Jane Allison – Methylene Blue

As 2017 went through its final handful of rewarding weeks, it is fair to say it produced some of its biggest musical treats, one of which was the new album from singer songwriter Jane Allison. The follow-up to her hypnotic debut album Just Another Girl three years earlier, Methylene Blue is a tantalisingly magnetic affair in its own right deserving of all the praise carrying attention it can muster.

The former vocalist of indie outfit KarmaDeva, Jane Allison Stanness to give her full name is one of those talents and voices which almost haunt the imagination. Her songwriting is an embrace of observation and intimacy, her fusion of folk and Americana a warm melancholic hug on the senses which carries you away in thought and creative seduction. Proof came with Just Another Girl and its bewitchment of emotive shadows and personal angst, attributes all the richer within the breath-taking thought courting adventure of Methylene Blue which confirms Jane Allison as one of Britain’s finest modern day troubadours, or should that be trobairitz.

Unveiling tales of “dereliction, salvation, obsession and allure, with its title track inspired in parts by the breath-taking love letters of Violet Trefusis to Vita Sackville-West”, all providing an “homage to triumph, defiance, the heroine, the daughter, and the muse”, Methylene Blue was recorded in fits and starts during Kula Shaker’s 2016 20th anniversary and K2.0 world tour. Blessed with the backing vocals of Audrey Evans from Mediæval Bæbes, the album arose at a time of great personal loss and during the devastating attack on Brussels. There is sadness at its heart but equally defiance and hope thick warmth which brews a melancholy so easy to immerse within.

The album opens up with Ain’t Wreckin’ Me, a country fuelled canter with the rich familiar twang the style often brews; its lure wrapping Allison’s enticing tones soon backed by equally beguiling harmonies. Rising from the ashes of a lost relationship, the track is a bouncy self-affirming affair getting the album off to a very potent start.

The outstanding Another Prayer follows, its mellow sighs riding a captivating swing as Allison again lures total attention with her bewitching voice and keys bred melodies. The darker pulse of bass is as compelling; its lurking presence engaging as the song with a certain Kirsty MacColl hue to it sublimely seduces ears and appetite before Hollow Rock slips in on a vibrant shuffle, growing second by second into a similarly absorbing proposal. Harmonica and guitar weave their own Americana spawned temptation but there is no denying that it is Allison’s voice and craft which takes the tightest grip.

Oh Girl is next, caressing ears with its gentle but determinedly infectious and lively serenade while its successor, For What It’s Worth shares a heart spilling ballad. From its initial breath, the first of the two is working away building towards a galvanic crescendo, Allison the fascination at its core while in contrast the second strolls along with reflection and brewing affirmation for company. Both songs simply charm in their individual ways as too the album’s title track, another skilfully catchy and soulful croon upon the ears hard to get too much of.

That is something which applies to all tracks within Methylene Blue, as the charismatic saunter of Forgotten Son and the brooding drama of Outlaw Valentine prove. The pair seizes ears and imagination with unstoppable ease, the first arresting ears with its expression and emotion, the body with its bounce while its companion takes the listener into a spellbinding landscape of long shadows and dark romance with a delicious carnival-esque hued undercurrent. The track, the best or not on the album, is undoubtedly the most enthralling.

The smiling invitation of Texas Baby blends the country joy of its named state with Nashvillian flavours before Unknown Soldier bring things to an alluring and haunting close. It is a fascinating and highly enjoyable end to an album which commands regular attention. It is fair to say that the genres at the heart of Allison’s music do not generally induce our passions but in her hands they combine to truly pleasure our ears and enrich our days.

An accomplished actress in her own right and soon to be seen in the film Slaughter House Rulez, a Simon Pegg / Nick Frost comedy horror movie directed by Crispian Mills and surely basking in plaudits for Methylene Blue, Jane Allison could find 2018 a very big year.

Methylene Blue is available now @ https://janeallison.bandcamp.com/

https://janeallison.net/     https://www.facebook.com/janeallisonmusic/    https://twitter.com/JAStanness

Pete RingMaster 10/01/2017

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Ex Norwegian – Pure Gold

Pure-Gold-cover_RingMaster Review

There is always a sense of anticipation and indeed excitement when faced with a new release from US band Ex Norwegian, but in approaching their new album Pure Gold, there was a heavier sense of intrigue involved too. It was the first encounter since the serious illness which band founder Roger Houdaille suffered, the proceeds from the album going towards the emergency hospital bills incurred, and brings a collection of re-interpretations of tracks by other artists alongside original compositions from a new line-up to that which created the acclaimed and outstanding Wasted Lines album of 2014. So there was a wondering if the release was merely a filler in the future of the band but fair to say and straight away ears and imagination were alive whilst being immersed in the recognisable but ever unpredictable Ex Norwegian pop/indie rock sound, and the diversity of flavour that breeds to show it was anything but.

