Dark Stares – Darker Days Are Here To Stay

With a clutch of praise wearing EP’s already under their belt UK outfit Dark Stares have now raised the ante with their debut album. Continuing the open evolution of their sound across those previous encounters, Darker Days Are Here To Stay is a release which maybe smoulders more than roars but like the band’s previous releases, just captivates but with an even greater depth of adventure and seduction.

The St Albans band’s individual alternative rock tempts like a fusion of Muse and Queens Of The Stone Age but equally has drawn references to the likes of Wolfmother, Royal Blood, Led Zeppelin, and The Beatles. Formed in 2011, the quartet released their first EP, Tell Your Friends, the following year. Its well-received introduction to the band has been built upon in sound and success across the likes of Octopon and Soul Contract as well as a host an eagerly supported singles. Self-produced, Darker Days Are Here To Stay continues the band’s DIY intent with a raw magnetism and organic radiance which just commands attention.

The album opens up with Liquid Reign and a sonic limbo from which a swagger gaited groove, firm beats, and the tantalising voice of Miles Kristian Howell emerge. The track settles into an infectious swing entwined in heated sonic vines as that initial groove continues to wind around ears and appetite. Crystaline in its melody, crisp in its rhythms, the song is a warm yet invasive seduction as catchy as it is hauntingly provocative.

The following Sweet Rider 5 is also the band’s new single, a track similarly woven to the first but with a fiery lining to its golden glaze and a whiff of latter day Depeche Mode to its air. The guitar of Harry Collins casts another alluring web of sound and heat; tendrils of enterprise which tease rather than entangle the imagination but have it alive all the same as the dark tone of Brett Harland Howell’s bass and the urge of Taylor Howell’s beats tempt the body.  So absorbing it feels much shorter than it really is, the track still ends too quickly but Pedal Pusher soon has all focus on its fuzzy, enticing saunter. An electronic grumble adds inventive shadow to the mesmeric charms of guitar and harmonies and equally a raw edge courting intrigue and dark melancholy to contrast the radiance on offer.

Darker Days is next, its electronic scuzz even deeper and dirtier than in its predecessor to accentuate the candescent sounds wrapping broad and intimate shadows. Richly captivating with its own individually bold sway, the song wears the scent of post punk and neo-psychedelia in its creative sigh; a The Jesus and Mary Chain meets The House of Love kind of wash adding to its rich pull before Animal floats in on a sonic breeze. Its climate is soon a sweltering embrace easily luring ears and imagination to its exotic heart and bluesy drama. It is a track which epitomises the album, making a strong and potent first impression but only glowing brighter with every listen.

Across the likes of the more volatile rock ‘n’ roll of Ordinary Way with its scuzzy touch and unpredictable air and the irresistible Hips Don’t Shake the album just drew us deeper into its grasp. The first of the two did not connect as thickly as other tracks but its successor more than compensated with its addictive twists and infectious almost mischievous character. There is a constant Josh Homme like hue to songs if mostly a mere dash of colour but makes for a compelling ingredient in the album’s best moment.

Cruise Control equally dips into that spicing for its raw harmonic roar, Muse-esque spatial hues fusing with the song’s sonic fuzziness while So Good serenades from within its cavernous heart. The second is a tapestry of imagination, every move unexpected yet instantly embraceable as the lucent croon of the song envelops ears and a by now greedy appetite.

The pair of Their Game and Feels (So Sad) bring the album to a beguiling close with their respective indie rock and hypnotic glow of melancholic yet lustrous beauty. They complete a release which just captivates but with moments that had us drooling. Even so we still have the feeling that Dark Stares has not come close to finding the boundaries of their sound and that makes the anticipation for their next release as strong as the enjoyment found with Darker Days Are Here To Stay.

Darker Days Are Here To Stay is out now through iTunes and other stores.

https://www.darkstares.com/   https://www.facebook.com/DarkStares/   https://twitter.com/dark_stares

Pete RingMaster 22/05/2018

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Backtrack Lane – In Fine

Four years after the release of their well-received debut album Black Truth & White Lies, French rockers   Backtrack Lane return with new EP, In Fine. Offering six creatively robust and impassioned tracks, the EP revels in a new energy and flair of enterprise in the Paris quartet’s sound; it a mix of the familiar and the captivatingly fresh sparking rich enjoyment with ease.

