If I Die Today – Cursed

If I Die Today_RingMaster Review

There is a torment in the heart of the new album from Italian post-hardcore band If I Die Today, and a tempestuous air which lives up to any ideas inspired by the name Cursed. There is also an invasive and at times punishing darkness and emotional trespass coursing through the veins of the encounter but equally an imagination loaded, gripping enterprise which ensures it easily stands out against any other similarly sculpted and bred offerings. Cursed is destined not to be for everyone, and will frighten many off with its searing intensity and emotion  but there is no escaping that it announces If I Die Today as one of the more fascinating incitements in the post and hardcore scene.

If I Die Today emerged in Mondovì in 2007 and by the early months of the following year had released their self-titled debut album through Wynona Records. The release enabled the quintet to tour their homeland and share stages with numerous bands, that success reinforced by the You Are Alone EP in 2009, again unveiled to strong and positive reactions. It was the same with second album Liars the following year, its potent presence luring greater attention and acclaim cross Europe, the band following it with shows across Italy, Hungary, France, and the UK as well as playing alongside artists such as Sum 41, Offspring, No Use For A Name, Simple Plan, Face To Face, Taking Back Sunday at Bologna’s Independent Days Festival. The band’s workload and reputation continued to grow as 2012 saw the release of the Postcards From The Abyss EP and If I Die Today playing with bands like Every Time I Die, Good Riddance, and H2O as well as going on a tour taking in Russia, Ukraine, Germany, and venues back home. Since then more venues and countries have been scorched by the band’s sound, before and after the recording of Cursed last year, which with its worldwide release through Sliptrick Records sets a new chapter in the rise of If I Die Today.

image1_RingMaster Review     It’s opening handful of seconds are an inviting temptation but in no time Jesus becomes a searing sonic wind blowing over thickly jabbing rhythms and coming loaded with spicy hook lined enterprise from the guitars. Vocalist Marco Fresia roars just as swiftly and intensely in the tempest whilst the caustic breath and heart of the track is perfectly tempered by the magnetic lure of the throaty bassline from Morgan Ferrua and the controlled rhythmic dance cast by drummer Davide Gallo. There is no escape from the sheer energy and emotional turmoil of the song though or its flesh scarring sound with its virulent onslaught as gripping as it is intimidating.

In the sheer wind tunnel like delivery of the song there are essences of bands like Kabul Golf Club, KEN mode, and Statues in its creative adventure and tenacity, a potent mix continuing in Adams which is another instant arousal of attention and appetite with thumping bold beats and bracing vocals. Settling down a touch once established, though still a bruising confrontation, the guitars of Antonio Aresu and Michele Testa spin a web of raw aggression and intricate sonic seducing whilst the bass creates another deliciously alluring and individual line of bait. As its predecessor, the song is an epidemic of punishing and invigorating incitement, pure abrasive adventure to get your teeth into and drool over before it fluidly flows into Lucifer and its own exhausting tempest of scarring emotion and increasingly volatile and creative ferocity.

Through Patrick and Elisabeth, band and album continues to wither flesh and create emotional tension but again with plenty of fresh twists and adventure to their canvases. The first of the enthralling pair comes in a hostility lit slow shuffle with numerous expulsions of energy and vocal angst but also tendrils of flirtatious grooves and addiction breeding rhythms. There is no compromising with an If I Die Today proposal and no chance of being subjected to anything mundane or predictable as shown by this and its successor. Elisabeth maybe offers less uniqueness within the album than other tracks but it too is ripe with seriously enticing slithers and caresses of sonic ingenuity and melodic seducing, all resulting in less than two minutes of exciting violation.

Faustus borders on barbarous with its bestial weight of sound and energy but counters it with a tapestry of punkish hooks and twisted sonic imagination that simply whips the passions into a maelstrom of lust whilst The Ancient Mariner prowls the psyche and taunts ears with its fusion of noise rock and punk in stormy hardcore antagonism. Both tracks are glorious, adding their full thrilling and inventive weight to the unrelenting persuasion of the album.

An even fiercer punk venom courses through Vincent, the song openly revealing the inspirations of the band with its Every Time I Die meets Converge like onslaught. There is plenty more in the depths and brutish body of the song of course, lots to get greedy over before the album’s title track gives Cursed a whole new climate to explore. The band is tagged as post-hardcore but the closer is the one song which perfectly fits that billing, the rest a wonderful bedlam of styles and flavours. With a blackened and frosty air to its invasive ambience over hauntingly cold scenery, the track is an inhospitable drift through a dark and emotionally tortuous landscape compellingly bringing the album to a highly provocative and startling end.

