Pink Tatami – Chapter and Verse

Pink Tatami

It is with great thanks to the vocalist of Pink Tatami, Mike Marques that we can bask in one of the most invigorating and downright thrilling releases of the year so far. The frontman of the French band introduced himself and colleagues with the hope that a review of their debut album Chapter & Verse might be possible. One blast of just its opening song and a review was not only possible but essential. Consisting of twelve exhaustingly imaginative fusions of alternative rock and metal, with plenty more besides lurking and seducing from within, the album is a breath-taking tantalisation. Bulging with virulent hooks, deceptive shadows, and an irresistible invention which hooks its claws in from the first second to the magnetic last, this is a debut of not only an outstanding band but of a potentially major force.

More than merely flirting with experimental tendencies, the sound of Pink Tatami feeds off the richest essences within metal and rock, every song a distinctive individual combining for an enthralling and mouthwatering proposition. Toying with and igniting the imagination and passions like a mix of Faith No More meets Kontrust with the devilry of Dog Fashion Disco and Destrage adding to the constantly evolving recipe with an extra spice of 6:33, sound and album roars and teases with all the charm of a bestial predator, the seduction of a sultry temptress, and the psychotic lures of a deranged puppeteer, though not always in that order or combination.

Recorded over a two year period, Chapter & Verse leap at ears and imagination right away, the Paris quartet simultaneously stroking coverand threatening the senses with dark riffs and rhythms with the entrance of opener Twisted Lip. The track soon settles into a feisty keen stride, the bass of Alex Ghilardi growling imposingly whilst the guitar of Florent Beaucousin coaxes and fires up thoughts in league with the richly impressive tones of Marques. It is an immediately flaming temptation which elevates its psyche metal seeded bait with the pop rock twist of the chorus. That Faith No More comparison is a swift suggestion though song and Pink Tatami only use it as flavouring to their ripe feast of sound. Across its saunter the song fuses in some funk twists with a Red Hot Chili Peppers lilt and a strong melodic rock grunge like enticement, an ingenuity which only adds to the potency.

The very strong start is soon shaded by the following Sinistra, which opens up its lure with an electro resonance, its stimulating wash surrounding the welcoming vocals and subsequent blaze of guitar steered by the punchy beats of drummer Bamby Alfonço. Again there is a definite Patton-esque flavour to the teasing which only accentuates the rich tones of the song. Flowing into slower romancing avenues and rapaciously toned energetic ventures, the track keeps thoughts and appetite on their toes and greedy for more which False Rebounds is more than happy to offer. Sinister whispers lurk as a singular guitar brings the song into view, the dark ambience standing over the emergence of the song until pushed aside by funky enterprise and bouncy vocals which step in to steal attention. It is a constant balance though, the shadows never far from making their narrative heard alongside evocative melodies and the livelier urgency of the track ever eager to have its say. It results in a riveting and thrilling proposition though in many ways just the appetiser to its quite magnificent successor.

The title track to the album is simply glorious, from its opening scrub of riffs and pulsating hypnotic beats a ridiculously virulent and anthemic suasion. The start has a Buzzcocks feel to its tempting and is soon courted by surf rock like croons and floating harmonies. Capture of heart and soul is done within those opening seconds, leaving the rest of the track to wrap tighter bonds around their submission. Into its stride the track enlists the contagion of rap metal with hip hop seeded vocals chopping across the ears whilst a sonic mystique dances provocatively in the background before erupting into a blazing sun of impressive vocal soars and searing melodies. It is easily the best song on the album, and the others are mighty, and one of the best to grace the year to date, much like the album.

Fears that there might be an anti-climax in store after such a triumph are soon chased off by both The Employee and “A” is for…, the first stalking ears at through dark vocals upon a stirring ridge of riffs before expanding into an intrigue noir kissed adventure with a sultry melodic breath. A track which manages to smooch with and haunt the senses at the same time it is another striking slice of invention; corrosive floods of aggression and predacious riffs having as much of a say in the painting of the song’s mysterious canvas as the mesmeric vocals and entrancing melodies, not forgetting the arcane tempting watching on. Its successor brings a ska toned walk to its delicious pop rock dance, crooning and embracing the listener in another RHCP spiced escapade which entrances and mischievously plays.

   The caustic touch of Dumas & Dos Santos brings another flood of ardour upon the album, the carnivorous bass tones and rapier like aggression of the guitars and rhythms irresistible as they thrust a violent furnace of intensity through the ears. It is tempered though by an infectious side to its provocation which increases the epidemic invasiveness of the explosive treat. It is a pleasure taken on further by the dark suggestiveness of We Can Help You, a track veined by exploratory sonic adventure and intrusively appealing twists, and the intensively shadowed Dorothea Tanning, its tale and invasive sounds an enveloping cloak of danger and creative spite. The song roars and thrashes about as its theme unveils every black twist and intimidating turn whilst merging passages of intimidating seduction into the turmoil.

