Hello Bear – I Don’t Know… It’s Fun Though, Isn’t It?

hello-bear-promo-shot_RingMasterReview

A trap waiting to grab your imagination and energy, I Don’t Know… It’s Fun Though, Isn’t It? more than lives up to its title with its bouncy persona and rousing spirit. The new EP from British quartet Hello Bear, the four-track stomp is a sparkling burst of power/punk pop which may not carry major surprises but is as fresh and vibrant as anything escaping the year so far.

Formed in 2010, the Norwich bred band take inspiration found in the likes of Weezer, Pavement, Los Campesinos!, Refused, The Bronx, Presidents of the USA, McFly, Johnny Foreigner, and Dananananaykroyd into their own highly flavoursome exploits. Invigorating as a live presence which has seen Hello Bear play with bands such as Los Campesinos, Coasts, Darwin Deez, The Futureheads, and The King Blues, their sound is an ear grabber which now refuses to be ignored within the band’s new offering. The press release accompanying the EP suggests it carries “their most exciting material to date.” Being our introduction to Hello Bear it is hard to confirm or argue, but exciting the Lee Batiuk (Deaf Havana, Trash Boat, Hopeless Records) produced release is and relentlessly enjoyable.

I Don’t Know… It’s Fun Though, Isn’t It? opens up with new single We Held Hands Once, But Then She Got Embarrassed, the collective energy and enterprise of Luke Bear (vocals, guitar, keyboards), Mary Bear (guitar), Tom Bear (bass), and Daryl Bear (drums) hitting the floor running. A lone strum entices first being quickly joined by the potent tones of Luke before the song jumps on ears with eager riffs and canny rhythms. In no time it is into an infectious stroll with hooks and melodies uniting to charm attention before brewing and finally expelling a virulent contagion through its irresistible chorus. There is no escaping joining those offering Blink 182 meets Weezer as a reference for the tenaciously lively sound of song and band; add a touch of Super Happy Fun Club and The All-American Rejects though and the mix is even closer to the rousing incitement.

hello-bear-cover-artwork_RingMasterReviewThe following Mmm Cheque Please! makes a just as striking entrance, another single strain of guitar bait making the first lure, rampant beats and Luke’s inviting vocals the next  before it all blooms into another infectious canter. Daryl’s beats resonate as they land and Tom’s basslines grumble as much as they seduce while Mary and Luke share a tapestry of hooks and melodic endeavour which only leads to a greater appetite for song and release. Admittedly the track lacks the final spark which ignites its predecessor but leaves pleasure bubbling eagerly as does Dirty Weekend with its more restrained but wholly magnetic presence. Repeating a prowess which confirms Hello Bear masterful at creating big choruses and ripe hooks which simply infest the psyche, the song lays lustfully upon the senses.

The EP ends as its starts with a track which just whips up the passions. Attack Hug Influences is addiction for the ears, a slice of rock pop which seizes hold of body and spirit in a breathless romp complete with spicy hooks, tenacious rhythms, and a vocal coaxing which virtually forces listener involvement.

It is a boisterous end to a release which demands a party is woven around its presence each and every time. No moments of major uniqueness, all irresistible fun fuelled ingenuity; that is I Don’t Know… It’s Fun Though, Isn’t It?, one of the most enjoyable adventures this year.

I Don’t Know… It’s Fun Though, Isn’t It? is released November 11th

http://www.hellobear.co.uk/   https://www.facebook.com/hellobear/    https://twitter.com/hellobearband

Pete RingMaster 08/11/2016

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Min Diesel – Mince

Photo by Lori Wilson.

Photo by Lori Wilson.

Mince, the debut album from Scottish band Min Diesel, is a clash on the senses and for some maybe a car crash as certainly their sound is not going to be an easy fit for many. It is a challenging proposition, and at times has even keen ears unsure but its real potency is in luring back regular attention which shows album and band are doing plenty right.

