Contemplating Leaving Eden

le-3-11-16_RingMasterReview

It is quite simple. Leaving Eden is a band which demands attention with a sound and creative flair that persistently captures the imagination drawing an ever growing following simultaneously. Their ear catching and thought provoking music has help lead the band to sharing stages with hundreds of the biggest national bands in the world and tours across numerous countries. We managed to grab some time with Eric from the band to learn more about Leaving Eden and what makes them tick…

Hello and thanks for taking time out to talk with us.

Can you first introduce the band?

Hi, great chatting with you also.

Eve: Lead Vocals

Ryan: Manning Drums

Johhny V: Bass

I’m Eric Gynan: Guitarist, vocals, Keys.

Have you been involved in other bands before? If so has that had any impact on what you are doing now?

Yes we’ve all been in various bands along the way and learning from the past always gives you a jump on the future.

What inspired the band name?

Leaving Eden came to be simply that this planet is like the Garden of Eden right, with all of its corruption; wouldn’t it be nice to take off and go somewhere else to visit? Lol.

Was there any specific idea behind the forming of the band and also in what you wanted it to offer and does that intent still drive the band or has it evolved over time?

Definitely we have evolved. I think you have to in order to change with the times so long as it’s better. It’s important though to maintain your individuality. For us we set out to be different. Quick story here, we went to this huge studio once where bands like Seven Dust, The Rolling Stones and Boston recorded. The person there brought out a white board in the conference room and drew a box. They said you are here, pointing outside the box and you need to be here, pointing inside the box. I immediately said wait, are you telling us we need to be in that box?  They said well yes I guess I am. I said thank you very much and got up and walked out. I get it, if you wanna ride a wave and be like everyone else on that moment of time, they can easily slip you into a genre. For us though it’s hard to just slip us in to any particular genre. We won the best Hardcore act in New England and I thought that was funny because they couldn’t find the appropriate Genre for us. We stay true no matter what the times may change to our roots, Rock Music.

Since your early days, how would you say your sound has evolved and has that been an organic movement or you guys deliberately heading in certain directions?

I think being a recording artist, endlessly recording and working with some incredible recording engineers like Johnny K (Disturbed, Pop Evil) you learn what it really takes. When they say they will go through your music with a fine tooth comb, they mean that literally that down to the 64th beat your music will be scrutinized for perfection. Ya know good bad or indifferent, when you listen to the radio, you may not like the band you’re listening to but aside from that, you will NEVER hear something that’s not polished. It’s gotta be perfect or you’ll never make it to the radio. With this on mind, you take this knowledge of being tight to the live performance and it makes all the difference in the world. This is why some bands may record a great album but when you see them live, it’s just not the same. We try and stay true to our recordings.  We also evolve in that area after the recording we may change it up live where we may think we’ve built upon that foundation.

art_RingMasterReviewPresumably across the band there is a wide range of inspirations; are there any in particular which have impacted not only on the band’s music but your personal approach and ideas to creating and playing music?

I think all of us are inspired by what we like as far as taste in other bands music. For us what greatly inspires us is that organic sound that manifests itself in a way that is kind of like connecting the dots. We feel that Leaving Eden learns from the past, encompasses the present and forges the future. Any band that has been in the gutters not in the limelight, they’re the ones whom always forged the future. This is why we named our last album Pinnacle…Because it’s at that pinnacle where trends will be forged.

Is there a particular process to the band’s songwriting?

Sure. For me I connect with the Universe in a way that opens my mind to listening. I use my fingers as kind of line antennas to pick up the frequencies, as strange as that sounds, if you listen, you can hear the music that lyrics, melodies and harmonies completely produced. Just gotta transfer that info to the recording. Then the rest of the band puts their stamp on it and presto, there’s a new song. I’ve even felt the influence of dead poets coming through. Sometimes I feel like I really can’t even take credit for the songs as they’ve come from somewhere else. It’s a deep meditative state of mind that brings these ideas into fruition.

Where do you, more often than not, draw the inspirations to the lyrical side of your songs?

