Joecephus and The George Jonestown Massacre – Death Rattle Shake

It seems like Joey (Joecephus) Killingsworth has been dealing out potent sounds as long as The RingMaster Review has way back had music in the heart though that realisation comes with hindsight after actually being introduced to the vocalist/guitarist/songwriter through his band Joecephus and The George Jonestown Massacre; more specifically through 2010 anthem WWLD (What Would Lemmy Do), a track and chorus which still rings out in the office when faced with a dilemma. Now the band has a new slab of Joecephus led goodness out going by the name of Death Rattle Shake, a release all punk ‘n’ rollers and hard rocking, country licking, metal hugging lovers should take a moonshine soaked dance with.

Joecephus and The George Jonestown Massacre as a band rose up around 2005 though, after an EP under his own name, Killingsworth had already released a first album under the name. Performing their first show that year,  the Memphis outfit have gone on to share stages with the likes of David Allen Coe, HR of Bad Brains, Agent Orange, Jucifer, Green Jello, Unknown Hinson, Black Oak Arkansas, Jim Dickinson, Rev. Horton Heat and many more. A handful of attention and praise drawing albums have also graced and bruised the years with Hell or High Water (2010), and Arockalypse Now (2012) probably the most notable and acclaimed. Death Rattle Shake easily takes its place alongside the band’s biggest successes and as a collection of tracks we would confidently suggest is their most impressive and rousing moment yet.

With bassist Brian Costner and drummer Daryl Stephens alongside Killingsworth and featuring the organ of Gerald Stephens, Death Rattle Shake bursts into life with its title track and a slice of dirtily animated rock ‘n’ roll. With beats rapping firmly on the senses and the bass grumbling with devilish seduction, the track is soon a compelling stomp which the magnetic flirtation of keys and the grimy riffs of Killingsworth lustily align with as his vocals further incites the body romping antics the music commands.

It is an outstanding start, one of those irresistible moments we all crave for and the spark for the following diverse dance of the album starting with the blues rock saunter of Drivin Blind. Again the warm, psych lit keys of Stephens contrasts yet unites with the scuzzier tendrils of guitar rising from similarly raw sonic flames, Killingsworth like an outlaw in its midst. It is a description which and always has suited the band’s music perfectly, its character like a rock ‘n’ roll felon/bandit but  an outsider you want to run with.

The addiction sparking Terminally Hip is next swinging its angular hard rock bred hips with attitude and mischief while Karma’s A Bitch brings a cauldron of old school rock nurtured blues punk as irritable as it is boisterously animated. Both tracks incite swift involvement from body and vocal chords, firing up rock ‘n’ roll instincts as easily as Excaliber also proves itself able. Again blues and punk unite as more stoner come sludge metal hues lick away at song and ears, the track another treat even if far too short for unbridled satisfaction.

Through the psych rock seeded, R&B keyed punk ‘n’ roll of Flypaper and the cowpunk sniping of Gold Digging Whore, the album continues to broaden its flavour and magnetism, the first simply a delicious noise nurtured infestation and its successor a woozy intoxication of sour but richly appetising sonic liquor.

Though the country lined funk ‘n’ roll of Cosmic Retribution did not trigger the same greedy appetite as those before it, the track effortlessly had attention hooked as hips swayed again with that mesmeric organ of Stephens a major flirtation alongside swinging rhythms and the enterprise woven web of guitar.

From its title you will correctly guess the nature and sound of Tombstone Blues, a track which without breaking boundaries was full distraction before the album closes off with the enthralling epic stroll of Helping Hand. Though a track unsurprisingly flourishing from the open individual and united craft of its creators, it is the suggestive meander of Killingsworth’s guitar which wanders with a skilled touch and intimation across the increasingly cosmic landscape of sultry keys and boldly ambling rhythms which primarily stands out and grips the imagination.

It feels a long time since we had a Joecephus and The George Jonestown Massacre offering to chew on but well worth the wait as Death Rattle Shake is easily their best yet.