Aberdeen bred Min Diesel take inspirations from late-80s/early-90s punk, lo-fi and math-rock bands into their abrasing cacophony of sonic enterprise. They are a trio also becoming used to strong support and praise, through a live presence which has seen the band play with the likes of Errors, Acoustic Ladyland, Joan of Arc, Johnny Foreigner, Playlounge, Tuff Love, Hot Club de Paris, Sky Larkin, and Paws since forming in 2009 and a clutch of EPs. Two splits with Sidca and Pinact respectively in 2013 lured potent acclaim whilst last year’s Puzzle & Activity EP gave an enticing teaser to Min Diesel’s debut album now uncaged and prowling the psyche.

The threesome of Zippy, Stu, and David state inspirations come from the likes of Fugazi, Pavement, and Shellac whilst others have compared the band to artists such as Dinosaur Jr. and Stapleton. They are all understandable references though you can add many others, for us at times thoughts of Pere Ubu emerging in certain places across Mince. Equally though there is a freshness to the band’s sound which puts them at least one step aside of the crowd. Opener War Band swiftly entangles the senses in a healthy scrub of guitar and thumping beats, their union with the throaty lure of bass a magnetic invitation for ears and attention. The vocals come from within the thick mesh of sound, laying deeper in their textures than expected but working enjoyably as contagion brews within the enjoyable encounter. A searing spearing of guitar erupts in its closing moments, its acidic aggression imposing and magnetic as the track leaves with impact.

a2445096622_10   The following Pagan Pageant opens with a folkish air and quaint melody wrapped in caustic ambience, the blend further coloured by raw and often wandering vocals. Slightly deranged and openly wrong-footing, the song swings from good to not sure regularly but already there is that captivation at play meaning you want to indulge in its confusion and incitement again and again in response to its increasing persuasion. Next up Trail of T-Shirts is a more immediate tempting but also reveals stronger enticing over listens. Sharp hooks and spoiled melodies provide an appealing enticement whilst the energetic rhythms quickly bait ears and appetite, but it is the delicious discord coating the clang which steals the passions, another mighty aspect across the release backed as here by potent guitar craft and rhythmic juggling.

Kirk Session reveals a mellow though no less concussive quality to songwriting and sound next, the band casting a jarring croon of sound and vocal prowess which again will work for some and not others whilst Down on the Green straight after, goes for a more predatory intent for its pop rock cacophony. The bass discovers a bestial growl over which voice and guitar dance with brash yet warm resourcefulness. As it continues the track seems to turn a little mellower though ears are still resonating to the sonic jangle and rhythmic confrontation by its close.

The album hits its high spot with the next trio of tracks, starting with the virulent swagger of dB where again the bass is wonderfully bestial against the melodic ferocity around it. The song emerges like a tart mix of Swell Maps and Asylums though there is also a strong whiff of Josef K and very early Orange Juice to the encounter, all spicing adding to the invention of the best track upon Mince, though it is quickly challenged by Last Bus (Emm Es Bee ). The new encounter sways whilst caressing ears with citric melodies and a tangy sonic tempting, musically playing like a raw lemon on the tongue, making the senses pucker at its touch but sparking a hunger for more. Again though, it is the inventive discord trespasses which steal the show, adding greater intensity and weight to the thrilling croon.

Another song which half thrills but leaves questions in its wake, Musskulls is a psyche pop/noise rock tangle of sound and ideation. It twists and turns through coherent and deranged scenery with seamless and ultimately enticing adventure though vocally something goes a little astray. That said without finding the same spark as the last two songs, it still engages ears and thoughts forcibly and as the album grows with every listen.

Mince is brought to a close by firstly the volatile energy and aggression of Bastards, an encounter with a catchy melodic spine of infectiousness, and finally North-East Soul, a dark and raw serenade which sparkles with the Scottish lilt of the vocals, the first time the accent really comes into play within the album. Stray twangs and off kilter noise add to the drama and lure of the enthralling end to the encounter, the band almost exploring improvisation with sonic relish across the turbulent landscape.

We are on safe ground suggesting that Mince will not be a tasty offering for all but it is a release which needs time and focus to explore and come to terms with; for us as an example, it making an ok first impression but with regular engagement turning into a vat of increasing persuasion and thorough enjoyment.

