Shadowed reflections and bright legacies: embracing the heart of 1919 with Vocalist Rio Goldhammer

Photo by Carl Arnfield

Bloodline is an album which is destined to not only leave a striking creative fingerprint on the year but the decade as a whole for not only post punk/gothic rock, but simply rock ‘n’ roll. The new outing from 1919, a band inspiring generations of artists from their emergence in the late eighties, Bloodline is not only one deeply rousing slice of musical adventure and imagination but also a major last triumph from founding member and guitarist Mark Tighe who sadly passed away virtually days before its release. It is a stunning part of the legacy the musician left global music. With deep thanks to vocalist Rio Goldhammer and also drummer Mick Reed, we had the pleasure to talk about Mark and also delve into the future of 1919, the fabulous Bloodline and much more…

Hi Guys and thanks for taking time out to talk with us.

A pleasure.

Before we talk about your album, could you please just say some words about band founder and guitarist Mark Tighe who so sadly passed away recently; about him as a musician and friend.

It’s hard to put into words really. His legacy will be one of sound… it already is. He was an artist and trying to explain his craft in a few words would do it an injustice – it took him a lifetime to do what he did. If you look through his old online posts (something it seems we all do quite regularly), his words are very few – usually to punctuate an image. He lived and breathed art. His eulogy reflected this well. It was mainly music…Exactly what he would have wanted.

As a friend… well, he would have been blown away by the tributes that came for him. From the music press, from fans, from bands we’ve worked with and many that we haven’t. He was a humble guy who always thought of others first. He’d bring chocolate to rehearsals, even when his illness meant he couldn’t eat it himself. He looked after the merch for the band right until his last day – always with a hand-written note. He wanted to do his bit and never took our supporters for granted. I could go on for days about him. Anyone who met him, even for a moment, knows he is a huge loss to the world, and we’ve lived on top of each other for 2 years. It’s still hard to accept not seeing or talking to him

His untimely passing must make the release of your new album Bloodline, the saddest joy possible?

Of course. You know, the label called up after the CDs arrived saying “the album is too good not to be on vinyl”. I wish Mark had heard that. He was desperate to get a vinyl release. Sadness and joy are, yes, perhaps in equal measure. But the prevailing emotion is doggedness. We know what we have to do now, and we know who we have to do it for.

Do you know what the future of 1919 might be without Mark, or is that a question you have yet to ponder?

We’ve had to ponder it for a while but we’re determined to finish what we started. Mark insisted we find someone… he’d wanted to teach them the guitar parts himself but he deteriorated so quickly. He insisted “no one was irreplaceable”, but at the time we were more concerned with being there for him as friends. And indeed, we now have someone in the unenviable position of trying to learn the guitar parts without Mark’s tutelage! We’re determined to honour him, and we will. Humans are mortal. 1919 is not.

We do have someone on board though [Sam Evans]… Someone who met Mark a couple of times. We didn’t want a hired gun because the band is a family. It will be a new chapter for us of course, but we had a good idea of our future direction from our final months with Mark. There are a couple of finished tracks and a handful of demos from the last 6 months so we have a good base to work from. But I don’t think its right to say we’re “without Mark”. He will always be with us, and as long as 1919 is alive, so is he.

It is fair to say that for gothic/post punk fans who knew you first time around, 1919 was one of the most important and inspirational propositions in the eighties. Is that a feeling you found in people if not then when 1919 re-emerged a couple of years or so ago?

Absolutely… 1919 never performed outside of the UK the first time around, but we’ve found a lot of love from across the world. Particularly in France and Germany (and of course our favourite place, B52 in Eernegem) we’ve had some amazing audiences, and they tend to be a lot younger than our audiences at home. The band obviously means a lot to people and we take that very seriously.

Obviously the time between has seen original members grow as artists and people, can you describe how creatively 1919 evolved from those early heady days seeing chart breaking singles and an acclaimed debut album?

Mick Reed: Well, as you say we’re a lot more refined now in terms of musicianship. But you know, in a lot of ways nothing’s changed at all. The writing process is similar; as is the way we rehearse and record. There are no egos in this band and it’s just so easy to get on with it. This incarnation of the band has actually been the most stable line-up in our history. I honestly can’t see anything other than mortality come between us.

How did the link-up with Mark and Mick, of course the band’s original drummer, with you Rio and bassist Karl Donner come about; how did you all meet?

We hit the ground running really. Mark and I had been doing Circle of the Absurd and put the Revenge demo out as 1919. Mick and Karl had been doing some work together on some lost Ship of Fools material… Once Mark and Mick were in touch again we just brought the two pieces together.

Mark’s poetically haunting melodies and grooves showed they had lost none of their invention and evocative touch within the new album but there is a bold new freshness to the whole 1919 sound, more than maybe would be expected with simply maturity and experience involved. How would you assess its new character and body?

It feels fresh. We’re simultaneously an old band and a new one… but aside from that I think you’ve said it yourself. Mark spent a lifetime perfecting a sound that was completely his, and Mick’s drums – the tribal power – has always been a signature of the band. We’re not going through the motions though, we mean every note we play and every word we sing. We’re a tight unit and the music means everything to us. Anything else is up to you to discern.

Can you tell us about the recording of Bloodline? Was it an easily flowing process?

100%. When we recorded The Madness Continues…session in 2015, we did all 14 tracks in a day. For Bloodline we took a little more time, of course, but the core of each song was still recorded live in our rehearsal room. We’re just comfortable there. Live music, a little overdubbing, and then vocals. Then of course we have an excellent producer in James Reid, who does the mixing. Mick sits with him for the most part and he’s got an excellent ear for texture, but it definitely flows.

The rhythmic adventure of the songs with Bloodline is for us addictively invasive, bound in almost tribal persuasion as you just mentioned, and more than matched by the web of sound round them. Mick and Karl have an instinctive understanding it seems, creating a tempting core for the goodness. How did the songwriting work for the album; those dramatic rhythms first, suggestive melodies, or variety of things breeding what it offers?

We jam! A lot of bands don’t… sometimes someone brings an idea into the room and we play with it… I try to scribble some lyrics out on the spot when possible. But there’s no definitive method. We just make noise and the best bits start to structure themselves.

Can you give us some background to the themes within Bloodline?

