Ruts DC – Music Must Destroy

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Back in the day, The Ruts stood to the fore of the punk scene in sound, presence, and lyrical insight, an attack which evolved but never diminished as Ruts DC emerged from the sad death of still missed frontman Malcolm Owen. Two albums before and two after his passing provided an innovative and snarling voice for a generation and more before the band disbanded. Reforming for a benefit show for their guitarist Paul Fox, following his diagnosis of lung cancer and who died not long after, remaining members John ‘Segs’ Jennings (bass and vocals) and Dave Ruffy (drums) carried on and released the mighty Rhythm Collision Vol. 2, another glorious dub fuelled vat of diversity to echo the success of Vol.1. Now the band are poised to uncage a new tour-de-force in the shape of Music Must Destroy, a release, to get straight to the bottom line, which is quite possibly the finest rock ‘n’ roll album you are likely to be aroused by this year, maybe this decade.

Music Must Destroy is one glorious anthem made up of ten ear and imagination sparking proposals. Segs and Duffy with Leigh Heggarty have taken their time to write, hone, and step forward with their latest collection of songs but, aided by a host of guests such as Henry Rollins, Captain Sensible, Boz Boorer, Marco Pirroni, Jake Burns, Kirk Brandon, Tara Rez, and Paul Laventhol, have created another landmark in punk fuelled rock ‘n roll. The album’s variety of incitements sit somewhere between the raw challenge of The Ruts and the experimental exploits of Ruts DC, the band calling themselves The Ruts DC for the new offering suggesting the band came at the album from the same angle. The trio has explored their past and inspirations across the fan funded Music Must Destroy to create some of their most inspiring and fiercely addictive songs yet.

It all starts with recent single Psychic Attack, it alone a highly charged and intoxicating incitement to get greedy over. With a Damned like scent to its riffs, the song strides from its initial shimmer with imposing rhythms and one mouth-watering bassline. Within seconds the nagging riffs and Segs’ potent tones grip ears further, his words and expression getting as much under the skin as the twisting and turning character of the song itself.

Starting off a release with such a momentous moment would put a strain on many offerings from other bands, but The Ruts DC simply follow it up with matching peaks of imagination starting with the band’s upcoming new single and album’s title track. Featuring Henry Rollins, Music Must Destroy also makes its initial coaxing with rhythmic and repetitive guitar shared bait which needs mere seconds to get under the skin. Melodies and drama spread as the song expands its theatre of intent, group harmonies pure infection around Rollin’s call to arms before a chorus to stir armies pulls thoughts and spirit into the song’s galvanic prowl.

The Ruts DCart_RingMasterReviewSurprise steps forward next carrying a broader rock air to invasive seduction. Like a blend of Ruts single West One (Shine on Me) and the sound of 999 at certain times, the track crawls over the senses, sweeping them up into another virulent chorus and nature before the highly emotive and haunting Second Hand Child takes over. This too infests body and emotions with ease, its poetic melodies and evocative vocals as magnetic as its sound with the dusty lure of The Duel’s Tara Rez’s voice extra temptation to be tempted by.

Soft City Lights is another recalling the early days of the band, its reflective melodies and shimmer infused in a smouldering embrace of evocative adventure and harmony. With rhythms casting darker shadows and intimidation, the track is aural alchemy and like those before it and indeed to come quite irresistible, a success emulated by the anthemic and predacious roar of Kill The Pain. A track which stalks the listener with a challenge in its voice as potent as the virulence in its infectious character, it too has bodies bouncing and attitude aflame.

The mellow seducing and evocative pleads of Peace Bomb follows, the song a Bolan-esque engagement showing more of the album’s diversity, variety continuing  across the psychedelic shimmer and melodic jangle of Tears On Fire and the hard rock soaked exploits of The Vox Teardrop. It is impossible to pick a best track within Music Must Destroy but the first of the pair always features in first thoughts while its successor simply stirs blood and spirit each and every time.

The album concludes with Golden Boy, a poignant ballad seemingly inspired by the death of previous band mates and a captivation as powerful as anything before it with its heart offered vocals, emotionally charged melodies, and provocative strings.

The track is a breath-taking end to a simply electrifying rip roar of an album. Music Must Destroy has all the qualities and boldness expected of The Ruts/Ruts DC past and present. The guys might be a touch older than those early inspiring days but they still have the energy, snarl, and invention to provide something seriously special which can also spark a new generation.

Music Must Destroy is released September 16th via Westworld/Sosumi Recordings with the single/title track released September 9th.