Mince is available now via Struggletown in association with AlbTwo Records and Cool Yr Jets digitally and on Ltd Edition 12” cream or red/white vinyl @ http://mindiesel.bandcamp.com/

https://www.facebook.com/pages/Min-Diesel/122142337808269

RingMaster 12/05/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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Rivertairs – Jack

Picture 57

Flirting with the imagination like a mix of Common Tongues, Tankus The Henge, and Johnny Foreigner, the debut single from UK band Rivertairs is an introduction which does not instantly make your mind up about their presence but certainly ensures there is an appetite to hear more of their obvious potential. Carrying a flavoursome blend of varied rock spices as dramatic hues of folk rock and indie pop enterprise add their lures to the aural shuffle, Jack is a captivating and seriously intriguing proposition.

Hailing from Manchester, Rivertairs first explored their expressive and expansive design of sound with the 2013 three-track demo, Fool’s Parade. It was supported and followed by numerous shows across the north of England which included sharing stages with bands like Space. Now ready to break into a broader spotlight the band is releasing their first single, a “tongue-in-cheek vignette on the infamous Jack the Ripper”.

Jack opens with swarthy strikes of guitar which in turn are joined by a dark bassline and crisp beats. There is an instant creative and striding swagger to the song which grows in boldness as the vocals begin unveiling the song’s narrative and melodic flames wrap around the infectious enterprise. There are essences of folk and indie pop to the rock based offering and even more varied colour to the imagination spicing up every tenacious sway and seductive caress on show.

The track almost prowls with its adventure and has a theatrical relish to its inventive mischief which keeps ears and imagination gripped and intrigue greedy. As mentioned one song is never enough to decide if a band is for the long-term in thoughts and emotions but Jack has plenty to make Rivertairs a prospect needing thorough exploration ahead and an enjoyable companion right now.

Jack is available as a free download from www.rivertairs.com now!

RingMaster 11/11/2014

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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Johnny Foreigner – You Can Do Better

 

johnny foreigner pic

     After the ridiculously appetising and resourceful persuasion of previous album Vs Everything in 2011, it is fair to say that the anticipation and excited intrigue for the new release from Johnny Foreigner was making intensive demands before a note was heard. You Can Do Better, the fourth full-length from the English quartet does not disappoint. It is another teasing and tantalising bewitchment of the already distinctive sound of the Birmingham band but one which delves deeper into their unique landscape of songwriting and imagination. As much as the previous album enraptured and enthralled, in hindsight it was maybe too ambitious in its bulk of seventeen tracks to avoid being a mix of the brilliant with simply the satisfying, which was a triumph all the same. Consisting of a mere ten songs plus a hidden treat, You Can Do Better stalks the sun side of unpredictable and magnificence from start to finish with offerings which maybe do not always master the same pinnacles of the last release but stands alongside it and with a richer impressive consistency across its adventurous narrative and sound.

    Recorded with long-time friend Dominique James (Sunset Cinema Club) once again and the first release with new guitarist Lewes Herriot alongside vocalist Alexei Berrow, bassist Kelly Southern, and drummer Junior Elvis Washington Laidley, the Alcopop! Records released You Can Do Better has been eighteen months in the making. Berrow recently gave an ‘introduction’ to the album by saying “For the last year we’ve been messing around behind yr backs. It started with robbing drum intros from Blink 182 and ended with horns stolen from Screaming Maldini and in the middle we had these 10 (11) little encounters with a louder noise than you’d possibly be happy about. And if that sentence wasn’t enough of a secret map, we created an entirely probably fictional city for the whole mess to live in. Bands are supposed to mellow as they get older, idk quite what’s gone wrong“. As the release leaps upon and engagingly taunts the senses we can certainly confirm that Johnny Foreigner has not mellowed in presence or exploratory adventure.

    Band and album rampage through ears from the first punk bred breath of opener Shipping, a tsunami of noise and rhythms coverengulfing the senses like the jaw of a sandworm in Dune. The entrance smothers and takes the listener into its cavern of shadows before expelling a loud graze of sonic endeavour and richly gripping hooks. The distinctive voice of Berrow is soon taking over centre stage as the song’s narrative entwines the imagination, extra suasion from the equally individual tones of Southern adding extra bait to the temptation. With a throaty bass coaxing from the lady only adding to the spice alongside the rattling rhythms of Laidley and the wonderful emerging consumptive discord, the track is a maelstrom of enterprise and unpredictability engaging and provoking thoughts and emotions.