The creative union of Houdaille (vocals, guitars, keyboards, percussion), Giuseppe Rodriguez (vocals, bass, moog), Lucas Queiroz (vocals, guitars), Fernando Perdomo (drums, slide guitar), and Michelle Grand (vocals), with occasional guest organ prowess from Chris Price, tempt and grip ears straight away with album opener It’s A Game. A String Driven Thing song arguably made more famous by The Bay City Rollers, it quickly has feet in an eager shuffle and appetite licking lips with its catchy pop rock stroll. Ex Norwegian cast a vibrant energy to the song without losing its folkish charm whilst the great blend of vocals between Houdaille and Grand is almost flirtatious in its persuasion. There is also an Abba-esque hue to the great start to the release, though the fade-out is a touch annoying just to be picky.

Asking Too Much steps forward next and just as easily has attention enthralled with its melodic caresses and infectious persuasion as a healthy scent of Kirsty MacColl like folk pop flavours it. As the first, the song has a simplicity which is as inviting and enjoyable as the nuances and melodic enterprise the band inject into its design, the result another lively excuse to romp; a similar invitation given again by the feisty rock infused Beeside, a Tintern Abbey song. Sultry air and fuzzy breath soaks the song to great effect, whilst its psych rock character becomes increasingly compelling with each passing second and smouldering melody.

Already it is fair to say highlights are the order of the day so far, another provided straight away by the band’s impressive cover of the Melanie song Cyclone. Providing an inflamed melodic roar led by the superb tones of Grand, her harmonic expressive serenading ears as potently as the fiery side to her great voice, the track swiftly gets under the skin. It’s successor, the boisterous and show stealer On The Sidelines, is a match in such invasive potency, it playing like a feisty Martha and the Muffins but creating its own unique personality with every swinging rhythms, melodic temptation, and gripping hook. For us every Ex Norwegian album seems to have one song which especially hits the sweet spot, On The Sidelines that irresistible offering within Pure Gold.

A new wave essence fuels the following Other Half, a touch of Graham Parker to the song lighting up ears with a nostalgic bluesy air whilst the Paul McCartney track Keep Under Cover is given a virulent tonic of adventurous infectiousness and quite simply a tenacious fresh breath. Both tracks again leave body and emotions smiling and greedy for more, the album’s title track eager to satisfy with its mix of dark funky basslines, surf harmonies, and romancing melodic seduction. There is a less dramatic feel to the song compared to other tracks but with keys an emotive haze around the contagious lure of the bass and the lacing of spicy blues guitar, it is a robustly catchy proposal very easy to get fully involved with.

A fine take on the Jimmy Campbell song Close My Case And Move On comes next, Ex Norwegian accentuating its emotive heart and intimacy with a sturdier frame and tangy country rock colouring. A fascinating canter of a song with an element of pleasing discord to its nature too, it is maybe not as immediately impacting in comparison to the more boisterous approaches of other tracks within the album, but it matches all in persuasion before Shadow Ships and a version of Tell Me Your Plans by The Shirts brings things to an enjoyable close. The first of the pair merges Americana with sixties pop vibrancy, creating a richly satisfying if not fevered incitement; Tell Me Your Plans providing that with its again sixties hued interpretation of a great power pop offering.

From start to finish Pure Gold is a thoroughly engaging and highly enjoyable romp. It might not quite match the triumphant majesty of the band’s last album yet it is a different kind of proposition. For pleasure though, it is a rivalling success and reason enough to suggest Ex Norwegian is one of our brightest pop rock bands.

Pure Gold is released December 11th via Dippy Records @ http://shop.exnorwegian.com/album/pure-gold

http://www.exnorwegian.com     https://www.facebook.com/exnorwegian/     http://twitter.com/exnorwegian

Pete RingMaster 02/12/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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Niamh Crowther – Little by Little

NC_RingMaster Review

Folk rock/pop with a beaming smile, that is Little by Little, the new single from Irish singer/songwriter Niamh Crowther. Gripping feet and imagination from its first vibrant breath, the song is one of those feel good moments which continues to linger, warming the soul long after it has taken its physical leaves. The successor to the well-received single Origins, Crowther’s new flirtatious shuffle suggests she is well along the path to big rewards.