Adhesive spits and romances with its diverse wares next, the song a gentle caress in certain moments and a voracious assault in others reminding of Russian punk rock band Biting Elbows at times. The song is surpassed by the following Evokes, a spiral of sonic addiction from its first seconds before careering into the passions on a torrent of punk/metal rabidity. Grooves and riffs squall irresistibly across the bow of the rhythmically challenging song, vocals adding irrepressibly to the raucous tempest. It is a stunning and quite brutal peak to the mountainous range of the album, a Breed 77 toxicity only adding to the inescapable trap.

Closing on the mild in comparison Eye Bank, a song where thoughts of Poets Of The Fall come to mind but just another tone in something unique to Pink Tatami, Chapter & Verse is one of those gifts you cannot turn away from without assistance, an enslaving incitement with far reaching snares. Though long in the making, the album is only the debut of Pink Tatami, a quite magnificent and accomplished one admittedly, but just the start of their journey. It is scary to think how good they have the potential to become and extremely exciting.

The self-released Chapter & Verse is available now!

https://www.facebook.com/pinktatami

http://pinktatamiband.bandcamp.com/album/chapter-verse

10/10

RingMaster 17/04/2014

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard from

http://www.audioburger.com

 

 

BulBul – Hirn Fein Hacken

EOM57_PromoWallet

Ok I will admit I had not come across Austrian band Bulbul before being handed their new album Hirn Fein Hacken, a release which sees them returning after six years from not sure where, but from here on in after the intensive psyche examination presented by their latest, a backward investigation is sitting high on the list of musts. An insatiable and mischievous, not forgetting criminally addictive, exploration of every delicious element you can imagine to rile, ignite, and seduce the very core of the mind and senses, Hirn Fein Hacken is quite simply sonic irreverence and quite brilliant.

The first sign of Bulbul we can find is the release of their self-titled debut album in 1997, Bulbul a one man project of guitarist/vocalist Raumschiff Engelmayr at the time. With Derhunt linking up on bass, the band released second and again self-titled album in 1999, via as the first via Trost Records. Drummer Ddkern joined not long after as the band continued to experiment with sound, imagination, and their fans minds through their third and fourth albums in 2003 and 2005 respectively, again under the same monikers as the others. 2006 saw fifth album BlllBlll unleashed whilst the Patrick Pulsinger produced 6 was uncaged via Exile On Mainstream two years later to strong acclaim and attention. Hirn Fein Hacken is as mentioned the band’s return, again via EOM, and takes little time in slipping under the skin of the senses and psyche as well as giving the passions an irresistible creative toxicity to feast upon.

The Vienna hailing band’s influences according to the press release include the likes of The Kinks, Cpt. Beefheart, Rhys Chatham, Django Reinhart, Abner Jay, Fats Domino, and Bob Dylan, but as the album seduces with its ingenious seductive dementia we would suggest artists such as Kontrust, De Staat, Yello, and Fantomas as a starting place. Opener Fire offers a wide groan before bringing all of its thought and energy into a concentrated rhythmically driven nagging of ears and senses. Riffs gently niggle as the bass provides a fuzz kissed tonic to greedily swallow whilst all the while strong vocals dance over the bait with devilry in their tone and relish on their lips. The song continues to swagger and weave across the imagination, enterprise of the guitar as boisterously naughty as it is creative and the bass an irresistible growling incitement impossible to tear emotions away from.

It is a magnetic start which has little difficulty in making slaves of thoughts and passions, leaving the following Uhu a willing canvas to play with. An electro simmering ebbs and flows initially, its voice slightly smothered but eager to break free to greater clarity. That aspect is taken by the funk bred grooves and suasion of the guitar matched by the vivacious vocal delivery. The song smoulders, never lifting its gaze or energy from a wanton sway of its body and sex infused melodies. Not as dramatic as its predecessor but equally as enthralling, the song makes way for I hea eh scho lång nix mea, a song which like the first secures its initial conquest through repetitive coaxing before exploring an industrially inspired realm with clanking tubes, concussive temptations, and unpredictable almost maniacal imagination. The track pushes the earlier thoughts of De Staat to the fore, the song a cousin of their Sweatshop track without the same feverish urgency. It is a glorious trap for the passions warming them up for the even greater infestation to follow.

That virulence comes in the shape of the ridiculously addictive and epidemically infectious instrumental Kanzla. From its first second, guitars respectfully grind against the ears whilst the bass again adds a barracuda like tone to the abrasing lure of the song. The rhythmic restraint with punctuating twists of the drums only reinforces the delicious irritancy as the track persists with its rub through sonic rises and falls. The dip into a brief sultry teasing only inflames the senses more before the track reverts to its feverish meshuga of a tango, intermittently interrupting its blaze with further inventive twists.