Instantly gripping, Cursed only gets more powerful, persuasive, and emotionally penetrating with very listen. It certainly lingers and leaves scars in its wake too, but only to please and make demanding reasons to go back into its merciless majesty. If I Die Today is one of the truly exciting bands in the post and neat hardcore scene, Cursed shows exactly why.

Cursed is out now through Sliptrick Records.

RingMaster 12/08/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Tvivler – Negativ Psykologi #1

photo by Mads Ogstrup Nielsen

photo by Mads Ogstrup Nielsen

A rousing of the passions like no other; that is probably the best description of the effect the debut EP from Danish noise punks Tvivler had on our tender ears. Bristling with four tracks of something between post hardcore, noise rock, and sonic ferocity, Negativ Psykologi #1 is a blistering trespass of rabid virulence, an addiction in the making for fans of anyone from At The Drive-In and KEN mode to Kabul Golf Club and Coilguns. Band and release has a sound and presence though which is equally unique from those suggestions, a personality and freshness of its own which translates as one of the most exciting debuts in recent times.

Formed last year, Tvivler (Danish for doubter) hails from Copenhagen and comprises the united talent from numerous other Scandinavian bands. Vocalist Thomas Burø is a member of Lack whilst bassist Morten Ogstrup Nielsen is part of instrumental progressive metallers Town Portal. Completing the line is guitarist Thomas Feltheim from Obstacles and drummer Morten Clausen, the pair also part of hardcore band Children Of Fall. The quartet bring an eclectic mix of styles from their other projects into Tvivler but yet again the band emerges with something wholly distinct from those spices and other propositions breeding a similar assault of sound.

front coverReputation Radio/RingMaster Review   The first instalment in a 7″ trilogy, Negativ Psykologi #1 simply explodes in ears with the first breath of opener Almanak, guitars spreading a sonic rub quickly joined by raw and catchy riffs amidst scything rhythms as well as the scorching tones of Burø. There is an immediate contagion to the encounter, hooks and grooves uniting in a web of irresistible sonic flirtation whilst vocals squall with a just as gripping persuasion. UK band The Gaa Gaas spring to mind at times as the tones of Burø climb over the wiry strands of guitar, his magnetic pull the perfect temper to the carnivorous enticing from the throat of the bass and the emerging dance of surf and post punk imagination.

At two minutes it is far too short but in its brief presence an inescapable slavery of ears and emotions making it easy for the following Tænder to turn up the heat and passions. It too has no interest in offering a gentle entrance, bundling itself through ears in a ball of antagonistic bass and jangly guitar temptation courted by Clausen’s concussive beats. It is a thick assault of busy sound but with a clear centre from which Burø unveils the narrative with acidic prowess. Living up to its title, the song switches around with striking invention and rhythmic agitation, guitars and drum sticks a maelstrom of unpredictability to which the bass provides its own twisted grudge. With a whiff of bands like The Mai Shi to it, the tempest is an anthem to the primal and disorientated amongst us and quite scintillating.

Træfælder opens on a portentous ambience wrapping church bells, but an atmosphere taking less than a second to become a cauldron of unsettling suggestiveness leading to a furnace of guitar causticity and raw vocal bewitchment. As imposing and abrasive as the delivery of Burø and in turn the backing of the band are, they expel a ringing harmonious lure which is as seductive and disturbing as the kaleidoscope of psyche sucking adventure around them. The song’s title means traps and there is indeed no escaping the addictive hold of the song, another living up to its name and keeping ears with a greedy appetite chained.

The EP finishes with Tyndhudet, the harshest, most disorientating fury on the release. Each track within Negativ Psykologi #1 gets progressively rawer and violent, the closer bringing the release to a hellacious and abrasing finale. It is not all raw confrontation though, Tvivler again spinning a weave of infectious hooks and addictive grooves which just light body and imagination. Drums and bass are bestial it is fair to say against that alluring tempting but even they have moments where lust gets the best of them and they ease off a whisper to add fresh flirtation.

The track is a glorious end to a stunning encounter. Tvivler and their sound is not going to be for everyone of course but if those hints earlier get the juices bubbling and indeed post and neat hardcore as well as noise and punk rock too, then Negativ Psykologi #1 is going to bring some ecstasy to your lives.