The label called it “the soundtrack to the end of the world” in their press release. I like that.  There’s a lot in there really… Life, death, environment and architecture, violence, peace, power, philosophy, representation… a touch of nostalgia. There’s a political element, sometimes abstract and sometimes more direct. But I won’t feed you the minutiae. I prefer to leave room for interpretation.

You have also released a great video for the album’s title track. It was created and filmed by Carl Arnfield of Chalkman Video, the producer of a string of striking videos and films. What brought you guys and him together?

He’d done a video for The Kingcrows which I liked – they’re friends of mine and put me in touch with Carl. He’s done all of our videos now and there will be more collaborations with him without a doubt. We do butt heads occasionally, but only because he has such an artistic vision for his work. He’s in it for all the right reasons and a real asset to be able to call upon. He’s also a top bloke and worked his socks off to get the C.O.T.A video out in time for Mark to be able to see it. Can’t recommend the guy more highly.

It is hard to imagine your emotions as Bloodline sees itself being devoured by fans and lauded by so many,  your proudest moment musically?

Mick & Karl: Watching Joy Division was incredibly important in our lives.

Mick: John Peel too. When he announced he was going to bring 1919 in for a session I couldn’t believe it. To have done two of them will always be something I’m proud of.

Rio: The first time we played Paris (at Le Klub). The power blew in the middle of the set… it felt like the building was going to collapse during the rest of it. It was perfect.

Once again my biggest thanks. Anything you would like to add?

Just some words from our Captain:

 

I work life like it is worked

The moon shimmers red

Cherry red

The glow distilled into exploding fireflies

Roads are long

Fields pass

The blue twilight comforting

I am dazed and even confused

But I realise that I love this life

On the road

My band

High on life

Twitching to go

To play

The electricity overwhelms me

It is immeasurable

1919……….. Forever

A. Tighe

Image by Scott Ford

 http://www.1919official.co.uk/   https://www.facebook.com/1919official/   https://twitter.com/1919official

Read our review of Bloodline @ https://ringmasterreviewintroduces.wordpress.com/2017/03/06/1919-bloodline/

Pete RingMaster

The RingMaster Review 23/03/2017

1919 – Bloodline

This is a moment no one likes to contemplate let alone undertake, reviewing something from an artist and exceptional musician who has sadly just been untimely taken from music and the world. It also though gives fingers and thoughts a chance to pay homage especially when the subject of the piece is such a striking and rousing slice of creativity.

Bloodline is the new album from gothic/post punks 1919, a band formed at the tail of 1980 which proceeded to break the charts with a trio of singles, record one of the genre’s inspirational albums, and make appearances on the John Peel sessions twice before disbanding. Founding guitarist Mark Tighe

Mark Tighe RIP

began bringing the band back to life in 2014, its line-up sealed the following year with original drummer Mick Reed and bassist Karl Donner joining Tighe and vocalist Rio Goldhammer; the quartet subsequently releasing the ‘Madness Continues Sessions’ live album and in turn the self-released Death Note EP.

This past night of January 27th, Mark passed away; a deep loss for family, band, and fans but equally for music generally. His playing was distinctive, like a single individual colour in a vast palette of hues, able to create haunting melodies and moments as evocative and captivating as the incisive grooves and hooks from him which so freely and uniquely gripped body and imagination. The evidence is no more powerful and true than on Bloodline. He was also a wholly loved man to whom music was his life’s fuel and a true gentleman for all those who knew and met him.

Bloodline is a thrilling way to remember and enjoy Mark’s craft and potent presence; an album which grips physically and imaginatively from its first breath, increasingly winding appetite and lust around its creative fingers track by track. The foursome quite simply cements themselves as still one of the essential post punk incitements with it, almost as if they had never been away as a presence yet pushing themselves into new fresh realms of creative drama and aural adventure.

The album’s title track is first up, chugging riffs swiftly turning into wiry tendrils as percussion teases. Once the brooding bassline enters, things become eagerly catchy with the song blossoming into a PiL meets Leitmotiv like lure with Rio’s tones showing a certain Lydon-esque tinge to them. Feet and hips cannot avoid being involved as sultry melodies weave their temptation and a repetitious Killing Joke scented nagging growls in its belly.

Drama seeps from the electronic coaxing bringing next up This Vanity into view, its raw industrially kissed smoulder continuing to hug the senses as the bass unveils a gorgeous lure. Alongside, Mark’s guitar spins a spiral of melodic suggestion as Mick’s rhythms instinctively roll, a Gene Loves Jezebel like breeze soon floating over the provocative landscape to seep into every emotive crevice as vocals plaintively croon. Quickly absorbing the senses, the track makes way for the outstanding, rhythmically tenacious canter of Inquest. There is no escaping thinking of Jaz Coleman and co as Karl and Mick unite their flirtatiously anthemic designs but as throughout Bloodline, 1919 soon breed their own distinct character of sound and imagination. Magnetic harmonies and intoxicating melodies proceed to vine the ridiculously virulent encounter drawing the listener further into its creative theatre where just as riveting treats lay like its successor Retrograde. Like a puppeteer, it has the body bouncing while its spicy maze of melody is a sunspot of temptation contagiously matched by the snarling bass and hungrily leaping beats; Rio the ringmaster to its rousingly provocative and exhilarating waltz.

Even darker depths are drilled by the bass next in Legacy, its gnarly breath echoed in the caliginous air of the song though it too has a rampant catchiness which tempers and suits its shadowy presence. Imagine Bauhaus in league with Play Dead and the song can be visualised but still only a glimpse of its invasively compelling adventure, success matched by that of the wholly different presence of Zeitgeist. Again the first of the just mentioned pair of references is a prime clue to its tenebrific air and almost vampiric temptation, Rio carrying a Pete Murphy air to some of his persistently highly enjoyable, ever moving delivery. Mark’s imagination spins another labyrinth of melody and haunted sound too, evolving textures as radiant as they are emotively darksome to seduce and ensnare.

Through the galvanic punk rock of Disassociation and the intrigue soaked flirtation of Waiting For God ears are thrilled and the album’s variety stretched with the latter revolving its charms in ears and imagination like a temptress whilst wearing Theatre of Hate/ The Danse Society sourced inspiration as another alluring spice to its own spellbinding and tenacious revelry. Both tracks whip up body and spirit with sublime yet forceful ease, being quickly and as boldly matched in results by the slightly calmer and heavier fascination of Trespass. Maybe the most pop lined song on the album it just as openly shares raw shadows whilst boisterously serenading the listener, and as those before, it only sparks emotional and physical participation.

