The Erkonauts – I Did Something Bad

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Having missed the release of I Did Something Bad first time around, we as so many others will be, are seriously grateful for its world-wide re-release through Kaotoxin Records. The debut outing for Geneva’s The Erkonauts, the album is a ferociously diverse and increasingly fascinating collage of genres and sound. As thick in unpredictability as it is rich in bold imagination, I Did Something Bad is one of those propositions that heavy duty recommendations swarm to. We can only join the crowd and with two additional new tracks to contemplate and devour for all, the album’s return is a not to be missed a second time treat.

Formed in 2014, The Erkonauts consists of ex-Sybreed members in bassist/vocalist Ales Campanelli and drummer Kevin Choiral, alongside guitarists Adrien Bornand and Sébastien Puiatti. Together they expel a sound which is as punk and heavy rock as it is metal, as much progressive enterprise as it is off kilter imagination. Fair to say the band made a hefty impact with the self-released outing of their debut album in 2014, the limited first and second press of I Did Something Bad greedily consumed with the band’s reputation growing in tandem through their live show and touring voracity. Produced by Drop (Samael, ex-Sybreed), the album is now poised to allow the rest of us slow coaches to dive into The Erkonauts bedlam, as mentioned with a pair of new songs recorded last year for extra rich taste.

The Great Ass Poopery opens up the tempest, a gloriously carnivorous bordering on carnal bassline infesting ears initially to be joined by the kinetic swings of Choiral. Alone it is gripping stuff but add the fiercely shimmering guitars aligned to rousing vocals and the air becomes aflame with rumbling attitude loaded rock ‘n’ roll. In some ways like Fear Factory meets Mudvayne with Suicidal Tendencies orchestrating, the punk metal assault is creative rampancy and virulent energy fired down the barrel of a dynamically hungry cannon.

art_RingMaster ReviewTony 5 swaggers in next, its body similarly spawned to that of its predecessor but swiftly sharing its own consuming tenacity. As biting rhythms and swinging grooves embrace the excellent mix of clean and aggressively rasping vocals, the song is a cantankerous affair but with a body of spiralling twists and sonic resourcefulness which makes other’s references to bands such as System Of A Down and Gojira understandable. As the first, the track is a ravenous swamping of ears with superb clarity within its smothering touch for the swarm of progressive tenacity within to equally entice and shine.

There is a greater initial hostility to the following All the Girls should Die, riffs and rhythms angrily badgering ears whilst readying them for the fluid slip into melodic pastures with emotive mellow vocals. Entwining melodic rock fire with alternative metal flirtation as other elements snarl and grumble, the song ebbs and flows in its sonic ire whilst providing a perpetually compelling persuasion. Again there is a rampant directness upon ears at times, the track managing to be simultaneously predatory and seductive before making way for the electro lit, punk fired triumph of Nola. The first invading bassline tells you all you need to know about what is to come; the track flinging hooks and rapier beats around like a dervish whilst expelling a groove infested sonic devilry around them. Vocals again are as varied and impressive as the maelstrom of delicious sound and the increasing imagination of the aural emprise.

A sultry climate comes with Dominium Mundi, its evocative air a suggestive calm for the imagination to expand upon before the heart of the storm breaks with again addictively stabbing rhythms and aggressively hued vocals. Though it brews an inferno of sound, the earlier haunting peace continues to switch and collude with the raging animosity, leaving ears ringing, emotions aflame, and the body exhausted by the persistent breakout of heavily flirtatious grooves. The latter is weaponry which increases its pull in Hamster’s Ghosthouse straight after. With irritable riffery and stalking beats, the track stalks and infests the senses. Its hardcore/nu-metal infused rock ‘n’ roll is pure temptation as it leads the listener into a following progressive garden of melodic and classic rock. As many songs, how they start is no hint to how they depart and certainly their ever intriguing journeys as superbly epitomised here.

The creeping devilment and sonic rapacity of Gog raises the greed in an already eager appetite with ease, its dark character and lively imagination awash with biting elements and imposingly suggestive textures and flavours whilst Your Wife hugs with an acoustic caress shaped by equally warm vocals. The croon does get feistier across its melody and harmony soaked captivation but never relinquishes its elegance and charm.