Great question… Our songs speak from experience, life’s experiences…Sometimes good but mostly bad lol. Bad in the way of getting screwed, for instance our song Tied and Bound comes from the frustration of the music industry; “We’ve been screwed overcharged underpaid and abused, exploited avoided and falsely accused, we’ve been cut down let down fucked around tied and bound, but nothing can take the music away”

Are you a band which goes into the studio with songs pretty much in their final state or prefer to develop them as you record?

Pinnacle released by Rock Avenue Records USA, was completely written before we got to the studio. We like to do pre-production first, be prepared so to speak, so that we aren’t wasting valuable time and money. Pinnacle is really an eclectic array of song themes and music. We tried to keep it again organic so you won’t hear all these extra vocal harmonies for instance that we could never do live. Yes there is harmony, but it can be done live.

Tell us about the live side to the band, presumably the favourite aspect of the band?

That is where one should shine right?  I feel it is our live sound which is one of our trade marks. It’s so hard in the studio to capture that live performance primarily because it’s a one sided energy exchange. When you have a crowd, that’s where the sharing of the energy happens, therefore it really helps to put you on top of your game. You can’t see the band for instance when listening to an album, so that performance is so necessary.  Can the band reproduce that sound live? With Eve in front, she is clearly universal and really takes control of the room or festival, really just connecting with the crowd.

It is not easy for any new band to make an impact regionally let alone nationally and further afield. How have you found it your neck of the woods?14195978_1274693589207580_3294288122701219788_o

Correct. We’ve been fortunate, lucky, graced, whatever you’d like to call it. Our motto has always been that we will play anywhere, anytime, any way we can so long as we can. This philosophy has led us to share the stage with some of the biggest bands in the world with;  Lacuna Coil, In This Moment, Black Sabbath (Heaven & Hell), Ronnie James Dio,  Rob Zombie, 5 Finger DeathPunch, Disturbed, Marylyn Manson, Alice Cooper, Lynyrd Skynyrd, ZZTop, Puddle of Mudd, Korn, Killswitch Engage, BuckCherry (Jefferson Starship, Big Brother and The Holding Company, Country Joe, 10 Years After, 40th Anniversary Woodstock) Shinedown, Dropkick Murphy’s,  Alice in Chains, Papa Roach, Bret Micheals, Halestorm, Theory of a Deadman, Avenged Sevenfold, Seether, Hell Yeah, Trapt, Dope, Soil, Fuel,  Queensryche, Saving Abel, Hinder, Damage Plan, 7Dust, Sebastian Bach, SoulFly, Days of the New, NonPoint, DrowningPool, The Misfits, The Butcher Babies, Collective Soul, MushroomHead, Mudvayne, Chevelle, Godsmack, Powerman 5000, 10Years, Taproot, Gin Blossoms, Michael Schenker (UFO, MSG & The Scorpions) Herman Rarebell (The Scorpions), Nicko McBrain (Iron Maiden), Kittie, One eyed doll, Uncle Kracker, Tremonti (Creed/Alterbridge) Lamb of god, Slayer, Stone Sour, Motorhead, Blackstone Cherry, HOOKERS & BLOW Featuring GUNS N’ ROSES, QUIET RIOT, W.A.S.P. Members, Steven Tyler, Ted Nugent, Lita Ford, LA Guns, Trixter, Warrant, Apocalyptic Review (featuring members of Godsmack) and many more..  This has led us to Winning The New England Music Awards & The Pulse Magazine Worcester MA Music Awards and Touring The USA, UK & Canada. If we didn’t get out there we would have never found these opportunities. There’s usually someone there that can help move you forward.

Are there the opportunities to make a mark if the drive is there for new bands?

Absolutely…In fact I believe bands who haven’t “made it” have more of an opportunity. Let’s take a band that has made it whether it was one song or many. As time passes, for whatever reason, they stopped making hits. It’s very rare for them to have another hit song or even get on the radio. It’s very strange but true. As a new artist you have more of a chance because again you’re at the pinnacle forging ahead.

How has the internet and social media impacted on the band to date?

