Machinista – Xenoglossy

10454242_646923842055489_627674484089076675_o

Having set a striking standard with their Arizona Lights EP barely five months ago, Swedish electro/synth pop band Machinista not only confirm the potency and potential of their sound with debut album Xenoglossy, but expand it with an even more rigorously captivating and enterprisingly inventive persuasion. Consisting of eleven tracks which are as boldly fresh and bred of a modern creative climate as they are seeded in an eighties nostalgia, the album is an irresistible blaze of electronic pop, quite simply persistent bait for body, imagination, and emotions to romp and bask in.

Machinista is the creation of Malmö/Kalmar based pair, vocalist/lyricist John Lindqwister (Cat Rapes Dog,Departementet, Basswood Dollies) and musician Richard Flow (ex.Vision Talk, Haze For Sale). Starting the project in the December of 2012 alongside their other bands, the duo instantly gripped attention and keen responses with a cover of David Bowie´s Heroes, which now closes up the new album. Its success and that of their first self-penned release, the single Molecules And Carbon, both accompanied equally appreciated videos, led to an eager spotlight soaking the band not only from fans but media too. Last year the band signed with the Juggernaut Music Group with the Arizona Lights EP their first release this past March. Recently and really before the dust of fervour around the EP could settle, Xenoglossy was uncaged to as mentioned not only reinforce their opening presence but cast a whole new mesmeric spell on the synth pop scene.

From the opening almost warning prod of first track Take Comfort In Being Sad ears and attention are wide awake breeding a just as immediate appetite. Punchy beats thump their coaxing next before keys relax into a melodic sway coveraround those persistently provocative textures. The equally as tantalising voice of Lindqwister is soon caresses the senses too around that jabbing rhythmic punctuation, the mix of forceful tempting and seductive soothing an enthrallingly magnetic proposition. As the song bounces along thoughts of The Cure, certainly vocally and in the shadowed essences which lurk within the bright sounds, and of A-ha musically make their suggestions. It is a masterful start swiftly matched by Arizona Lights. The second song casts a hazy yet crystalline ambience before eager beats and similarly feisty electronic grooves wrap around ears. As with the first track, and the majority of the album, there is a familiarity to the encounter but a recognisable spicing which only enhances the fun and potency of the offerings. Here a Thomas Dolby/Paul Haig like air makes hints as the song unveils its sparkling revelry.

Its lively presence and heart is followed by an initially more reserved and shadowed suasion through Molecules And Carbon, its first breath holding a melancholic spice before opening up into its own vivacious if still slightly reined in dance. Again it is hard to resist adding comparisons to Robert Smith and co, but it is only an appealing hue in the flowing imagination of Machinista. Though not as striking as its predecessors, the song satisfies a by now greed ridden appetite for the release before letting its outstanding successor, Salvation intrigue and seduce the passions. Sporting the irresistible charm and vibrancy of Landscape and poetic melodies of Zero-Eq, the track soars in elegance and beauty, keys and vocals a glowing smouldering climate to immerse in.

An industrial unpredictability and dark air brings the next up Summersault in to view, the track a stirring protagonist with military bred rhythms and an imposing atmosphere of stark and binding incitement. There is also the most vivid cinematic aspect to the song. Each track has that ability to work with the imagination visually it is fair to say but none as voraciously and enthrallingly as here. With drama clad keys and the ever impressing vocals, the song leaves thoughts reminded of Associates and in an evocative grasp before the equally thrilling Pushing The Angels Astray steps forward to sweep body and emotions to their feet for a perfect slice of synth pop. Melodies and hooks blaze away with harmonic resonance whilst rhythms steer the whole thing into the instinctive eagerness of feet and passions. It is the chorus where you lose self-control though, its contagion as toxic as a sunset and just as colourfully entrancing.