There is no escaping the great humour that runs through the band’s songwriting and attitude either ,with its boldest moment coming in the punk rage and fun of 9 is better than 8. It is an unbridled riot, simple as that and impossible not to get physically involved in before Machine brings its own commanding incitement to the party. The first of the new tracks exclusive to the release, it is a growling, thrashing slab of metal diversity. Hellacious in its body, infectious in its armoury of hooks, grooves, and anthemic rhythms, the track is as much punk metal as it is extreme metal toxicity and manna to the ears.

Concluded by the tempestuous Culbutos, it a merger of thunderous confrontation and seductive tempting, I Did Something Bad has all the quality and mastery to leave body and soul enraptured. As the intricately and dramatically woven final song, the album is a creative collage of sound turned into a riveting theatre of invention and fiercely arousing adventure that no one should miss out on.

Quite simply, with a new album proposed for later this year, time is ripe for all newcomers to grab your piece of The Erkonauts via I Did Something Bad.

I Did Something Bad is out via Kaotoxin Records from February 12th @ http://www.kaotoxin.com/shop/page/6/

Check out our interview with Ales Campanelli @ https://ringmasterreviewintroduces.wordpress.com/2016/03/25/exploring-the-roar-of-the-erkonauts-with-ales-campanelli/

https://www.facebook.com/theerkonauts   http://www.erkonauts.com

Pete RingMaster 12/02/2016

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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The Lumberjack Feedback – Blackened Visions

THE-LUMBERJACK-FEEDBACK_RingMaster Review

As debut albums go, Blackened Visions from French instrumental progressive doomsters The Lumberjack Feedback is a colossus, though maybe that is not so much a surprise given the impressive and intensive tempest of their earlier offerings. The new album though sees the band exploring even more darkly provocative depths and uncompromisingly invasive textures in their sound and sonic suggestiveness. Blackened Visions lives up to its name with physically invasive ease; providing an inventive playground for the imagination and emotions to eagerly conjure within whilst at the same time luring ears into dramatic landscapes.

The band’s first acclaimed EP Hand of Glory in 2013 set the template and intent of The Lumberjack Feedback exploration in composing and sound, it offering a highly ravenous and intrusive adventure which has only grown more compelling and creatively dynamic, not forgetting experimentally bold within Blackened Visions. Between these releases, the Lille quintet drew potent reactions with Ausstellung, a split release with We All Die (Laughing) and the live EP Noise in the Church, both in 2014. Fair to say though, that Blackened Visions sees the twin guitar craft and imagination of Simon Herbaut and Arnaud Silvert, the predacious bass trespass of Sebastien Tarridec, and the united and often duelling enterprise of drummers Nicolas Tarridec and Virgil Chaize, sculpting their most stimulating and immersive proposals yet.

Artwork_RingMaster ReviewThe band’s fusion of crushing doom metal with progressive and post rock explorations, all infused with tar like sludge and intensively fiery stoner-esque fascination, swiftly seduces and devours body and senses with the initial heavy throws of its opener No Cure (For The Fools). The track is a predator, laying down a sonic trail as menacing riffs lurk in the background before bringing it all to the intimidating fore led by the bestial instincts of bass and the united grouchy twang of the guitars. The track continues to crawl over and invade ears as it develops an equally gripping anthemic devilment to the combined but individual rapacity of the drums. There is a touch of Morkobot to the piece and equally in its raw character and volatile intensity, the scent of bands like Neurosis and Pelican, but whereas maybe in previous encounters they would be an overriding presence straight away Blackened Visions reveals a distinction solely from The Lumberjack Feedback.

The excellent start continues with the album’s title track. The melodic first touch and stormy air is an engaging but portentous melancholy fuelled invitation which only intensifies as guitars and bass entwine and creep around firm rhythmic pokes. There is a fearsome romance to the lure of the music too, even as things intrusively erupt and grooves become more sinewy as rhythms forcibly make their trespass. Darkness and invasive shadows always come equipped with a certain lure and so it is with the increasingly fiery and vitriolic landscape and indeed heart of Blackened Visions, song and album.

I, Mere Mortal steps forward next, another sonic coaxing the first contact from within which a rousing rhythmic incitement grabs the imagination and appetite. The anthemic potency of the drums is matched by a throaty bait of bass whilst a repetitive nagging from the guitars adds to the raw almost monolithic tempting enveloping the listener before spreading broader pestilential and ravenous sonic antipathy. The track is irresistible; a gloriously bruising call to arms led by, to simplify things, the thumping drama of rhythms and niggling persistence of guitar.