I find this very interesting. In a moment you can be heard all over the world. It’s absolutely amazing. Back in the day I feel bad for the artists before the internet that never had that chance. Shit, back then you couldn’t even stay connected with different states via phone. It was too expensive to make a phone call so you were quite limited as far as how far you could reach. Now, our music is flying through the airways, our unreleased song Out of the ashes says; digging deeper underground faster than the speed of sound

I can see the light of day, darkness fades away”. This just says as a band that’s not superstars, they are basically underground in the gutters spreading like swill in the harbor of slime lol. God some of the venues we’ve played have been the scum of the earth. Shit when we went to UK, there was a dirt floor. But in order to really appreciate where you may end up you’ve got to crawl through the slime in the gutters. If I for instance just started a band, had lots of money, related to someone big in the industry, getting signed immediately and becoming famous overnight, how then could I appreciate where I came from? When you come from the bottom of the barrel and make your way to the top, you never forget where you came from.

Once again a big thanks for sharing time with us; anything you would like to add or reveal for the readers

This was fun. Please excuse my unorthodox replies here and appreciate your time. Leaving Eden will be touring the USA, Canada and Europe. Hopefully South America as well, where our management/touring Co. Alpha Omega/Darkside Entertainment has offices in Europe, USA and South America we feel honored to be part of the family there. We hope to see all of you soon!! For all Leaving Eden Info go to http://www.leavingeden.com

And see us on Facebook Leaving Eden and Peace and Harmony to all!!  I say harmony because this planet, the universe, everything in it works in perfect harmony accept one species, Humans. WTF is that about right? Let’s make it happen.

https://www.facebook.com/bandleavingeden

Pete RingMaster

The Ringmaster Review 01/12/2016

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Adelitas Way – Getaway

AW_RingMasterReview

Adelitas Way has persistently shown themselves capable of writing and creating anthemic roars that instinctively ignite the spirit and adrenaline. From their self-titled debut album and tracks like Invincible, the US band has early on uncaged impassioned and dynamically persuasive proposals. With new album Getaway though, they have hit a new peak. From start to finish, it is a conveyor belt of rousing proposals, as sturdy and aggressive as they are melodically contagious. It is probably fair to say that the Adelitas Way sound has never been one close to re-inventing the wheel, but they and certainly these ears have no issue when body and spirit is relentlessly given a shot of the band’s fresh and anthemic virulence.

Getaway is the fourth album from the 2006 band, and as suggested another in a line of highly persuasive and captivating releases. Whether they have hit the personal sweet spot or not, all have gone to establish the Las Vegas quartet as one eagerly devoured proposition on record and indeed live where they have shared stages with the likes of Guns N’ Roses, Shinedown, Creed, Alter Bridge, Three Days Grace, Chevelle, Theory of a Deadman, Breaking Benjamin, The Pretty Reckless, Godsmack, Staind, Flyleaf and many more.

The successor to Stuck of 2013, the Johnny K (Disturbed, Staind) produced Getaway sees the foursome of Rick DeJesus, Tre Stafford, Robert Zakaryan, and Andrew Cushing in no mood to hold back on their emotive intensity and sonic dexterity. The evidence is immediate as the band’s new single Bad Reputation, and first taken from the album, launches at ears with infectious bait. Choppy riffs and similarly tempting rhythms immediately press suggestively upon the senses as the always welcome tones of vocalist DeJesus step forward. Inspired by his own feelings about a reputation he has earned over the past few years, his reflections come entangled in a web of spicy melodies and snapping hooks within a climate of sound which builds small but effective crescendos of energy and intensity.

COVER_RingMasterReviewIt is a great start which barely waivers over the next stretch of songs starting with the album’s title track. The band’s hard rock bred sound is in feisty mood from its first breath, almost irritable in its sonic jangle backed by attitude lined rhythms. Increasingly fiery yet equally catchy, especially around its sizzling chorus, the track has feet and emotions quickly involved and in time exhausted, though they get a chance to relax with the sultry smoulder of Good Die Young. The fiercely energetic tracks always emerge as personal favourites across an Adelitas Way encounter but as proven here, the band is very accomplished at creating emotively and sonically incisive balladry. Expectantly it does come with a raw edge and dramatic intensity which only helps it make a potent impact as enjoyment flies high.