Formed in 2009, Backtrack Lane has played hundreds of gigs across their homeland, moving from small local stages to some of the most prestigious venues whilst playing alongside the likes of Black Star Riders, Gotthard, and numerous more. 2011 saw the release of first EP, It’s Not Like…, the national attention stoking Black Truth & White Lies album appearing two years later. The multi-flavoured alternative rock of In Fine is Backtrack Lane poking even bigger and broader spotlights while being for many a potent introduction to a band which knows how to rock ‘n’ roll.

With its lack of real uniqueness more than countered by the passion and energy at its enterprising heart, In Fine is a magnet in the speakers swiftly grabbing ears with opener Fifteen Minutes. Straight away the steely riffs of Adrien Crestey and Stefan Gatti spark the appetite, the heavier dark throb of vocalist Raphael Gatti’s bass zoning in on the instincts for predatory sound. Their collusion is instantly joined by the latter’s vocal prowess; his energy in delivery matched in the sounds blossoming up around him. With keys melodically shimmering behind the forceful yet invitational web created by the foursome, Gui O’Crest’s rapier like beats are like a punctuation to each strand of temptation. The song continually expands and grows note by note, blues filtered grooves only adding to the creative prowess working on body and imagination while familiar hues, with a suggestion of Sick Puppies/3 Days Grace to them, simply accentuate the lure and adventure of the encounter.

Underground is no less of a temptation with a vine like groove instantly wrapping around ears as desert rock seeded melodic enticement brews around another great vocal beckon from Raphael Gatti. A definite Josh Homme air creeps across the songwriting and character of the track, its slightly tempestuous climate and energy as irresistible as its sonic dexterity and spicy melodies with Crestey’s lead enticement teasing with a Billy Idol hue. As its predecessor, the song might be missing majorly unique surprises as feet and spirit are keenly manipulated yet expectations are left empty by its adventure and fresh breath, qualities just as rampant within next up Perfect Motion. Though there is more restraint in its first touch than those before, its zeal to stomp is soon in charge and throwing rapacious grooves and boisterous rhythms at ears as vocals add their own catchy exploits. Once more Queens Of The Stone Age is an inescapable clue to the bold and potent sound inciting something which simply is a thick pleasure.

Breaking the Rules has a broader hard/alternative rock landscape to its sound, Stefan Gatti and Adrien Crestey blending their hook littered designs with infectious prowess as rhythms stroll and vocals roar. Ultimately the song misses matching the lofty peaks of those before it but thorough enjoyment and involvement is a given as with the blues lined inevitably catchy prowl of the following Stray. An energetic slice of pop rock with a broad smile in its air and nature plus a snarling bassline to get greedy over, the song saunters without distractions into eager ears and spirit with its lively romp.

The EP is closed off by After the Rain, another song with a sizzling blues rock nurtured spicing and instinctive contagiousness in its creative veins. Once more things are familiar yet full of an adventure with a seduction and craft hard to not be taken by. In Fine delivers rock ‘n’ roll which feeds all the wants; fun, energy, and passion all served with something extra driven by imagination.

In Fine is available now.

http://www.backtracklane.com/    https://www.facebook.com/Backtrack-Lane-143002764878/    https://twitter.com/backtracklane

Pete RingMaster 30/05/2017

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Gelato – Weird

Pic Chris Patmore

Continuing to invite fresh attention and praise, UK trio Gelato recently released their third EP in the highly flavoursome shape of Weird. Offering three varied slices of the band’s increasingly individual sound, the EP is another potent step in the London based rocker’s rise upon the national rock scene.

Formed in 2014 by vocalist /guitarist Drew Wynen, Gelato swiftly excited ears and attention with a powerful live presence and the release of their self-titled debut EP in 2015. Inspirations from the likes of Foo Fighters and Queens Of The Stone Age were open hues in its striking introduction to the band, but flavours less leading in their second release, the Daydream EP as the band’s sound quickly and boldly revealed its own character. Weird is an even stronger realisation of that individuality, a mix of alternative and garage rock with punk and psych rock among many additional traits for extra spicing.