   The impressive start is exceeded by the brilliant Le Sigh, a track which slowly and mischievously walks into view before unveiling a glint in its eye as its persistently raises its energy and pace, easily drawing a greedy appetite for its thickening brew of synapse seduction through its indie dance of sonic bluster and twisted guitar twang. With the devilry of say Baddies and the almost belligerent ingenuity of The Sugarcubes mixed with the sultry temptation of Morningwood all laid in a bed of eighties discord, the track is a masterful temptress of rapacious rock revelry. The repetitive chant of the chorus with its minimal cladding also brings thoughts of Japanese band The Plastics, not so much in direct sound but simply the aural addictiveness.

    The following In Capitals also takes a reserved gait to its invitation and equally builds a feisty compelling wall of bruising garage punk like enticement through raw guitars and magnetic vocals within a shuddering rhythmic frame. The bass of Southern pulls on a bordering on carnivorous growl for its prowl whilst the sonic confrontation of the guitars comes as a weave of acidic senses scorching enterprise. The power and imagination of sound here and for most tracks steals the spotlight initially with the rewards of the lyrical adventure and imagery coming in stronger potency through further encounters, this making the album a constant treasure trove to plunder.

    Both the subdued caress of mystery from Riff Glitchard and the almost disorientating sonic brawl of The Last Queens of Scotland ignite the passions with their individual premises and inventive traps. The first is a slow smoulder of self-tempering textures and emotion hues; bass snarls contrasting guitar and vocal melodies with mesmeric emotive dependencies, whilst its successor is another fire of rabid rhythmic twists and guitar sculpted toxicity tempted and encouraged to push its limited by the equally vivacious and voracious dual vocal waltz. Being a sucker for discord in any form, it has to be said that by this point Johnny Foreigner has a tight grip with their one of a kind seduction.

    Stop Talking About Ghosts flirts and romps with ears next, its entwining of bracing and disharmonious eagerness with reserved elegant shadows eventually merging into a greater transfixing anthemic riot of exhaustive rock ‘n’ roll before the more pronounced stalking enticement of Wifi Beach next takes over. It is a song which took longer to convince than others, its reflective and enjoyably messy soaking of the ears a deceptive slice of noise sculpting which without lighting fires proves to be one more highly pleasing provocation to immerse in. The same can be said about To The Death and Le Schwing in many ways, neither pulling out with ears that instantaneous connection of earlier songs but evolving over time into thrilling incitements, the first of the two especially persuasive with its riveting surface explosions of discord aligned to a rhythmic tango contrasting and provoking the song’s heavily shadowed emotional presence. The second of the pair sways and swaggers with a vague similarity to that elsewhere on the album, its body familiar but dressed in new hooks and mischief which ultimately leaves satisfaction and pleasure full.

    The closing antagonist, DEVASTATOR is a strong enough conclusion to a great album but arguably a little underwhelming against previous songs, though the ‘hidden’ song To The Deaf which emerges from the silence after, is a compelling epilogue which has the album leaving on a greater high. With You Can Do Better, whilst retaining all the qualities and invention which made Johnny Foreigner an irresistible proposition, the band has evolved their presence into an even more unique and rather thrilling encounter through a quite outstanding album.

http://www.johnnyforeignertheband.com/

8.5/10

RingMaster 09/03/2014

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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Miniature Dinosaurs: Turn It On EP

Building on the success of earlier releases, Scottish indie tunesmiths Miniature Dinosaurs release their new EP, Turn It On, confirming all the early promise and why there is an impossible to ignore buzz around the band. The four track release still indicates there is much more to come and be explored within their creativity and songwriting, which only fires up a stronger eagerness to watch them develop ahead.