Low brings a great grouchiness to its riffs and nature next, guitars almost carnivorous in tone as a Sick Puppies like flame of melodic and harmonic energy emerges from within the song’s growl. As many tracks, ears feel like they are meeting up with an old friend, being enveloped in a recognisable infectiousness which adds colour to the band’s blaze of heavily pleasing and fresh enterprise. By the end of the first minute, vocal participation is inevitable, a temptation most tracks are equipped with as shown by the volatile roar of Put You in Place with its web of spidery steely grooves and the mercilessly contagious I Get Around. A resonating bassline invitingly groans from the heart of the second of the pair, its dark hues a gripping tempering and spark to the tempestuous and boisterous roar around it. Not alone in showering the senses in serious infectiousness, the song epitomises the power, attitude, and rousing ferocity of the band’s sound, and equally its rock pop prowess.

Across the tenaciously excitable Filthy Heart with its blues spiced sonic winery and the mellower coaxing of Harbor the Fugitive, band and album, maybe without matching earlier heights, has ears and firmly attentive whilst Sometimes You’re Meant to Get Used really stirs things up again with its tantalising blend of rapaciously snarling textures and melodic revelry bound in emphatically infectious imagination.

The album concludes with firstly the blues rock flavoured Shame, an enticing flame of enterprise which again might not create the same lustful reactions as others but with a whiff of Bowie-esque toning to parts of the vocals, only holds attention firm before Deserve This twists and turns with robust rhythms and crunchy riffery leading its fractious yet anthemically layered tapestry of striking sound and endeavour.

It is a fine end to a thoroughly enjoyable release where major surprises are low but invigorating rock ‘n’ roll is nonstop incitement. Getaway is the most rounded and fertile release from Adelitas Way, and for us, the most fiercely enjoyable so far.

Getaway is out now via most online stores and @ http://adelitaswayshop.bigcartel.com/category/cd

https://www.facebook.com/adelitasway   https://twitter.com/adelitasway

Pete RingMaster 07/03/2016

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

For more exploration of the independent and promotional services check out http://www.zykotika.com/

Black Tide – Chasing Shadows

blacktidepic_RingMaster Review

Miami trio Black Tide this month follow-up their well-received second album Post Mortem with Chasing Shadows, for their fans a long overdue successor which they will find makes the wait endured more than worth it. An accomplished blaze of craft and adventure, the release without starting major fires of uniqueness is Black Tide doing what they do best, unleashing rousing roars of highly flavoursome and varied heavy rock /melodic metal enterprise.

Formed in 2003 by vocalist/bassist Gabriel Garcia with drummer brother Raul, Black Tide went through subsequent line-up changes, drums included, before releasing debut album Light from Above on Interscope in 2008, with Garcia only fifteen at this point. Recorded with Johnny K (Disturbed, Machine Head, Soil), the album’s recording was the trigger to quickly bigger things including the band playing alongside Ozzy Osbourne, Lamb of God, and Static-X on the main stage at OZZfest 2007, and post release, an appearance on the inaugural Rockstar Energy Mayhem Festival alongside Slipknot and Disturbed as well as playing the main stage of 2008’s Download festival. Post Mortem appeared in 2011 to continuing acclaim and success for Black Tide, its release followed by the band’s hunger to play live and tour filling subsequent years. Now guitarist/vocalist Austin Diaz and drummer Cody Paige alongside Garcia are poised to awaken new keen appetites and their album’s storming body of fierce rock ‘n’ roll, to which expectations of more success coming the way of the band easy.

btamend_RingMaster Review     From an engagingly melodic Intro which emulates the opening to many metal releases today in its own imagination sparking way, the album erupts to full life with Guidelines. A hefty punch of drum sticks is the spark to weaving tendrils of enterprise from Diaz before a darkly strolling bassline and crisp rhythms join the already open vocal prowess of Garcia backed as potently by Diaz. Soon striding resourcefully with a My Chemical Romance meets Avenged Sevenfold like drama to its increasingly magnetic weave of diverse metal bred styles, the song provides an impressive full start to the album, quickly getting ears and thoughts fully involved and eager to know more about at the same time.