Both the psychotic Fisole, where instruments are abused and random items employed for a warped bedlamic cacophony, and the noise rock taunting of Quicksand keep the passions breathless, the second of the two finding an element of Melvins and even Pere Ubu to its spellbinding guitar sculpted temptation. As impressively thrilling as they are the pair are only the appetiser for the pinnacle of the album, Gurdy. The track takes a breath before cantering eagerly through the ears, spicy short guitar strokes and rumbling riffing spurred on by the darkly sinister vocals and unrelenting rhythms. The track is pure 100% unbudging contagion, every flavour, trait, and inventive bait pure addictiveness. Imagine Mike Patton, Pryapsime, and Queens Of The Stone Age engaged in an illicit enterprise and you have the quite magnificent Gurdy.

Genderman Can provides a raw punk fuelled rampage next, vocals and bass antagonistic whilst the guitar boils the air with a blues tasting sonic toxin which again is only good for health and passions, especially its closing warped and sizzling smothering of the senses. From here the album relaxes its energetic stance to unveil a pair of slowly burning treats. Bomb comes first, its opening air awash with the fiery country blues flames which were hinted at on its predecessor. With pulsating beats and a psychedelic ambience drifting over song and listener whilst the vocals like the music flickers within a seductive fire formed around the narrative, the track is a mesmeric enchantment littered and primed with broad intrigue and unruly invention, but within a relatively sobering confine.

The closing A To Beans is just aural sex, a slow hip swerving seductress with smooth rhythms, a throbbing intent, and a sinister vocal invitation which should be avoided but impossible not to embrace as deeply as the noir blessed sounds. It is a ridiculously captivating end to a quite sensational release. As these last words are written contemplation of how BulBul avoided our attention is loud and incriminations rife, but it is hard to imagine previous releases being better than Hirn Fein Hacken so maybe this was the right time to find the band. We are heading back into their history as you read and suggest you do the same once you have been infected by this mad beauty.

http://www.bulbul.at/

http://bulbul.bandcamp.com/album/hirn-fein-hacken

10/10

RingMaster 08/04/2014

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard from

http://www.audioburger.com

 

 

Hardcore Anal Hydrogen – The Talas of Satan

Hardcore Anal Hydrogen

Sometimes a release just stops you in your tracks, presses an irresistibly inviting hand into yours, and pulls the psyche into an undiscovered experience which ignites every pore, thought, and emotion. Such is the case with the unpredictable, thoroughly compelling, and insatiably gripping new Hardcore Anal Hydrogen album, The Talas of Satan. Though their third album it is the first to cross the always eccentricity inspired greedy appetite of the site, which is quite irritating realising we had missed out on the previous sure to be thought provoking creativity of the French quartet. Their new album is quite glorious, an exploration where predictability and assumptions do not even get a sniff of realism in its exhausting inventive tapestry of sound and imagination. It is an unforgettable adventure everyone should experience at least one in their lives if only to show that originality and bold invention is not a dying trait of modern music.

Hardcore Anal Hydrogen was formed in 2009 with the meeting of Martyn Clement (guitar/backing vocals) and Sacha Valony (vocals/keys/flute). A duo in the studio expanding to a quartet with the addition of bassist Jonathan Marole and drummer Damien Salis on stage, the band has released two albums before the new revelation, Fork You and Division Zero in 2009 and 2011 respectively. The band’s sound is a fusion of metal and ethnic music, brewed into rabidly diverse and fascinating ventures in turn soaked in experimentation and imagination. Released via Apathia Records, The Talas of Satan is an eclectic dance of modern and traditional spices thrust through a maelstrom of structural instability and physical might aligned to disorganised invention sculpted with the purest skill and instinct.

Every track on the album is a unique character in presence and sound, making a general description or comparison for the album impossible. logoThat is a wonderful essence which constantly exploits and ignites the imagination from the opening track Dhamar. Hand drums, possible tablas open up the track, the eastern lure instantly captivating as the thick blaze of metal spawned riffs and pungent rhythmic caging join in soon after. Still merging both ethnic and aggressive counterparts, the track steers ears into a groove and psyche metal escapade which constantly relaxes to flirt with that initial Indian folk tempting. The vocals scratch and scowl as an additional texture to the opening piece, provoking thoughts of Korn whilst musically elements suggest Motherjane and Pryapisme, the last a constant and most accurate relation to Hardcore Anal Hydrogen.

The mouthwatering start is swiftly reinforced by the outstanding Ramahd, a ravenous squall of sonic and hardcore hostility with plenty of sonic and electronic toxicity which again sends the passions into a hectic scramble for more. There is a definite Mad capsule Markets feel to the rawest psychotic aspects of the track whilst the guest scratching skills of DJ Mattéo produces a spice you can find anywhere from Limp Bizkit to The Kennedy Soundtrack for another potent flavour to the virulent contagion. It is a bordering on pestilential treat with rhythms which resonate in their uniquely specific tone, a breath-taking enticement taken further by Release The Crackhead. The track prowls and prances with a posing gait which dances mischievously around the ears, coaxing closer attention for the subsequent unleashing of blackened vocal spite and dramatic intensity. With more shadows and colours to its imposing endeavour than on a dysfunctional TV, the track courts every emotion from passion to fear, seduction to madness .