Death Rattle Shake is out now; available @ https://joecephus.bandcamp.com/album/death-rattle-shake

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Pete RingMaster 20/10/2018

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Liquid Meat – In Meat We Trust

LM

Want a slab of rock ‘n’ roll just to lose yourself in and let inhibitions slip away with, then try out In Meat We Trust the new album from German rockers Liquid Meat. The thirteen track riot is from start to finish an honest and mischievous fusion of heavy rock, metal, and punk rock with extras, which simply leads passions astray and body into an unbridled stomp of instinctive devilry.

The creation of German born Rocker Freddie Mack, Liquid Meat was formed in Los Angeles in 2004 and was soon playing a horde of gigs around Hollywood. Two albums followed before in 2011, Mack returned to his hometown of Munich which meant a new line-up was needed. This led to the recruiting of drummer Manu Holmer and bassist Max Horch, and unsurprisingly soon after the trio was back into the swing of playing shows, drawing attention, acclaim, and notoriety musically all over again. Earlier this year the band began recording the Indiegogo crowd funded In Meat We Trust with legendary producer Reinhold Mack (Queen, ELO, Led Zeppelin, Rolling Stones, Black Sabbath, Deep Purple, etc.), the result one mouth-watering rock ‘n’ roll party which enjoyably wears its warts and influences like a badge.

The album opens with Liquid Meat Anthem, an uncomplicated bruising of choice riffs and crisp rhythms aligned to a great bass sound which probably grabs attention most of all on the track. The growling vocals of Mack instantly reveal the grin in his delivery and the song, whilst the backing calls of the rest of the band lays swift anthemic bait. It is hard to ignore the Motorhead like causticity and charm of the track as it provides one strong and inviting entrance into the album.

The following song right away shows the unpredictable and diverse flavouring to come across the release. They Lied sways in front of the ears with a sultry blues haze to its sonic enticement before prowling around the imagination with a IMWT Cover_1funk bred swagger which has the markings of Infectious Grooves. Equally there is a punk air to the blend which only increases the persuasion, especially when provides urgency through the chorus which brings another tasty spice, this time a Rage Against The Machine colour. It is an infectiously flavoursome track with twists of drama and an increasingly addictive groove. Its triumph is immediately matched by the outstanding Punch The Clock. Its opening intimidation of bass and predatory rhythms makes for an intense affair though that is soon lost to a big smile as the track starts flirting with what can be best described as Macho Man does Pantera. Mack does his best wrestler vocal impression as a groove certainly related to the one in Walk binds attention and appetite. It is insatiable in its luring and delicious in its devilment with Holmer providing her most magnetic rhythms yet alongside the throaty bounce of Horch’s bass.

The best song on the album is followed by the smouldering blues revelry of Double Standard Blues and then the punk joy of Black Out. The first also has a swagger which grips imagination as well as ears, whilst as with most songs lyrically it brings a devilish tone to climb on board with. Though not at the same heights of the first songs, it still provides a pleasing proposition which its successor soon over runs. Teasing and exciting ears with a riff stolen from The Ramones songbook, so much so that you just are waiting for the “Hey Ho! Let’s Go!” chant, the song is punk ‘n’ roll at its most contagious; hooks and beats as potent and greedily devoured as the driving riffs and bursts of caustic intensity. The track is another which makes claims on that best track title.

Both There Is No God and Guilty As Charged keep things strolling along nicely, the first with a dark blues whisper to its almost psychobilly kissed blues breath, which reminds of Joecephus and the George Jonestown Massacre, whilst the second puts a lighter shade of the first to a raw and incendiary classic metal canvas. Each song leaves a dose of keen pleasure behind whilst the next up Rock N Roll Will Never Die from a reserved but alluring opening melodic flame, breaks into a virulently catchy stomp of old school rock toxicity with a fevered rhythmic energy. There are no surprises with the song but a flood of hooks and inescapable trappings which leaves ears and emotions on a high as lofty as that forged by the groupie salaciousness of Up Against The Wall, never has rock ‘n’ roll romance been so aurally addictive.

