This Burning Age – Desolation

this-burning-age-ep3-desolation-band-photo-5th-day-records-2015_RingMaster Review

It has taken a while to get here but now inciting ears and emotions, Desolation proves the wait was more than worth it. The new EP from British electro rockers This Burning Age is the third in a four EP cycle which began last year. The three track encounter is a rousing and forcibly provocative proposition proving that whatever has happened and evolved in the time between releases, the This Burning Age songwriting and sound has potently grown through it.

The EP’s songs feel physically and emotionally fiercer than ever but equally more inventively woven from the depth of sound and flavours which have always marked the band’s sound and releases. Originally a solo project for vocalist/songwriter/guitarist Friday, the Birmingham band emerged on the live scene as a full line-up after the release of debut album A Muzzle for the Masses. Wanting to take its heart and success to live venues, Friday enlisted guitarist/keyboardist Jon Farrington-Smith, bassist Davey Bennett, and drummer Christian Jerromes (since replaced by Jack Josypenko) to the band, with the years since seeing This Burning Age play with the likes of Fearless Vampire Killers, William Control, Heights, and Hundred Reasons amongst many.

this-burning-age-ep3-desolation-5th-day-records-2015_RingMaster Review   The band’s sound fuses essences of post-punk, industrial, Synth-pop and post-rock to really simplify its tapestry, with influences arising from bands such as NIN, Interpol, Rammstein, Sonic Youth, and Smashing Pumpkins. It is a fusion which potently gripped attention through the first pair of releases in the four EP project. Both Supplication and Devotion revealed an evolution in the band’s sound with a fresh thick web of textures to that within the band’s album, whilst exploring the theme of love and sex in their destructive form across their songs. That growth has continued with Desolation, its tracks inspired by a look at death and the human condition. As to the timeline of songwriting between the EPs we cannot say but there feels a new maturity to the band’s latest EP which not only seriously ignites ears but offers the potential of even bolder and deeper things ahead.

First song up on Desolation is Tatterdemalion, a quickly voracious and rousing proposal but one just as quickly slipping through an unpredictable and tempestuous landscape of intensity and creative resourcefulness. From its initial fuzzy flame of riffs, imposing rhythms stir the blood with just as potent scything grooves getting involved. The song hits a commanding stroll before relaxing into a prowling gait lit by a great steely twang of the bass. This ‘restful’ passage in turn welcomes the distinctive tones of Friday, his expression and emotion as open as ever as keys glow with simmering but bright temptation around him. Fiery expulsions of energy and heart then drive the soon to break chorus, its ferocity lingering to add richer hues to subsequent melodic and slightly restrained moments. For the main though, the track is a cauldron of inventive twists and turns, an array of styles colluding in a striking blaze which at times pokes thoughts of bands like Joy Division, in others of the likes of Pitchshifter and Smashing Pumpkins or Trent Reznor and Anti-Clone.

The outstanding start makes way for Drown In Silence, a song which leans more or certainly quicker to its industrial and electronic rock side as lively cascades of punchy rhythms and suggestive synths fall upon ears before dissipating for the emotive reflection of voice and atmospheric melodies. Calm before the storm, the track is a furnace of emotive energy and heart but again thick intense shafts which share time and the imagination with increasingly volatile and ferocious crescendos, all these keen essences uniting in an explosive and dynamic climax to another increasingly contagious persuasion.

As striking and irresistible as they are, the first two songs are slightly over shadowed by the closing Ab Aeterno (From Forever), a mesmeric introspective unveiling from Friday in voice and emotion. A crystalline twinkle of keys light a creeping mist of evocative melodies from the song’s first breath, the vocals emotionally raw as guitars and stirring beats add their weight to the unfolding intimate drama. Like a mix of Bauhaus and very early U2 embraced by the dark ethereal craft of Nine Inch Nails, the song glows with charm and shadows, eventually igniting in a searing fire of sound and suggestiveness.

It is a transfixing end to a breath-taking release from This Burning Age, the band’s finest hour without doubt though you get the feeling even now that we have seen nothing yet.