Bloodline closes with Life Is.., its tribal incitement of rhythms alone enough to incite allegiance, bewitchingly assisted by the fuzzy glow of melodies and variety coated vocals. Something akin to a fusion of Calling All Astronauts and Inca Babies but not, the wonderfully niggling song saunters and swings with increasing infection; an aural epidemic from which there is no escape as it brings one very fine release to a tremendous conclusion.

You cannot evade sadness listening to Bloodline but neither the joy sparked by its simply stunning presence.

Bloodline is out now through Westworld Recordings.

Video Dir. Carl Arnfield / ChalkmanVideo.com

https://www.facebook.com/1919official/

Pete RingMaster 06/03/2017

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Naked Lunch – Alone

Alone

Receiving the promo for the new single from Naked Lunch instantly raised a tingle as thoughts shot back to our first discovery of them through their appearance of the Some Bizarre compilation album from Mute Records way back in 1981 with the excellent Rabies single coming soon after. Returning after a 30 year break the band shows that maturity and time has not diminished their unique sense of and adventure within electronic music one iota. Alone is an evocative slice of haunting and provoking imagination drenched in the presence fans of the band remember and brought with a fresh and potent, almost destructive dark breath.

Formed in 1979 by vocalist Tony Mayo and guitarist Gary Shepherd as Sons of Perdition, though this name was changed to Naked Lunch after their debut gig, the band underwent a few changes in personnel as well as working out and delivering their sounds live. To condense their story, from a show alongside the likes of DAF, Cabaret Voltaire, Fad Gadget, B Movie, and Clock DVA organised by the band and Stevo, who Tony had DJ’ed with previously, the band undertook the Naked Lunch’s Electronic Indoctrination Tour in 1980 which included a show at Leeds Futurama, which was filmed and eventually broadcast on BBC2. Naked Lunch then set about helping Stevo find artists and recordings to make up the Some Bizarre album, to which the band itself contributed La Femme (a song originally called Le Femme but Phonogram who the Daniel Miller (The Normal) owned Mute released the album through, changed it to grammatically correct French, missing the point of the androgyny of the electronic music scene and that the song was about that). After a parting with Stevo, Naked Lunch became managed by Ramkup with the single Rabies backed by Slipping Again being released, though it suffered from a ban on day time radio play due to the title but did receive good play and support from the likes of John Peel and Nicky Horne on their night time shows. Line-up changes continued t before the band split in 1981 with Mayo retaining the name Naked Lunch, which he registered with Companies House in May 1981. A second version of the band emerged as a live thing until 1985 and though Mayo continued with Naked Lunch projects the band as such was a quiet presence.

2010 saw Mayo link up again with early member Paul Davies and writing new material, with Mick Clark and Cliff Chapman joining in 2011, both in the original line-up. Their first gig for over 30 years came at BAS II with the addition of Mark Irvine coming in early 2012 and Jet Noir linking up in June of this year.

Themed by “Isolation, Loss and Feeling Disconnected from Society”, Alone immediately unleashes a rich beckoning atmosphere upon the ear to dramatically mark the return of the band, its lingering caresses and expansive breath an evocative cloak around the vocals of Mayo, his tones understandably feeling older and authoritative. Keys and guitars bring suggestive hues to the air and thoughts whilst the excellent backing whispered vocal kisses of Black simultaneously chill and seduce the touch of the track. With a more than slight Fad Gadget essence and the vibrant light spots and melodic teasing holding a sense of Yello to their temptation, the song is a mesmeric blend of frosty intent and warm electronic persuasion.

The single is an absorbing pleasure which raises real appetite for future sounds and endeavours of the band. Naked Lunch is as strong and as impacting as ever and electronic music will only benefit from their return.

www.nakedlunch.org.uk

8/10

RingMaster 22/08/2013

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard from

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Snarling with varied weaponry: an interview with John Robb of Goldblade

Goldblade 1

Punk has been treated to some exceptional albums so far this year and none any better than the new album from UK giants Goldblade. Their sixth album, The Terror Of Modern Life, is a masterful, openly diverse, and ferocious strike of irresistible and inciting riots of invention and enterprise. One of the most thrilling releases to unleash its triumph upon 2013 so far, the thirteen track brawl snarls and provokes thoughts and senses with pure imaginative craft. Seizing the opportunity to talk with band founder and vocalist, John Robb, we charged up our questions to ask one of the genre’s biggest creators about the album, punk itself, and his own history.

Hi John and welcome to the site, thank you for sharing time to chat with us.

Album six, The Terror Of Modern Life, has just unleashed its confrontation on the world; does the feel, thrill, and anticipation change from release to release?

Of course…and it gets to be a bigger thrill.  It’s a mixture of thank fuck we are still doing this and surviving in the collapsing music business and still have enough inspiration to still want to make music!

With this album we felt really excited. We knew we were onto something good with this record a long time ago. We got the sound we wanted from the start and we worked hard to get the songs right. We wanted a variation of styles- from fast kinda hardcore rushes to anthemic punk to dark tribal stuff to droning post black metal apocalyptic pieces. It’s like a collection of all the various strands of punk and its off shoots – we wanted something people could dance to at gigs, something full of hooks but also fuck with things a bit as well. We wanted to make a record that reflected the underlying darkness and unease of these times, times where the word ‘terror’ is the key word like the word ‘clash’ was the key word in the punk times and caused the classic band to name themselves.

We immersed ourselves in the album and pushed ourselves to the brink. We then made the sound the way we wanted, in a way we never got close to before. We wanted something darker and heavier- we wanted the bass to sound right- I had reformed my old band The Membranes for a few gigs and played bass again and it reminded me of the fundamental power of that instrument if you stick it though a rat pedal and play it with a direct venom- this cross pollinated into Goldblade and infected the album and it really places us back into the place we wanted to be- that twisted end of punk occupied by Killing Joke, Dead Kennedys, Stranglers, Black Flag, whilst continuing the great quest of the Clash but updated to a 21st century feel because we have never stopped listening to new music.

The year has already seen the outstanding new UK Subs album XXIV provoke and impress and now your scintillating encounter, it feels like the ‘old brigade’ is still driving and leading UK punk, does it feel like that for you?