The decent enough fiery rock sounds of classic/blues rocker Road House comes next before another pinnacle of the album arrives in the shape of Fuck That. The track is a return to a more punk led rampage, its jabbing rhythms and scything riffs again offering a slight rockabilly flirtation whilst the bass roams around like an adulterous predator. Revealing a parade of impossible addictive hooks and grooves blessed with a Dead Kennedys temperament, it is another glorious encounter which leaves the remaining pair of songs a task to match and leave the album on a high. That they do with consummate ease though, Smoke ‘Em a grizzled protest and confrontation of bruising raw rock ‘n’ roll and final song, The Devils Music is a noir cloaked stroll with sinister intent and psychobilly/blues intrigue. As all songs the tongue in cheek honesty is as infectious as the great sounds and adventure it rides in upon.

It is fair to say that In Meat We Trust is not going to be the greatest album you are going to hear but it will be one of the most fun and irresistible.

In Meat We Trust is available now @ www.liquidmeatlocker.com

8.5/10

RingMaster 25/07/2014

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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DogHouse Swine: Dogs Of War

DogHouse Swine pic

    Dogs Of War, the latest album from US rockers DogHouse Swine is not a release which re-invents the wheel but it sure smashes aside any bumps in the road not ready to join its bruising riot. The nine track album is a muscular treat which rampages through the ear like an antagonistic adversary whose only real intent is to offer up a good feisty time, something it does with ease.

The New Jersey band has earned a good reputation for their sounds and energy through live shows, which has seen them share stages with the likes of Electric Frankenstein, and Mucky Pup, and their previous album Faster Side Of Normal. Formed in 2009 by lead guitarist and vocalist Ian with former The Wretched Ones guitar player B.T. and co-founder and drummer Chris DeBellis, the band has been on a powerful rise which the new release only adds stock to. Now a quartet with bassist Iron Rich joining during 2012 which saw B.T. moving from bass to rhythm guitar within the band, DogHouse Swine has unleashed an album to stir up the heart and quell inhibitions with its punk rock passion and breath; a punk n roll treat to bring an insatiable party to each and every day.

The release opens with the first single from the album, I’m Suffocated. From its barging riffs and keen sonic guitar squalls the trackDogs Of War CD Cover has limbs and senses at the mercy of its powerful rhythms, venomous basslines, and sizzling guitar play. The effected vocals bring a menace to proceedings before turning into a defiant and raw rub across the ear. The song is a fiery excursion for the passions, an aggressive and anthemic instigator for which only full enthusiasm and energy can be given in return. The song like their sound overall, reminds of bands like Motorhead, Joecephus and The George Jonestown Massacre, and DC4 delivered with a healthy presence of punk rock found in the likes of Johnny Thunders and The Heartbreakers. It is not anything particularly brand new to the ear but brought with an accomplished skill and unbridled musical lust which takes it above most similarly sounding contemporaries.

The excellent Hard Luck Education takes over next with more of the same offered in a different thrilling guise. There is a swagger to the song which makes it openly infectious though the sing-a-long chorus and teasing melodies are as much to blame for its pleasing contagion. It is fair to say both tracks are like old friends, companions you basically know but with a new wrap of quality aural clothing to make them deeply welcome and enjoyable.

The glorious chunky riffs and ravenous basslines within Open Wide bring a new angle to the release, the slower stalking gait of the song an intimidating and fully rewarding confrontation, whilst Nonstop To Nowhere pulls one into a vintage punk brawl of belligerence and honest acceptance. Both leave one greedily satisfied and eager to hear more of the barracking rhythms and scathing sonic riffs crafted impressively by the band. Neither song is arguably as memorable as the previous tracks but still only light further desire to share their sounds again and often.

Goin’ Down The Bar is a song you will not forget, from its predatory bass leering start through the rampant guitar scrubbing and vocal celebration and on to the anthemic alcohol dripping declaration, the track is an irresistible and simple mission all can aspire to and climb on board with, thematically and musically. There are no frills or pretty decorations to the song, just pure and raw rock n roll, a claim you can happily throw at every track.

Dogs Of War is completed by a quartet of live cuts including the single Bitch from their earlier album. The tracks are rough and in your face, brawling at you as if you were there at the time. They do pale compared to the studio tracks but still only incite the need to retrospectively check out Faster Side Of Normal and catch them live if the opportunity arises.