Karma to Burn like spicing lines Salvation next, melodic acidity which burns on the senses but sweetly entices ears and heart to its cancerous rock ‘n roll leading to intensely viscous doom and post rock spawned exploration. It is a flight into the beauty and hopeful calm found within acceptances of dark and merciless emotional and physical climates, and another song which leaves the body invigorated, thoughts stretched, and emotions exhausted.

A tapestry of drama and creative enmity follows with Dra Till Helvete, the track an addictive and mercurial beckoning turned sonic devourer leading body and imagination into the hellish depths of the underworld with rhythmic magnetism. As through all tracks, thoughts paint a picture and emotions flirt with more intimate realisation, every intrusive note and swinging beat a powerfully impacting and rabidly lingering incitement to be entangled in.

Mah Song (Horses Of God) completes the album, it a rumbling and lumbering beast merging expulsions of rock ‘n’ roll with psyche twisting post rock winds infused with danger lit melodic veins. It is a dramatic and compelling end to a demandingly impressive proposition. The Lumberjack Feedback has unlocked their most destructive and invigorating depths yet with Blackened Visions and it feels like it is just the beginning too; happy days!

Blackened Visions is out now via Kaotoxin Records digitally @ http://listen.kaotoxin.com/album/blackened-visions and as limited edition 500 copy DigiSLeeve CD with 100 copy collector edition 12″ LP on clear vinyl and 400 copy limited edition 12″ LP regular versions will be released during 2016’s second quarter at the Kaotoxin Shop.

https://www.facebook.com/thelumberjackfeedbackband    http://www.thelumberjackfeedback.com/    https://twitter.com/LumberjackFeedb

Pete RingMaster 18//01/2016

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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6:33 – Deadly Scenes

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Entwining an extensive mix of styles and psyche exploring sounds is a carnival of fun in the hands of the most inventive and accomplished bands but loaded with the uniquely flavoursome imagination that is 6:33, that bold daring becomes pure musical alchemy. The French avant-garde metallers had us hooked with their Giggles, Garlands & Gallows EP of 2012, an introduction to our subsequently feverish ears backed up a year later by their formidable second album The Stench from the Swelling (A True Story), both featuring CinC/Carnival In Coal/ We All Die (Laughing) vocalist Arno Strobl. Now the Paris quintet have turned up the lust with new album Deadly Scenes, a tempest of invention and sheer aural ingenuity which sees the band at its loftiest pinnacle of creativity yet and surely the most exciting incitement in music today.

The Kaotoxin Records released stomp consists of nine tracks romping down dark avenues of psyche igniting drama and heavy, almost vaudeville like creative emprises. It dives into ravenous shadows, through blood strewn scenery, and across the darkest corners of mind and soul, leaving smiles and bruises as a token of its salacious esteem. Like an anarchic tempest of sound grown from the creative sap of Faith No more, Pryapisme, Polkadot Cadaver, and Mr Bungle, the perfectly formed and fluidly sculpted Deadly Scenes is a tapestry of intrigue and unpredictability casting unbridled pleasure. It carries a lyrical derangement and musical maelstrom across every one of its truly individual offerings, each sublimely and voraciously igniting every cell of those drawn into its inventive hex.

The album starts it’s ridiculously compelling spell with the ‘gospel’ of Hellalujah, certainly it starts that way with a richly resounding choir announcing “Lord Jesus!” It is a great wrong-footing coaxing, even for 6:33, which is soon opening up its invention through a building crescendo of flavours which unite in a sturdy footed stride. It is a bedlamic revelry of sound with a show tune essence to its invention, but as is the norm for the band a mere moment in the travel of a song. Bursting into a ruggedly flirtatious and body swerving blaze of swing and melodic rioting, the song is afire with hooks and metallic lures, all courted by the drama of the keys and the show-pop tenacity of voices and similarly inflamed sound.

Ego fandango comes in next, soaring keys and preacher bred samples the bed for the subsequent muscular and antagonistic stroll of the song. In many ways a Mike Patton essence is never 760137674726_TOX043_6-33_Artwork_480x480far from the band’s music, here helping flavour the rampant vocal and inventive swagger flirting with an Oingo Boingo like vivacity and enterprise. Female vocals, as in the first song, provide a magnetic companion to the ever striking and gripping delivery of Rorschach whilst spices of Queen and Five Star Prison Cell bring further strains of sonic colour to the ever evolving terrain of the brilliant encounter.