The Desolation EP is out now via 5th Day Records @

Pete RingMaster 05/10/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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We’ll Go Machete – Smile Club

We'll Go Machete_RingMaster Review

Though knowing the name and reputation earned through their earlier releases, we had yet to get to grips with a We’ll Go Machete encounter. So it is with thanks to the band’s vocalist/guitarist Paul Warner, who introduced band and new album Smile Club to us just recently. All that can be said is boy have we been missing out, as the band’s second album is a glorious tempest of sound, striking imagination, and creative intensity. Smile Club simply infests ears and psyche with a hex of noise rock, post punk, and math rock plus any other caustic spicing you can think of, and certainly left us not hungry but desperate for more.

With a line-up completed by bassist Chris May and drummer Rachel Fuhrer, the Austin hailing We’ll Go Machete first sparked interest with their 2009 self-titled EP though it was debut album Strong Drunk Hands two years later which was the catalyst to richer attention and acclaim. Live too the band has garnered a healthy name and stature, shows alongside the likes of Future of the Left, Melvins, Hammerhead, and Fatal Flying Guillotines, as well as their own headlining events over time marking We’ll Go Machete out as one of the more exciting emerging propositions. Late to the party, as said Smile Club is our first real taster of the band and fair to say the, as its predecessors, Cedar Fever Records released album just whipped up a frenzy in sound and lustful reactions.

cover_RingMaster Review   Absence is the first welcome stirring of the senses, tangy grooves and thumping beats enriching an instant sonic swamp of noise swiftly loaded up further with the distinctive, angst hued tones of Warner. It is a striking and invigorating mix which has body and thoughts fully involved from the first trespass. Like something springing from a blend of Melvins, Quicksand, and Sofy Major, the track continues to growl and flex its confrontational muscles yet breeds an inescapable contagion. Adventure is already bold in the album, the song for example slipping through mellower evocative scenery across its potently unpredictable landscape for a mighty start to the inventive emprise of Smile Club.

The following and as outstanding Drawstring is just as quickly captivating, its entrance of tenaciously prowling rhythms and rapaciously alluring riffs gripping attention and appetite immediately. Spicy grooves and sharp hooks only add to the emerging theatre of sound and melodic drama with the again pungent voice of Warner only seeming to inflame the sounds around him into greater enthusiasm of craft and energy. Like a web, the track has fresh inescapable treats at every turn, the rhythms of May and Fuhrer cage like in their union around the acidic tapestry cast by the guitar.

A post punk tone and imagination comes with The Bardo though it is soon overwhelmed by a noise rock tsunami of emotional intensity veined by creeping sonic tendrils of guitar. The song does not have the same immediate impact as the pair before, but blossoms into a bordering on sinister persuasion of clanging dissonant chords amidst suggestive and volatile textures to only enslave over time.

Strasberg Air is a far swifter raw seducing with again hooks and rhythmic tenacity key bait in the evolving ingenuity of sound. Like a more restrained Fat Dukes of Fuck and mellower Shevils, the track bounces off the walls of ears and senses with Fuhrer alone creating an inescapable trap with his addictively imaginative beats. Carrying a grungier colour to vocals and melodies, the song leaves a lingering thrill before making way for the melancholic tempest of Scratch Built. The early solemn come doomy premise and air is eventually set ablaze by the corruptive quickstep of toxic riffs and earthy basslines splintered by viciously swung beats. With its own emotional ecoclimate, the track shifts from heavily dark through torrentially volatile to infectiously energetic before heading back into imposing shadows in a final exhilarating outburst.

The major pinnacle of the album is Positive People which comes next. It is another delving into post punk terrain, an eighties genre spicing lining choppy riffs and a wonderfully brooding bass tempting from May. Elements remind of bands such as Artery and The Fire Engines, whilst the cold air certainly has a Joy Division-esque feel to it, but again We’ll Go Machete only sculpt a startling and addictive exploration of their very own. Discord is always a friend of the musician and here perfectly woven into the torment soaked anatomy of one glorious incitement, its majesty continuing into Break the Kettles which evolves out of its predecessor’s tail wind. A slower corrosively elegant proposal, the track binds ears and imagination with sonic lacing whilst simultaneously sending splinters of guitar invention and rhythmic animosity into its angst thick drama.

Both Shot Giant and Cigarettes and Face Masks keep the compelling power and industry of Smile Club ablaze, the first an intensive shuffle pressuring ears with spiteful beat spilling agitation and ravaging riffery but unafraid to slip into something more melodically provocative and hauntingly intimidating. Its successor brews its own ridiculously addictive and threatening maze of fierce imagination and bitchy rhythms infested with swarms of toxic grooves and citric melodic endeavour. Each only ignites greedier pleasure but the second is especially virulently disorientating and thrilling.