With bassist Jacob Roos and drummer Callum Green alongside Wynen, Gelato gets down to business upon Weird with You Ain’t No Match. As jabbing beats set the tone and gait, wiry riffs lay tempting fingers upon ears, their intermittent lures soon a constant bait of intrigue loaded persuasion. As vocals join with variety and energetic persuasion, things mellow out a touch but still with drama and bite to keep the song sparking in ears. Warm harmonies and tangy grooves all add to the magnetism of the impressive opener and its web of creative seduction.

Breaking the Spell follows, initially caressing the senses with a melancholic shimmer. From within the evocative coaxing, a network of steely hooks ensnare ears, their flirtatious appeal only leading to matching lures found in vocals and melodic infection. There is still a touch of Josh Homme and co to the song and Gelato sound but entangled in the band’s own imaginative theatre they build another riveting and strongly enjoyable proposition matching, even eclipsing its predecessor.

The EP closes with The Optimist, a sultry seduction wrapped in melodic psych rock heat and suggestion. Its touch is a smouldering call but with livelier depths which bubble and flame as heavier rock textures brew to infest the track’s heart. More of a slow burner than its companions, the track further blossoms in pleasure with every listen, its further layers and adventure unveiled with every listen to provide a tantalising close to another highly persuasive and enjoyable moment with Gelato.

The band is looking at another healthy year in their emergence upon the British rock scene; indeed Weird suggests it just might be their biggest yet.

The Weird EP is out now through iTunes and other stores.

https://www.gelatomusic.com/   https://www.facebook.com/GelatoMusic/   https://gelatomusic.bandcamp.com/

Pete RingMaster 15/03/2017

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

King Colobus – Self Titled EP

king-colobus-promo-shot_RingMasterReview

There are times when something just clicks with ears and imagination, instincts instantly seizing the day and directing responses with almost lustful energy. That is what happened to The RR when facing the self-titled debut EP from UK rockers King Colobus. From virtually its first breath on the opening listen, the four-track theatre of blues and alternative rock trespassed and seduced the imagination and passions. It is pure drama, creative adventure as bold and ballsy as it is imaginatively intricate and sinisterly persuasive.

With its seeds sown in 2013, King Colobus officially stepped forward two years later. Vocalist/guitarist Stewart MacPherson and bassist James Bailes had already collaborated on ideas and songs for a future project when independently they both relocated to Devon. There they linked up with Plymouth based guitarist Gavin Huck and drummer Simon Marsh, uniting as King Colobus.

There is no escaping inspirations found in the likes of Queens Of The Stone Age, Soundgarden, Johnny Cash, and Interpol in the band’s sound but equally they have a personality and character to their music and songwriting which is sure to intrigue fans of others like Japanese Fighting Fish, Damn Vandals, and Inca Babies. There is uniqueness to their sound though which is most vocal and suggests why the quartet has already earned a potent live reputation whilst taking in shows supporting artists such as Sea Sick Steve, Band Of Skulls, De Staat, and Crazy Arm.

king-colobus-cover-artwork_RingMasterReviewRe-released this past week, the first King Colobus EP is a majestic introduction to the band and needs mere seconds to grip attention and appetite through opener Get Up. From its initial dark minatory melody, its texture wiry and tone ominous yet pure enticement, the track bounds in with swinging rhythms and a growling bassline supported by just as primal riffs. MacPherson instantly engages and recruits already persuaded ears, the song itself bluesy in air but pure virulent rock ‘n’ roll with an underlying punk snarl. It is a controlled web though, teasing and taunting rather than assaulting and only increasing its grip as a shimmer of guitar around alluring vocals breaks the tenacious trespass before breaking into an even bolder compelling incitement.

It is a stunning start swiftly reinforced by the song King Colobus, it too opening with a juicy lure before uncaging its heavy blues rock saunter. Bass and vocals stand individual in tone but equal in temptation as beats jab with relish at the senses, the song’s flames waiting to erupt in a sizzling blaze before settling down again until further incendiary expulsions throughout its compelling body. Showing an array of flavours making up their sound, at times the track reminds thoughts of Josh Homme and co and indeed The Doors but again the result is individual to the foursome.

Tits and Teeth steals its fine share of the passions next, its dark vaudevillian devilry carrying an air of sadly demised circus punks The Shanklin Freak Show, further evidence of the host of spices in the King Colobus invention. The song as good as stalks its victim but relishing its creative invasion of ears and imagination with energy eager to consume its prey whilst, with virulent catchiness, recruiting their participation.

