defective Mind is available now via More Hate Productions @ https://saintorment.bandcamp.com/album/defective-mind

https://www.facebook.com/SaintormentSNT/

Pete RingMaster 18/01/2018

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Skox – Years of Legions

Skox_RingMasterReview

If you have a sweet tooth for raw thrash metal or a soft spot for ravenous death metal, Years of Legions has plenty to eagerly embrace. To be honest, the new album from French band Skox has much for fierce metal fans in general to get their teeth in to across ten tracks which maybe do not always majorly surprise but definitely get the juices flowing.

Formed in 2003 and with their current line-up in place since 2010, the Lyon hailing Skox has shared the stages with the likes of Napalm Death, Hatesphere, Loudblast, Destinity, Blockheads, Mumakill, and No Return over the years whilst also making successful appearances at festivals such as Sylak and Ragnard Rock. An early EP also caught attention but it is with Years of Legions that it is easy to expect real attention gathering. With a sound inspired by thrash and raw metal from across the decades and an album “whose martial tones would convey the band’s ambition through the metaphor of war”, Skox is ready and equipped to wage war on a broader landscape.

The album opens with Entering the Battlefield…, a prelude and lead into individual battles posing as songs. Air and land is swiftly busy with the weapons and intent of confrontation, rhythms raising the flag as melodies lay down the sizzling colour and suggestion of things to come as the instrumental heads straight into the jaws of the album’s title track. A stable yet imposing start to the second track is soon a hellacious onslaught of vicious rhythms and violent riffs matched in grizzly kind by the tones of vocalist Jean-Charles Dupin. It is stirring stuff, a visceral dark thrash incitement driven by the hefty swings of drummer Arnaud Neyret and the grouchy bassline of Florent Claudel. Within this, guitarists Vincent Morelle and Gildas Turpin unite to savage and seduce with sonic and melodic enterprise, the band creating warfare across a rousing challenge with plenty to be beguiled by.

Years of legions_RingMasterReviewClaudel’s bass has ears and appetite enslaved in no time on the following Cell Swelling too; its throaty snarl delicious bait which is quickly matched in steely kind by invasive riffs. Provoking and enticing with every touch, the song scowls and bruises throughout but tempers its merciless intent with great unpredictable side steps into calmer rapacious exploits often led by that irresistible bass tempting. As with its predecessor, the song is not re-inventing the wheel but a fresh and individual character to each is the predominate spice which equally stirs the spirit across the likes of Running Out of Time and Thrashtastik. Amongst influences listed are the likes of Slayer, Testament, and Kreator; flavours which especially come to mind in the forcibly contagious first of the pair with its compelling trespass of a swing. Its successor is relatively less open in influence as it uncages a bedlamic shuffle of thrash voracity and ridiculously catchy endeavour. It is a death dance, a flirtation to destruction and as the previous track, one thrilling provocation.

Engine of Death is a track which stalks the senses, prowling around them with toxicity slavering grooves and brutal rhythmic teeth as the increasingly enjoyable growls and animosity fuelled squalls of Dupin rage. By its close, ears and senses feel like road kill, trodden into its sonic rancor and acid laced melodic dust before Road 666 runs over both again with its own eventful juggernaut of lethal swipes and carnivorous riffs. As with others, Skox infuses the song with tendrils of fiery and evocative melodic invention which aligns with the antagonistic side perfectly; the extremes sharing song and attention like brothers in arms.

One bassline is all March of the Dead took to spark an insatiable hunger in the imagination and appetite, its opening trap the doorway into a bestial consumption of ears whilst Smash Your Enemy matches its predatory prowess with its own particular militarist quarrel. Throughout both Skox again turns familiar essences into their own enthralling and highly incendiary sonic warfare and once more leave a certain hunger for more.

Closing with the instrumentally descriptive ‘epilogue’ of Leaving the Killingfield, the riveting album is an increasingly impressing and rousing encounter revealing more temptation with every listen. Skox is a name hard to forget from a band with a sound which seemingly has the same property going by the effect of Years of Legions over time.

Years of Legions is out now across most online stores.

https://www.facebook.com/Skoxband

Pete RingMaster 12/04/2016

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

For more exploration of the independent and promotional services check out http://www.zykotika.com/

Endless Recovery – Revel in Demise

ER_RingMaster Review

Just released is the second album from Greek metallers Endless Recovery, a thrash fuelled scavenging of the senses helping to get the new year of metal off to an accomplished and highly satisfying start. Revel in Demise unleashes ten voracious roars seeded in the heavy and thrash metal scene of the eighties but just as keen to involve other extreme spices in their tenacious confrontations.