Album pre-order links: CD digi: http://bit.ly/MusicMustDestroyCD and Vinyl double album: http://bit.ly/MusicMustDestroyVinyl

http://www.pledgemusic.com/projects/ruts-dc-psychic-attack

https://www.facebook.com/theruts   http://www.theruts.co.uk/

Pete RingMaster 01/09/2016

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

One Minute Silence – Fragmented Armageddon

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On hearing that UK rap metallers One Minute Silence were about to rampage across thoughts and senses again after a seven year hiatus it is fair to say excitement was high and expectations hungry. Just maybe there was also a wonder and fear that the band would have lost their potency through the long break. Listening to new EP Fragmented Armageddon wiped any such concerns away, the release confronting the ear with the power and imaginative attitude sculpted sounds we are used to from the quartet and when played alongside last album, the 2003 released One Lie Fits All, and the likes of the Revolution EP or the single We Bounce, it is like they have never been away. It is an absorbing and inciting confrontation which awakens thoughts and passions and though the release has elements which do leave one a little dissatisfied in the lack of more new material, it is impossible not to  feel even more enthused from its creative tempest.

Since the hold on the band its members have eagerly explored new musical styles within projects set in the likes of folk to electronica and jazz to beat poetry. These are essences which appear to have brought influences and inventive ideas to the new phase of One Minute Silence though their core is still openly rap metal with hardcore/punk grievousness. The band on the evidence of the EP has certainly lost none of its fire in sound and politically inspired narrative neither, lyrically and in attitude but at the same time appear to have stretched into new avenues to express their passions and intrigue the mind and senses. It is hard to make a full declaration of there being new venture to their sound and enterprise and imagination from two songs of course, the planned album to be released next year will confirm if that is so, but it is easy to be assumptive in the strong possibility indicated by Fragmented Armageddon. With original members vocalist Yap, guitarist Massimo Fiocco, bassist Glen Diani linking up with new drummer Martin Davies, One Minute Silence will easily grab attention with their returning release, the collection of new material, re-workings, remixes, and an acoustic track sure to spark up and refresh the greedy appetites which feasted on the band before.

The Freeport Entertainment released EP brings opening track Fruit From The Lie into view through a compelling sonic mist but Fragmented Armageddon EP coveras soon as the recognisable voice and taunt of Diani’s bass and the vocals of Yap encroach the ear everything steps into place musically and emotionally for the passions. As spine-tinglingly distinctive as ever and ripe with that expected sense that band and song are about to leap for the jugular, the track instead takes its time, teasing with chilled atmospheric embraces and melodic dances whilst drums brew up an agitated framework to further captivate and feed on the listeners reactions. Once the explosive heart of the track does erupt air is driven from the lungs and thoughts ignited from the blaze of rapacious energy and provocative lyrical persuasion. The track continues to ebb and flow in intensity and attack but is a continual aggravator of the mind and instigator of unashamed selfishness to hear and feel more from the song, which it delivers with raging invention across its rhythmic barracking and sonically carved melodic fascination.

Second new song Pandemic Schizophrenia opens amidst street unrest and a social emergency call, vocals beginning a raw stance whilst bass and drums spear the scenery with monosyllabic punches. It is a potent warning on the ear with the guitar riling the ambience further as it leads to another contagious bruising laced in a sonic heart driven fire of intensity. Not quite corrosive but defiantly abrasive, the song tantalises and strokes the ear with addictive grooves and predatory imagination whilst the vocals of Yap prowl and incite it all, his delivery at times an acidic torrent of expression which sounds like a mix of John Lydon and Kirk Brandon. Like its predecessor it is a stunning track and ensures the wait for their proposed album is going to be impatient.

The release continues with firstly a reworking of You So Much As Move, a track from the One Lie Fits All album, and two remixes the second of the same song by Fiocco with before it a remix of Fruit From The Lie by Ben Hurd. Though they all feel like fillers to stretch the comeback release they do not hold back on providing satisfaction, the first of the trio a rampant and slightly rabid expanse of atmospheric temptation and carnivorous ravishment. It is shaped with enthralling enterprise and thought, its intent chewing on the senses whilst simultaneously bewitching them into uncaring submission. Though not a fan of remixes here, both tracks do leave a welcome taste in the mouth even if fires are not sparked by their presences, which also applies to the closing acoustic song Early Morning, though again the melodic emotive caress offered leaves sure and undeniable pleasure.

     Fragmented Armageddon is a great return from One Minute Silence which shows them to be as strong and creative as ever. It is also a rich tease for their future album and following stage return. World be warned the impacting storm has not lost its bite.

www.facebook.com/oneminutesilence.band

8/10

RingMaster 16/06/2013

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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