Crowther first came to prominence in Ireland when aged sixteen she beat over 15,000 other young people to claim the prestigious Irish Youth Music Awards. Concentrating on her school exams first, with most of 2014 devoted to successfully completing her Leaving Certificate (A Levels), Dublin hailing Crowther eventually went into the studio with Tim Martin (The Corrs, The Commitments, Declan O’Rourke), emerging with both Origins and Little by Little. Her eighteenth birthday also saw her on stage with Richie Sambora at the Olympia theatre in Dublin; so it has been a heady time on all counts for the emerging talent over the past couple of years or so, the garnering of over 130,000 streams on Spotify whilst having her music play listed on national Irish radio further success; all adding to good times sure to continue with the release of Little by Little.

A stroke of Crowther‘s guitar leads in her immediately alluring voice, the pair uniting as understated but firm beats add to the rising infectiousness of song and craft. Soon into a lively stroll which has feet tapping as if on puppet strings, the song seems to relish the tangy lilt of Crowther’s enticing voice and her instinctive melodic prowess, raising its energy and heart with each passing kiss of harmony and tenacious canter of rhythmic catchiness.

Though not necessarily in sound, there is a definite Kirsty MacColl like poise and invention to the songwriting and swing of the song too, a rich lure making up part of the refusing to go away majesty of the single, that and simply the organic virulence cast and fuelling the festivity.

Niamh Crowther is the name; expect to hear a lot more of it wherever you are in the world.

Little by Little is released on October 23rd.

http://niamhcrowther.com/   https://www.facebook.com/NiamhCrowther   https://twitter.com/Niamh_Crowther

Pete RingMaster 22/10/2105

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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Woody Woodgate – In Your Mind

Woody with Dan_RingMaster Review

It is a bit of a surprise that Madness drummer Woody Woodgate has only now unveiled a debut solo album, though given the busyness of the man over the years with various projects as well as of course with the Nutty Boys similarly it is not. Anyway the time has come and the enjoyably charming In Your Mind does not disappoint.

Taking the opportunity to hit the studio with fresh ideas whilst the Magic Brothers has been put on hold due to an on-going battle with mental health issues for his brother Nick, the other half of the acclaimed band, Woodgate has created a collection of melody rich pop songs which vivaciously dance on the senses and imagination. They also carry an openly personal and intimate aspect to them, playing like a kaleidoscope of reflections from the life of their creator whilst shimmering on and seducing the ears.

With vocalist Dan Shears aligning his unique and captivating tones to the sounds of Woodgate, contributions from guitarist/keyboardist Tim Maple, bassist Dan Drury, Madness’ brass section The Brass Monkeys, wife Siobhan Fitzpatrick, and brother Nick bringing their skills to the magnetic release also, In Your Mind swiftly has thoughts engaged as it opens with This Is It. The track is a brief scene setter, a glimpse of life breeding the spark to go on ‘romantic’ escapades, they starting with the following Magic Train. Instantly the song, through keys and a jazzy air, is an escape from the mundane into vibrant adventure, melodies and grooves flirting with the imagination whilst beats dance with ears and feet. The expressive tones of Shears bring their alluring colour to the ‘trip’ soon after, his voice courting songs like an enjoyable mix of Ian Broudie and Ste McCabe, and indeed here but more so across the album strong whispers to The Lightning Seeds kiss the music too. Becoming richer and thicker with every passing temptation, the song is an inescapable infection getting the album off to a strong and highly pleasing start.

woodywoodgate_inyourmind-_RingMaster Review     A spicy tang coats the following Something, guitar and keys bringing a smattering of country rock to their enterprise whilst vocals and harmonies swing with catchy revelry throughout. A bluesy tone also adds to the energetically creative waltz of the song whilst the brass seducing is simply the cream on the top of another captivating persuasion before the bewitching stroll of the album’s title track slips in. Bred in a sixties pop smile and melodies which quickly bring the sounds of Kirsty MacColl to mind, the song is a serenade for the summer, a warm kiss of pop which simply blossoms in strength and persuasion with every listen, in sound and the just as potent intimacy fuelling the lyrics.