A tribal and shamanic rhythmic canvas provides the landscape for the following brilliance of The walking fed, its hypnotic bait a constant persuasion as a low key Yello like electro and vocal beckoning lures ears into a sinister weave of progressive metal and funk infused exploration. The dark bass conjuring of S.A.D. works masterfully with the beats to cage the fiery endeavour within their walls but leaves his strongest most potent tempting for the closing stretch of the song where he unveils an addictive steely web as medicine man chants dance with the keys.

The furious intensity of I’m a nerd escapes another choral welcome straight after, its hellacious rage of metal an imposing roar before everything moves into a country kissed pop ramble with 12 Stone Toddler like pop ingenuity and Kontrust spiced mischief. To be honest as with every song, words can only give a hint of the depth and invention of the superbly blended flavours and ideas escaping the heart of the sonic incitement, and even listening in person, further twists only reveal their lures over numerous plays.

Through the theatrical noir of Modus operandi and the psychotic stalking of Black widow, 6:33 continue to paint new provocative pictures of musical drama and virulence, the first a kaleidoscope of again Faith No More ferocity with the worldly rock essences of Les Negresses Vertes, but as expected honed into something mouth-watering and unique to the band. Its successor is a furnace of creative and rhythmic fury sculpted into a virulent dance of sonic mayhem and deliciously cultured harmonic beauty; a Mr Bungle meets Toumaï seduction for want of a better clue. Their brilliance and exhaustive presence is followed by the gentle acoustic caress of Last bullet for a gold rattle, a country seeded night around a crackling campfire evolving into a melodic shuffle of Cajun/Latin sultriness.

The smouldering Lazy boy croons and bawls impressively over the senses next, it’s raging fury and warm lingering seductions a battlefield of gripping unpredictability. The song is as contagious and as vicious as any song you are likely to hear this year, but there will few which fuse the extremes as imperiously as this. Its sensational bellow brings the listener to the epic title track. Deadly scenes has a theatre all of its own as it narrates, soundtracks, and relishes a clutch of dark tales and spoiled souls. Atmospherically pungent and musically deranged, the track as the album blows ears and imagination away, leaving the passions exultant. Imagine every sound and musical spice you would wish in a soundtrack to your day and it will probably be in the enthralling and feet manipulating track.

     Deadly Scenes is another stunning triumph from 6:33. With every release we ask how they will top their new pinnacle but they do as evidenced by this front runner for most exhilarating if not important releases in 2015.

6:33 Deadly Scenes is available via Kaotoxin Records from 12th January as a limited edition (1,000 copies) DigiSleeve, bundled with a free 26-track label sampler, a special cassette version limited to 100 copies @ http://www.kaotoxin.com/product-category/kaotoxin-releases/ and digitally @ http://listen.kaotoxin.com/album/deadly-scenes

http://www.633theband.com/

https://www.facebook.com/6h33official

RingMaster 12/01/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard from

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Sidious – Revealed in Profane Splendour

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The first infestation of pestilential temptation came with Ascension to the Throne Ov Self and now the ruinous seduction returns to devour the soul as Revealed in Profane Splendour.

No, this is not a portentous warning of biblical design but the next inescapable savaging cast by UK blackened death metallers Sidious. Following their acclaimed and attention gripping debut EP, the London quartet now unleash their first album and it is fair to say that everything potent and impressive about its predecessor has been bred, dragged, and sculpted to another irresistible level.

Ascension to the Throne Ov Self was a disarming introduction to Sidious upon its release in 2013 but in hindsight just an appetiser of broader and more intensive invention and imagination to come from the band as swiftly evidenced by Revealed in Profane Splendour. Between releases the band which features members of Eye Of Solitude, has had movement in its line-up with the departure of vocalist Tom “Void” Allen and the coming in of Krhudd, the man behind solo project COLOSUS. With guitarist Isfeth adding lead vocals to his role in the band, Sidious has found further depths and exploration to their songwriting and rigorously imposing sound, their album not only another striking offering from the band but one to assert with greater potency and authority their leading role in the future of British extreme metal. Released on Kaotoxin Records, Revealed In Profane Splendour is an insatiable temptress which from its enslaving first moments takes ears and imagination through an epic emprise of almost carnal and certainly uncompromising raw beauty.