From Stirling, the quartet of Barry Maclean (vocals/guitar), Alban Dickson (bass), Craig Ferrie (guitar/synth) and Sam Waller (drums), has been igniting attention and keen responses from day one, the band receiving BBC airplay before they stepped onto a stage and pulling acclaim from all quarters. Once into their stride live, Miniature Dinosaurs has supported the likes of Fenech-Soler, Johnny Foreigner, and Young the Giant to again nothing less than strongly positive returns whilst at the same time releasing singles and EPs of quirky and imaginative infectious pop. TheTurn It On EP is arguably a little bit of a surprise, the tracks maybe less instant than previous tracks like Alligator and Fight And Flight, but they all show a fresh expanse to their songwriting in tandem with a more intricate and serious breath to their still contagious imagination. The quartet of almost psych drawn pop songs brings a heated experience to feast upon without restraint, whilst taking thoughts on a ride of unpredictable and fiery invention to wake them up and spark their own individual responses. Their sound again feels like a invigorating mix of David Bowie, Josef K, and Pulp but even more so on these new tracks, carries the feel and drama of the Associates, with even vocally Maclean having whispers of Billy Mackenzie in the gait of his delivery. They are spicy extras to the uniqueness of the band and music, something to ensure as mentioned it is impossible to ignore.

Released through Integrity Records, the EP opens with the download single which found strong success over the summer, Lemonade. The song is the most straight forward companion of the four, an easy to consume piece of pop with a mellow and warm presence. As its keys stroke the ear with gentle warmth, the beats of Waller divert the attention to a core of feistier intent within the song, soon joined by the muscular and slightly barbed basslines of Dickson. The crystalline yet discord barked guitar play lashes the ear within and around the shadowed rhythms to open up the senses further, the track never bursting into a riot of energy but capturing the passions with the emotive deliverance of keys and vocals alongside the moodier and more forceful elements elsewhere.

The great start is followed by best track on the release in Lip Synch. The song opens with a provocative questioning lyrically and musically, the guitar, bass, and drums prodding until they get a response and the synth slowly offering its own seductive persuasion. The simple but effective start is a slow build which is masked by the captivating sonic spotlights and melodic teases. Eventually one is face to face with a powerful and dramatic crescendo of passion and energy in the chorus, a dazzling and explosive joy to leave one breathless. Repeating the opening and climax again the track taunts and thrills with further expressive enterprise within the repetitive but irresistible structure of the song. It is glorious, maybe the best thing Miniature Dinosaurs has done.

Next of Kin is a sonic sun of sharp and pulsating guitars and epic keys driven atmospheres speared by the again excellent dark bass tones of Dickson. The track has a heart as big as its sounds and makes immersing within its emotive very easy and rewarding. Like its predecessor, the track has denseness to its gift which stretches and shows the evolution of the creativity of the band though it still has the ability to engage with impressive contagion.

The closing title track like the first is a song with a more instantaneous pop swagger, one you can jump on board with like an old friend and join its new but familiar mischief with ease. It brings a compulsive end to an equally addictive release that marks Miniature Dinosaurs as a band continuing to shout out look at us, something which with Turn It On EP alone would be rude to refuse.

http://miniaturedinosaurs.co.uk

RingMaster 21/10/2012

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Miniature Dinosaurs – Lemonade

Last year Scottish band Miniature Dinosaurs opened up a flood of attention their way with the mischievous and wholly infectious single Alligator. The track was strongly impressive and put all on alert for what came next from the band. August 13th sees new single Lemonade let loose to show that the success and quality of its predecessors was no flash In the pan and that the quartet from Stirling is one of the brightest sparks to have recently emerged within UK indie music.

The new track is taken from the upcoming Turn It On EP, which comes out in October alongside a second single from the release. Whereas Alligator was a greedy bundle of energy with a wicked grin upon its face, Lemonade finds the band exploring a more expressive and seductive sound though the track is no less infectious and short of a tongue in cheek breath. Their first release since signing with Integrity Records, who brought the likes of Reuben and Million Dead to the nation, it is another impressive step in the constant rise Miniature Dinosaurs has been on since their beginning. The band at their start found themselves receiving radio play months before their first ever gig and on stage has thrilled alongside the likes of Fenech-Soler, Johnny Foreigner, Twin Atlantic and Young the Giant. Singles through Electric Honey and Saraseto Records has only added fuel to their growth and as one listens to Lemonade and with the upcoming EP, it feels that the time of Miniature Dinosaurs is on the very near horizon.