The following Pentamère is a celestially borne instrumental with twinkling sonics and bubbling expression within its expansive flight. It is a piece of music which at first was not a certain success for ears but once it stretched its warm arms into an oriental sunset with tribal chants and charmed vocals, submission was rapidly given and retained by the following Kalakaka. The storm unleashes a punk metal ferocity, its persistently twisting sonic grooves entwining the senses as the vocals rage with tempestuous expression, again the previously mention Japanese band coming to mind. The track scores and rages against ears and emotions, taking stabs with rhythmic spite and antagonistic riffery whilst vocals torment thoughts and its victim within the climax. It is another song which unveils a new facet and side to the album, as does quite brilliantly Rupack. It isa track which stomps and dances with the imagination through fevered keys and menacing rhythms. Side steps into jazzy avant-garde revelry makes a delicious fuse to the already smiling appetite helping it develop a greater predatory hunger. Imagine a mix of Pryapisme, Cardiacs, Kontrust, and Mucho Tapioca and you get a whiff of the mania superbly offered.

Next up COI rages with chucky riffs and brutal rhythms for another addictive metallic onslaught; guitars scything air and senses with vicious intent whilst bedlamic vocals find a new vitriol to their grazing tones. Once more though there is a wealth of additives which ensure song and experience is one of a kind, just like the very short sonic disorientation which KRR offers, the track psyche/hardcore at its noisy inventive best.

The seemingly distressed passion of 한오백년 probesthoughts next, driven by the equally intense guest vocals of Doowah before Coq au vin strolls in with a big naughty grin on its face and an electro/Nintendo devilry which masterfully teases around the coarse punk vocals and ravenous riffs. It is no surprise at this point to hear the song unlock a bedlam of ideas and psychotic imagination converted to equally deranged sounds, continuing the strengths of the album so far. The song is a beautiful meshuga sparking a rapturous and maybe equally cracked ardour for it.

The album ends just as powerfully compelling as it started, Chautal a rigorous mix of ethnic and metallic genius which flows as if family whilst offering extremes in beauty and character. It is impossible not to immerse in and be seduced by the track and all of its imagination, drama and epic intent making for a sensational finale. The Talas of Satan is quite brilliant and Hardcore Anal Hydrogen a rare proposition which creates something that is truly new and inspirational, not forgetting unbridled fun.

https://apathiarecords.bandcamp.com/album/the-talas-of-satan

https://www.facebook.com/hardcoreanalhydrogen

http://hardcoreanalhydrogen.com/

10/10

Ringmaster 01/04/2014

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard from

http://www.audioburger.com

 

Secrets Of Sin – Future Memories

SecretsOfSin_Band

Making their world introduction with debut album Future Memories, German band Secrets Of Sin certainly gives food for thought with their imaginative and adventurous sound. The nine track release is not without flaws and is openly declares that there is plenty within the band to come out and improve upon, but quite simply the album is one rather appetising encounter that is full of promise and lies in the hands of the band ready to be built upon.

The band’s demo EP Fairytales of 2009 caught the imagination of their home underground press and fans, their merger of symphonic and melodic metal making a strong exciting persuasion but with Future Memories it is fair to say that Secrets Of Sin has leapt forward in their sound and invention. As mentioned the album declares the band as nowhere near being the finished article, if there is ever such a thing in music, but the quintet certainly has the ammunition and skill to become a strong and lingering presence in world metal.

Consisting of guitarist/vocalist Robert Mansk, guitarist Niklas Rach, drummer Michael Schier, keyboardist Philipp Eiperle, and newest Secrets Of Sin - Future Memories - Artworkmember vocalist Christina Groner, Secrets Of Sin take little time upon Future Memories in sparking good thoughts with opener Deus Ex Machina. The track is a brief industrialised dawning provoking rich ideas before merging into the initial electro stomp of Utopia. From here synths make a swirling beckon before the orchestral heights of the keys veined by thumping rhythms immerse the ear in epically toned persuasion. Into its galloping stride the song makes for a strong if unsurprising adventure though expectations are soon displaced by excitement as the wonderful voice and delivery of Groner lays their touch on the senses. She has a sirenesque quality which mesmerises even within the more demanding and caustic squalls of Mansk and the heavy boned sounds building up crescendos of melodic flame and intensity. Reverting to again more familiar essences for the latter symphonic pressing, the almost Nightwish meets The Browning like track is a potent and gripping start to the album with imagination and thoughts finding a steady and pleasing place within the less than unique but enterprising encounter.