Formed in 2011, the Athens hailing Endless Recovery soon made their mark on the local underground scene with debut EP Liar Priest the following year. With their first album Thrash Rider uncaged in 2013, the band was already garnering firm interest and support, one fuelled as potently by a live presence which has seen the band over time play with the likes of Deceptor, Enforcer, and numerous Greek underground artists. The follow-up to the well-received Resistant Bangers EP of 2014, the Xmas eve released Revel in Demise makes the band’s thickest forceful nudge on the broadest attention yet.

artwork_RingMaster Review     As ripe with speed metal voracity as thrash hostility, Revel in Demise sets its stall out straight away with opener Sinister Tales, a spicy instrumental of metal diversity magnetically leading the listener into the wilder throes of the album’s title track. The heftily inviting start makes a seamless transition into the more antagonistic and primal nature of its successor, riffs and rhythms an immediate barrage of muscle and attitude driven by the blackened vocal delivery of Michalis Skliros. Group shouts add to the drama already being spun by the sonic dexterity of guitarists Tasos Papadopoulos and Apostolos Papadimitriou, that theatre of temptation courted by the dark primal tone of Panayiotis Alikaniotis’ bass and the uncompromising attack of drummer Michalis Moatsos. It is a quickly gripping beginning to the release, one arguably low on major surprises but rich in full-on incitement.

The following Reaping Fire instantly savages and entices with its torrent of riffs and tangy sonic enterprise whilst Storming Death provides a darker and more hostile environment again coloured with fiery craft and exploits from across the band straight after. Both prove to be just as barbarous as they are welcoming in grooves and hooks, the rhythms and thrash fire in their hearts insatiable provocation driven in top gear. There is plenty of twist and turns to keep predictability at bay too, the first with its spiralling guitar endeavour and varied textures and the second by the vocal scourge of Skliros crawling over the senses as wiry tendrils strikingly vein the tempestuous proposition.

Leather Militia reveals thick eighties inspiration from start to finish but within a muddy tone and air which lifts it into something more intriguing and threatening than it might have been whilst Trapped in a Vicious Circle is a maelstrom of raw fury and adventurous tenacity. At times it is a tapestry of creative clarity and in others smog like intrusiveness on the senses, contrasts working a treat throughout just as Blood Countess does with its torrential invasion of biting rhythms and smothering riffery. It too is a wall of pleasing noise and ferocity veined by searing flames of guitar and captivating grooves, and equally skilled in creating a ravaging as inviting as it is destructive.

A surface familiarity between some tracks is not a major issue when looking deeper into the openly crafted encounters. The excellent Hypnos is a great example, its start and core shape similarly related to its predecessor but quickly given its own character by the cauldron of sonic and melodic enterprise unveiled by the band.

Another lofty highlight comes with Evoke Perdition, the track a hell for leather trespass that bewitches with its nagging grooves and repetitive forcefulness in riff and rhythm, Skliros once again courting the demonic depths with his black metal spiced vocal predation. A definite favourite, the song makes way for the closing assault of Lurking Evil and a dynamically thrilling end to Revel in Demise. The track is a predator, living up to its title with an urgency and creative rabidity which not so much lurks but swarms over the senses to thick success.

The album certainly ends on its biggest high with the last trio of incursions on ears and the soul, but from start to finish Revel in Demise hits the spot perfectly. Uniqueness is maybe not as potent as the instinctive creativity and energy which definitely enriches the encounter, bands such as Kreator and Exodus often reminded, but for an invigorating and thoroughly enjoyable experience Endless Recovery masterfully gets the job done.

Revel in Demise is out now via Witches Brew @ https://endlessrecovery.bandcamp.com/album/revel-in-demise

https://www.facebook.com/endless.recovery

Pete RingMaster 05/01/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

For more exploration of the independent and promotional services check out http://www.zykotika.com/

Biotoxic Warfare – Lobotomized

Biotoxic Warfare PIC_Reputation Radio/RingMaster Review

It would probably not be too unfair to say that Lobotomized is not overloaded with rich originality, though it has plenty of flavoursome exploits which stand out, but when it rocks like a barbarian smelling blood, which is most of the time, the debut album from Greek thrashers Biotoxic Warfare is one fiercely enjoyable and invigorating incitement. Wearing many of their inspirations on their sleeve, Slayer and Kreator more obvious ones, Biotoxic Warfare create the kind of hostility their name hints at but also weave in some juicy sonic imagination and temptation to ensure that every song within their first album offers unpredictability as well as spicy familiarity. The result is a compelling and thoroughly pleasing rampage to heartily recommend.