The album is brought to an end by firstly the warped harmonious beauty of Molten Tiny Cell, a song nagging in sound and repetitious mastery until satisfaction is drooling and lastly Dust Storms May Exist. The final song is just superb, a hellacious storm of flavour and imagination which at times has a spicing reminiscent of KEN mode, in others moments a raw tone and feel which is similar to In Love Your Mother, and continually leads the listener on a spiral of exhaustive and perpetually resonating adventure in craft, energy, and again relentlessly twisting swirls of rabid sound and invention.

There is plenty more to say in praise of Smile Club but bottom-line is we simply adore it and feverishly recommend it to all fans of noise, psych, punk…well any lover of fierce rock ‘n’ roll.

Smile Club is available now via Cedar Fever Records.

RingMaster 26/08/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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Maff – Self Titled EP

banda_piso_RingMaster Review

It is not too hard to guess some of the bigger influences upon Chilean band Maff whilst listening to their self-titled debut EP, the likes of The Jesus and Mary Chain, The Pixies, Sonic Youth, and My Bloody Valentine amongst them, yet fair to say the Santiago quartet weaves it all into songs which reveal their own distinct characters. Bred from an evolving fusion of shoegaze, alternative rock, noise pop, and indie to try and pin down the mix, sound and songs are a striking and tenacious shimmer on the senses which it easy to find yourself getting a touch greedy over. The release is a captivating introduction to a band with all the potential and imagination to evoke a worldwide appetite if not now surely ahead.

Maff began in 2012, formed by Richi Gómez (vocals/bass/guitar) and Nicolás Colombres (drums), two childhood friends who had previously played together in various punk rock bands. The line-up expanded with the addition of Nicolás’ brother Martín (guitar) in 2014 and was completed earlier this year by Talo Correa (guitar/bass /vocals/synth). Creating, recording, and producing their EP in their own studio, Maff has already sparked potent reactions to their music, dreampop duo Ummagma already amongst those enamoured, recognition which should now ignite through the EP’s release. Exploring themes such as innocence, mysticism, true love, loss, drugs, freedom, and timelessness within its songs, the Maff EP is a sultry romance for ears but one unafraid to ignite an unpredictable blaze or two in sound and energy.

The EP opens with Act 1, a spatially atmospheric instrumental evolved from post punk and eighties alternative rock which swiftly brings the imagination to the boil with its evocative soundscape which is best described as Joy Division meets My Bloody Valentine. It is a dramatic and rousing start to the release, an incitement of dark rhythms and sonic exploration wrapped in vibrant freshness and familiarity.

Maff - Maff Cover Art_RingMaster Review     Its potent persuasion is followed by the just as invigorating Linger Around, a hearty stroll of riffs and beats which relaxes a touch but simultaneously increases its fiery atmosphere and dark shadows as the mellow effect lined vocals of Gómez step forward. That influence of The Jesus and Mary Chain is a spicy ingredient to the gripping incitement swiftly seducing ears, adding thick hues to a provocatively crafted blend of almost prowling dark tones and emotions aligned with melancholic beauty and shimmering resonance.

Walking On Fire slips in next on a slim and radiant melody, the simple coaxing soaked in childlike innocence and radiance. It is soon courted by pulsating beats and a darker celestial climate though as the song’s entrance increasingly captivates, the atmosphere and scenery becoming more inflamed and hazy respectively. Vocal harmonies are as much about texture as narrative here, more so in many ways as the song’s chorus revolves around bewitching singular repetition with the end result as all unite together, a magnetic piece of composing and enterprise which inspires body and mind from start to finish.

     A more indie toning comes with Million Year Picnic, the guitars exploring a richer creative clang against another enthralling lure of post punk seeded bass and crisp jabs of beats. Vocally and melodically the song still immerses in shoegaze imagination but its canvas has stronger clarity from clearer air for the craft and individual incitements of the band to weave their combined tapestries of temptation. The House of Love essence to the song just adds to its lure and sets up of ears nicely for the ethereal charm of Someday. Featuring guest vocals from Francisca Morandé alongside Gómez, the supernal seduction of the song’s warm balladry simply drifts over the senses, immersing ears in an electronically sizzling Lush like embrace.