Final track Wait immediately reminds of nineties band Skyscraper, having their instinctive rock ‘n’ roll infectiousness and tenacity to command attention; invention and imagination blossoming in its success. Grooves and hooks tangle the senses as rhythms ground out an easily given submission to their insistent prowess, vocals leading it all with their own rousing presence.

It is a glorious end to a must hear release not only bringing King Colobus to wider attention for the first time but suggesting there is really something major brewing down on the south coast.

The King Colobus EP is out now through all stores.

http://www.kingcolobus.com/    https://www.facebook.com/kingcolobus/

Pete RingMaster 07/02/2017

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Creative espionage and inventive intimation: an interview with Aiming For Enrike

 

Photo: Marius Mada Dale

Photo: Marius Mada Dale

Without doubt, one of the year’s most exhilarating and inventive propositions has been Segway Nation, the new album from Norwegian duo Aiming For Enrike. The encounter is a fascinating instrumental adventure in sound and captivating aural suggestiveness; a multi-flavoured infectiousness created by drummer Tobias Ørnes and guitarist Simen Følstad Nilsen. Offered the chance to learn more with the duo, we set about discovering the creative heart of band and album.

Hello and thanks for taking time out to talk with us.

First of all can you tell us about yourselves as individuals?

We are two quite calm persons; a guitar player and drummer. We love making and playing music, so we spend a lot of time in the rehearsal space, practicing, jamming, and composing.

When did you first meet and what sparked the idea to form the band?

We met in 2010, when we attended a music school in Oslo. We were both into experimental noise rock music. After seeing some mind-blowing bands like Monolithic and Zu, we wanted to do something like that as a duo. By using loops we managed to get a huge sound even though we were only two. In the beginning we had more of a noise/prog sound but over the years the songs developed into more conventional song structures where we have incorporated a lot of influences from electronica, funk etc.

Is there a specific meaning behind the band name?

Yes, but not worth sharing 😉

Photo © Haakon Borg / Magpie

Photo © Haakon Borg / Magpie

It is wonderfully difficult to pin down the Aiming For Enrike sound for us, how would you describe it to newcomers to the band?

It’s an adventurous band with good melodies, cool grooves, and lots of energy. It has a very distinct sound, but still the music can go in many different directions.

What and who have most inspired your musical ideas and subsequently sound would you say?

Our sound is kind of schizophrenic and has a lot of layers because of a wide range of influences. Of course we can be inspired by other things in life, but I think it is only music and music gear that have a direct influence to our sound. Aiming for Enrike is the result of two people and sounds like something none of us would have made by ourselves.

Here are some names: Miles Davis, Josh Homme, James Brown, Nels Cline, Radiohead, Sonic Youth, Greg Saunier, Hot Snakes, Glen Branca, Mike Patton, Moha…

I am no expert on the broad expanse of the Norwegian music scene right now, generally coming across the diversity of metal and rock bands from there, but I get the feeling that your music is a one of a kind there; something unusual to the Norwegian landscape of sound. Is that the reality and if so how have they taken to it?

In Norway it is very common to have musical collaborations across genres. If you look at the jazz and improvisational music scene, you have lots of artist who play music that have more in common with pop, rock/metal, electronic music than traditional jazz. In jazz festivals you can go and see pop acts, and in commercial festivals there are jazz bands playing. So I think in general people are very open to new stuff.  Most artists are not so focused on sounding like the other one. It is a good thing to be original, and have your own thing going. We don’t know of any other Norwegian band that sounds like us but way more people than we would have guessed have been positive and open to it.

You have just released new album, Segway Nation; a release which had our imagination as busy and enthralled as ears and feet. Where does a ‘typical’ Aiming For Enrike song start composing wise?

We always start by just playing. We spend a lot of time just improvising, or trying out different kind of ideas. It is important that we are inspired when we play, and that there is a fun factor. We try to follow our intuition, and not doubt our choices too much. Then we record our ideas and make tunes out of them.

Throughout the album, there is an organic freedom, almost as things were created, played, and improvised in the moment. Tell us about the recording of Segway Nation; were songs already AimingForEnrike-SegwayNation_RingMasterReview2400written before recording them or was there an element of conjuring twists and turns there and then?