Ensuring that pinnacle is not a lone voice in what are nothing but peaks across Xenoglossy, next track Wasted sways and stomps with tenacious enterprise and pop infused vivacity. Featuring guest vocals from Toril Lindqvist of Alice in Videoland, the track is like a flaming collusion between OMD, Blancmange, and MiXE1, and ridiculously addictive. Maybe not quite as gripping but certainly a flavoursome and resourceful coaxing is Love And Hate Song. It has the unenviable task of following the two previous triumphs and does so with a unfussy and minimalistic march covered in a thick and enticing melodic weave which itself is coated in an unpredictable emotive suggestiveness. It is a gentle yet powerful tempting showing another strain of invention and intelligent variation to the album.

The closing stretch of the release is led by the heated emotion and climate of Crash. It is a strong and thought sparking encounter but lacks the spark of earlier tracks even with its Vangelis like flumes of epically honed melodies. It is also left looking pale sandwiched between the last song and slow burning success of The Blues And The Reds. Holding a feel of Pete Wylie to its provocative caress of electronic sound and floating harmonies, the song takes a while to warm up thoughts and emotions but does so to a lingering success.

Xenoglossy is completed by an excellent version of Heroes, and it is easy to see why the track made such a powerful impact with its band introducing release. The Eno/Bowie penned classic is not dramatically changed but given an insertion of electronic teasing and enterprise which brings new inescapable infectiousness to its charm. It finishes off the album in fine and thrilling style. With the fact that despite the praise it is also one of the weaker tracks on the album, it shows the might and impressive adventure across the whole release. Synth pop is an awakening inspiring genre it seems and it is fair to say that Machinista is destined to be one of its leading lights.

Xenoglossy is available now via Juggernaut Music Group @ http://music.juggernautservices.com/album/xenoglossy

http://www.machinistamusic.com/

9/10

RingMaster 08/08/2014

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard from

http://audioburger247.webs.com/

 

God Destruction – Novus Ordo Seclorum

10369740_702219499834086_1875462536860800187_n

Having preyed upon and traumatised the world with their richly acclaimed and exceptional debut album Illuminatus two years ago, Mexican provocateurs God Destruction return with its successor Novus Ordo Seclorum. It has been a battle to bring the release to bear upon the senses, the demise of their previous label an imposing obstacle, but finally the insidious collection of dark and intensive anthems for the soul and psyche has been unleashed to the continue the impressive emergence of the band. Darker, intently more venomous, and arguably even more viciously intimidating than its predecessor, the album infests the trio’s industrial and harsh EBM sound with a black metal rapacity which infects and enflames the senses and imagination voraciously. It is another uncompromisingly thrilling and hostile proposition which without surpassing the previous release sits potently alongside its stature.

Consisting of Imperor, Charles Black, and Muteitor, the 2009 formed band as expected explores the most primal and vindictive sounds within the new release’s satanic themed tracks. The album exudes a constant pressure and gripping irritant on the senses, each song crowding the listener with ravenous and at times concussive waves of sound and ideation which exhaust as they spark ears and imagination into willing submission. It is a mighty and riveting encounter but one which suffers from a meandering and at times potency defusing mix from Mario Carrasco (SIN DNA). There are certain tracks where clarity is smothered in a distorted touch which corrupts the quality of the song within though the strength of the songs always wins through.

The Juggernaut Music Group release opens with New World Order and immediately has ears wrapped in a predatory sonic provocation veined by a sample of Middle Eastern suggestiveness. The track instantly surveys the climate of the world with its initial seconds, beats a menacing incitement to the vocal suasion flirting with thoughts. Eventually the track explodes into a tsunami of electronic enticement bred in inhospitable breath, where it shows itself to suffer from the awkward mix, though maybe the warped sound and touch is intentional. Nevertheless the track continues to swarm around the senses, its melodic and sonic appetite entangled for a scorched and acidic enterprise. It is not a startling start to the album but one rigidly gripping attention and appetite which I’m Your God and especially Bellum capitalise on. The first of the pair also takes a mere second to intrigue and grab the imagination, its initial heavy emotive keys a classical lure into the waiting arms of abrasing electro caustic and punishing beats. The song proceeds to leer at and climb over emotions with its demonic intent and the equally serpentine vocals, exposing them to its treacherously seductive heart before making way for the album’s best moment. Bellum is a bordering on sadistic provocateur from the first intensive scrub of riffs and electronic scowling. Antagonistic rhythms join the corrosive mix swiftly after as the track blossoms into a twisted tempest of deranged electronics, warped guitar endeavour, and again that irrepressible erosive vocal presence which marks out the band as pleasingly as its sound. The track is scintillating, a traumatic blend of metal and industrial antipathy soaked in epic drama and climactic atmospheres.