Both Alive and Once Upon A Time continue the impressive start if certainly with the first not reaching the same heights set by its predecessor. With Mansk taking the vocal lead the song is a less dramatic and exploratory song but again a more than solid track with the guitars and keys painting a sonically sculpted melodic weave to satisfy the ear before passing over to its successor and its emotive and classically weaned beauty. An elegant ballad with Groner bringing further irresistible temptation to the guitar and string hued evocation, the song from a regular start brings in sun clad melodic flames and a sultry ambience which as it expands its horizons offers greater temptation to mark a step up for the release, a rise soon cemented by the blistering assault of Inside. A spiral of guitar sets things in motion before keys and rhythms stretch its touch and the metal reaped vocals of Mansk herald a heavier suasion. Another step up comes with Groner adding her presence to the continually hungry song, and it has to be said that with all respect to the rest of the band it is no coincidence that songs and the album find even greater potency and originality when the lady opens her lungs.

The two following songs Hope Dies Last and The Joker are arguably the least fluid and for many one suspects  will be the least successful in persuading their ardour but for invention and bringing something new in imagination to symphonic metal, they emerge as our favourite and the most exciting songs on the album. The first opens with a straightforward heavy/epic metal like lure before Groner and a great throaty bass sound start picking and teasing at the ear with mischief and adventure. It is an inspired moment leading to another successful union of the two vocalists alongside a wash of melodic heat which rises in temperature with skill and hunger. At times thoughts of Hammers of Misfortune rear their suggestion whilst at other twists and especially in its successor there is a definite Kontrust devilry at play. The second of the pair beckons with a brass lure before diving into another electro waltz blended into a techno metal like suasion. Soon the metallic intent takes over with Mansk opening the vocal narrative but things never settle into predictability as sound, vocals, and band leap persistently and scintillatingly from note to note and idea to idea. It completes easily the best part of the album for personal tastes and the area where you hope the band push and experiment more with in the future.

The extremely potent and stirring power ballad Shadows, the song a merger of tender light and heavier menacing dark with Groner and the keys in conflict and union with the intensive guitar and muscular rhythm storm, and the twelve minute epic presence of Civilisation stretch thoughts and the now truly lit passion for the release further. The second of the two does meander along with undulating success to be honest, losing some of the undoubted grip it forged early on though it is mainly down to its length you suspect, but musically and with the keys especially vibrant bringing a contagious embrace amongst a delicious wash of discord taunting throughout it is another great track.

Completed by firstly Puppet Play where the band and Groner flirt with alternative rock and the very decent closing ballad What I Am, Secrets Of Sin leaves a very healthy appetite and anticipation for their future offerings. With room for improvement but full of very enjoyable and enterprising imagination Future Memories is a great introduction to fresh adventure.

http://www.secretsofsin.de/

8/10

RingMaster 30/08/2013

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard from

http://www.audioburger.com

Russkaja – Energia!

russkaja01152013-2

    Sounding like the bastard offspring of the Austrian Strauss Brothers with a bent for insatiable adrenaline fuelled folk metal and exhausting jazz, Russkaja is a dream or delicious nightmare for those with the wildest adventure in their musical hearts. Fusing and brewing up a storm of crazed polka beats, bedlamic punk rock energy, and a multitude of other instinctive essences from a tempest of styles and sonic cultures, their sound is as distinctive as it is wonderfully challenging. Self-penned as Russian Turbo Polka Metal, Russkaja create music which is a jaw dropping joy and certainly across the fun of new album Energia! ignites thoughts of the likes of Gogol Bordello, P&H, and Kontrust within a unique and wholly addictive individual stance.

Formed by Georgij A. Makazaria (ex-Stahlhammer), the band consists of a group of Russian, Austrian, and Ukrainian musicians. Though begun in Vienna the band has a certain Russian flavour to their near manic creativity, an imagination with a tongue firmly entrenched in its cheek but dripping with enterprise, pure invention, and irresistible anthemic lunacy. Since 2006 the band has played more than 300 concerts across Europe and found major success in their ‘adopted countries’ of Austria and Germany. Four impressive appearances at Wacken Open Air has lit up attention and a growing fever for their sound with shows at Chiemsee Reggae Festival, Nova Rock, and numerous World music and Jazz festivals furthering their brewing presence, thirty Festival events occurring across Europe last year alone. Third album Energia! feels like a trigger to major things for the band as it teases the senses during its irrepressible encounter but then we at The RR are suckers for aural mischief and meddlesome ingeniousness.