Recorded with Russ Russell (Napalm Death, Dimmu Borgir), Revealed In Profane Splendour emerges through a haunting sonic groan as opener Sacrilegious Majesty sets things in motion. Within a breath pungent anthemic drums are casting their irresistible bait upon ears and imagination, riffs just as hungrily skirting their potent lead. Portentous melodies amidst a sinister air joins the expanding landscape but it is still those provocative beats which provide the richest coaxing before a maelstrom of intensity and malevolence erupts in sound and vocals. It is a ravenous consumption of the senses within which grooves and hooks flirt with the listener without always breaking free from the oppressive strength of the track. It is the drama of the song which ignites thoughts and emotions as much as anything though, every rhythmic swipe and sonic tempting adding to an epic excursion into dark realms and a fateful emprise. Ending as it’s began; the track is a riveting and thrilling entrance into the album and an immediate declaration of the new creative strength and ingenuity within the band.

The following Inexorable Revelation is less startling in its opening but still a forceful impact as riffs and rhythms career through ears with hellacious urgency as keys alongside sonic enterprise tantalise with menacing suggestiveness in Sidious-Revealed-In-Profane-Splendour-coverthe background of the thick violation. It is a torrential outpouring of malicious and imaginative provocation which deeper into its heart you go, the more toxic elegance and emotive grandeur is shared. Exhaustive in touch and intensive ideation, the track bridges the serpentine animosity of black metal with the corrosive predation of death bred fury for another welcome and scarring persuasion before the album’s title track spreads its blistering venomous charm. As the last track it is a tempest of fierce creative twists drenched in insatiable energy sculpted and provocatively honed into a climatic and vehemence soaked inventive soundscape.

There is no mercy given by any song, each a psyche devouring, emotions despoiling rage as proven with the next up Annihilation Ov Abhorrent Credence and its successor Obscenity Ov Old. Each though colours their rugged canvas with an evolving cauldron of melodic ingenuity and intuitive invention which may need close attention but rewards with a fiercely busy and oppressively seductive blaze of invigorating enterprise. The first of this pair a case in point, its cloistral entrance the doorway in to a ravenous insurgence in theme and sound upon religious templates and the listeners senses. Simultaneously stalking and rampaging through mind and body respectively, the track is a scintillating marauder chewing upon ears and emotions with virulent and destructive rabidity. Its glory is emulated by the second of the two, a similar yet distinctly separate beginning the unveiling of a bestial and ravenous violation complete with torrential spite and as in the last track, bewitching clean vocals which escape the carnage for exciting deviation.

A cold ambience brings Infernal Reign to light, its chilling landscape swiftly scored by inhumane vocals and a brewing sonic causticity. There is little time for frost bite to set in before rabid rhythms bludgeon the senses and venom spilling grooves begin squirming under the skin of song and passions. It is an increasingly transfixing fascination of sound and emotion which is as debilitating in its calmer moments as it is in full cruel flow, the fine mix of vocal styles a driving force in that success.

Revealed In Profane Splendour is brought to a close by O Paragon, Bringer Ov Light, a dare one say mellower track, certainly initially which is soon merging floating celestial harmonies with predatory beats and hungry riffery. It is a song which at times seems like a recap of other tracks essences but once it brings out its own warped rhythmic antagonism and sonic majesty, the track turns into a searing and spellbinding intrusion.

It is a mighty conclusion to an increasingly imposing and impressing release. Revealed In Profane Splendour is a startling step on from the band’s first EP, employing all of its assets in viciously richer and deeper cavernous dark hymns. Sidious is on a demonic march with sounds to breed fear in even the devil.