Negativ Psykologi #1 is out now @ http://tvivler.bandcamp.com/releases

https://www.facebook.com/tvivler

RingMaster 23/06/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard on Reputation Radio @ http://www.reputationradio.net

 

Raketkanon – Rktkn#2

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Barely a handful of weeks back, Belgium band Raketkanon not only ignited but incinerated the passions and imagination with the single Florent. A warped rhythmic dance immersed in a startling and ridiculously compelling tapestry of noise, the song not only announced the introduction to one compelling band but made a riveting and exciting appetising to the album it came from. Now that the release has arrived, and though Rktkn#2 does not always quite live up to that first initial seduction, it makes for one blissfully thrilling proposition.

To be fair when we say the album does not match the earlier appetiser it is not strictly true as where Florent was a swift explosive dig in the ribs of attention and lust, many of the songs within Rktkn#2 provide a slow and intensely simmering temptation which need time to convince and seduce. Ultimately they do though, ensuring every listen is a fresh and perpetually unveiling exploration that is very easy to rigorously enthuse about.

With their name meaning rocket cannon in Dutch, Ghent hailing Raketkanon create an experimental incitement seeded in a wide array of sounds and flavours. From sludge and doom to noise and psychedelic rock, the band’s music has a distinct character and invention which defies comparisons on the whole. Some have offered Melvins and Tomahawk as references whilst we could suggest the likes of Kabul Golf Club, Joy Division, Coilguns, and Young Gods as a hint to their sound but only listening reveals the dark majesty of the compelling drones, incendiary rhythms, and dramatic textures fuelling tracks and release.

10959513_10153103655542112_4720665964608033336_nThe album opens with the aforementioned single and after a torrent of listens when first released, Florent still makes the greatest magnet for the band. As feedback and sonic enticement lead into discord kissed enterprise surrounding an unrelenting prowl of invasive rhythms, the track preys on body and emotions. It has a threat, a danger, and a fascination which just engulfs the ears and psyche. The quartet of Jef Verbeeck, Pieter de Wilde, Lode Vlaeminck, and Pieter-Paul Devos continue to entrance as scowling vocals from Devos spill from his throat over the expanding web of noise. A post punk tone to the bass also emerges more prominently as the song takes to a meditative respite midway; it’s tempting aligned to twanged guitar endeavour and a calm which is almost as portentous as the returning deranged dance of noise. The song never turns into a raging fire though; its droning reserved and its croon certainly unhinged yet controlled, with only the vocals a bedlamic fury.

With each song titled by a name, Nico Van Der Eeken comes next and it too opens on an immediate bait of slow but focus grabbing beats before creating a spiralling weave of synth brewed intrigue. The effect coated vocals also have a restrained introduction though it cannot stop them bringing inviting mania into the mix. They surprisingly remain ‘subdued’ as the song raises its intensity and voracity, taking centre spot in the quieter moments of a song which despite its energetic pursuits is also nothing less than mesmeric. A flush of hardcore like influence eventually ignites the vocals in an inflamed finale to a song, and end and song leaving thoughts and emotions startled and enslaved.

The following Suzanne has an instant swagger to its lively entrance and a more stoner-esque air to its melodic sultriness, both aligned to the ever vocal and enticing down tuned coaxing of guitars. The track is a more recognisable rock proposal initially, stomping with aggression and energy before wrong-footing with a drop into calm evocative waters, a simple melodic caress accompanying similarly gentle vocals. Of course all that we suggest has another lining to it, a generally indescribable one which festers and grows into something different, here a psychedelic wind of stark and uncomfortable but mentally and physically stimulating trespass growing from the calmed storm.

The albums adventure twists around again with Mathilde, the song a gentle embrace of cold but welcoming guitar and wistful low toned vocals over repetitive and wonderfully hypnotic bait. For three minutes its sombre yet magnetic temptation enthrals before lifting its muscular head and weight with a new angst in riffs and vocals matched by a dark fuelled bassline and fiercely jabbing beats. Doomy and embracing essences of post rock, the song is one of those longer to persuade but emerges as a spellbinding and ever changing sonic emprise of emotional and physical evocation.

Elisa is another long term simmering in regard to getting under the skin but with a spine of rhythmic repetition and eruption into an angst pooled vat of intensity and sonic rapacity it wins out. Exploring a more alternative rock premise whilst continuing to throw in a constant barrage of musical and inventive curveballs, it takes time to grip the passions unlike Ibrahim which has them enslaved within the first few moments of its driving and almost sonically mystical opening. The track is sensational, a rival to the opener and a tantalising maze of spicy endeavour with an imagination bordering on the chaotic yet staying within a sculpted framework, though to be honest that in itself is bordering psychotic.