There are great younger bands around- Dirt Box Disco album is stuffed full of great songs- I think it’s a case of older bands not giving up in their dotage- with discipline and concentration you can make the best and most urgent history of your history. Punk, by its nature, doesn’t have leaders- we just operate in our own space! The UK Subs album is great and Charlie is an inspiration to anyone, there have also been great albums from Killing Joke, the Stranglers and other bands from that generation- it’s like those bands have found their teeth again- maybe they also feel the urgency of these times…

The Terror Of Modern Life is as with your previous albums a collection of songs which steer through, challenge, and stand eye to Goldblade-the-terror-of-modern-life-296x300eye with injustices and social wrongs, but your most potent and venomous yet?

I think things are getting a bit helter skelter out there and it’s hard not to reflect this, the last ten years has seen things get very unsteady in the world and that’s bound to get into the music- we have no interest in lecturing people, we just reflect what’s happening- people can make their own minds up or just dance to the music- it does not concern us what people think of the words, the world seems to be in a fast forward towards several different conclusions and out album reflects this tension.

Do you feel the impact of politically fuelled songs whether on the personal, social, or world level is still as strong as it used to be within not only punk but music as a whole? Do people and especially the latest generation of young people listen to songs and music the same way as those before them?

To be honest the impact has lessened in some ways and yet in others it’s got stronger- music, the music discourse is no longer driven by the counter culture and there are many strands of thought out there, but that’s inevitable because people don’t have the time and the impact of being a political song is less than when it first came about in modern culture. I don’t think young people are less political than they were years ago- that’s a bit of a myth. Not all of punk was political and it didn’t have to be- punk was many things- it could be comic book like the Ramones or political like Crass and both were genius for me. I think people sometimes feel overawed by the world these days and feel detached from the political process and that’s creating dangerous vacuums. We don’t claim to have all the answers but we have definitely have all the questions.

You obviously grew up with and were inspired by the birth of punk and the bands sculpting its first mighty wave; do you still see and feel the same essences politically and musically in today’s punk bands outside of yourselves and the still provocative bands from back then?

First wave was important for me but I don’t wallow in there for ever- those records always sound magical and powerful but I love lots of new music as well even it affects me in a different kind of way. Modern punk bands are as varied musically and politically as any bands were back then, it has changed in many ways as well- even if it was a business then as well it seemed to be a bit more haphazard and suicidal- now it’s a long term operation and band’s gigs are very different. In some ways punk has become a tradition like jazz or blues and a way of making music or dressing- and that’s understandable – the music and the style are very attractive and create a cool- the only danger is getting trapped which is a contradiction of the punk spirit!

For those unaware of your intensive history within music could you give us the history of John Robb between say ’77 and the emergence of Goldblade?

Wow, that’s long and complex!

Born in Blackpool, formed The Membranes in the punk period and also started a fanzine called Rox. The Membranes became a big underground band with noisy records inspired by the dark zone in the middle of punk and post punk- we toured the world and were critic and John Peel faves. At the same time I started writing for Zig Zag and then Sounds and covered all the fallout of the punk generation from the goth to grunge scene to Madchester to baggy to punk itself- being the first person to interview Nirvana and also coining the phrase Britpop, formed Goldblade in the mid-nineties to fly the flag for rock n roll in the middle of the non-rock n roll decade! Wrote books on punk and the Stone Roses and the eighties underground scene as well as doing TV and radio stuff…and that all continues now with Goldblade playing all over the world etc…

As you mentioned your writing, something you are renowned, has that experience and aspect of your life impacted or brought a view upon your music lyrically and in regard to creating sounds which brings something different to Goldblade, something other bands might lack?

Of course, even for the simple reason that I hear lots of music and it also keeps me fully engaged in the culture and keeps me interested and investigating everything. I’m a compulsively creative person who keeps making, creating and writing stuff. Apart from hearing so much stuff I think the impact on Goldblade is more minimal as that is a very instinctive thing, we make the music that entertains us and the songs are kicked about in the rehearsal room till they sound and feel right to us and not to fit in with anybody, anywhere!

Listening to The Terror Of Modern Life alone, one has the sense inspirations are far wider than just the early days and sounds of punk. What does give you food for thought musically?

You got it- some people think we operate only within punk but we have a far wider listening base than that- even punk was originally about dub and other musics- it’s good to mess with things but keep the focus and the energy- sometimes it’s great to switch to fast and furious punk rushes just to get that adrenalin fix, sometimes it’s good to find a different rhythm or atmosphere- it could be from black metal or from dub reggae but it must always be put through the Goldblade mangle and made to sound like us.

Goldblade 5Did you approach the new album any differently to your previous releases?

We wanted something a bit more extreme, more heavier, and rawer; we felt the last album had been too tame and too much click track and production- we wanted the record to sound live and if the songs speeded up towards the end then great! Because they speeded up with excitement- ‘rock n roll should speed up’ as Guy Stevens told the Clash during London Calling recordings…we had to record the album twice because of a fallout with the label but the second time we recorded it in two days flat and mixed it in 2 days- the urgency was vital to the album, it gives it an edge and we are addicted to the edge…

The songs on the album strike hard lyrically and deliver them with some of the most deviously addictive hooks and grooves, which comes first in your songs as a generalisation?

It can be either- we can have songs and bash them out in the rehearsal room and work out a vocal melody or it can be a phrase or some lyrics that come with a tune and we build the song around it- it’s a very varying process.

Is there any particular moment on The Terror Of Modern Life which gives you the strongest satisfaction?

I think the playing by the band is amazing, brother Pete’s guitar is fantastic- every time I listen I hear something new, even on the songs I mainly wrote! And getting the bass sound the way I wanted it to be- as heavy and raw as it should be- that made a big difference- when we finished the album we were really happy with it, I listened to it over and over- normally you feel a bit down when it’s finished but this time I could actually listen to this as an album and felt really excited by the sound and the reaction we have got so far with all the great reviews has proved this.

And anything you would have changed or like to have evolved further in hindsight?

That’s for the next album!

I would change the way people consume music- I think it’s getting almost impossible for people to record and release music now unless they are rich- the download thing has killed it for small underground labels and studios and everyone is really struggling out there- this is our first release where most of the people listening will have not bought the record but downloaded it from the internet and from the pirates- it doesn’t make me angry as technology is part of music- but it may mean that making another album may be almost impossible for us and lots of other bands. We will have to think of other ways of making and releasing music in the future.

The late seventies and punk gave freedom and realisation to bands and people that they could make music as they wanted, on their own terms. Do you think that freedom or realisation is still as potent, has the internet and the digital world given back that belief?