With the lyrics predominantly in Russian but with plenty of other national flavouring included throughout, the songs are said to be a475_Russkaja postmodern version of Russian folklore; all you need to know is that they make up another thrilling thread to a weave of sensational limb commanding and passion firing brilliance, starting with the title track. The song takes the length of one mere breath to scoop up the passions in a dance of teasing guitar and the bear like vocals of Makazaria. Into its stride the song reaps a ska/reggae swagger to its strolling stride with the horns adding a gentle flame of heat to the brewing urgency of the now romp approaching gait. The sparks of brass instantly bring a grin and warmth to the heart, the trumpet of Rainer Gutternigg and potete (a unique hybrid of trumpet and trombone) of H-G. Gutternigg teasing and guiding to the head bobbing strokes from  the guitar of Engel Mayr.  Firing up the gypsy inside us all, the song is instantly one of the pinnacles of the album though closely challenged by each subsequent riot of sound and dance.

The following Barada and Radost Moja continue the flush of excitement, the first with a slower walk within sun soaked rays of smouldering brass and sensitive guitar caresses though you sense a wickedness just waiting to free itself throughout. Like a muscular Bad Manners, honestly, the track sways and lights the air with compulsive temptation whilst its successor leaps in like a court jester, a kaleidoscope of aural colours primed to tease and persuade the most potent ardour. Featuring Wladimir Kaminer and Yuriy Gurzhy, the song is a delicious romp of melodic rascality, a delicious devilment of toe tapping merriment with street corner shadows to pounce within the sinewy tones of the chorus. With the drums of Mario Stübler framing all, the firm rim of the song breaks into a sizzling waltz of seductive melodic sunshine before regaining its hold for another muscular climax, and completion of one more major highlight within Energia!, one of so many.

Soaked in diversity as much as crafty imagination, the likes of the brawling punk lined Autodrom with its schizo breath, Violina Mia with the violin of Ulrike Müllner placing its emotive kisses on the ear, and Surrealnaja with the bass of Dimitro Miller finding its throatiest presence within the sweltering whimsy of the polka embrace, all reap distinct and individual fields of invention and musical textures.

The album holds back two more of its greatest moments for the latter end of the release, firstly with the thrash/grind metal coated Dikije Deti. Of course it is not long before the track is flaunting its aural knavery with siren like melodic inducement but punctuates it with explosions of metallic ferocity which seamlessly erupts from the surrounding energetic folk parade. Tanzi Tanzi is another punk n roll bruising veined with unhinged melodic revelry and one more ardour causing triumph.

With only the closer Sorry unable to keep the fires which raged from the opener continuing to burn as furiously, though it is an impressively sculpted piece of emotive adventure, the Napalm Records released Energia! is a magnificent tempest of intoxicating joy. It might not be for everyone but certainly any fans of folk metal and psyched melodic invention will be wetting themselves in delirium for what Russkaja conjure.

www.facebook.com/russkajaofficial

10/10

RingMaster 10/04/2013

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard from

http://www.audioburger.com

The Physicists – Wayne Newton Hulabaloo

The Physicists

Finnish industrial science metal band The Physicists is a new treat for us and one which going by their new single Wayne Newton Hulabaloo points to its creators being another flame to add to the fires of passionate preferences already garnered over the years. The single is immense, an eclectic riot of rich imagination, insatiable energy, and potent inspirational enterprise. If like us the Helsinki trio is new to you then their new song is the perfect doorway into their seemingly eccentric and wonderfully inventive world.

Taking a look and listen at some of their earlier tracks before addressing the single, The Physicists seem a band which brings an essential breath of experimentation and intrigue to their creativity, the clutch of songs briefly investigated all with an unique presence and gait let alone diverse sound. The new song is no different and a track which is the band at their invitingly mischievous best.

Wayne Newton Hulabaloo is said to continue the scientific tracks which began on their debut album Observation in 2011. The band itself planted its seeds in 2004 becoming a fully functioning trio in 2006 consisting of MC Omega zero (guitar, vocals, loops), Eerosmith (drums), and Gravitinus XVI (guitar). After a series of explosive and unforgettable gigs their first EP Welcome To The Dark Room appeared a year later and was said to split opinions between rapture and confusion, something you feel all their songs and music will wonderfully do. 2008 saw the unleashing of The Old Religion EP as well as the departure of Gravitinus XVI who was replaced by bassist F.P. Meridian. A year later rhythm guitarist David joined and the band took the whole of 2010 recording their first album which included the leaving of the newest member. Produced by Hiili Hiilesmaa and released like the single on Inverse Records, the album drew strong acclaim and enthusiastic reactions. The current line-up was completed by 2012 with new guitarist M-Theory and drummer Bill Rubin replacing Eerosmith. The new single finds the band at first glance on an even greater plateau than before and looks set to make the band a wider known proposition.

Wayne Newton Hulabaloo opens with a deep velvety guitar caress before opening up into a stroll of thumping rhythms, throaty vocals, and hypnotic melodic teasing. It is an instant hypnotic dance for the senses with sonic dazzling and mixed voices, smooth, seductive, and growling. The brief explosive chorus with an additional female beauty is sensational within the rampant and persistent sinewy drive of the track. It is mere moments before voice and certainly feet are complying with the persuasive charms and enthralling energy at work. It is a techno metallic feast with melodic manna and sonic conjuring for which there is no resistance. Warm and aggressive the track is an irresistible brew of sound which plays like a mix of Kontrust, De Staat, and Bondo Do Role.