A fuzzy courting of the senses with a deeply rooted growl comes next in the shape of You, its shapely and slightly scuzzy rock ‘n’ roll rumble toying with aggression and causticity whilst casting a sultry anthemic enticing. Its dirtier air is the perfect taster for the outstanding Planet Wave, an inventive maelstrom of garage and surf rock embroiled in a just as thrilling alignment of space and psychedelic revelry. It is the most exciting and exhilarating offering on the EP, standing out amidst a collection of tracks which are certainly not lacking in those resourceful traits either.

The release is finished off by the rhythmically forceful and sonically bracing Blue Seas. As all around it, varied strains of flavours combine to create an inviting web, though primarily the encounter is more indie rock with potent hues of rock, grunge, and electronic rock. Even if not whipping up the passions as much as other tracks, it is a highly satisfying ‘end’ to the EP, though the actual final track is a radio edit of Walking On Fire.

For a debut Maff makes a striking statement and as they and their sound evolve, it is probably safe to assume more and greater offerings and enjoyment are ahead.

The Maff EP is available now via

RingMaster 07/07/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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Flyying Colours – ROYGBIV EP

Flyying Colours_Reputation Radio/RingMaster Review

Like a favourite candy, the ROYGBIV EP from Australian shoegaze popsters Flyying Colours, is richly flavoursome, addictively captivating, and impossible not to treat oneself to another portion of. It is a delicious slice of aural contagion wrapped in inescapable melodic seduction, and one addiction it will always be ok to indulge in.

Hailing from Melbourne and formed in 2011, Flyying Colours cite My Bloody Valentine and Fleetwood Mac as influences to their own sonic explorations and with the former an immediate spicing and the latter becoming more apparent over listens, they make a healthy spicing to something individual to the band. Similarly the compelling beauty of a Lush and the psych pop seducing of House Of love also nudge comparisons yet there is a bolder, almost bruising texture to the Flyying Colours sound which adds stronger uniqueness to the creative theatre of songs and EP. 2013 saw the release of their self-titled debut EP, a full introduction to their attention grabbing, raw beauty clad sound which came after the first teaser of the single wavygravy. Its qualities and lures are now explored with new intensity and adventure through ROYGBIV, a success with the potential of awakening a really broad spotlight upon their presence.

Flyying Colours EP_Reputation Radio/RingMaster Review     Single songs and the EP as a whole, are as rich in aural colour as its title suggests, but an evolving kaleidoscope of sound rather than a structure of individually layered hues just lying against each other. It all has a changeable and transfixing quality which starts with I Don’t Want To Let You Down. A sonic jangle works on the senses initially with its bait quickly joined by the thick beats of drummer Andy Lloyd Russell. The persuasion of guitar expands the moment the two meet and collude in awakening imagination and appetite, a sonic smoulder with a lively underbelly casting its spell on ears as the equally magnetic vocals of guitarist Brodie J Brümmer caress. The song continues to stroll with warm intent, getting feisty at times especially in a vivacious chorus which sees second guitarist Gemma O’Connor add her siren-esque tones to the mix. The bass of Melanie Barbaro is arguably the most laid back thing on the increasingly fiery encounter, yet her strings only add thick seduction through their thickly magnetic shadows within the blaze of the song.

It is a potent and infection clad track quickly backed and surpassed by the voracious shimmer of Running Late. Guitars jangle and dance in ears, offering a feel of British eighties indie pop a la Orange Juice and Josef K, whilst both vocalists twin up their mellow tempting to stroke ears. There is an unmissable sparking between textures in the song, igniting the thick sonic haze of the encounter further and indeed a sway of bodies and movement of feet and emotions before it.

The increasingly impressive adventure and ascent of the release continues with Not Today, and straight away the song has ears and thoughts spellbound as an opening melodic mist is pierced by one invigorating and tantalising bassline. Its groove is matched by those of the guitars and also in the more low key post punk vocal delivery of Brümmer. That post punk essence is throughout the EP but especially here makes the most delicious lure, suggesting that if Joy Division had gone funky with their sound it would have been something akin to this hex of contagion. Spicy hooks and a rhythmic swagger relentlessly feed a quickly hungry appetite and impassioned lust for the incitement and it is no surprise the song is the lead invitation to the EP, and indeed a favourite across the band’s recent UK tour with Pinkshinyultrablast.