In some ways yes- you can get heard more now and the consumer has the power which we love- cult bands can be heard now and don’t have to grovel to the mainstream media for attention- that’s been very important to the underground and made a real difference- this is coupled with the real problems that many studios, labels and shops are having because of the pirate thing- we felt that if you want to give your music away for free that’s up to you and not someone else but we realise that there is nothing we can do about it- the internet is young and its effect on culture cannot be measured yet- at the moment its chaos out there and like the wild west- and as punks we love that aspect of it but we are not so servile that we want people we don’t know to make money out of us!

There has always been a unity and kinship between punk bands, certainly in its origins, do you still think it exists, can you feel that Gold Blade Smallunity now?

Yes we all know each other, some bands are more friendly than others but there is a unity- I think we all face the same problems!

You have just come off a tour with the Misfits, and a band we love and feature constantly on our podcasts The Bone Orchard and The Ringmaster Review, Dirt Box Disco who you mentioned earlier. How was the tour and did you have to put those punk n roll freaks from DBD in their place 😉

DBD are good people and a great band and there songs are killer- I think they will be one of the biggest bands on the scene by the end of the year and we can then go and support them. It was great to tour with them and I had to chuckle when we played with them at the Manchester Ritz when their stomach problems were quite loud back stage. 🙂

You have toured all over the world it seems, any particular places other than the usual countries which you enjoyed and surprised you with their knowledge of your sounds?

Algeria was amazing- we were the first band to play there for 20 years and yet people knew our songs – that’s the power of YouTube for you- the songs that were on YouTube they were singing along- we have played all over- we have played Russia a few times and there is talk of going to China…

Once more a big thanks John for talking with us, anything you would like to add?

Join our Facebook page – http://www.facebook.com/goldbladeband

Review the review of The Terror Of Modern Life @ https://ringmasterreviewintroduces.wordpress.com/2013/05/19/goldblade-the-terror-of-modern-life/

Pete RingMaster

The RingMaster Review 30/05/2013

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard from

http://www.audioburger.com

Jacob’s Mouse: The Dot EP / No Fish Shop Parking

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    Jacob’s Mouse was a band in the early nineties which stretched creative limits and ventured into unexplored sonic shadows but also escaped the deserved success and recognition less worthy ear friendly bands received. The trio brewed an instinctive and intrusive blend of indie rock, post punk, and various incisions of inciting noise and aural storms, a sound which explored the listener as much as its own corners and boundaries. Now for the first time two of their releases have a digital release, their debut EP The Dot and first album No Fish Shop Parking, and a long overdue treat for noise fans they truly are.

From Bury St Edmunds, the 1988 formed Jacob’s Mouse consisted of identical twin brothers Hugo and Jebb Boothby on guitar and bass respectively, and vocalist/ drummer Sam Marsh. Taking reported influences from the likes of Fugazi, Minor Threat, Big Black, Pixies, and Hüsker Dü, the band released by the vinyl-only The Dot EP through Liverish Records in 1990. The release grabbed critical acclaim and led the way to support slots with the likes of Nirvana, Suede, Th’ Faith Healers, and Manic Street Preachers, as well as enthused support from John Peel and Kurt Cobain. The following year saw the release of No Fish Shop Parking on Blithering Idiot, an imprint label of the band and continued the strong responses and acclamation surrounding the trio. As the nineties bred and flocked to the Brit-pop phenomenon, Jacob’s Mouse was found itself left out of the focus of an indie scene which was drooling over Oasis, Blur, and similar flavoured presences with a seeming tunnel vision. The threesome reacted in their own way by becoming even more experimental and creatively wilful, their following albums I’m Scared in 1993 and Rubber Room of 1995, released via Wiiija Records (home to Cornershop, Therapy? and BiS), testing and pushing their invention and craft to continually unappreciated responses. The year of their third and last album also saw the band call it a day to leave behind a legacy of unique and inspiring releases and songs which now finally have the chance to cast their magnetic sonic incitement once again.

Both releases come through Sturm Und Drang Recordings and make just as impressive an impact as they did first time around. TheJacobs Mouse Dot EP sleeve Dot EP musically is easy to describe though what you consequently imagine barely glances the reality of the sounds created. Like a searing fire of World Domination Enterprises, The Fire Engines, and Hüsker Dü, the five track release teases and taunts whilst creating its own eclectic character and originality. Opening track Signs initially plays with the ear with an inviting sonic groove before vocal squalls assault with abrasive passion. Unveiling up a web of mischievous delicious hooks and addictive discord driven melodies, the song is the strongest persuasion possible ably coaxed deeper into ardour by the wantonness of the basslines.

The following garage punk caustic brawl of Enterprise leads into the mesmeric Hey Dip Sugar with its dub infused charms and exhausting sonic adventure. Both tracks leave passions ablaze whilst Ho-Hum ignites the senses with insidious repetition lyrically and sonically for a full capture of the imagination and a grazing of their sensibilities. Closing on Microflesh with its blistered atmospheric radiance and gloriously acidic melodies, The Dot was and is an irresistible and deeply compelling introduction to the band and it is no surprise that the releases garnered such plaudits.

Jacobs Mouse - No Fish Shop Parking - front cover      No Fish Shop Parking shows the evolution in the ideas and sound of the band at the time. It still has the essences which made the EP so refreshing but expands to explore and extend the innovative design of the imagination reaped. Opening track Tumbleswan envelopes the ear in a sonic blaze veined with evocative spoken vocals, provocative bass taunts, and more defined melodies than found on the EP. There is a Gang Of Four breath to the track which opens up the attraction further whilst immediately standing as a step forward from their debut release. The following tracks Twist, She Is Dead, and A Place to Go to, entrap the passions further with their distinct stances, the first another Gang Of Four like provocation whilst the other pair search through garage rock seeds to breed their own senses confronting glories.

From the dub blossomed Carfish, a track which has a touch of Ruts about it, the best track not only on the album but arguably one of the best from the band ever sends one into orbit. Caphony is simply sensational, a psychobilly rhythm and simmering tease loaded into a hungry and devilish groove and energy. Though the song predates Th’ Legendary Shack Shakers they are a fair reference with slithers of Screaming Blue Messiahs adding extra spice. Justice and The Vase complete the exceedingly magnificent album with further unique enterprise, the whole release an inspiring sculpted maelstrom of invention and noise.