It is a sensational single which has recruited our passions and no doubt will grab many more recruits to the band given the chance. That is up to you but we can only recommend letting it make its persuasion.

http://www.facebook.com/pages/The-Physicists/125952537425441

http://www.thephysicists.net

RingMaster 11/01/2013

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Interview with Leon Welburn of Mammal Hum

Sometimes a band steps forward to truly captivate and excite the senses, to thrill the heart and fire up the imagination like very few others are able. One such band is UK psychedelic pop band Mammal Hum, a quartet of musicians who have created not only one of the best albums this year but treated the passions to mischievous sounds of textured and layered majestic beauty. The release is a mouthwatering expanse of diversity and mesmeric soundscapes to ignite open ardour towards it. Not just wanting but needing to learn more about the band, album, and the minds behind such a unique release we had the pleasure to fire off questions to band member Leon Welburn.

Hello Leon and welcome to the site.

Firstly please just introduce the band.

Hi everyone. We are Mammal Hum, a four-piece from Hull, made up of Nick Cammack, Simon Andrew, Sarah Mole and myself, Leon Welburn

We have to ask firstly about the band name…?

Ha! The band name was a laborious process. We very nearly all fell out over it. So, four part harmonies are an essential part of our sound. We saw it as a whole-band voice. A communal ‘hum’ with each member vital to the mix. Hum can also be extended to form the word Humber, the river by which our hometown rests. We’d like to think its different if anything else.

Can you tell us how Mammal Hum began and how Geoff Travis comes into the equation even though it is before the band is a reality I believe?

Nick formed a band a few years back in London, involved with Blanco Y Negro. Geoff Travis was linked to them at the time and basically Nick landed a deal after speaking to him. Then, the band went their separate ways. Nick returned to Hull in 2008 while the others continued to pursue different musical projects. A few months after this, I put my house up for sale, and Nick was one of the prospective buyers. He didn’t end up putting an offer in, but he did notice a Hammond Organ in the corner of the room, and we started chatting about music and bands. A week later I saw Nick in our local pub, and we agreed to have a jam one night with Sarah, who we had both known for a while. The band was pretty much formed that night.

What are the musical experiences for you all leading up to the band?

Nick and Simon have been in a variety of bands for years, Sarah is into DJing, and although this is my first serious band, I’ve been playing and recording solo music for about ten years.

Now a quartet, I read the band began life as a trio before Simon joined up, if so did that mean you used guest drummers, electronic or went without?

We started as a six-piece band with a drummer, two guitarists, bassist, two keyboards, and four singers. Quite hefty really. We lost one guitarist early on when he moved away. Then our drummer left to work abroad. For a while we tried to work as with drum machines and loops, and take it in an acoustic direction, but it just didn’t sit right. One of our ladies (Nick’s partner) departed to have their first child. At this point we realised we desperately needed drums. We knew Simon played guitar in another band, approached him one evening, and he agreed to rehearse with us. The minute he began drumming, we knew he was exactly the person we needed. A loose jazz style, with lots of heavy, rolling toms. That was, and still is, the Mammal line-up.

We used the tag psychedelic pop which most seem to use to describe your music for our review of your new album What’s Behind Us Is Not Important. It is a description which just grazes your sound to be honest, how would you explain your music and intent to newcomers?

Bright and breezy pop nuggets with layered group harmonies, chunky guitar and big drums scattered in and out of various tracks. It’s an album that tries its best not to be too serious. That’s not to say we are deliberately tongue in cheek or humoured. The songs just seem to happen this way.

What are the influences which have had the biggest impact and effect on your individual and band sound? One imagines there are many whispers which spice your ideas.

We always liked the idea of not being tied to a specific musical genre. We have so many different influences from the Beatles and Beach Boys, along with a host of 60s psychedelia, to Sparks, Super Furry Animals, 80s and contemporary electronica….there really are too many to mention, but hopefully this gives you an idea.

There are shall we say nostalgic tones to your music but with a freshness and imagination of modern times, how easy or instinctive is finding and reaching the balance in your sounds?

We used to write the tracks separately, and then it reached a point where we felt the best songs were being created organically in the rehearsal room. One of us would come up with an underlying theme for a track, and the rest of us would all contribute with lyrics and ideas. Pretty much the entire album is based on this system. We do keep influences in mind when writing songs, but always manage to pull ourselves away from being a sounding too much like our influences. I suppose we all value the importance of wanting original sounds, and creative freedom, so luckily yes it feels like a fairly easy process. Always helps!

Where do your songs seed from and how do they evolve within the band?