Hailing from Heraklion in Crete, Biotoxic Warfare began in 2012, drawing on the European and American thrash metal scene as well as the roots of the genre to create and hone their own ideation and sound. Making a potent impression on the Crete and Athens live scene soon after, the band released the Baptized In Blood And Greed EP in the April of 2013, its fury earning good reviews around the metal media. Live the band equally flourished, earning a potent reputation as they proceeded to support bands such as Suicidal Angels and Enforcer. 2014 saw the current line-up of vocalist Mike Kavalos, lead guitarist George Dimitrakakis, rhythm guitarist Stelios Sfendilakis, bassist Panagiotis Polioudakis, and drummer Orestis Drapaniotis in place and the recording of the band’s Vaggelis Theodorakis (Revolted Masses) mixed and mastered debut album.

Lobotomized Cover Art_Reputation Radio/RingMaster Review    Lobotomized quickly works on ears and imagination with its opening instrumental Mors Indecepta. The piece is a swift scene setter, its prowling almost lumbering body dragging portentous hues around as rhythms crawl slowly and intimidatingly through ears. At the same time guitars spin an evocative web of sonic expression until it all comes to a point where it all erupts into a predatory incitement of ears and imagination. The track does not make an instant dramatic persuasion, even as it increases its weight and intensity minute by minute, but over listens becomes a rich and potent introduction. Its transition into Proclaim The Gospel Of Lies is not as fluid as one would wish but quickly forgotten as the second track from a demonic declaration, sends forth riffs and rhythms clad with brutal rabidity, though they quickly become entangled with highly alluring grooves. The track is soon really storming the barricades, its riffs almost punk like and its slithers of grooves pure tangy acidity around the caustic growling of Kavalos. There is familiarity to its hooks and driving riffery yet not of sources or styles expected which adds to the intrigue and fun, as does the slip into dark cavernous, almost doomy terrain.

The song is sheer anthemic magnetism but equipped with expectations throwing exploits and imagination that makes song and band something fresh, a characteristic exploited again in Baptized In Blood And Greed. Again a bestial prowl is the springboard to furious and anthemic tenacity from all areas of the band, the bass a primal invitation as thick and potent as the fiery endeavour of the guitars. Another inescapably rousing conflict, the song makes way for the darker saunter of Dsyphoric Reality. Well its entrance is a deliberate stroll; the rest of its torrential offering is soon after an unbridled and carnivorous trespass of ears and pleasure. As in most songs, an ever twisting gait breeds a compelling and contagious swagger around which the craft of both guitarists shine with their individual creative flaming, the bass on its own agenda to prey on the passions with a rabid snarl and addictive rancor.

Drapaniotis is a perpetual magnet and provocateur with his inventive and constantly evolving swings, as proven once again in the album’s title track, though he has to hold back whilst the song makes a mouth-watering and melodically charming entrance. The itch to uncage energy and antagonism is soon inescapable and drummer, band, and song are soon descending on ears and appetite with a tempest of rabid rhythms and ravenous riffs guided by the ever raw and enjoyable hostility of Kavalos, potently backed vocally by Dimitrakakis. It is the rolling contagion and spicy slithers of sonic invention which steal the show though with the virulence of the song pure slavery as too, as indeed the ingenuity of the guitars in setting off kilter almost post-punk like sparks to the outstanding encounter.

The gripping savagery of Lust For Hate is next, bringing more of the similarity between the surface actions of some songs within Lobotomized but quickly spearing and defusing it with its own imaginative and searing tapestry of sonic colour. Not quite matching previous songs, it leaves ears and satisfaction enjoyably full before Parasitic Life and finally As We Rot (Promises of Heaven) bring the album to a thunderous close. The first of the pair is waspish in its grooving, a tasty and welcome irritant leading into the warfare of the song and returning with regular invention and success whilst the track breeds even broader rhythmic and infectious shoulders for the guitars to blaze from. It is a scintillating proposal matched by its successor, the album closer a tsunami of intensity and barbarism within a whirlpool of unforgiving energy and twisting enterprise, and quite irresistible.

As suggested there is plenty to find yourself familiar with in Lobotomized but it does not stop the album throwing up one of the most invigorating and enjoyable metal releases this year. Biotoxic Warfare is thrash metal embracing the old and new whilst infusing its own spice of character and imagination. This might not rank as your best metal album of 2015 but it just could be your favourite thrash encounter.