Everything is played live in the studio, without any click track. That might create a more «free» or improvised feel. On Segway Nation we composed all the songs before we recorded them, but there are some parts in the songs where we improvise. It can be open sections, or written parts played in different ways. That keeps it interesting for us, and hopefully for the listeners. Some of the more «free form» songs like Minitrue and Phone Phobia are the result of some improvised recording sessions.

Another great aspect to the album is the way it inspires the listener’s imagination to create its own adventures. Can you tell us about some of the actual themes and inspirations to the tracks and their suggestive dramas?

We didn’t have any specific plans for this. But it is a good thing if the listeners make up their own adventure in the music. I don’t think there are any specific themes to the songs, but there are specific inspirations to some of the songs. It can be a groove, melody, riff etc.

The past few years has seen some impressive and ear striking duos emerge with varying styles and dynamics within their union. Often it seems that the slimness of personnel allows a band to bring its live presence much more easily to recordings. It is the same with you guys; there is a feeling that listening to Segway Nation would be like standing in front of you on stage. Do you think there is some validity in that thought from your perspective; less bodies and minds leads to less of a leaning on technology and tricks when recording music?

There is more space in the music when you are a duo, and that makes it easier to follow your intuition and play in the moment. Since we record our music live in a room, the recording becomes very representative for us as a band. There are very few options sound wise with only a guitar and a drum kit, so I think it is hard to lose the live feeling in the recording.

Marius Mada Dale

Marius Mada Dale

Tell us about your live side; how you translate the dynamics of songs to the stage?

It works really great! We played the songs live many times before we recorded them. So the recording is not much different from a live performance. With the live performance you will also get the visual aspect and a bit more playful approach to the material.

What is next for Aiming For Enrike now that the album is out and earning acclaim and new hearts?

We are working on new material, which is turning out really good! And we have some festivals coming up this summer; first there´s Nattjazz festival in Bergen, then Øya festival in Oslo. We are planning a European tour in the fall! So lots of cool stuff coming up!

Once again many thanks for giving your time to us. Anything you would like to add?

Check out our album Segway Nation, and also the live in Rohdos garage videos on YouTube.

Read the review for Segway Nation @ https://ringmasterreviewintroduces.wordpress.com/2016/05/06/aiming-for-enrike-segway-nation/

https://www.facebook.com/aimingforenrike    http://www.namemusic.no/aimingforenrike/

Pete RingMaster

The RingMaster Review 04/06/2016

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

BIGG – Lock Up Your Daughters

BIGG_RingMasterReview

For us, all the best bands have an essence of off-kilter, bordering on loco imagination to their sound and creativity; an unconventional take on conjuring ideas and distinctive noise which certainly seems to be present in the invention and adventure of British alternative rock band BIGG. The suggestion of they having that potent essence comes through debut EP Lock Up Your Daughters. It is three tracks of devilish rock ‘n’ roll as infectiously catchy and hungrily punk as you could wish for that is unafraid to weave in many more highly flavoursome and individual spices. It is a success in our experience which sees the EP capture ears and imagination by song one, has them seduced by its second offering, and by the third sets them drooling hungrily for more.

Rising from the ashes of successful indie band Beat Magnets, when its vocalist left, Reading based BIGG soon revelled in the chance to explore new directions and sounds.  Consisting of brothers James and Thomas Wade alongside Pearce O’Keeffe and James Smith, the quartet have drawn on inspirations ranging from “Grime and Pop Punk to Frank Zappa and Electro” as they developed and honed the next evolution in their creativity. Swiftly they have become a potent live draw which Lock Up Your Daughters should push to national awareness given the opportunity.

art_RingMasterReviewThe EP opens with How Do You Sleep and needs little time to excite ears with its opening rhythmic shuffle soon joined by sand textured vocals. Across their songs BIGG use a great blend of alternating lead singers in the band, the first here easily adding to the inspiring of swinging hips on a bouncing body as dirty riffs collude with funky grooves and hooks. The grouchy prowl of bass also potently adds to the irresistible persuasion worming under the skin, though the song’s efficiency is soon shown to be less pacey than that of Man Overboard if just as successful.

Whereas the first is a sawdust and rock ‘n’ roll like stomp, the second track is a more devious blend of indie and punk rock mischief merged with a Queens Of The Stone Age like seducing. Bass again is a great growling proposal courted by the firm swing of beats as vocals come at ears with a catchy swagger. Hooks and slim but spicy groves align to increase the magnetism, a draw which blossoms even further with that fuzzy stoner laced roar reminding of Josh Homme and Co. Taking best track honours, the song alone makes BIGG a invitation not to be ignored, even more so when forcibly backed by the opener and closing song Nobody.