Our songs come from childhood memories. The Bingo Wing is about sitting in social clubs playing bingo as a kid. Mechanical Horse is about a local bus I used to travel on, and the varied and interesting characters you would see and become accustomed to week in, week out. The life of a car, bee epidemics, close and distant acquaintances, folk tales and our seemingly tiny existence in the enormity of everything which surrounds us……just some of the things we like to write about.

Though the songs upon What’s Behind Us Is Not Important are organic and breathe melodies like we do air, one senses that in the studio a lot of care, time and attention is attached to every aspect of the tracks, is that the case?

Yes. In a way. We do actually try to keep our production quite raw. Not too embellished. However, we do return to songs regularly with new ideas on how various sections can be improved, how vocals may be better structured, re-structuring sections, adding and taking out instruments……basically trying to get a song sounding as interesting as we can, usually within the space of three or four minutes. This isn’t a set rule we stick too though. It does commonly happen though.

How long did the album take to record and was it one big session or an ongoing process in its birth?

It took about two and a half years in all. We originally started recording in late 2010 on an analogue desk belonging to Nick, and then the desk lost its way, and had to be serviced…..in fact it’s still in need of a service. We had major problems with it in the end. The rest of the album was recorded during the last twelve months, by our friends Richard Gilbert from label-mates Lymes, and Patrick Tobin at Room Room Studios in Hull.

Admittedly I am no musician but it is hard to imagine where you start to compose your sprawling mesmeric soundscapes, so please give some clues haha.

Going back to the rehearsal room idea. We really do start with a riff, or drum pattern or keyboard part, or a bass run. It usually has a Captain Beefheart twang to it. What usually happens next is a twenty minute jam. I’ll usually record it on a mobile phone, and we will build the track up over a series of rehearsals, before layering it all up in the studio. It’s a four-way split from nothing. That’s how we roll in Mammal Hum

You are all multi instrumentalists I believe, does that bring a depth of ideas and imagination to songs which maybe are not as strong in other bands?

Not so much multi-instrumentalists. Well apart from Simon, who really can either play every instrument, or is learning to! We do like applying ourselves to, and experimenting with other instruments though. This definitely makes a more interesting sound. It does expand your creativity and make you much more imaginative. You don’t feel constrained to the usual formula.

How does your expansive sound transfer to a live setting, do you have to make any adjustments to bring the same effect as on recordings?

We use samplers, effects pads, overdriven bass and guitar and the big big drums, to try and reflect what goes on in the records. That combined with four voices on stage makes it quite challenging on some tracks to get the overall balance. A good challenge of course. At the same time, we like to tinker with our live set enough for it not to be a repetition of what you hear on the album. You may as well just give the crowd then an album each and send them home. We find the idea of sounding exactly like the album tracks a little……well…….constrictive! That’s absolutely no disrespect to bands who aim to achieve this. We have actually started doing more acoustic gigs to see how the tracks convert when played unplugged. We can then push the harmonies further to the front. The acoustic gigs have been working well actually! We sit in the middle of the room instead of on stage. It’s a nice vibe.

In our review of What’s Behind Us Is Not Important we brought up names of artists like Kontrust, De Staat, The Knack, XTC, The Monkees, Flaming Groovies, Ok Go and even Marilyn Manson (read the review to see why ;)), showing the diversity of your release and richness of its sounds. Any there you would agree with or have you wondered if we were drinking at the time? Haha

I can see The Monkees in there, and some Flaming Groovies. We do like XTC too………Marilyn Manson???? That’s not a comparison I’d either thought I’d hear to be honest! Interesting! Haha!

Is there a prime intention or aim you bring to your music and has it evolved over time?

No specific aim, other than for us all to be creative, enjoy it and invent! The music certainly has shifted in style slightly as band members left, and others joined. The music on the album is certainly representative of our direction over the past three years though.

Also how has your music changed since those early days in 2008?

The music has changed quite a lot, and for the better in our opinion. The voices have always remained, but we are certainly much more versatile now.

What is next for and from Mammal Hum?

We are planning a follow-up album on Mollusc Records. We are currently writing tracks for this one, and hope to start recording next year. Expect a different direction, a lot more laid-back, gentle affair. A bit of a departure really, but an idea we really want to work with. We have plenty of ideas in the pipeline……

A big thank you for sharing time to talk with us, any parting words you would like to leave behind?

Thanks for chatting to us, and to friends for their support, and Mollusc Records for their continued hard work. Please listen to the album…..and yeah start a band. It has ups and downs, but its good fun. What’s Behind You Is Not Important……

https://www.facebook.com/pages/Mammal-Hum/11380710291

Read the review of What’s Behind Us Is Not Important @ https://ringmasterreviewintroduces.wordpress.com/2012/09/13/mammal-hum-whats-behind-us-is-not-important/

RingMaster Review 27/09/2012

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

The best and easiest way to get your music on iTunes, Amazon and lots more. Click below for details.