Straight away another irresistible triumph is unleashed through Harald, a contagion loaded song which is as funky as it gets in a noise woven, distortion fed, and sonic crazed enterprise. Its opening minute is sheer infection but it is when the band unleashes a rhythmic stalking bred from the same wells of invention of a Wire or Gang Of Four that the track kicks off a torrent of lustful reactions. Entangling disorientating sounds, raw vocals, and sonic disturbances, the track sculpts the most enthralling and mouth-watering demented soundscape.

The album closes with the epic Hanz, a track maybe too long for personal tastes though not one moment of its nine minutes is lacking certifiable invention and engrossing ideation. Its low key emergence is soon a continually growing and intensifying brew, harsh but gentle sounds gaining an edge and attitude in many ways before finally breaking into more tempestuous scenery, though that too is just a stage in the evolution of the song. Cinematic, transfixing, and atmospherically brooding, the track eventually finds its heaviest, intrusive touch at its climax. It is a fascinating end to the album if not the most easily accessible without plenty of attention.

As we said at the start, Florent brought high and excited hopes for Rktkn#2 and the scintillating encounter has not let us down. The single forged a plateau for the band’s music which was always going to be hard to persistently match but plenty of tracks within the album do and those missing its ledge still leave a seriously enjoyable and creatively innovative experience to greedily devour. Bottom line is that Raketkanon is a must for all fans of noise, discord, and experimental challenges.

Rktkn#2 is available now via KKK Records @ http://raketkanon.bigcartel.com/ on CD and vinyl and digitally @ https://itunes.apple.com/us/album/rktkn-2/id972774371

Upcoming show dates…

28/04/15 : Stag & Hounds – Bristol

29/04/15 : The Shacklewell Arms – London

30/04/15 : Audio – Glasgow

02/05/15 : Live in Leeds Festival – The Brudenell Social Club

03/05/15 : The Hope – Brighton

http://www.raketkanon.com/   https://www.facebook.com/Raketkanon

RingMaster 15/04/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard on Reputation Radio @ http://www.reputationradio.net

Raketkanon – Florent

 

    Raketkanon

    Raketkanon is most likely a name still relatively or entirely unknown to the wider expanse of British ears and appetites, but a situation unlikely to remain the same after the release of the band’s debut UK single. Florent is sheer noise alchemy, an insatiable and ravenous temptation. It is also the first teaser for the band’s new album, a larger and easy to suspect no less potent proposition with the potential to make the Belgian band a new lustful passion for a great many across the UK.

Hailing from Ghent, Raketkanon (meaning Rocketcannon in Dutch) have a sound which launches itself on the senses with zeal, relish, and devilish invention. It is easy to offer comparisons to the likes of Melvins and Tomahawk upon the band’s music, yet it defies real tagging as equally essences can be found of nosier exploits like Kabul Golf Club, Butthole Surfers, and Coilguns. It is a proposition which more than likely will draw different ideas and references from different sets of ears, and a sound, alongside the band’s presence on stage, which has led to the release of the single on Jazz Life Records, the label of Blood Red Shoes. Laura-Mary Carter of the British band recently commented on Raketkanon, saying “After seeing their first London gig and being pinned to the back of the wall by the sheer force and insanity of them playing live, I knew we had to sign them to our label.

Feedback and sonic enticement make the opening lure, bait swiftly reinforced by a heavy rhythmic stroll and he discord kissed enterprise which springs from the intriguing start. Consisting of Jef Verbeeck, Pieter de Wilde, Lode Vlaeminck, and Pieter-Paul Devos, Raketkanon soon has ears and imagination immersed in their thick, unpredictable experimentation. Sludgy atmospheres collude with quietly psychotic textures whilst just as reserved droning comes to play with the senses. Each though is just a strand in the fascinating and incendiary tapestry of noise conjured by the band, post punk seeded bass and guitars aligning with rapid fire beats for a psyche twisted dance bound in a sultry and equally bedlamic synth cast seduction. Courted by the increasingly deranged delivery of vocalist Pieter-Paul Devos, the track is a bedlamic croon, a distorted and unhinged serenade sending shivers of joy across senses and imagination.

Florent is quite sensational, an insatiably and creatively irrational seduction which is not only frighteningly captivating but an irresistible temptation to the band’s forthcoming album RKTKN2#. Britain and the world is about to be seriously infected and after being tainted by Florent, it cannot come fast enough.