As more and more noise rock bands emerge you can hear the sounds and inspirations of Jacob’s Mouse within much of their creativity, whether they realise it or not and with this twin release maybe the band will now get the full recognition and awareness it so surely deserves.

www.facebook.com/jacobsmouse

The Dot 9/10 No Fish Shop Parking 9/10

RingMaster 12/03/2013

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James J Turner – How Could We Be Wrong?

There has been some quite special folk orientated albums this year, whether a more traditional approached release or a rock/folk fusion, but How Could We Be Wrong? from James J Turner is something special again, an album which quite simply puts most others into the shade. Whereas other albums as good as they truly are, sound written to be a collection of good songs, How Could We Be Wrong? is so organic sounding it is like it has been lived and breathed into existence.

Singer-songwriter Turner is a Liverpool boy and someone who was playing guitar and singing from a very young age and playing gigs at the Liverpool Cavern (the Junior Cavern sessions) from the age of nine. From school he worked on the docks but music still led him through evenings and weekends, growing constantly until he gave up the day job to give it full concentration. He played in several bands, notably Lies all Lies and The Electric Morning, the latter having releases on indie label Probe Records and touring with bands such as Rain Parade, True West, the Long Riders and Mitch Easter’s (REM’s producer) Let’s Active, as well as gaining enthused media interest from people like John Peel and Andy Kershaw. Next he opened his own studio, the renowned Liverpool Hard City Studios where he recorded his acclaimed debut solo album The Believer.

How Could We Be Wrong?, recorded and mixed by Ronnie Stone, finds Turner returning to his roots. The songs thrive in the use of vibrant instruments like mandolin, violin, cello, and accordion alongside acoustic guitars, the combination a warm and stirring union to inspire. The tracks are diverse and continually shifting their stance, whether a more traditional folk breath, to a rock toned romp, or a punk edged brew, each one treats the ear to a natural and fluid presence to light up dark corners whilst evoking thoughts within new emotional shadows. The premise of the tracks stem from the heart of spirituality, people, and honest lives, as well as offering an affinity with nature, all enforcing  the organic feel of the album.

The album opens on a stormer of a song in the title track. From its opening scythe of the violin and the compelling whistle kiss the song romps across the ear with energy and attitude. The Irish/Celtic feel is a large voice within the song and alongside the inciteful energy brings thoughts of bands like Flogging Molly to the fore. The violin of Mark Knight is a sonic delight alongside the punchy rhythms of drummer Paul Walsham and the reserved yet boisterous tones of the bass of Etienne Girard but it is the voice of Turner which seals the deal, his plaintive and strong tones thrusting the lyrics and passion forth wonderfully.

The slower more emotive Forever No More sways in next with the strong whistle calls wrapping round the chorus harmonies impressively. Though rarely some songs like here did not light the same fires as others, the more raucous compositions hitting the right spot more consistently, it is down to personal preference only with the tracks still sowing a passion and undeniable impressive craft one cannot ignore or dismiss.

The likes of Walk The Bridge, Beyond The Pain, and Let Love Into Your Heart send one into a kind of reflective rapture, the songs especially like the first of the three, offering melancholic breath to immerse within. This song weaves around the thoughts with gently coaxing guitar chords and a beautiful yet mournful cello sound from Vicky Mutch, its caress an instigator of deep imagination. The second of this trio of songs soars off of a big beating pulse, the beats anthemic whilst the violin is sawing tenderly across the ear for the fullest pleasure, and the last is simply a totally infectious ball of folk n roll.

Out of only impressive tracks further songs like Silver and Gold, Never Been Born, and Once Upon A Time just light more fires of joy, the latter especially impactful. Initially the song did not quite grab the passions but during its thoughtful play it then brought out a glorious barbed melodic hook which returned intermittently. Bringing an element reminding of Echo & The Bunnymen to lie perfectly alongside the more traditional folk sounds and the accordion grace of Henry Priestman, it tipped the balance fully in the favour of the song to emerge as one of the best.

James J Turner has released in How Could We Be Wrong?, one of the best folk rock records of the year, probably the very best. A must listen release.

http://www.jjturner.com/

RingMaster 27/09/2012

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Interview with Roger Wells and Jason Applin of Union Starr

Falling Apart Together from UK rock band Union Starr has easily been one of   highlights to come out so far this year. The debut album from the band is a magnificent collection of melodic heartfelt songs that offer a fire and light to brighten everyday and to bring a sunshine to the heart through wonderfully crafted songs and lyrics to easily find a connection and understanding with. The album took ten years to finally have the opportunity to treat our ears, which it does so wonderfully.  This was one of the things we asked about when we had the great pleasure of having Roger Wells and Jason Applin of the band sit down and tell us more about themselves, Union Starr and the album.

Hello and a big welcome to The Ringmaster Review, many thanks for taking time out to talk with us. 

Firstly could you please introduce the members of Union Starr?

Roger Wells – Vox\Guitar, Jason Applin – Vox, Mark Lyons –bass, Simon Nash – Guitar, Neil Macurley – Keyboards,  Patch Hannon – drums and Steph Moorey – backing vox.

The seeds of the band began a decade ago I believe what was the inspiration that led to Union Starr?

Roger: I remember the original inspiration being a ‘Best Of Bread ‘album cover from the seventies. Four bearded men standing in a cornfield, sun setting behind them, cheese cloth shirts flapping. Classic stuff!

Jason: Rog and I have been listening to lots of things like Crosby, Stills and Nash and Steely Dan, sort of as a reaction to the indie we’d been living for the last 5 years. We both liked the idea of writing something so consciously timeless and high fidelity.

There was a musical past for you guys before the band too?

Roger: Yes, I was one of the founding members of Resque and played bass for Airhead for a couple of years.  I went on to form Pallet and after a Reading festival appearance alongside Jason’s band Bennett, we were inspired to work together and formed Union Starr.

Jason: Yes, Rog will no doubt tell you about his. Obviously Patch was int The Sundays, and I had been in a band called Bennett who had minor success largely to John Peel being a fan.

The promo sheet came accompanied our review copy of your wonderful new album made the time that led to the beginning of the band sound like a last chance saloon moment certainly emotionally for you musically if not deeper, was that the case?

Roger: No, not really, for me it was more the beginning. Having been mainly a bass player until then, I started playing guitar and song writing.  This wasn’t something I thought I could do so for me this is where it felt it all started for me.