The dangerous air and sonic swing of Disintegrator comes next, its lures as infectious and crystalline as they are caustic before making way for a cover of the Marilyn Manson track Angel With The Scabbed Wings. The encounter coveris another crawl through the psyche, the band employing the prime essences of the track’s creator and twisting them into an impervious fiendish temptation which impresses far more than expected. It is a richly appetising baiting which is matched by the following Prominent Darkness. The slow predation which marked the previous track is again the formidable gait and intent of the song, its thick toxicity an oppressive weave of electronic sultriness and emotive storming spiked with industrial unpredictability and melodic crooning.   Through the despotic Destroyer with its patchwork of bad blooded invention of sound and climactic provocation, and the similarly structured Satan’s Storm, the album persists in its riveting exploration and diabolical persuasion. The latter is toxic bait for the dance floor which works as easily on feet as it does emotions, though it is soon lost in the shadow of the excellent Revolution. The track drives an industrial demanding through ears with its first gasp of sonic breath, keys and guitars rippling with primal rabidity as the vocals spill an officious rancor with every syllable. It is an exhilarating assault which only elevates it’s tempting with disorientating shards and splinters of ear bending and unpredictable ingenuity. The track is sensational and stands beside Bellum as a pinnacle.

Touched By Lvcifer rises from a minimalistic coaxing into a roaring ferocity of sound and emotional spite to sear body and soul before the demonstrative Doomsday parades its own distinct ravaging with magnetic shafts of melodic and scarring electronic beguiling. Both leave hunger greedier whilst Regresus Diaboli provides a lingering manipulation of senses and emotions with its transfixing and fascinating tide of searing sonic elegance and rhythmic grudging, all as ever lorded over by the Luciferian vocals.

Completed by the C-Lekktor Remix of Touched By Lvcifer, as well as the Esquizofrenia Viral and Satanized By Alien Vampires remixes of Regresus Diaboli, the album is another inescapable and increasingly impressive violation from God Destruction. It does have that issue with its mix but again the band has cast songs which simply corrupt and ignite for the fullest invigorating pleasure, Novus Ordo Seclorum returning the band to the frontline of corruptive ingenuity once again.

Novus Ordo Seclorum is available now via Juggernaut Music Group @ http://music.juggernautservices.com/album/novus-ordo-seclorum

https://www.facebook.com/GodDestruction666

8/10

RingMaster 08/08/2014]

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard from

http://audioburger247.webs.com/

 

Machinista – Arizona Lights

Photo by Milla Randjelovic

Photo by Milla Randjelovic

    Laying out an irresistible invitation into their magnetic synth pop world, Swedish band Machinista provide the most mouthwatering pedigree temptation through their Arizona Lights EP. Consisting of four original tracks and an enterprising clutch of remixes, the release is a dramatically compelling persuasion leaving a rather healthy and greedy appetite for this new genre proposition.

    Machinista is the brain child of John Lindqwister (Cat Rapes Dog, Basswood Dollies) and Richard Flow (Vision Talk, Haze For Sale) who linked up together in the final weeks of 2012. Their first effort was a greedily accepted version of David Bowie´s Heroes followed to equal responses by Molecules And Carbon. Fresh from supporting Henric De La Cour and with a flurry of their own shows coming up this month, the duo seductively hits us right between the eyes in presence and sound with their EP, it one blinding incitement that simply wraps around the passions.

     The ten track limited edition EP through Juggernaut Music Group also makes a masterful teaser for the band’s forthcoming indexalbum. It flirts and plays like a sonic temptress, bringing the richest colourful hues of synth pop past and present into its smouldering depths. The title track swarms into view first with a celestial breath starting things off, a spoken vocal narrating the emerging ambience and golden electronic sun of vibrant sound. The song is soon into a warm and inviting stroll with synth caresses and similarly coaxing vocals embracing the imagination. There is an elegance to the melodies which accentuates the lure of the encounter and a dance in its heart which equally engages body and emotions. It is an undemanding but thoughtfully composed and easy to access electronic waltz, a mesmeric evocation which alone provides perfect bait for band and upcoming full length.