Lobotomized is available now via Slaney Records and @ https://biotoxicwarfare.bandcamp.com/album/lobotomized

https://www.facebook.com/pages/Biotoxic-Warfare/427903787269059 https://twitter.com/biotoxicwarfare

RingMaster 23/06/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard on Reputation Radio @ http://www.reputationradio.net

Atomik Destruktor – Unnatural Disorder

Atomik Destruktor 2015

If looking for some old school thrash inspired by the genre’s founders then the debut album from Portuguese metallers Atomik Destruktor is the perfect offering to get your teeth in to. Influenced by the likes of Destruction, Sodom, Kreator, Metallica, Slayer, Exodus…well you get the picture, the Braga quintet is straight down the line thrash metal but with an attitude and creativity which makes their release much more than expectations filling. Explosive and suitably aggressive, it is full-on enjoyment with a great anthemic presence, a mix which always goes down a treat.

Atomik Destruktor began in 2007, formed by three high school friends in vocalist Turtle, guitarist Gibson, and drummer Jota, with second guitarist Pedraça straight away brought into the band too. The departure of Turtle saw bassist Marco joining up alongside vocalist Paulo Thrasher, but it was only a few months later that the latter left and the returning Turtle completed the now in place line-up. 2008 saw the band ventured into the live scene and the following year the release of the Destroy, Disagree & Disrespect demo. In 2011 the band entered Grave Studios to record their first album. With live shows also going on, its recording took a long time to complete but finally it gets it’s unveiling via Helldprod Records, providing a fierce, volatile, and thoroughly enjoyable outing for thrash fans.

The album opens with Atomic Destruction, its initial touch samples within a distant but swiftly brewing web of guitar enterprise. They swiftly confront ears in full volume and tenacity though as riffs become a fiery and inviting incitement matched by jabbing beats and a meaty bassline. Top gear is soon locked in, the band charging with spicy grooves and rabid riffs across the senses and into a quickly greedy appetite. Turtles’ vocals are antagonistic and raw, the perfect fit for the erosive energy and driving riffery fuelling the highly agreeable encounter. Backing vocal calls and sharp hooks certainly hold no surprises, as the rest of the track in many ways, yet it matters little in the contagious and accomplished persuasion of the excellent song.

album cover - promoçao  A great start is matched by the following Attack of the Virus where again riffs and rhythms collude with ripe vocal bait to create a virulent slab of thrash addictiveness. Those earlier mentions influences are heard across song and of course album, extra colour to the infectious exploits of the band. A hostile swagger and enticing grooves unite to create a bruising march on the senses whilst a spicy sonic guitar solo towards the song’s end, is a moment revealing more of the skill and imagination of the band.

Comatose next is anything but, an explosive and hungry surge of nagging riffs and vicious rhythms stoked further by the angry tones of Turtle, whilst the album’s title track roams the senses with niggling infectiousness and bracing ferocity. Both also expel moments of inventive melodic acidity and uncompromising sonic intrusiveness which only captivates as it stirs up the already turbulent landscapes of the songs. The same again applies to the excellent Phantom City, its bruising and intensive assault, though less violent than the previous two, comes with tasty veins of imaginative grooving and searing individual endeavour courtesy of the guitars.

No song is anything less than vehement rhythmically, though that element is never short of imagination, and in basslines a constant offer of primal temptation, as found in the blistering confrontation almost punk like of Merciless Squad and after, the barbarous War Machine. Both as you would expect are loaded with anthemic persuasion and raw power, though the latter feels like a barrage of the most brutal armoury at the band’s creative disposal.

The same kind of extreme viciousness soaks final track DxDxD too, though it infuses its attack with hardcore attitude and punk energy for quite simply a mouth-watering riot of rock ‘n’ roll. It provides a thrilling end to a great encounter. Originality is at a premium but for unbridled fun and exhaustingly accomplished thrash metal Unnatural Disorder is a triumph all should take a romp with.

Unnatural Disorder is available from April 30th via Helldprod Records, digitally at https://atomikdestruktor.bandcamp.com/album/unnatural-disorder

https://www.facebook.com/atomik.destruktorthrash

RingMaster 30/04/2105

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard on Reputation Radio @ http://www.reputationradio.net

 

Golers – In ‘n’ Outlaws

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Originally out as a limited edition CD in 2013, In ‘n’ Outlaws is now digitally poised to pounce on the world and a tremendous assault it is too. The fourth album from Canadian punk metallers Golers, the release is a furious and ridiculously contagious slab of crossover ferocity throwing thrash, hardcore, and crust punk voracity into one bruising and belligerent treat. Every mention of the Vancouver quartet seems to draw comparisons to Slayer and DRI, and it is hard to be any different here, though there are plenty of other extreme provocateurs hinting in the spicing of the ultimately fresh fourteen track brawl.