Revealed in Profane Splendour is available now via Kaotoxin Records on CD @ http://www.kaotoxin.com/shop/cd/sidious-cd-pack/ and digitally @ http://listen.kaotoxin.com/album/revealed-in-profane-splendour

https://www.facebook.com/sidiousofficial

RingMaster 05/11/2014

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard from

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We All Die (laughing) – Tentoonstelling

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After their riveting and extraordinary album Thoughtscanning of last year, the appetite for something more from We All Die (laughing) has been the epitome of hunger. It is a want and need now richly satisfied by the band’s new offering, the Tentoonstelling EP, well certainly by half of it. Consisting of two tracks, one from the duo of Déhà (Maladie, COAG) and Arno Strobl (Carnival In Coal, 6:33) and a second piece by Mathieu Drouet, a French photographer for whom We All Die (laughing) composed the lead track, it is a provocative encounter of instrumental temptation which pushes the imagination into dark and sinister landscapes.

When asked by Drouet to contribute a track to a contemporary art project for his Grande Plage exhibition planned for January 2015, We All Die (laughing) crafted the instrumental Variation on the scanning of thoughts, a piece 760137644422_TOX038_We-All-Die-(laughing)_Artwork_600x600inspired by and a companion to the band’s extraordinary one track album. The exhibition itself is based on photography of Drouet which the artist ‘considers worth being used as cover artwork for music releases’. Consisting of twelve pieces, he chose a similar number of bands to contribute a track (also including The Lumberjack Feedback) of which a single copy 12″ EP would be released with one of his pictures as the artwork along with an’ experimental audio rendition of the photography’s digital file’s data’, basically an aural portrait of the picture cloaking the release.

Variation on the scanning of thoughts is a piano sculpted exploration, a shadowed and brooding suggestiveness which wraps seductively around the senses and imagination whilst soaking both with melancholic expression. Noir lit jazz scenery colours the evocative canvas throughout whilst sharing hues with a more choral persuasion, their entwining suggestiveness a haunting embrace within the oppressive atmosphere. The press release with the EP declares the track as more depressive than the band’s adventure upon Thoughtscanning which is easy to agree with, yet as the music permeates ears and emotions there is also an imposing beauty and stark elegance which ignites the warmth of hope in song and reactions. As always with the band, it is a healthily long piece which provides a template for the listener’s imagination to fill and colour whilst emotionally it is a provocation which is as cinematic in drama as it is intimate.

The following Grande Plage, OP. 1, Movement #1: Le Noir from Drouet is the complete opposite and whilst you can understand and respect its breeding, the track is an underwhelming challenge. A sonic expanse of electronic smog, a static wave which ebbs and flows but makes for a constant irritant, the track is a ten minute excuse to return to the majesty of its predecessor. Again it is a piece which will inspire or push away individual thoughts and imaginations, with ours unreceptive, but it is a pale if initially intriguing companion against the magnificence of the lead track and the musical alchemy of We All Die (laughing).

Tentoonstelling is available now Kaotoxin Records @ via http://listen.kaotoxin.com/album/tentoonstelling

https://www.facebook.com/wealldielaughing

Check out the excellent photography of Mathieu Drouet @ http://www.mathieu-drouet.com/

For the track Variation on the scanning of thoughts 10/10

RingMaster 21/08/2014

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard from

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Dark realms and shadowed emotions: an interview with Déhà of We All Die (Laughing)

 

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The union of musician and composer Déhà (C.O.A.G., Maladi) and vocalist Arno Strobl (Carnival In Coal, 6:33) for the project We All Die (Laughing) has resulted in one of the most extraordinary experiences and towering creative tempests of recent times. Consisting of a single thirty three minute track sending the listener on a continually expanding landscape of emotionally drenched progressive dark metal, the Kaotoxin Records released Thoughtscanning is a powerfully provocative and enthralling immersion for thoughts and emotions. Keen to learn more about the project we took up the offer to talk with Déhà, questioning him about the band and album as well as news on his other projects.

Hello Déhà and thank you for sharing time with us so we can dig into the creative world of We All Die (Laughing).

The first question is obvious, how did the union of you both come about for the project?

Just out of nowhere, Arno & I started to discuss with an artist/fan relationship because I am a huge appreciator of Carnival in Coal. I talked to him about my different projects and I sent him the first demo of WADL back then, he fell in love and we decided to make this true!

You both guested on The Deceit EP from Eye Of Solitude; was that actually working together or just happened to be both appearing on the same song?

Well… I kinda forced my appearance on that song, haha! I was recording Arno’s voice for this song and I was like “oh fokdatchit, I’m going to scream a bit and in any case, they can remove my stuff” and they liked it really much! Funny fact it was before we released the album so many people were just asking “what the hell is “wadl” ?” and that was someway a good thing.