    The outstanding Wasted steps up next and features guest vocals from Toril Lindqvist of Alice In Videoland. Like the first, initial contact comes in an enveloping and this time a haunting almost sinister ambience which takes its time to enjoy its consumption of the imagination. As it explores and sparks those thoughts the song simultaneously breeds a contagion which erupts into the restrained but eager stomp which excites and enthrals. There is also a definite eighties essence to the song, thoughts of B-Movie and Paul Haig hinting along the way.

    The following Salvation ventures more to the scenery of Landscape meets A Flock Of Seagulls with its mischievous and refined croon, pulsating beats and electro throbs magnetising the passions as vocals and melodies wrap their expressive weaves around the riveting canvas of the song. Again there is an energy and appetite to the song which similarly invigorates the senses as the track entwines its bait around the ears. Comparisons as everywhere are mere spices in something uniquely Machinista, their recipe certainly here mouthwatering and hypnotic.

     Pushing The Angels Astray completes the quartet of original songs, continuing the concept of the release which hints at UFOs and Abductions. The song trots through the ears with a vivacious heart and gait to its body as well as a virulently infectious chorus to match the charm of the electronic sculpting. It is a glorious enchantment and exploit for limbs and emotions, the pair at their most virulently persuasive and scintillatingly creative on the release which is confirmed by the delicious acoustic version of the song which swiftly follows.

     The release is completed by a quintet of remixes of its tracks, four of the track Salvation firstly by FutureFrenetic who give it a dancefloor friendly injection of energy followed by an atmospherically immersed treatment from Not Lars, a more chilling rendition through Tactical Module, and a vein throbbing interpretation from 2PM. In the middle of the four IIOIOIOII unveils his wonderfully invasive remix of Pushing The Angels Astray, the artist luring out the deepest textures and emotions of the song.

     With their debut album on the near horizon, Machinista could not have given it a better lead in than the Arizona Lights EP, a release which thrills and intrigues at every turn even through its remixes. Modern synth pop has found itself another exciting protagonist as the genre continues its thrilling revival.

http://www.machinistamusic.com/

http://music.juggernautservices.com/album/arizona-lights

9/10

RingMaster 07/03/2014

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard from

http://www.audioburger.com

Electric Breathing – Sweet Violence

cover

     Going straight for the throat from its opening moments and never removing its antagonistic bared teeth from there on in, Sweet Violence the new album from German electronic predator Electric Breathing is one of those scintillating releases which you do not really realise just how good it is until lying in its wake, reflecting in your own fevered waste. The ten track fury is a breath-taking, senses violating tempest of industrial, techno, and harsh ebm goodness or should that be pestilence? Nevertheless it is one invigorating voracious fire of sonic contempt and carnivorous passion soaked in a melodic toxicity you just cannot switch off from.

    Electric Breathing is the solo project of Göttingen artist Maik Grohs, and Sweet Violence his fourth full-length rampage into the psyche. Since starting up in 2006, the band has captured strong, if not yet widespread, attention for its unorthodox sequencing and unrelenting aggression. The new album takes it to another level, merging that predatory stance and invention with an urgent techno seeded energy, the result an invasive proposition which snarls and seduces with rigorous voracity in both. Released via Juggernaut Music Group digitally and for the first time for the band, on CD which is limited to just 50 copies, Sweet Violence attacks the world and its political agenda with the tenacity and aggression of a tornado.

     Blindfold kicks off the storm, low lying atmospheric coaxing and shards of electro tempting merging into a flume of sonic persistence for a restrained yet imposing invitation. Soon the song is striding with rhythmic muscles pushing air and intensely heated flames of electronic persuasion searing the senses. The pressure is increased once the caustic tones of Grohs unleash the start of a vitriolic narrative, his delivery varied as if from two sources and as magnetic as the nagging sounds around him. It is a rousing of the imagination and passions providing an exhaustive and inventive confrontation to devour with greed.