Recently released single Angel In The Dark steps forward next, its captivating body similarly designed and textured but with its own host of sonic swagger and fiery hooks against again powerful vocals. Major surprises are scarce yet a freshness and energetic passion to the song ensures satisfaction is as ripe as the sounds flowing through its skilfully sculpted and presented proposal. An acoustic aside adds to the richness of the song, adventure never low on the agenda of band and album, as shown again by the pair of Predator (Animal) and Burn. The first of the two rides in on baying wolves, quickly spinning a spicy web of guitar lined with tangy meandering grooves. Without making the same kind of immediate impact as the previous two tracks, the song still firmly and increasingly captures the imagination with an enticing blend of grooved and stringed blessed rock ‘n’ roll, eventually outshining its successor, a mellower melodic caress with pungent rhythms and a gripping central Bond like hook entwined in orchestral and harmonic tempting.

At times, and often, the song spellbinds but does lack the same overall spark as found in those before it. The same applies to the album’s title track though its classic metal meets modern rock canter ensures enjoyment still remains high especially as it increasingly swings with energy and technical flair. To be fair, both tracks become more compelling with each play, maybe providing food for expectations but leaving pleasure in their wake which the likes of Before We Form and Sex Is Angry revel in and prolong with their individual collusion of rock and metal honed with infectious imagination and emotion.

That catchy virulence which flows through Chasing Shadows finds a rich vehicle in Welcome To Misery, the song a sing-a-long anthem which quickly has its way with the listener’s ears and involvement. Seemingly simple in its lure, such its infectiousness, the song almost belies the layers and textures aligning to drive its persuasion, a craft in songwriting and sound more open in the alluring croon of Heaven and its warm ballad of emotive vocal and tender musical craft. Melancholic, tangy, and classically lined with great strings and orchestration, the song is an endearing and lingering offering which finally has to make way for the closing stomp of Promised Land, a song which though different in character, ends the album the way it started, with a raucously tenacious slice of Avenged Sevenfold scented, Bullet for My Valentine fuelled enterprise.

As suggested, Black Tide has not returned with a game changer for them or metal but Chasing Shadows will leave few heavy/melodic metal fans dissatisfied or lacking a spring in their step after facing its roar.

Chasing Shadows is out via Pavement Entertainment on October 16th with pre-orders still @ http://www.pavementmusic.com/product/black-tide-chasing-shadows-cd-pre-order/

https://www.facebook.com/blacktide/

Pete RingMaster 15/10/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

For more exploration of the independent and promotional services check out http://www.zykotika.com/

Nonpoint – The Return

byKatieHovland_01

byKatieHovland

It is hard to say that anything really surprised upon The Return, US metallers Nonpoint’s new album but it does come with a fresh aggression and intensity, as well as resourcefully crafted and presented songs, which will ensure their fans will devour it greedily. The album is prime Nonpoint, melodically flaming with the muscular energy and framing which has kept the band from being lost in the wealth of similarly toned bands these past seventeen years since forming. It does not leave ears awestruck or passions aflame but the album does provide a tasty slab of Nonpoint potency stoked with a strong contagious enterprise missing from many of their previous albums.

Backing up the success of their previous self-titled album of 2012, the Florida quintet spent most of last year touring in its support but swiftly set to writing its successor once they could relax. This past February Nonpoint hit the Groovemaster Studios with Grammy Award-nominated producer Johnny K [Disturbed, Staind, Megadeth] and engineer Daniel Salcidoto, subsequently giving birth to The Return.

It is a proposition which is definitely one of the band’s most consistently captivating encounters with each song an individual and gripping narrative in its own right, something their earlier full-lengths could not always achieve for us. The Return still maybe feeds expectations more than wrong-foots them across its total provocation, but with flavoursome sonic endeavour and melodic toxicity aligned to an at times new hostility to the sound, the album provides a constant intrigue and satisfaction which never diminishes.

Opener Pins and Needles gives a clear sign of intent from its first breath, thunderously thumping beats punctuating fiercely fiery riffs from the off before settling into a formidable canter ridden by the distinctive and potent tones of vocalist Elias Soriano. The guitars of Rasheed Thomas and B.C. Kochmit relentlessly spin a toxic web around ears and the song’s imposing spine sculpted by drummer Robb Rivera and the throaty weight of Adam Woloszyn’s bass for a riveting mix and design. It is an offering unleashing that new intensity to the band’s sound with relish whilst adding some sublime individual invention, especially in a gripping guitar solo.