The single instantly bursts in to life with a flurry of vibrant jangly guitars and firm rhythms before settling down to begin its tale of young romantic angst. The bass of Alban Dickson strolls with a moodiness adding depth to the elevated guitar play and the whispered tones of the synths from Craig Ferrie. Within the warm sounds the vocals of guitarist Barry Maclean are an expressive delight which explore each note and word he delivers with a compulsive emotive lilt. The track then brings in bursts of energetic passion where the beats of Sam Waller ensure a fuller attention from the ear so the melodic enterprise and discordant tinged surface of the guitars can play with relish. It is a glorious blend which along its length brings thoughts of bands like Associates, Orange Juice, Pulp, and Josef K to the unique sound the band conjures with ease.

Lemonade is outstanding and incites an even more elevated affection for the contagious sounds of Miniature Dinosaurs. The Turn It On EP cannot come soon enough and there is no doubt the band will become a constant on radio shows and channels with their sounds and accompanying videos of this and the forthcoming releases.

www.miniaturedinosaurs.co.uk

RingMaster 10/08/2012

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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Johnny Foreigner – Johnny Foreigner vs. Everything

Though it has only been two years since their last album Grace And The Bigger Picture, the wait has felt much longer and another release well overdue. The wait is now over as November 7th the Birmingham noise pop maestros Johnny Foreigner unleash their massive 17 track album Johnny Foreigner vs. Everything. The band’s first release on Alcopop! Records, the album is an expressive and emotive array of light and not exactly darker but carrying the real tones that touch our each and every day, and as singer/guitarist Alexei Berrow reveals the album “sounds like a huge expansive sprawling ambitious and personal version of us.”

Johnny Foreigner vs. Everything is this time self produced with the band basically having full control over everything and it shows, the album oozing elements that make up the band as musicians and people. Recorded with long time friend Dominique James (Sunset Cinema Club) who understood the band far beyond the music side, the DIY plateau the Johnny Foreigner vs. Everything was created upon has brought out even more charm and essences of the band than in their previous impressive and certainly welcoming releases. Again Berrow sums it up better commenting “We started writing it two years ago, and staggered recording and mixing over 5 months. The title came first. This is the first full length record we’ve made without a Grammy – nominated producer, without contracts and New York and professionals. The biggest challenge we’ve faced as a band, and the worst thing about leaving the world of corporate-funded labels, was knowing that sooner or later we’d come to this point; having to make a way better record for a way worse budget… and I’m beyond proud to say that I think that’s exactly what us and Dom have achieved. We’ve made the record that sounds like we do in our heads.”

The songs within the album come in varied guises and intent but all come equipped with incisive melodies and emotions that cause smiles alongside personal reminders and references all can recognise and feel somewhere within the release. Songs swoop upon and mingle with the senses with equal  wonder whether brought with indie punk urgency, charismatic pop allure, or touching sentiment, the overall effect the same of pleasure and a sense ‘they know’ because they have been there and the songs playing are their lives too.  

A rundown of all seventeen gems would take longer than the albums length but some tracks play deeper and stay longer than others. The opening pop artistry of ‘If I’m The Most Famous Boy You’ve Fucked Then Honey Yr In Trouble’ and the hypnotic vibrancy fuelling ‘Hulk Hoegaarden, Gin Kinsella, David Duvodkany, Etc.’ alongside the melodic trickery of ‘Electricity Vs The Dead’ and slow burn into anthem flow of ‘New Street, You Can Take It’ simply inspire and excite the senses with manic enthusiasm. The combined vocals of Berrow and bassist Kelly Southern a perfect union whether in frantic energy or powerful sentiment; melodic and harmonious and as engaging as their eagerly striking sounds from exploratory teasing guitars and delicious thrilling basslines over the classy and inventive rhythms from Junior Elvis Washington Laidley.

The songs within Johnny Foreigner vs. Everything ripple with various essences that recall a maelstrom of delights from the wells of Pixies, The Jesus & Mary Chain, The Victorian English Gentlemens Club, Daisy Chainsaw, and very, very early The Cure. Melodic, discordant and thoroughly inventive the album is a complete joy to the ear and heart. The more you listen the more you get from it and the deeper Johnny Foreigner becomes a part of your world.

RingMaster 19/10/2011

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