   As soon as the opener departs a teasing electro beckoning marks the arrival of Suck It Dry, again a song which is in no rush to explode in the ears but keen to offer a menace and pressure to keep an already bred hungry appetite awake and impatiently waiting. There is a harsher industrial intent to the track which is tempered by the melodic acidity spearing the prowling thrust of the encounter. Having pressed and niggled submission into place, the song than explodes into a contagious toxicity of imagination and sound which is as anthemic as it is inventively twisted. It launches the album up another level, a height reinforced right away with the following title track. The third song from a great agitated and unsettling opening stretch relaxes into an incendiary antagonistic stance with sounds and lyrical incitement to match. Like its predecessor the track easily recruits the listener into its anthem like attack, thoughts and emotions forcibly engaged and willing from start to riotous finish.

    An insidious vocal attack leads the thrust of No Sense, No Solution, No Way Out next; rasping serpentine squalls and spoken malice drenched provocation driving the sonic web of intrusive rabidity through the ears.  The track also unveils a sirenesque vocal call to seduce the imagination mid-stream into the torrential flood of riveting electro spite. Not as strong as the previous trio, the track certainly ignites a greed for its offering whilst its successor Brain Reset exploits that need with its bright and vivacious electronic waltz within the clutches of a hostile industrial climate. Again using that irresistible vocal bait within its enthralling enterprise the track leaves satisfaction overfed if passions like its predecessor not quite inflamed.

    That early plateau is unreservedly returned to with the next couple of tracks, first up through the demonically sculpted seduction of The Devils Whore. Warning calls and industrial sirens punctuate the incendiary sonic cyclone whilst scorching acid bred melodies entwine around the ferocious animation of song and energy. There is also a punk like brawl to the heart of the proposition which only increases the depth of it textures and malignancy. It is a scintillating conflict but soon left in the shade of Lord’s Prayer. From its first vibrating bounce of rhythmic enticement the song unleashes a mouthwatering twisted and persistently shifting intimidation of sound and vocal rancor, but within a stimulus of transfixing invention and unbridled experimentation. The song never stands still, every second leading into new ventures which barely get repeated across its sensational and imagination drenched charge. It is easily the best track on the release despite being amongst so many which would easily steal the spotlight in any other release.

    The only draw-back about the sonic alchemy that is Lord’s Prayer is that the still impressive and pleasing MK Ultra and Psycho In Me have too much to contend with as a comparison and ultimately suffer, though both, and certainly the first, also lack the spark and toxicity to launch the emotions as those first few songs. All the same both are ravenous protagonists with vitality and invention which grabs attention with an inspiring craft ensuring a full recommendation is the only course.

     The album comes to a close with the violence and ominous conclusion of Beautiful Sacrifice, the track a savage yet enchanting mesh of sonic beauty and rhythmic barbarism. Exhaustingly unrelenting with a pulsating fermentation of anger and venom within a bloody melodic blizzard, it is a towering end to a thoroughly compelling and destructive triumph. Sweet Violence is addictive and anthemic musically and in its invention; undeniably one of the early major releases in electronic/industrial music. Electric Breathing is a project which you know will only get stronger, a thrilling thought.

https://www.facebook.com/pages/Electric-Breathing/165582646816546

http://music.juggernautservices.com/album/sweet-violence

9/10

RingMaster 14/02/2014

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard from

http://www.audioburger.com

IIOIOIOII – Sun

IIOIOIOII

Earlier this year the Rising Sky EP from US industrial/electro project IIOIOIOII set the imagination away on a warm mesmeric flight bred from its expansive atmospheres and spellbinding synth pop seduction. Equally it stirred up anticipation for and high expectations of the impending album from the North Carolina artist. On a day many hide in the shadows from, Friday 13th of this month will see the dawning of said album and an insatiable tantalising of melodic elegance and consumptive aural caresses which confirms and then crafts to greater heights all the promise and assumptions spawned by its predecessor.  Sun is a masterful casting of eighties synth pop and seductive electronic textures which enthral and flirt with ears and emotions from start to finish, a provocateur  who is new to the senses but holds a familiarity which makes easy allegiance to its infection seem like destiny.