Jason: I suppose there was a feeling of wanting to do something that was critically acclaimed rather than just indie kids liking it, but now 10 – 12 years on I feel completely the reverse, I don’t care who likes it, I just want people to enjoy it.

I have read somewhere that Union Starr almost ended before it started, that there was a falling out? Is that correct and if so what brought you back on course?

Jason: It wasn’t so much a falling out, more of drifting apart and then that kind of lack of communication ends up being a chasm in itself so I think we sort of filled that space with problems that weren’t really there. But, to my mind what happened when the album was finished, was that we fell out with the production company because they wanted our publishing as well as the record. So the whole thing basically caved in and Rog made it clear that he didn’t really want to work with me anymore. At the time that really pissed me off because I felt I was being made the scapegoat for everything going wrong. And it all sounds very melodramatic but conception and writing of the album itself took almost 2 years. And at the time I though Rog’s actions spoke volume about the true level of our friendship. I should say that I don’t think that anymore.

Roger: There was no falling out as such, between Jason and I, just a series of misunderstandings and things left unsaid.  It happens in most close relationships I imagine. I think because the actual process of writing together was such an easy and enjoyable place for both of us, we kind of carried on knowing that what we had was worth pursuing….

Does the album title Falling Apart Together reflect that period and the friendship between you two?

Roger: Very much so. It kind of says it all.

Jason: Yeah, the album title encapsulates 2 things, the first being that the majority of the lyrics I wrote were about the failing marriage I was in at the time. And the second is a nod towards that, for the best part of 11 years, the album destroyed a friendship.

Initially you were just a duo or there were other musicians helping out before you found the drumming skills of Patch Hannon (ex- The Sundays), to add permanently?

Jason: Simon Nash was always very key and involved right from the start. The others apart from Patch were pulled in to make up the band when we first attempted to record the album. At that time we had a drummer called Martin and it’s actually his drumming that remains on the song ‘Don’t Worry Baby’. We sacked him and as we knew Patch and had started working with Nick, using his brother just fell into place. Stephanie does not appear on the album but is a full time member of the current line up.

Roger: Simon Nash our guitarist featured heavily in the initial ideas for sound as it was his home studio that we spent time in. The three of us would sit and listen to loads of different stuff and draw inspiration from each others take on things ranging from sixties spy films to The Beta Band, Steely Dan, XTC…… Loved those nights…..

How and when did the link up with producer Nick Hannon happen?

Roger: We had known Nick for sometime before Union Starr as he used to play bass for Jim Jimenee and The Deep Season and had recorded demos with various bands that Jason and I had been in. So it was kind of a no brainer as far as we were concerned….

Jason: I knew Nick from the days in Bennett and we’d used his studio to record our first album. I think Rog might have known him too but I’m not sure. I can’t really remember but I think I might have played him some demos or something and he offered to work with us after that.

 Again the impression given from bio etc is that this all happened early on and it has taken ten years to reach the release of  your album Falling Apart Together can you put in perspective the time span and placing of things please?

Roger: The album was all ready to release in 2001 but the production company folded forcing us to shelve the album and with tensions running high and a feeling that all was lost I just kind of walk away from the project and my friendship with Jay.  We did talk, however in summer 2005 and began to discuss getting together with a view to at least gigging the album, but again it wasn’t happening…..

It was only when we met again at Mark Lyons (Bass) birthday party in 2010 that we decided to finally do something about Union Starr. And that is where we decided to put together the Woodenhouse Record Label, a label that would encompass Union Starr and projects that had been worked on during the bands lengthy hiatus.

Jason: Approximately 11 or 12 years ago we wrote and recorded the album. We then immediately split up, Rog and I didn’t really communicate too much for about 10 years. The last year we performed at Mark’s 40th birthday party, got talking about the album and decided to form Woodenhouse Records. That’s it.

Moving on to the album Falling Apart Together, so all the songs on it were written during the previous ten years or from a certain period?

Roger:  All the tracks on the album were written and recorded in Reading and Nashville between 1998 and 2000….

Jason: All the songs were written approx 11 or 12 years ago.

The album is a collection of beautifully crafted and inventively melodic songs but also heartfelt, is there a lot of you personally and emotionally in the compositions?

Jason: Yes.

Roger: For Jason definitely. As the lyricist it was bound to. For me melody is all, so I feel very much part of every song…

There are numerous spices that flavour your distinct songwriting and impressive sounds on the album, what influences have predominantly affected you musically and as people?

Jason: I think we always wanted to make something that was uplifting and it’s odd, but the only word I can think of is ‘summer’ I think there is a lot of countryside in that album.

Roger: To many influences to name, but on the whole, the Seventies, early and late, lay under the whole album.

There is a definitely eighties flavouring too, we got whiffs of the likes of The Bluebells, XTC and The Lightning Seeds, is that a period especially from the UK that has made a big impact on you?

Roger: I have more than a fondness for the bands mentioned and would also include The La’s, Wonderstuff, The Cure, Wire, Banshees, and many more. So, yeah, the 80’s made a huge impact on me….

Jason: I’ve always loved XTC; I don’t have interest in the Bluebells or Lighting Seeds. It’s odd, a few people have said that there is an 80’s vibe to it, that’s not conscious, I think if anything we were looking for a mid 70’s feel. But having listened to it recently I can see why people might say that and I’m totally comfortable with it.

How does the songwriting work within the band?

Roger: Generally I’ll come up with an idea or part formed song with a definite melody but with little or no lyrics and Jason and I will sit and arrange it. Then I’ll make the tea whilst Jay writes words…

Jason: The majority of the stuff Rog writes the basic song structure and often a sort of hummed melody line for the vocals. On the album I wrote all the lyrics and a couple of the songs I had more steer in. A Real Fool and I Kept Knocking for example, where I take the main vocals.

 So the songs start from the music aspect more often than from a thought or lyric to inspire them?

Jason: Often the music that Roger played me would evoke certain feelings or emotions that in turn would steer the lyrical content.

Sorry for going back to the promo sheet again haha but one line states ‘A year long process defined by fear and qualms, the end result was an album and a band that was completely unrecognisable to them but they still had great respect for.’ Could you explain and elaborate on that for us please?