Come To Me is just as irresistible straight after, though admittedly taking longer to find the same depth of reactions as other songs upon the album. There is a strong resemblance to UK indie pop band The Tonics in the song at times, but once the brass free their rich flames, the song soars into celestial climates. One of the numerously pleasing aspects of songs is the ‘simplicity’ of the lyrical side, a repetitious flare which just works, in choruses especially, but never defuses the thick emotive strength of words and intent as it graces the tenaciously spun web of catchy sounds.

The Beach marks our arrival at the seaside, its joyful lure the lead into the warm embrace and festivity of We’re All Going To Brighton. Everything about the track from the smouldering brass caresses and swaying vocals to the energetic but relaxed rhythms says escape, relief from the pressures and boredom of life’s normal days whether as a child or adult we have all felt, its charm and presence sublimely relating those emotions and excitements.

The ska seeded Friday Night To Sunday Morning saunters through ears with a dreamy glaze to its poetic pop hug. The song almost glistens as guitars, harmonies, and brass venture into their imaginative exploits, rhythms in turn bringing their own pulsating shadow, wrapped bait to the sultriness of the song. There is no escaping a feel of Madness to the rich atmosphere and happy-go-lucky sway of the song either, or another potent slice of distinct variety within the album as also on offer in Everything Is Sunshine and its tantalising croon awash with an eighties pop lure which occasionally whispers Squeeze and The Bluebells. The track quickly has the listener involved though it is soon outshine by the excellent Flower and its psyche pop beauty. ELO has reportedly been an inspiration to the songs within In Your Mind, and for sure the legendary Birmingham rock pop band is a delicious hue to the siren-esque majesty of the album’s best track, though that choice does vary from listen to listen if we are honest.

The funky psychedelic tango of Mother comes next, the song a sweltering breath of seventies inspired blues/pop rock which at times feistily simmers and in other moments enflames with tenacious ingenuity. Its success is followed by the electro rock exploration of Shaman where within its relatively gentle hug on the senses drama bubbles away, creative and emotive shadows colluding with emotive energies for a fascinating and invigorating theatre of sound.

The album is brought to a close through Thank You and its melancholic yet vibrant balladry of emotional textures and words. You can feel the heart of Woodgate fuelling its presence and sentiment, portrayed potently by Shears and only accentuated by the expanding and evocative sounds around him.

It is a fine end to an increasingly enthralling and enjoyable proposition. It is easy to assume something similar to Madness from the encounter but In Your Mind swiftly sets that thought straight and just grows with every listen. At its height it is majestic and throughout is one nonstop summer of nostalgic incitement and warm enjoyment, an encounter you firmly resolve to hurry back to time and time again even before it runs its first course.

In Your Mind is available now via DW Records

http://www.woodywoodgate.co.uk/

RingMaster 07/07/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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We Ghosts – Decade

WE Ghosts_Reputation Radio/RingMaster Review

A release of multiple charms and flavours, Decade the new album from Anglo-Swedish alternative acoustic duo We Ghosts gets its UK release this month and a tantalising treat it is. Such its distinct yet united variety, the album ebbs and flows in its strongest persuasions but from start to finish the band’s new encounter takes ears on a captivating adventure in celebration of the band’s ten years of creative life.

We Ghosts consists of the song writing team of Swedish vocalist/guitarist J.J.Woodall and English instrumentalist John Christopher, the band emerging in 2004. The years since has seen the band on a constant adventure of live shows and releases. On stage the band is expanded by the likes of Johan Persson and Richard “Rat” Westlake, both making contributions to the album too with the latter also co-producing it with the band. Record wise, We Ghosts’ blend of pop, jazz, blues, and folk has fuelled a clutch of EPs and acclaimed albums such as Things That Go Bump In The Night in 2009 and Almost Alone three years later. Now fourth studio album Decade, released as its predecessor through Deep River Records, provides the imaginative epilogue to the band’s first decade and increasingly seductive opening to the next.

A rhythmic acoustic coaxing opens up album and its first track Broken Sky; its initial lure alone pure magnetism which only increases as melodic intrigue and the instantly enticing vocals of Woodall link their tantalising lures. A spatial breeze soon immerses ears too as siren-esque harmonies float, but that early bait still provides the most direct and gripping pull for the imagination and appetite. With darker hues of bass adding to the elegance and temptation offered, the song is nothing less than a busy and warmly welcoming seducing.

cover_Reputation Radio/RingMaster Review    The masterful opening continues with the summery saunter of Out Tonight, a song with a Caribbean bred canvas and flirtatious melodic scenery matched by the vocals and the more wistful but equally colourful keys. The song’s dance is an irresistible contagion, a nudge to feet and emotions to eagerly join its warm revelry before the bluesy funk pop of Death or Glory casts its emotive persuasion next. Without quite matching its predecessors, the track sways and croons with a fiery attitude aligned to similarly intense enterprise from the guitar and easily leave ears smiling.