It is not a devastating start to the album but definitely a rigorously anthemic one which is backed up by latest single Breaking Skin. The song is a sinew driven portrait of the familiar Nonpoint sound but with a volatile air to its energy Coverand impassioned intent to its rich melodic hues. There is no denying the craft of the band members either, the track a blistering showcase of their individual qualities and skills as well as their musical brotherhood. The fact that the most striking aspect of the song is its brevity and enjoyable acute ending does tell of a missed opportunity though which in some ways sums up the album.

Bullet With A Name from Nonpoint’s 2005 album To The Pain is an all-time favourite track here and it is fair to say it is not matched by any song on The Return but the next up Razors is a near miss. It says anthem from first note to last, ruggedly winding grooves and riffs enslaving senses and appetite from the start before relaxing into a melodic embrace which comes alive through the exceptional vocal design carrying it. Soriano as expected croons with an inviting growl but it is the stretched almost warped harmonies accompanying him which help turn a great song into an album topper. There is also a muggy intensity and atmosphere to the track which tenaciously simmers and boils at certain points, again flicking a dramatic switch within the excellent encounter.

Both Misery and the album’s title track keep ears and enthusiasm for the album high and concentrated, though neither can quite match their predecessor. The first of the pair carries another imposing roar in sound and presence which again suggests that the band has chosen a direction in which they can really flourish ahead whilst its successor confronts and seduces the senses like a mix of Stone Sour and Poets of the Fall. The stalking beats of Rivera make a sizeable intimidation and lure around which the song brews a flaming bluster of sonic enterprise and temptation. It is a song where there is plenty going on, more than can be taken in through one listen which in itself is another new side which can be argued has been absent previously in their music, and gives another major highlight to the release.

It is hard not to get a soft spot for the inventive bass proposals of Woloszyn across The Return, his gripping lead into Take Apart This World a prime example where he triggers a lick of the lips for his baiting enterprise in the compelling track.

From this point though the album loses some of its grip on thoughts and passions even though tracks like Forcing Hands and Goodbye Letters are highly pleasing offerings. They slip into that expected and appreciated but unsurprising Nonpoint feel bred over so many potent years, and even though there are definitely enticing and exciting twists and moves within the, to be fair, enjoyable tracks they are unable to seize ears as tightly as the earlier songs on the release.

Never Ending Hole is another similarly missing a trick, especially as it shows like on most tracks, the band’s new adventurous and skilled appetite to suddenly switch and twist the direction and ideation of sounds and vocals. It is a fine and engrossing offering but ultimately hints more than it delivers in that experimentation and originality before making way for the emotive and melodically seducing power balladry of Widowmaker and the ferocious intensity and urgency of Never Cared Before. The second of the two roars and brawls with ears as it treats them to a virulent fury of riffs and rhythms spiced by sonic venom. It is another gripping assault which if anything is again not quite bold enough in its violent invention.

The album closes with firstly the anthemic animosity of F**K’D, a track which is an easy protagonist on ears and to engage with, though lyrically it seems to take the easy option and go straight for the primitive instincts of us all. It is still a rousing incitement which leaves the likeable if uninspiring Know Myself to bring the album to an end.

In some ways The Return is an album of two halves, the first a stirring and thrilling encounter which maybe does not quite go far enough in its new adventure and the second just what you would expect and admittedly want from Nonpoint, superbly crafted and structured sounds which bless ears but this time without setting them ablaze. To be truthful the more you listen to the album the more it impresses so it is hard to be too hard on it but the wish that it surprised with greater tenacity and simply threw some truly unexpected curveballs is never absent.

The Return is available now via Metal Blade Records @ http://nonpoint.merchnow.com/ and http://www.emp.de/nonpoint-the-return-cd/art_288636/

http://www.nonpoint.com/

RingMaster 02/10/2014

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard from

http://audioburger247.webs.com/