IIOIOIOII (pronounced I.O.), is the solo project of Charlotte musician Christopher Gurney who since the release of the Rising Sky EP has come under acclaimed attention from fans and media alike. The quality of the four track release sparked something in people and its chosen genre, its seeds and poetical melodies seemingly cultured from an older era but evolving into a fresh and transfixing presence which adds almost classical warmth to the current climes of synth pop. Released as the EP via Juggernaut Music Group, Sun provides a glowing understanding soundscape and incitement for thoughts and emotions which with nostalgia and invention an equally tempting fuel to its enterprise leaves an already eager appetite for the artist full and still greedy.

Rising Sky is the first caress, senses spotting melodies gently coaxing in attention as a sinister industrial/electro rub shadows IIOIOIOII - Sun - covertheir enticement. It is an instantly engaging encounter which enriches its lure the further into its evocative depths the song moves. As the welcoming yet also slightly dark tones of Gurney call from within the predacious heat, the song arouses thoughts of eighties bands B-Movie and Modern English. It is a mesmeric start which holds an intimidation but it is held in check by the magnetic elegance of the melodies and the persistently infection laced lure of the song.

The impressive start continues with Weapon, again light and shadow entwines in a dramatic melodic embrace. With an enveloping tantalising ambience stalked by sinewy rhythms, the song simultaneously prowls and seduces the senses and imagination, flowing crystalline melodies making spellbinding bait to which defences are immediately attracted, especially as a Visage like electronic narrative coats the delicious enchanting and intrusive toxicity. The song immerses the senses in a provocative bathing, one which is reassuring but also emotionally exploratory; a trait just as ripe within its successor Stardust. Like those before the song has no urgency in making its full intent known, instead slowly dawning in all its aspects and emotional castings. The evocative slow stroll and celestial kisses from within the melodies sparks another delve in to eighties synth pop, the crafting of Paul Haig coming to mind as well as a darker presence which has whispers of Nine Inch Nails to it. Absorbing and virulently infectious within its reserved yet fully flighted soar, the track pulls the passions even deeper in to the riveting narrative of the album.

For Do You Know Gurney uncages a serpentine malevolence to his haunting vocals, a move again opening new shadows and enticements within the album which the following Falling boldly stretches into even darker realms whilst persistently lighting the way with irresistible melodic and electronic weaves. Gurney’s vocals on the second of the two provide an almost venomous breath to temper but also stretch the glassy beauty flowing easily over the ears; a kind of Frank Tovey meets Mr. Kitty persuasion. Though admittedly the pair nor the invasive but beguiling Spotlight which emerges next manage to ascend the heights of the opening trio of songs, all with sumptuous ease increase the bewitchment from and hunger for Sun.

    We’re Still Alive steps forward next with a steely intent and stance to its contagious croon. Like a new sculpting of the haunting invention of Trent Reznor and the chilled imagination of John Foxx, the track is another merciless majestic tempting of the senses and emotions whilst both New Sedations and Echo, the first a feisty discord drenched slice of creative bedlam and the second a ghostly smothering which induces fear and rapture, increase the drama and intrigue of the album. Gurney on the pair again shows with varying success he is unafraid to push his vocals to places they may not be wholly comfortable with but constantly it only adds to the appealing portentous air of songs and release.

After the veering on doomy presence of Goodbye, the album is completed by remixes from Dreams Divide (with Stardust), Revenant Cult (Spotlight), Art Deko (Rising Sky), Garten der Asche ( Spotlight), and Machinista (Stardust), all in their individual ways discovering and extending new aspects and traits to their chosen sources, though truthfully none find the unfussy triumph of the originals. Nevertheless they provide a fine closing stretch for a release which reinforces and forges greater promise within IIOIOIOII; the dangerous beauteous temptation unveiled one rewarding trap to fall for.

https://www.facebook.com/IioIndustrial

8.5/10

RingMaster 11/12/2013

 

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard from

http://www.audioburger.com