Florent is available on limited 7” white vinyl through Jazz Life Records from March 30th whilst RKTKN2# is released via KKK Records on April 13th.

http://www.raketkanon.com   http://raketkanon.bigcartel.com/   https://www.facebook.com/Raketkanon

RingMaster 23/03/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard on Reputation Radio @ http://reputationradio.yooco.org/

Statues – Together We’re Alone

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Blistering is the best way to describe Together We’re Alone, the debut album from Australian hardcore band Statues, that and thoroughly enjoyable. Hailing from Perth, the band uncages a “chaotic” style of the genre which has a just as keen penchant for acidic noise and caustic punk. Like a voracious merger of Ghost of a Thousand and Shevils with Coilguns and Kabul Golf Club, band and sound is a corrosive and exhilarating proposition, not forgetting one of the most unique.

Formed in 2009, Statues became swiftly recognised and renowned for their high intensity stage performances, shows which has seen them play alongside the likes of Every Time I Die, Northlane, Stray from the Path, Stick to Your Guns, Structures, and La Dispute. Their reputation has gone before them but Together We’re Alone is the band’s first real foray into global attention and it is hard to see the release missing out on awakening an intensive spotlight on the quintet’s presence.

As unafraid to make a searing commentary on social and personal issues as it is in scorching the senses, band and album instantly stirs up attention and imagination with the brief and seriously potent All Fears Are Learned, All Victories Are Earned. The opening song almost swaggers as it casts percussive bait straight away but is soon turning its enticing entrance into a brewing maelstrom of raw grooves and caustic riffs. There is still a teasing lure to the track though, a lighter almost mischievous wink which subsequently turns to a scowl and roars along with the imposing and striking vocals of Jayme Van Keulen. As swiftly realised across the album, how a song starts and tempts is never a consistent narrative, just a moment in a fury of invention shown here by the guitars of Scott Kay and John Overthrow mixing stabbing riffs and hook spilling noise to further colour and ignite the already incendiary proposition.

The following Always Building, Always Breaking similarly opens with an engaging temptation before venting its rage, a bluesy flame of guitar a spicy offering initially. It is soon battling c7e74127-c689-4e43-ad49-1d7a5e203f3cwith and aligning to, a fierce bluster of noise and the rapid fire skills of drummer Daniel Harper as the track explodes with fierce enterprise and magnetic intensity. As its predecessor, there is as much irresistible contagiousness to the encounter as passionate fury, especially through the masterful infectious lures laid down by Matthew Templeman’s bass skills which seem to creatively revel in the tempest. The track is a brawl of an incitement, a torrential outpouring of angst and hostility within a weave of sonic ingenuity. Only two songs in and Together We’re Alone is already announcing that it is one of the most startling and exciting hardcore releases of current times.

Oh Precious Commodity does nothing to defuse that thought and declaration, its hoarse vocal and anthemic barracking accompanied by throaty bass groans and tangy grooves which feverishly scorch and light the senses. There is hailstorm of piercing beats throughout the knee buckling ferocity too which collude with a cascade of just as hellacious vocals and dramatically imaginative inhospitality. Together they make an antagonistic treat matched in its individual way by the mouth-watering sonic hysteria of Forseeing the Cloud and Not the Rain and the hellacious rampage of Affliction Prescription. With a great many hardcore bands similarity seems to creep into any clutch of songs but there is no sign of that across Together We’re Alone, this pair alone steeped in abrasing individuality and unpredictable invention.

The band throws a curve ball from left field next, the simple and bewitching soulful blues croon of I Want Peace stepping forward with just voice against handclaps as its body, before the impassioned hostile delirium of Abide consumes ears and senses. As now expected, the track is a shifting landscape of imposing ideation and eventful sound, ruggedly caressing and forcibly pounding the psyche from start to finish. The thrilling turbulence makes way for Burning the Truth At Both Ends with its spiralling acrid grooves of and the concussive might of The Wanderer; both a crippling net of rhythms and scalding vat of sonic exploration bound in emotional ferocity.

Between the slower melodic almost post hardcore tinged Hard Words, Softly Spoken and the closing Within Arm’s Reach, another unexpected twist comes with the blues instrumental twang of Hope Is. Its minute plus lure is an intriguing and pleasing respite ready for the final creative furor of the album, Within Arm’s Reach arguably the most intensive and painfully invigorating track on the album, though all songs truthfully leave senses sore and emotions elated.

Statues have set down a benchmark not only for themselves but hardcore with Together We’re Alone, the first of many you imagine if this release is anything to go by.