So We All Die (Laughing) is the first time you have intensively worked together creatively then?

Exactly. And that was fantastic. We understood each other without a need to talk or else.

Was there a particular spark which brought the actual project to life and specifically determined its direction?

That “power” we have together was the sparkle that started the fire. This mood we had was just “the” stuff we needed.

A bit of a naughty question 😉 but has each other’s music been something which has thrilled and inspired your individual passions or has it been more an encounter which has artistically impressed without lighting feverish emotions?

As for me, despite everything you might hear on this album, I was not inspired by any other music at all. This is emotion, as cliché as it sounds…

 A quick mention about your other bands/projects if we may; 6:33 has been a lustful passion for us since discovering Arno and co through the Giggles, Garlands & Gallows EP in 2012 whilst admittedly it has been only recently with C.O.A.G and Maladi that we have been drawn into the imaginative aggressive fire of yourself, Déhà. For you is there anything from those and other of your projects which have helped spawn or inspire some of the We All Die (Laughing) sound?

Absolutely not. The most “influential personal band” on this album might be some “imber luminis” stuff (an own project of mine) but it’s not even that hearable.

You have just released the extraordinary Thoughtscanning, your stunning one track epic debut album. How have responses cover Artwork by Maxime Taccardibeen and have they matched your expectations?

We have absolutely nice reviews all over the world and this is really great! I was not expecting that much positive reviews as the music’s complex, but I am really happy and grateful!

I will be honest and we said so in our review that a single thirty minute plus track was a daunting and initially not the strongest lure…that was until we plunged into its depths for the first time.  Did you have worries about a similar fear and maybe assumptions about a single track album scaring people off or was that something which never crossed your minds?

It did, but I am used to composing long tracks for one purpose : the trip, the journey given by the music has to stop only when we state it. And this album, even if lyrically divided in parts, had to be one song because it’s a circle closing on itself. And we wanted to keep it that way.

Was the release always planned as one piece of music?

Absolutely.

Thoughtscanning is an enthralling, intimidating, and breath-stealing adventure, certainly challenging but equally a virulently stimulating and dramatic journey for the emotions and imagination. Tell us about the premise behind the album and its theme.

It’s emotion. I won’t say it’s the purest emotion I might release, since I have different projects and bands for my different emotions, but WADL is mainly this constant struggle between you and yourself, wanting to be healed and at the same time, you don’t want to be healed, you’re tired, or else. It’s a cliché, but to hell with it. People are all clichés.

How did Thoughtscanning emerge; did it grow and come to life as we hear it on the album or was it more like a movie, scenes created and recorded in random order to be shaped after into the sonic narrative we are confronted with?

From the beginning until the end, I would fuse your two metaphors : It’s a movie which was shot from start to finish

We imagined that the album evolved right up to its final moments, is that the reality or did you have it in a finished state before recording?

It was exactly like what you’re hearing.

How long did the album take to create?

The Composition took one year, the voices recording took 2 months of demo & 1 week for the final recordings

The first pressing of Thoughtscanning also included an Amy Winehouse cover; tell us about that and how you approached a song which is distinctively hers?

It was our label’s idea for this song, we had plenty of choices but we never really agreed. When Nico told us about this song we totally agreed in one shot, since we’re appreciating Winehouse’s music and it was a pleasure, since her lyrics went perfectly with our concept.

Can we assume We All Die (Laughing) is an on-going project or will you be disappointing us with little or no more releases?

On-going.

Portraits by Maxime Taccardi.What comes next for We All Die (Laughing) and for you individually?

An EP, at some point, and more stuff at some point. We’re not stopping. As for my side, you can expect releases for Merda Mundi, COAG, Imber Luminis, Maladie and Clouds.

Once again thank you for talking with us.

Any thoughts or last words to inspire or provoke the readers?

Act.

www.facebook.com/wealldielaughing

Read the Thoughtscanning @ https://ringmasterreviewintroduces.wordpress.com/2014/01/14/we-all-die-laughing-thoughtscanning/

Pete RingMaster

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard from

http://www.audioburger.com

The RingMaster Review 11/03/2014

Insain – Enlightening the Unknown

 

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     First the good news; we can present to you one of the most brutal and exciting death metal releases you are likely to hear this year. Sadly the bad news is it is from a band which recently decided to call it a day. French metallers Insain had already announced themselves as one of the more promising and impressive emerging bands with their debut album Spiritual Rebirth which from a self-released unveiling was given a world wide release through Kaotoxin Records in 2012. It is fair to say though that their new EP Enlightening the Unknown thrusts the band into a greater intensive spotlight, one which they will not be seizing the opportunity of which is the only negative thing about the voracious release.