Roger: I could try. But I’d rather not. Not my words……

Jason: I think that’s just a reference to the sacking of Martin, the fact that when we went into it we probably all had a little bit more of an equal say in things. I think we froze Simon out a little bit which these days I feel bad about, and Rog and I took control. Then I felt that Rog was very much courted by Nick, the producer, as the main talent and as such I felt a little bit side lined myself. But ultimately what we ended up with was the right album, so maybe those decisions were the right ones. I should caveat all that with the fact that this was 10 years ago, or more, so a lot of it is a bit foggy. 

Falling Apart Together includes the excellent singles ‘I Know About Art’ and current one ‘Photograph’ which preceded it at the beginning of the year, did the response and acclaim towards them fill you with confidence on how the album would be received?

Roger: Of course, it not only gave us confidence with regard to Falling… but also has given us immense hope for a follow up album we are in the process of demoing….

Jason: Honestly, I was hoping for more reaction to the album than we seem to be picking up at the moment, but it’s early days. All I know is that we’ve played only our second and third gig In 12 years recent and both Rog and I noticed that there were lots of smiling faces in the audience so we must be doing something good.

I am always intrigued about the line between the self belief within artists for their work and the leap into the unknown and the anxiety at how the outside will perceive their creations. Which aspect has been to the fore for you leading up to the album unveiling?

Roger: The only feelings I have had are of pride and a great sense of relief that this album has finally seen the light of day. I have never been endowed with much self belief to tell the truth.

Jason: I think it’s on such a small scale that we are doing this that it’s relatively easy not to be too anxious about it.

Our favourite track was I kept Knocking, a storming and vibrant yet steely track, could you give some background to it?

Jason: It was originally a song about a trip to Nashville that Rog and I took and a girl that we met there who could drink us under the table. But we got the basic track down and it just sounded shit. Nick and I had been joking around with the concept of country garage music (as in dance rather than 60’s punk) and so Nick started mucking about with sequencers over what we had done. And that gave us the basic track. The lyrics I can’t actually take credit for even though officially I do on the copyright etc, as it is a direct lift from a letter that was left outside the studio by a UPS delivery driver.

Roger: The song started life as an ode to a girl from Nashville but didn’t make the cut for the album. However, during a lull in recording Nick Hannon and Jason started mucking about with sequencers and various other sounds and created ‘I Kept Knocking’ from the drum track of the original song. The lyrics are taken directly from a note pinned to the studio door by a UPS delivery driver who could not make himself heard above the din of the recording of the track…..

Has there been a big feeling of relief now Falling Apart Together has finally come out and has the journey to this been a test of your patience more than people will imagine?

Jason: I don’t think its relief, there has been something niggling me for the last 10 or 11 years whenever I think about it. And I found it difficult to listen to. But now friendships have been mended, and the thing has seen the light of day. At least it means I can comfortably listen to it again.  Probably the nicest thing to come out of it would be hooking up with Roger again.

Is this a time to sit back and enjoy the inevitable acclaim or is Union Starr already looking ahead?

Roger: The new album is in full swing. Some of it has been written whilst sitting back, some of it whilst enjoying the acclaim.

Jason: No, we’re already writing new things and we plan to bring out an EP in August that will bridge a gap between the album and whatever comes next. At this stage I’m hopeful that it won’t be 11 years before the next album comes out.

Are there live shows promoting the release coming up?

Jason: Live shows for Union Starr are very difficult due to physical location of the band (I live in Reading, Roger lives in Devon etc) However, we are trying to do a few shows and have been invited to play a couple of small festivals over the Summer.

Roger: Jason and myself will be supporting Newton Faulkner as a duo at The O2 Academy in Oxford on the 10th May and Lemington Spa Assembly on the 13th May. We shall be playing with the full band at Reading Plug and Play on the 12th May and The Elderflower Field Festival in Lewes on the 26th May.

Other dates to follow…….

Do you think your next album will be an easier ride, not in creating it but just in the whole aspect of bringing it to life and into the world?

Roger: I would like to think so. It is so much easier for all of us now as we have our own record label.

Jason: Yes because we now can do it completely on our own without the need to involve anyone else. I think Rog and I are both conscious of the fact that we want the songs to be better than those on the first album. So that will take as long as it takes and therefore that could be a difficult ride.

Falling Apart Together is released on Woodenhouse Records, your own label as you mentioned earlier.  Has this been a decision from the start or one that you made to ensure a release of the album?

Roger: A bit of both really. It is nice to be in control of your own work.

Jason: Woodenhouse was initially formed specifically for this recent release. Originally I think we envisaged the record being licensed to a regular label.

I guess having your own label means the pressure to get the album out swiftly is removed haha.

Roger: Quite the opposite. We now feel a real need to make up for lost time! Our aim now is for Union Starr to release an album a year. Union Starr was never supposed to move at such a glacial speed. Let the great thaw begin…

Does the label have other artists to share?

Roger: We have Jason’s other project Damn Damn Patriots and Beartown Zodiac. Dates for releases can be found at woodenhouse.me.uk

Jason: Yes, we currently have a band called Damn, Damn Patriots (which happens to be my side project) which is musically as far removed from Union Starr as you could possibly get. We also have an artist called Beartown Zodiac on the label and we hope to bring his album out in the autumn. In my opinion, his album will blow anything else we have done out of the water.

 A kind of repeat question but what is next for Union Starr and you as musicians?

Roger: To remain the best of friends and keep doing what we’re good at…

Jason: Union Starr are currently writing and demo-ing songs for our next album and will be playing a few small festivals over the summer. Personally I’m also concentrating on the release of the Damn, Dam Patriots album scheduled for July.

Thank you so much for sharing your time with us and good luck with the album though we feel you will not need it.

Roger: Pleasure, Thanks.

Jason: I think we will! Thank you for your support, keep spreading the word.

Have you any last thoughts to share with us?

Jason: No

Roger: I’m off to the beach. We should all live in Devon!

And finally could you give us one song or release that has given you the biggest inspiration or incentive to do what you do so impressively?

Roger: Elbow’s entire back catalogue would be a good start…Great stuff.

Jason: This is a hard question because things that influenced me to do Union Starr all that time ago are not necessarily songs that I find inspirational today. But I would say that at the time ‘You don’t have to cry’ by Crosby, Stills and Nash was pretty much there in my mind all the time.

For more info on Union Starr go to http://woodenhouserecords.webnode.com/

Read the review of  Falling Apart Together  @ https://ringmasterreviewintroduces.wordpress.com/2012/03/22/union-starr-falling-apart-together/

The Ringmaster Review 13/10/2012

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