In The End emerges from the closing strains of the triumph, swiftly laying down its own virulent persuasion though reining in the dramatic urgency of its predecessor just a touch as it wraps ears in a thicker smooch. Like the last track though, it barely takes a minute before full involvement of the listener is enticed, the still tenacious energy of the song inescapable incitement to the body as feet tap rigorously and hips swerve to the flow of the proposal.

Final track Leaks almost bludgeons its way into view in comparison to other tracks, the muscular snarl of bass and matching jabbing beats a heavily boisterous lure courting a caustic yet bewitching sonic mesh of sound from the guitars, it all coloured again by the immersive vocals. It is a fiery end to the release, and another irresistible song showing, as each proposition within ROYGBIV, another twist to the sound and invention of the band.

Flyying Colours is cast as shoegaze but their outstanding EP proves that there is much more to their voraciously bubbling shimmer of sound, plenty to appeal to fans of melodic and psychedelic rock as well as those of psych and lo-fi pop.

The ROYGBIV EP is available via Club ac30 in the UK @ and in the US on Shelflife @ now!

RingMaster 18/05/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard on Reputation Radio @



Pavillon Rouge – Legio Axis Ka

Photo Groupe

If there were still to be active dance floors after the apocalypse then the new album from French industrial metallers Pavillon Rouge would be the perfect fit for the dark mood and decayed energy it assumedly would possess. A fusion of black metal with industrial/techno bred voracity, the band’s sound and second full-length Legio Axis Ka, make for an erosive and ravenous affair but with a contagion which never leaves the body to simply bask in pestilential depths, dictating its movement across nine pulsating predatory tracks. The accompanying press release also states that their sound and intent explores ethereal 80s new wave atmospheres, and though not always as immediate within the tempests there are elements of the dark wave scene of that era pervading their latest release, scents of bands like The Chameleons, Joy Division, and Pink Industry offering themselves to thoughts. Ultimately though, Pavillon Rouge casts a sound which has its own distinct presence and an album in Legio Axis Ka which constantly and aggressively stimulates ears and imagination.

The band was formed in 2008 by musicians Mervyn and YVH, with the intent to merge black metal with hardcore techno. Highly acclaimed debut album Solmeth Pervitine was released in 2011 and was soon declared one of the best industrial black metal albums. It was followed by shows for the band with the likes of Psygnosis, Himinbjorg, Svart Crown, and The CNK, supporting the album and pushing forward their increasing attention grabbing emergence. Recently signed with Dooweet Records, the quintet of vocalist Kra Cillag, guitarist/vocalist Mu Cephei, bassist E.Shulgin, drummer Sorthei, and guitarist/programmer Mervyn now return with their second onslaught on the senses. Released on the Swamp Records side of Dooweet, Legio Axis Ka is a vicious seduction, a mesmeric violation which however you want to look at it, leaves the senses raw and emotions entangled in its increasingly magnetic tempest.

10347166_793523130703256_1060036933092637261_n   An immediate embrace of synth beauty amidst an evocative ambience immerses ears as album opener Prisme vers l’odyssée shows its introduction, a potent and atmospheric lure which is soon consumed by a thunderous tirade of rhythms and rabid riffs. Vocally too the song offers a merciless and diverse squall yet within it all the keys continue to cast a provocative and emotionally expressive voice. That industrial element is a nagging incitement within the evolving theatre of guitars and keys too, keeping feet and body agitated as the heart of the track spills its venomous and caustically poetic premise. Lyrically the album is sung in the band’s native tongue so there is little to its obviously dark climate that we can reveal but if the words and premises match the passion of the delivery then it is a brooding exploration just as potent as the sounds around them.

The following L’enfer se souvient, l’enfer sait takes the strong start up another step with its muscular rhythms and riff clad prowling wrapped in an electro hued colouring. The dynamic and persistent techno bred heartbeat of the song again has limbs on alert whilst thoughts and emotions are entangled in the melodic and vocal imagination lighting up the abrasing atmosphere of the song. Track and album definitely need close attention and several plays to unveil all the underlying twists and creative nuances within inhospitable surface and murky air, but it only adds to the satisfaction and drama of the stark, almost visual soundscapes sculpted.