    Also released via Kaotoxin, Enlightening the Unknown sees Insain reaching and delving into deeper pits of black pestilence and unbridled brutality, its six tracks and intro throwing off what little restraints crept into the previous release to uncage thick torrents of pure death metal maliciousness and inventive savagery. Every aspect of the release finds the band at a new dangerous intensity and level, from their skill and hunger to the lethal impact and vicious craft of the songs. It is a stunning beast which bellows deep from its guts, announcing not only a final swansong but the loss of a band capable of making an enduring inspiring mark on death metal.

     The ruinous affair is begun by Abyssum Invocatis, a brief atmospheric introduction featuring guest malevolence from Eye 760137621423_TOX033_Insain_Artwork_600x600-300Of Solitude vocalist Daniel Neagoe. It is a portentous if slightly underwhelming scene setter which still ignites intrigue for what is ahead, that something going straight for the jugular in the thunderous form of Absorbing The Masse. From its first second, riffs are scorching skin and sonic insidiousness squirreling through the psyche like a predatory cyclone, both David Schonbackler and Nicolas Becuwe merciless in their rampaging intent. Equally drummer Jonathan “Sangli” Juré unleashes a rhythmic rabidity which injures and compels the senses. The EP also features the musician’s final staggering performance of rapacious craft and blistering energy, Juré having fought for more than a year in the hospital to recover from a violent car crash which subsequently ended his musical career. The track consumes and suffocates in a thick tsunami like assault but as equally effective and dramatic is the contagious toxicity which brings even stronger temptation before the passions.

      Vocalist Louis Lafitte provides an almost scourge like persuasion with his irresistible guttural scowls and roars, a rage which continues to savage ears in the following The Faceless One; the diversity of the vocals as gripping and vicious as the sounds squalling around them. The bass of Benoit “Bono” Jean brings a throaty spite to the ferocity too, building on the snarl bred in the first song to coax guitars and drums to breed an almost pack like mentality to their ravenous onslaught. The track proceeds to prowl, stalk, and pounce as it plunders emotions and corrodes synapses, raising another rapture of pain and satisfaction with only the fade-out end a small niggle.

    Both Beyond Stellar Remnants and The Scourge take up sonic arms to continue the increasingly impressive and enthralling album, the first a ridiculously addictive and hellacious violation. Juré as usual is sensational, his arms and feet flinging beats and rhythms like lassos around the senses whilst the guitars scythe through the air and ears with a punishing intensity and ingeniously vindictive enterprise. The track swaggers and sways within its primal pillaging, igniting body and soul with a virulent infectiousness to its barbaric provocation. The track provides a mountain top in a heady range of peaks whilst its successor is a just as brutal and invigorating pestilential bombardment, grooves and vocals the perfect protagonists scavenging the beleaguered senses within a rhythmic threat just as intensively hungry and clad in animosity.

     The title track, with Neagoe adding more of his distinct venom, ensures there is no let-up in the epidemic of violence within the new level of searing causticity, its cruel vehemence and fearsome energy a tornado of noxious endeavour. As with all the tracks, it needs numerous ventures in front of its sonic sand blast to reap all the excellent skills and rewards on display but well worth every scar and wound incurred. The release is concluded in similar style by Apex, the song as groove laden and nastily uncompromising as its predecessor and the EP as a whole.

     Enlightening the Unknown is quite irresistible, a dangerously addictive venture which brings a sigh at the loss of a band once probably destined to be a giant of metal. There is obviously great anticipation of what the members of the band turn to next, expectations of notable things easy to build but it will not be Insain and from this release alone it is a major loss. You should always end on a high they say and Enlightening The Unknown is all that and much more. Available digitally and as a limited edition 1,000 strong MCD, this is one violent act not to be missed.

https://www.facebook.com/insaindeath

http://listen.kaotoxin.com/album/enlightening-the-unknown

10/10

RingMaster 11/03/2014

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard from

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