The perpetual distorted surface of guitar invention and grooves seems to be even more scorched in the final song whilst harmonies and melodies have richer seduction to their intent and sultry lures. Vocally too, there is a fresh sense of revelry in their delivery as the song shows another twist in the BIGG sound. Muscular and incendiary heavy rock with gentle sonic flirtations and unpredictable twists best describes the track, and an instinctive tempting providing a gripping end to one outstanding debut.

We cannot say that the band name has us particularly enthused but the band’s sound, well that just lights the fires.

The Lock Up Your Daughters EP is out April 15th via TakeControlCo Records @ http://bigg.bandcamp.com/

http://www.bigg-band.com/   https://www.facebook.com/BIGGband   https://twitter.com/BIGG_Band

Pete Ringmaster 15/04/2016

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

For more exploration of the independent and promotional services check out http://www.zykotika.com/

Gelato – Daydream EP

© Chris Patmore Music Photographer

© Chris Patmore Music Photographer

Having made a potent and impressive introduction to themselves with their self-titled debut EP earlier this year, UK rockers Gelato more than back up its success and potential with successor Daydream. The three track release again ignites ears and energies with a sound openly inspired by the likes of Foo Fighters and early Queens of the Stone Age, whilst pushing its own diverse character further to the fore. It is a tantalising and relentlessly infectious adventure and further confirmation of a new exciting prospect for the British music scene.

Made up of vocalist /guitarist Drew Wynen, bassist Phil Harris, and drummer Ben Welburn, London hailing Gelato emerged in 2014 and quickly lured attention through a vibrant and energetic live presence. Airplay via BBC6 was not long in the coming either though it was that Tobin Jones (Bo Ningen, Twilight Sad, Cold Specks) recorded first EP, released this past March, that really woke up ears and awareness for the band. That broader attention is set to be pushed further with Daydream, an encounter offering more of the melodic and catchy delights which marked its predecessor so enjoyably but also venturing into an even wider expanse of flavouring to wrap the pungent hooks and grooves Gelato have already shown themselves so skilled at.

GELATO - DAYDREAM_RingMaster Review    Daydream opens with its title track and straight away has ears and imagination engaged with its first lure of guitar. Straight away the sultriness of the invitation has the scent of Josh Homme and co, but it soon becomes entangled in the imaginative twists and enterprise of Gelato; rousing hooks and tenacious riffs colluding with eagerly swiping beats and the darker bait of the bass. There is a touch of Eagles of Death Metal to the song too when it is raising its intensive punkish stomp whilst throughout, the melodic craft of the band is an invention of unpredictable and seductive prowess.

The excellent start to the EP is matched and surpassed by the outstanding Salivating, the second song floating in on an ethereal ambience veined by a gliding melody as a grounding bassline strolls below the magnetic climate. Into its enthralling stride, the track keenly merges melodic and pop infectiousness in a psych rock embrace, but it is a warm and riveting hug equipped with boisterous energy and swing. KingBathmat and An Entire Legion come to mind as the song continues to flirt and dance with ears and imagination, taking best songs honours upon the EP at the same time.

The release is brought to a fine close by Grey For Good, the lead song for the EP with its new video. Though it might have not been personal choice for single one, all three tracks potent candidates to be fair, the track saunters and pulsates with a bluesy colour to its harmonic and fiery textures, increasingly honing them into richer persuasion and inventive resourcefulness. As with all tracks, stylish hooks grip with ease as rock ‘n’ roll instincts fuel a muscular canter and sonic roar, the result another instinctive pleasure.

From the vocal and stringed craft of Wynen, to the rapacious invention of Harris and the anthemic strengths of Welburn, Daydream is a perpetually compelling and gripping offering. It is also a release which only grows more impressive over time, though it needed few plays to confirm suspicions that Gelato is a fresh breath for UK rock.

https://www.facebook.com/GelatoMusic    http://gelatomusic.bandcamp.com  http://twitter.com/gelatomusicyeah

Pete RingMaster 03/11/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

For more exploration of the independent and promotional services check out http://www.zykotika.com/