Mars stella patria does not hang about tempting the listener either, electronic percussion and anthemic band roars immediate virulent bait. Their infectiousness seems to seep into the industrial climate, which offers warped noise and textures, as well as the chilled melodic enterprise adding its weight to the song’s persuasion. It is an endeavour spiced with a touch of Sisters Of Mercy and Bauhaus, and as the track continues with open clarity around its warmer elements, shadows impose upon and the raw vocals prey on the senses. It is fair to say that each song individually brings a new step up in the presence and persuasion of Legio Axis Ka, this one with its increasing rabid turbulence another strong step in its ascent, a compelling move almost matched by the mercilessly tempestuous storm of A l’univers. Electro pulses resonate through bone and psyche from the off, enticing feet and emotions to lend their eager energies to its call whilst the melodic and sonic invention of the band provides a ravenous celestial and dirty terrestrial landscape for ears and emotions. Not as instant as its predecessor, the song subsequently wins over appetite and thoughts whilst revealing more of the inventive ideation and songwriting craft of Pavillon Rouge.

Both Aurore et Nemesis and Droge Macht Frei enthral and enslave, the first laying down its first potent tempting through a delicious dark bassline before brewing up a sonic and emotional tsunami of ferocious ire and intensity. Its successor provides the first truly insatiable full-on invitation to unleash the dance floor moves, its rhythmic stomp a pulsating infection which leads and drives the song even when enveloped in rabid smog of noise and sonic rapacity. As ever there is much more to the songs and both engross with melodic ingenuity and the often understated but open imagination which brings striking contrasts and unpredictability to all offerings on the album.

From a raucous stomp Pavillon Rouge offer a celestial flight with Kosmos Ethikos, synths and samples aligning for an atmospheric exploration with a big brother like edge to its air before Notre paradis takes its own similarly seeded soar through a new spatial climate. There is a much darker feel and texture to the track compared to the last though, an ominous breath which coats guitars and vocals, not forgetting intimidating rhythms, as keys warmly and eloquently swarm around the senses. The pair offers their own sparking new adventures for the imagination to interpret before the closing Klux santur provides a transfixing finale to the album. With the most distinct eighties feel to its body and melodic enterprise yet, the track is a swirling maelstrom of light and emotional malevolence. It is a cyclonic treat to close things up, a seducing and senses ravishing end to an album which increasingly enthrals given time and attention.

The Grenoble based Pavillon Rouge have not offered an easily accessible proposal with Legio Axis Ka but who wants easy when far greater rewards come with uncompromising intensity and evolving creative assaults. The band finds the perfect blend of industrial and black metal fury for a proposition which fans of either genre should seriously contemplate.

Legio Axis Ka is available now via Swamp Records @

RingMaster 22/04/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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Raketkanon – Rktkn#2


Barely a handful of weeks back, Belgium band Raketkanon not only ignited but incinerated the passions and imagination with the single Florent. A warped rhythmic dance immersed in a startling and ridiculously compelling tapestry of noise, the song not only announced the introduction to one compelling band but made a riveting and exciting appetising to the album it came from. Now that the release has arrived, and though Rktkn#2 does not always quite live up to that first initial seduction, it makes for one blissfully thrilling proposition.

To be fair when we say the album does not match the earlier appetiser it is not strictly true as where Florent was a swift explosive dig in the ribs of attention and lust, many of the songs within Rktkn#2 provide a slow and intensely simmering temptation which need time to convince and seduce. Ultimately they do though, ensuring every listen is a fresh and perpetually unveiling exploration that is very easy to rigorously enthuse about.

With their name meaning rocket cannon in Dutch, Ghent hailing Raketkanon create an experimental incitement seeded in a wide array of sounds and flavours. From sludge and doom to noise and psychedelic rock, the band’s music has a distinct character and invention which defies comparisons on the whole. Some have offered Melvins and Tomahawk as references whilst we could suggest the likes of Kabul Golf Club, Joy Division, Coilguns, and Young Gods as a hint to their sound but only listening reveals the dark majesty of the compelling drones, incendiary rhythms, and dramatic textures fuelling tracks and release.

10959513_10153103655542112_4720665964608033336_nThe album opens with the aforementioned single and after a torrent of listens when first released, Florent still makes the greatest magnet for the band. As feedback and sonic enticement lead into discord kissed enterprise surrounding an unrelenting prowl of invasive rhythms, the track preys on body and emotions. It has a threat, a danger, and a fascination which just engulfs the ears and psyche. The quartet of Jef Verbeeck, Pieter de Wilde, Lode Vlaeminck, and Pieter-Paul Devos continue to entrance as scowling vocals from Devos spill from his throat over the expanding web of noise. A post punk tone to the bass also emerges more prominently as the song takes to a meditative respite midway; it’s tempting aligned to twanged guitar endeavour and a calm which is almost as portentous as the returning deranged dance of noise. The song never turns into a raging fire though; its droning reserved and its croon certainly unhinged yet controlled, with only the vocals a bedlamic fury.