If you want a slab of true and undiluted rock n roll/punk rock then DogHouse Swine is a band for you. With a new video for Goin’ Down The Bar directed by Dave Neabore of Dog Eat Dog fame ( he also did the one for Bitch) due soon and the planning of their third album for a possible August release, 2013 is looking like being a big year for the band and our grateful ears going by their latest album.

http://www.doghouseswine.com

RingMaster 31/12/2012

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Joecephus and the George Jonestown Massacre: Arockalypse Now

There is a persistent mystery when it comes to US band Joecephus and the George Jonestown Massacre of why when country music is as unwelcome and noxious to the RR as salt to snails this band lights our fires each and every time. To be fair the Memphis trio cannot merely be called a country rock band, their thick and eager roots borne of not only that genre but from punk, rock, and metal. There is no one like Joecephus and the George Jonestown Massacre and with new album Arockalypse Now they have returned stronger, hungrier, and with more mischief than ever, their cowpunk hillbilly rock sounds as insatiable as ever.

Consistently tagged as “a cross between Motorhead and Merle Haggard” it only gives a glimpse of the diversity of band, as the new album shows they are at ease and skilled at mixing in styles and diverse flavours to tease, taunt and ignite the deepest pleasures. Led by vocalist/guitarist Joe Killingsworth, the band has already left the deepest marks and scars with previous releases and the sharing of stages with the likes of Shooter Jennings, David Allan Coe, Jesco White The Dancing Outlaw, Jim Dickinson, Green Jello, H. R. of the legendary Bad Brains, and The Reverend Horton Heat to name a few. They have also had songs on many movie soundtracks like The Importance of Being Russell and Grim Sweeper plus numerous CD compilations.

Following 2010 album Hell or High Water, the new release sees the band riling up the ear with a heavier rock intent and invention without losing the essences and essential influences which makes them so unique. It successfully offers up sixteen diverse and distinctive tracks all fuelled by the need to make the time spent in their company a provocative riot of dirty irresistible fun. Maybe in the past their albums have had a slight inconsistency to them though the previous release made moves to change that, but with Arockalypse Now that is never in doubt, its course a persistent high.

The ear is thrilled from the start with the punk fury which is Get Away. Eager and raw it is an attitude drenched bomb of energy littered with inciteful riffs and a snarling bass from Brian Costner. Anthemic and uncomplicated, it recalls seventies punk drawn through a combative garage rock distillery.

The psychobilly tinged Love Song 666 rips up the air next with blistering beats from Daryl Stevens sending knees buckling alongside a greedy infection in the shape of riffs. Across its voracious length the song takes the senses on a reckless ride of pleasure through a great unexpected diversion before throwing one back into the maelstrom of contagion veined with scorched guitars and feisty vocals. As is the norm for them the song and album is a brought with the tongue of the band deep in their cheek and at times in yours too.

The irresistible feasts of limb jerking joy come at the ear at breakneck speed as song after song unleashes its own varied brew of rock n roll. Through the likes of the punk rock juiced Just Another Day, the incisively melodic Tomorrow, and the stunning RX Saviour with its warped rockabilly/country rock air complete with excellent female vocals, the album simply grows into an even greater beast of joyous wickedness. Every track offers something openly different and perpetually incendiary to ignite the heart and the urge to let loose.

As Arockalypse Now progresses it quite simply gets better and better with multiple loftier highlights. The ignition for these comes with the spectacular Six String Samurai, a song to take top dog honour. Whether associated to the track or not it plays like the bastard cousin of band classic WWLD? (What Would Lemmy Do), bursting out at points from similar riffs to forge its own mighty status. With a wonderful brooding jazz bass presence and near demonic offshoots within the electrified and blistered air the song is just immense. The brilliance found in that song is immediately continued in the rabid instrumental Pawtrick. A growling rampage of spiteful sonic conjuring and relentlessly jabbing beats the piece is an imaginative and unpredictable storm of what seems like improve based on a mutated jazz theme.

The dirtily sexy Pimpworth, another salacious slice of wantonness plus the excellent cover of the George Jones classic The Race Is On add to the toe tapping and senses firing party to further the adoration growing towards the album. Joecephus and the George Jonestown Massacre to be fair is a band which clicks with you or not but when they do it is for life and with the brilliant Arockalypse Now one can only expect many more willing victims succumbing to their amped-up unbridled and inventive rock n roll frenzy.

http://www.jk47.com

RingMaster 08/07/2012

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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