The folkish shimmer of Too Late to Learn merges a country twang with a sultry atmosphere next, its vocal offering led by Christopher this time. Though his delivery is potent and expressive, personal tastes hanker for the lures of Woodall whilst the song itself lacks the undefined but rich spark which lit the other tracks before it. Nevertheless enjoyment is still a given before the album hits another high spot with its next two tracks. Home Is Where the Heart Is comes first and from the glorious jazzy/blues vocal roar of Woodall to start things off, the song proceeds to stroll with a southern blues spicing across a melodic and rhythmic evocation. It is pure captivation, an inescapable anthemic and spiritual tempting to bask in, though quickly outshone by the even more exceptional Final Curtain. The track is virulent pop infused folk rock with a delta blues hue to its harmonies and invention. Like a mix of My Baby and Jingo, the song is a flame to the senses and rock alchemy for the ears, and quite outstanding with its voracious contagion and imaginative enterprise.

The lively acoustic balladry of Trying to Be Faithful makes a fine and bewitching effort of matching its predecessor, its Kirsty MacColl charm and tenacity compelling from start to finish. It is a success next up Suzie cannot quite emulate, though again there is little to pull it up for outside personal tastes and our always less than eager appetite for any countrified essence. Superbly crafted and intricately woven though, and with a host of creative hues, the song as the following album title track, is a keen persuasion, the latter’s enticing of melodies and poetic vocal expression leaving a glow in the air.

We Ghosts, the song, completes the album, its sixties psyche pop toning a final infectious serenade on the senses. It makes an engrossing end to a fine album, a release which just grows in strength and seduction with every listen. Like many, we have suggested a few releases to soundtrack your upcoming summers, and there is no way we cannot add Decade to those recommendations, especially for those provocative sultry nights.

Decade is out now via Deep River Records @ https://itunes.apple.com/gb/album/decade/id825383537

https://www.facebook.com/pages/We-Ghosts/170602999638293 http://www.weghosts.co.uk/

RingMaster 15/06/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard on Reputation Radio @ http://www.reputationradio.net

 

Black – Blind Faith

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Like for so many others, Wonderful Life is a mainstay of not only all-time favourite albums but also our weekly listening pleasure at The RingMaster Review. Its creator Black, the musical non de plume of Colin Vearncombe, has continued to incite ears and the passions since that triumph’s release in 1987, through over ten studio albums under the Black moniker and the musician/songwriter’s his own name alone, yet still that album steals the show of our personal pleasures. Now though it has a rival in the shape of the magnetic seduction of Blind Faith, Vearncombe’s first release of new songs in six years. It is a melodic smoulder and emotional caress of thirteen diverse and captivating propositions which potently reminds us that their composer is still one of Britain’s most imaginative and persistently compelling songwriters and artists.

Blind Faith was co-written with long-time friend and musical sparring partner Calum MacColl, the son of Peggy Seeger and Ewan MacColl and brother of the wonderful Kirsty. Recruiting a host of talented musicians to help its recording, and with Calum Malcolm (The Blue Nile/Prefab Sprout) producing, Vearncombe brings all his emotively description skills to bear from the opening seconds of first track The Love Show. A sombre yet joyful acoustic melody hits ears first, swiftly courted by a kiss of strings and in turn the ever distinct voice of Vearncombe. In no time the track is a blossoming breeze of melodic enterprise, recalling the early days of Black whilst conjuring a new evocative croon in sound and texture. The melancholy of the song is gorgeous yet its atmosphere is simultaneously the complete opposite of that, warmth and tantalising lightness providing one endearing kiss on the senses.

BF-Front-Cover     The sensational start is continued by the vibrant saunter of Don’t Call Me Honey, a mix of country and folk revelry colluding in a catchy escapade swiftly in control of imagination and appetite. The swinging beats of drummer Liam Bradley are aligned to the slightly darker but no less energetic tones of bass from Simon Edwards, their combined magnetic spine the keenest lure in the dance of the song. The proposition’s riveting call is matched by the distinctly different Good Liar, a slow stroll of vocal reflection embraced by guitar bred melodies courtesy of MacColl and a mesmeric wash of keys cast by Mikey Rowe. Ears almost float in the croon of the song before being taken on a wonderful dramatic ride in Sleep Together. This treat has a melody rich hook which is like a fine wine on the creative menu of the song and just as potent on the senses as the real thing, additionally bewitching them in the eventful mesmerism already fuelling the captivation.