With each song titled by a name, Nico Van Der Eeken comes next and it too opens on an immediate bait of slow but focus grabbing beats before creating a spiralling weave of synth brewed intrigue. The effect coated vocals also have a restrained introduction though it cannot stop them bringing inviting mania into the mix. They surprisingly remain ‘subdued’ as the song raises its intensity and voracity, taking centre spot in the quieter moments of a song which despite its energetic pursuits is also nothing less than mesmeric. A flush of hardcore like influence eventually ignites the vocals in an inflamed finale to a song, and end and song leaving thoughts and emotions startled and enslaved.

The following Suzanne has an instant swagger to its lively entrance and a more stoner-esque air to its melodic sultriness, both aligned to the ever vocal and enticing down tuned coaxing of guitars. The track is a more recognisable rock proposal initially, stomping with aggression and energy before wrong-footing with a drop into calm evocative waters, a simple melodic caress accompanying similarly gentle vocals. Of course all that we suggest has another lining to it, a generally indescribable one which festers and grows into something different, here a psychedelic wind of stark and uncomfortable but mentally and physically stimulating trespass growing from the calmed storm.

The albums adventure twists around again with Mathilde, the song a gentle embrace of cold but welcoming guitar and wistful low toned vocals over repetitive and wonderfully hypnotic bait. For three minutes its sombre yet magnetic temptation enthrals before lifting its muscular head and weight with a new angst in riffs and vocals matched by a dark fuelled bassline and fiercely jabbing beats. Doomy and embracing essences of post rock, the song is one of those longer to persuade but emerges as a spellbinding and ever changing sonic emprise of emotional and physical evocation.

Elisa is another long term simmering in regard to getting under the skin but with a spine of rhythmic repetition and eruption into an angst pooled vat of intensity and sonic rapacity it wins out. Exploring a more alternative rock premise whilst continuing to throw in a constant barrage of musical and inventive curveballs, it takes time to grip the passions unlike Ibrahim which has them enslaved within the first few moments of its driving and almost sonically mystical opening. The track is sensational, a rival to the opener and a tantalising maze of spicy endeavour with an imagination bordering on the chaotic yet staying within a sculpted framework, though to be honest that in itself is bordering psychotic.

Straight away another irresistible triumph is unleashed through Harald, a contagion loaded song which is as funky as it gets in a noise woven, distortion fed, and sonic crazed enterprise. Its opening minute is sheer infection but it is when the band unleashes a rhythmic stalking bred from the same wells of invention of a Wire or Gang Of Four that the track kicks off a torrent of lustful reactions. Entangling disorientating sounds, raw vocals, and sonic disturbances, the track sculpts the most enthralling and mouth-watering demented soundscape.

The album closes with the epic Hanz, a track maybe too long for personal tastes though not one moment of its nine minutes is lacking certifiable invention and engrossing ideation. Its low key emergence is soon a continually growing and intensifying brew, harsh but gentle sounds gaining an edge and attitude in many ways before finally breaking into more tempestuous scenery, though that too is just a stage in the evolution of the song. Cinematic, transfixing, and atmospherically brooding, the track eventually finds its heaviest, intrusive touch at its climax. It is a fascinating end to the album if not the most easily accessible without plenty of attention.

As we said at the start, Florent brought high and excited hopes for Rktkn#2 and the scintillating encounter has not let us down. The single forged a plateau for the band’s music which was always going to be hard to persistently match but plenty of tracks within the album do and those missing its ledge still leave a seriously enjoyable and creatively innovative experience to greedily devour. Bottom line is that Raketkanon is a must for all fans of noise, discord, and experimental challenges.