Together We’re Alone is available now via https://itunes.apple.com/us/album/together-were-alone/id944791123

https://www.facebook.com/statuesau

RingMaster 14/01/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard from

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Pord – Wild

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Employing a cauldron of hostile noise rock soaked in sonic causticity, Wild is a proposition which simply lights up ears and passions as it numbs and abuses the senses. The new album from French band Pord, the release is an exhilarating and at times gorgeous violation of sonic ingenuity which inspires a deep hunger for more. Their sound is not going to be for everyone but if the likes of Keelhaul, Melt Banana, or Craw tick all the right boxes then Wild is a must investigation.

Formed in 2001, Pord hail from Lozère and through line-up changes evolved with a raw and imposing sound which was not the initial intention of the band on its emergence according to the new album’s press release. Thankfully the band has taken, whether organically or intentionally, a corrosive and raucous route with their sound which has increasingly garnered potent attention and following. Their well-received debut album Valparaiso three years ago drew acclaim towards the trio yet it is easy to feel that Wild will brew a much more vocal and aggressive attention once its uncompromising claws dig in.

Recorded with Serge Morattel (Knut, Tantrum, Ventura, Basement) at Rec Studio in Geneva and released via Solar Flare Records, the album instantly lights up ears and thoughts with Staring Into Space. The first thing igniting the pord_wildpassions is the bass, its presence from the first second offering more primal testosterone than a pair of rutting stags and never losing its carnivorous snarl and beauty across the whole release. Its bestial predation and animal magnetism is soon joined by scythes of guitar, their sonic swipes no less attractive and spiteful on the senses. Drums as swiftly add their antagonistic punches whilst vocal squalls roar with an element of restraint within the storming mix. It is a riveting mix, the repetitive bass lures irresistible whilst the guitar casts scorched tendrils of enterprise which almost crawl in the songs slower sludgier moments and charge with a melodic tailwind when the song opens up a cauldron of energy.

The song is a tremendous start, hooks and grooves lethally delicious, and swiftly matched by I’m Swimming Home. The second song is like a mix of KEN Mode and the now demised Kabul Golf Club, its caustic melodies and abrasing textures simultaneously threatening and seductive, not forgetting ridiculously addictive. Vocals are submerged in the tempest of sound but still a potent protagonist in the contagion of noise and bullying enterprise. As with most of the tracks, there is a swagger and array of barbed creative hooks which are virulent in their persuasion to slightly temper and often accentuate the hostile tenacity. It is formidable romance of noise which is contrasted impressively by My Bloody Galantine. Whereas the previous song has an endearing side, the third track is a predator of the psyche, crawling over the senses with a sinister gait and intimidating ferocity honed into a primal stalking loaded with sludge thick intensity. It is a carnal beast of a track and no less compelling than it’s, shall we say ‘lighter’ companions on the album.

The short fury of Laguiole Bull’s Balls is outstanding. It just exceeds a minute and digs up old school hostility to its sonic furnace and an ever debilitating bass enticing which recalls early Killing Joke in many ways. The devastating statement is followed by the scarring qualities of What Are Tuesdays For? which from a menacing and ear splitting entrance, unleashes a rhythmic agitation and sonic maelstrom which blisters every surface it touches whilst sparking another epidemic of seductive infectiousness. The track has a real swing to its bones as it launches its own insatiable and senses scorching web of sound and ultimately leaving ears blissfully ringing by the time of its departure.

Pools’n’Chicks is another sparking thoughts of earlier eras. Its raging intent and creative wall of sonic temptation proceeds to evolve through a post punk like cold snap and predation before developing a rhythmic addictiveness and discord driven expanse of noise aligned to a raw aggravation. It is an incitement which reminds of The Fire Engines and The Fall as it uncages its mouth-watering tide of sound, living up to the album title whilst sculpting its own addiction forging glory.

The album ends with On The Couch, a final and individual furnace of sonic oppression and rhythmic ferocity which inescapably thrills as it bludgeons ears, body and. soul. It is a last exhausting vindictive suasion, an eleven minute plus violent, corrosive dance within a haunting and menacing atmosphere, and quite brilliant.

As mentioned Wild may not be for all but with a body and soul which lives up to its name, it is one of the physically unhealthy and emotionally invigorating triumphs of2014.

Wild is available via Solar Flare Records now @ http://music.solarflarerds.com/album/wild

https://www.facebook.com/pordnoise

9/10

RingMaster 08/09/2014

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard from

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