Womanly Panther has the same kind of theatre to it, this time in the shape of a siren-esque sixties flame. The imagination swiftly runs with the song’s suggestiveness as vocal harmonies are hugged by ever expressive strings. Thoughts conjure images of cosmopolitan temptresses on the French Riviera, a vision only encouraged by the tones and words of Vearncombe. It is another pinnacle in the increasingly thrilling Blind Faith and yet another unique proposal in its diversity, as indeed is Who You Are with its gentle embrace. Once more a whisper of nostalgia engages ears as the song’s chorus unveils a melody and vocal lure reminiscent of early Black enticements. Around this though there is a sultry climate which is almost surf rock like in a hazy complexion which has ears and emotions spellbound.

The following Sunflower is a slightly longer to ignite smoulder but from its first breath keys and Vearncombe’s tones cup ears in potent reflection before slipping away and being replaced by the just as emotively tenacious Not The Man. As it broadens its embrace, a more lively energy flows through the track’s sound and presence, and in turn the listener setting them up perfectly for the country rock spiced and new single Ashes Of Angels. Though another slimline song in textures, there is never a lack of thick melodic ingenuity and creative adventure to any Black song within Blind Faith, and equipped with a virulent contagion of vocal and musical hooks, the song sets itself up as just one more irresistible triumph.

The smoky emotion and tone of Stone Soup holds attention firmly next whilst the eloquent orchestral grace and provocative hues of When It’s Over has ears and thoughts bound with its contrast of soaring keys and strings against a grumbling bassline. Both though are over shadowed by the closing pair of Beautiful and Parade, the first, of course, living up to its title with a shimmering reflection of voice and guitar whilst the second unveils a celestial weave of melodies aligned to matching vocal prowess, the vocals of Vearncombe ever the strongest persuasive lure. It is a sensational close to an exceptional release which definitely flirts with the description classic.

Listening to Blind Faith brings back some of the same emotions felt listening to Wonderful Life way back in time and ever since, and that realising tingle of something special having just seduced ears and more. Colin Vearncombe’s first album is still the unrivalled Black album for us but Blind Faith is right there by its side as an essential proposition for all melodic rock/pop fans.

Blind Faith is available now via Nero Schwarz Limited @ http://www.colinvearncombe.com/music/blind-faith/

http://www.colinvearncombe.com   https://www.facebook.com/blackakacolinvearncombe

RingMaster 01/06/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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The Little Secrets – All I Need

 

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There is a charm to the music of UK indie pop band The Little Secrets, going by debut single All I Need, which is quite inescapable and irresistible. The song does not send senses and emotions whirling yet it lingers and seduces with long term potency, springing back in memory and thoughts whenever it pleases. One song does not reveal the whole picture of any band but All I Need it is fair to say makes a rather strong and persuasive colour for the Liverpool duo.

The Little Secrets began in 2010 after multi-instrumentalist Kevin Dixon spotted and met vocalist Stacy Jo at Liverpool’s world famous Cavern Club whilst she was singing with another band. Subsequently creatively uniting, the pair took a couple of years writing and exploring various line-ups and sounds before honing an infectious pop driven adventure as heard vibrantly on their first single. Released via Edge Hill University’s The Label Recordings, and already received keen radio support, All I Need is a slice of summer revelry sure to warm up anyone’s day.Picture 5

A great mix of feisty beats and a noise kissed tease of guitar tempts ears first, their magnetic unity the lead into a lively caress of guitar melodies and a courting dark bassline. They in turn are romanced by the magnetic vocals of Stacy Jo and just as flavoursome accompanying harmonies, her entrance seeming to warm up the energy and expression of the melodic seduction of the song even more. Into its contagious stride soon after, the song brings a great Kirsty MacColl feel to it in sound and voice, that earlier mentioned charm and warmth oozing from every polite hook and croon like melody offered.

Time will tell if The Little Secrets can fulfil the promise and initial acclaim All I Need has and is destined for, but we will not be betting against them.

All I Need is available from January 26th via The Label Recordings

http://www.thelittlesecrets.co.uk/

RingMaster 26/01/2015

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