Rktkn#2 is available now via KKK Records @ on CD and vinyl and digitally @

Upcoming show dates…

28/04/15 : Stag & Hounds – Bristol

29/04/15 : The Shacklewell Arms – London

30/04/15 : Audio – Glasgow

02/05/15 : Live in Leeds Festival – The Brudenell Social Club

03/05/15 : The Hope – Brighton

RingMaster 15/04/2015

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Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard on Reputation Radio @

Fawn Spots – From Safer Place

Pic Ben Bentley

Pic Ben Bentley

Though it will not be the fiercest most hostile offering you will come up against this year, there is definitely a visceral rawness to the debut album from UK trio Fawn Spots which has the senses curling up like paint on a wall under extreme heat. From Safer Place is a furious yet creatively magnetic seduction which rages with a belligerent hardcore and punk voracity whilst smouldering with a noise rock and post punk invention. It is also a massive grower, from a strong and captivating first impression becoming one inescapable proposition drawing ears back again and again with growing eagerness.

Hailing from York, Fawn Spots emerged in 2011, originally as a duo with the intent to “push how much noise two people could make.” One or two line-up changes has led to vocalists/guitarist Jonathan Meager and Oliver Grabowski alongside newest member, drummer Paddy Carley, now standing before the world with From Safer Place in their creative hands. Written and recorded in sheds located in an abandoned Georgian garden and lyrically inspired by T. S. Eliot and Jean Paul Sartre amongst others, the album is a stirring foraging of the senses and sparking of the imagination. It retains the intensity which has already fuelled the band’s sounds and sonic assaults but explores even greater twists of invention and twisted enterprise, its songs barbarous but also ingeniously unpredictable.

New Sense stirs the blood first, its opening sonic yawn the prelude to a maelstrom of aggravated rhythms and caustic riffs raged over by bracing and instantly appealing vocals. Hooks are just as swift a lure too, almost taunting from within the smoggy air of the track. It has to be said that initially the closed in, claustrophobic air to songs took a while to acclimatise to. It did not defuse the success and weight of the persuasions but certainly distracted for the first couple of tracks before slipping into place and becoming part of the inventive furniture of From Safer Place.

The strong start is matched by I’m Not a Man; I Never Will Be, its more controlled entrance just a deceit as it too is soon a tempestuous storm of riff and rhythmic confrontation. Barely safer_place_layout_ideapassing a minute in length, the track throws in the irresistible hook or two also, successful bait courted by a great heavy bassline as the temperature and temptation of the album continues to rise through it and find new heights via the spicy causticity of A Certain Pleasure. The band has understandably been compared to the likes of Rites of Spring, Husker Du, and Mission of Burma, but the third track, and not alone in this, sparks thoughts of older bands like The Fire Engines and Wire, if lost in the blistering causticity of At the Drive In. The track sparks new greed in an already contented appetite for the album, its potency emulated and surpassed again by the outstanding Black Water. Sinister in its melodies and vocal harmonies, toxic in its sonic enterprise, the track is post punk at its most addictively inventive and predatory.

Natural Vision returns to the smoky and oppressive texture of the beginning for its persuasion but turns in on itself with minimalist hooks and melodies which vein the intensive rhythmic and abrasing examination of the senses. Though the track leaves a satisfied smile in its wake it lacks the striking spark of the songs around it, as emphasized by the album’s title track. There is a feel of Josef K in some ways to the next song, as well as a brawling punk ferocity which vocally and rhythmically pulls no punches. It is an exciting peach of a bruising on ears and psyche, and almost poppy in its infectiousness.

The heavy rhythmic entrance of Remains sets the scene for an agitated dance of psychotic beats and brawling vocals bound in a tapestry of toxic melodies and piercing hooks next. It is a glorious violation and imagination sparking incitement which has to bow a little to the superb In Front of the Chesnut Tree which follows. Its start is ripe with choppy dark bass pokes whilst the soon joining melodic winery is pure XTC, though it all evolves swiftly into an even more apparent Joy Division blossomed tempting. The instrumental is bewitching, seriously addictive, and given the clarity which the vocals are not across the album, becomes a lusty seduction on ears and the passions.

The album is completed by firstly the hellacious tempest of Recurring Face, a hardcore spawned furnace of vocal and sonic spite infused with cold post punk ingenuity. At its conclusion it is impossible not to draw a deep breath in recovery before the closing Basque Knife consumes ears with its psychotic and predacious, but controlled swamp of sound and enterprise. It is a fine end to a great release if not living up to the previous peaks on the album though to be fair the strength of all songs seems to grow with every single dive into their corrosive beauty, this no exception.

     From Safer Place is a treat of primal and instinctive noise delivered with a similar inbred passion and animosity. It tests, stretches, and excites in equal measure and makes for a very easy recommendation.

From Safer Place is available now via Critical Heights @

RingMaster 10/03/2015

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