Golers first uncaged their belligerent and sonic fury on ears in 1998, forming after the end of the band they were all playing in, Subversion. The following year saw debut album South Mountain Style uncaged, it establishing the core Golers sound which has snarled and rampaged ever since. 2nd Generation followed in 2004, offering a honed and more impacting flavouring which again was intensified and broadened a touch more with Backwoods Messages five years later. Sparking the keenest attention on the band yet, its well-received arrival was more than emulated by the appearance of In ‘n’ Outlaws with easy to expect greater success coming with its digital unveiling. Recorded with producer/engineer/manager Rob Shallcross (Gene Hoglan, Strapping Young Lad, West Of Hell), the album commandingly and tenaciously shows why Golers has been so greedily devoured on records an live across North America and Europe alike, a presence taking in shows and tours with bands such as Toxic Holocaust, Kreator, The Accused, Napalm Death, Suicidal Tendencies, Dayglo Abortions, Destruction, Ghoul, and Prong. The ultimate step of recognition has yet to be breached though; something In ‘n’ Outlaws definitely has the potential to trigger given the opportunity.

The album’s title track roars in ears first, riffs and rhythms an instant bombardment, gripping attention and an early appetite with force. The great blend of vocals led by Walter ‘Chainsaw Charlie’ Mason, straight away ignite an already contagious offering whilst the sonic craft of Derek ‘Henry the 1st‘ Rockall squeals with appeal against the caustic scrub of riffery from Mason. In 'n' Outlaws_fullCatching the anthemic essences of thrash and punk in one almighty invitation, it is a thrilling start potently backed straight away by the even more hostile Lemon Eyed Devil and the following irritability of Angle Disruption. The first of the two is sheer primal virulence, vocals and grooves a spiteful bait against the fiercely provocative muscles of Jason ‘Cranswick’ Mosdell’s swings and Stuart ’Jonny Goler’ Carruthers predatory bass lines. Its punk rabidity is matched by that of its successor, a song with a bee in its bonnet and malevolence in its breath. Again though, every hook and rhythmic swipe seems to have a devious contagion matched by grooves and riffs, an enslavement of ears and imagination upon which the vocal squalls impressively vent.

Behind the Sun embraces a heavy metal spicing in its corrosive turbulence of sound and aggression next, the track as addictive as those before but finding a rawer, nastier nature to seduce and scar simultaneously. It is a bracing and abrasive quality which is just as vocal in Inbred Militia and soon after Kamikaze. Both tracks brawl with the senses and ignite emotions, the first blessed with a delicious crunchy growling bassline amidst a tempest of guitar and vocal inhospitality. It is pure addiction; the bands thrash intent the raging force of the compelling intrusion. The latter of the pair savages with every syllable and note expelled but again has a catchy enticement to its grooves which leave ears basking.

It is fair to say that there is no weak moment across the whole of In ‘n’ Outlaws; some songs might have a surface similarity at times but each reveals its own distinct character in time, as proven by the sonically inflamed Paradise Entrails, with its bewitching niggling and repetitive grooving, and the vicious When Shit Goes Down. This track scowls and abuses with every rhythmic flex and vocal glare, it’s brief but inescapable ire undiluted intimidation with, as in the previous track, a melodic toxicity to share.

The more composed and melodically fuelled Scratch steps forward next, it’s sonic enterprise a riveting tonic which as you might rightly assume, is soon smothered by an unfriendly vocal confrontation still impressing in its multi prong attack, and a more classic metal coloured voracity. It is another slight twist in the album and nature of songs, one turned a few degrees more in the hellacious storm of Quickshit McGraw with its exhausting intensity and melody induced trespass of the senses, and again in the rabid punk flirtation of Country Blumpkin, this another heady peak in the album.

The album ends as welcomingly riotously and adversarial as it began, Alcoholics Unanimous coming first and bellowing with rancor and rhythmic violence; a malice tempered again by irresistible and unrelenting grooves. It is a tremendous onslaught from the start but finds a new ground of addictiveness with its slip into a punk bred anthem towards the end. The Path is equally as incendiary and persuasive with its concussive charge and vocal causticity, whilst the closing Riff Cult / Relations just stands before ears and growls them out in sound, vocals, and attitude to provide a mouth-watering, energy sapping end to a thoroughly invigorating and rigorously enjoyable album.

Golers will be a secret to a great many no more, new hungry appetites sparked once In ‘n’ Outlaws hits the webby place. The album might not be quite announced as the very best thrash/punk metal offering in history but it is destined to be one of the favourites.

In ‘n’ Outlaws is digitally available from February 6th via Bandcamp. Check https://www.facebook.com/pages/The-Golers-Inbred-Militia-/103231376426551 for details.

RingMaster 05/02/2015

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