Rum Thief – Time to Make a Move

It has taken a couple of years for Rum Thief to follow up the acclaimed Reach For The Weather Man EP but the wait has been worthwhile as he releases his finest moment yet with Time to Make a Move. The new EP is a richer and broader adventure of sound and word without losing the instinctive energy and raw passion of its predecessors and a wake-up call to major attention.

Rum thief is the solo project of Manchester based musician/songwriter Jot Green, who previously played drums for over a decade in various bands before deciding to explore his own songwriting and imagination. Debut EP Clouded Mind quickly drew ears and praise in 2014 though it was Reach For The Weather Man a year later which truly sparked acclaim and interest the way of the project. The years around and since have established Rum Thief as a just as flavoursome live presence with guitarist Kieran Whitehouse, bassist Gary Long, and drummer Chris Hobbs alongside but it is through Time to Make a Move that you get a feeling everything is going to ignite for and around the band.

Recorded with producer Shuta Shinoda at the legendary Hackney Road Studio, Time To Make A Move opens up with the outstanding Spittin’ Daggers. A single melodic jangle beckons ears initially, its potent coaxing soon joined by the throb of bass and swing of beats, all settling into a tempting stroll as Green’s expressive tones and descriptive lyrics join the appealing mix. It is a lively simmer soon boiling over in a fiery chorus as aggressive as it is infectious. Like a mix of Arctic Monkeys and Fatima Mansions, the song prowls and roars; its feisty rock ‘n’ roll a web of instinctive catchiness, melodic fire, and dramatic heart spawned suggestion.

The thrilling start is followed by the milder flirtation of the EP’s title track; a mellower proposal soon revealing its own strength in tenacious seduction and captivating enterprise. Its heart is also a lively fusion of instinct and imagination, a new wave/indie rock weave becoming more boisterous and volatile with every passing second. There is something familiar about its character but an indefinable quality which just adds to two and a half minutes of pure pleasure.

What Do You Know is next, its raw air and melodic teasing a fusion of pop from the past few decades, being almost Joe Jackson like in its organic contagion of rousing pop ‘n’ roll. With as many hooks in voice as in sound and again razor sharp lyrically without a sniff of indulgence, the song simply captivates before being matched in potency by closing song Toilet Door. With a rockabilly scent to its voice and shuffle, the track at times reminding of The Shaking Pyramids, the song croons and seduces like a smouldering fire; transfixing from the start and bursting into bigger flames over time as its union of sixties/modern pop catches alight.

It is a strong end to a quickly and increasingly beguiling encounter. At the time, it was hard to imagine Reach For The Weather Man being majorly outshone by future offerings from Rum Thief but Time to Make a Move leaves it well in its wake which is why expectations are rising of seeing Rum Thief become something close to a household name.

Time to Make a Move is out now.

http://www.facebook.com/rumthief    http://www.twitter.com/rumthief

Pete RingMaster 19/04/2017

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Blind Cows – Stan/Your Enemy

Blind Cows_RingMaster Review

With there being little we can tell you about the band in background, Italian rockers Blind Cows make a potent introduction to themselves with new double A-sided single Stan/Your Enemy. If it is their debut release or not, again we cannot say, but certainly recommending the checking out of their new release and the band’s fiery, grunge inspired sound is something easy to suggest.

Formed in 2010, the Foggia hailing band began with vocalist Giuseppe Barbone and guitarist Domenico Fioredda, subsequently becoming a quartet as they hit the live scene, before eventually settling on the current line-up of bassist Andrea Pontone and drummer Nico Micaletti alongside Barbone and Fioredda. Inspirations come from grunge and the likes of Pearl Jam and Soundgarden, and there the background dries up. Right now though their music tells you all you need to know about Blind Cows, and of course that is always the prime factor in liking a band or not; and brewing a very healthy interest in the foursome is the likeliest outcome such the new single’s impact.

artwork_RingMaster Review     It is not a roar to stop you in your tracks but certainly one that boldly turns up and strongly nudges attention, and as found here, a swiftly keen appetite its way too. First track Stan, which comes with a just as alluring video, opens on a winey web of guitar tempting as rhythms robustly line it’s sonic coaxing. The strong and expressive tones of Barbone, backed strongly by Pontone, soon have ears just as fully engaged, his voice as the song’s sound, carrying an open air of familiarity to create a presence lying somewhere between Gruntruck, The Cars, and Joe Jackson. Increasingly it blossoms an invasive flirtation of keys and creative drama with a virulently infectiousness in tow which makes easy work of exciting ears and an ardour. It is arguably not a song offering real surprises but with plenty of imagination soaked flavours it is a thorough, inescapable enjoyment.

The accompanying Your Enemy veers more to the Soundgarden side of inspirations, but as it emerges from a sky of sonic pulses on a tendril of melodic expression with a harmonica aligning to the potent lure of guitar, the track soon casts its own character. Shadow wrapped and emotionally haunted, with Barbone again impressing with his dusky tones, the song’s intensity soon becomes increasingly fiery, a Queens Of The Stone Age breath blowing through the provocative blend of throaty bass, stalking guitar, and relentlessly jabbing beats. More of a grower than its counterpart, the song is soon an incendiary incitement drawing the same depth of reaction and satisfaction its way.

As the first track, Your Enemy wears recognisable clothes in the making up of its own outfit of sound, and like Stan whips up a great intrigue and want to know more about Blind Cows, an outcome easy to see a great many others experiencing from this single alone. With an album planned next June, 2016 has the potential of being a big and breakthrough year for Blind Cows, definitely if their single is a taster of things to come.

Stan/Your Enemy is out now via Musicarchy Media @ https://www.musicarchymedia.com/project/stan/

https://www.facebook.com/BlindCows

Pete RingMaster 17/11/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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James Younger – Feelin’ American

james younger

Hailing from Manchester in the UK, James Younger is an artist which on the evidence of his debut album Feelin’ American we will be hearing a lot more of over the next few years. The eleven track release is a vibrant blend of pop and rock with a healthy smile and energetic swagger to its enterprise. There is also a familiarity to it which helps it offer an instant connection with thoughts and emotions but equally there is a distinct voice to the songs that sets them and the album apart from the rest.

According to info accompanying the release Younger grew up telling friends that he was descended from the outlaws of the American West so really it was no surprise aged 21 that he headed to the States. Hitchhiking across America he collated stories and experiences from all he met, the adventures and tales influencing his songs and lyrical narratives to come. Eventually the musician moved further north and set up ‘home’ in Canada, becoming part of the Vancouver music scene playing in locals bands such as The Zolas and Sun Wizard. Released via Light Organ Records, Feelin’ American is his introduction to the world and one which makes you want to hear and know more.

The bio of Younger’s Facebook profile simply lists artists who have influenced him across the years, the likes of Any Trouble, XTC,1044494_518684871519498_937416621_n Tom Petty, and The Cars, and as the Steve Bays (Hot Hot Heat) produced release toys with and excites the emotions certainly the last two of that quartet from many inspirations to him, are apparent especially vocally and how the songs lay eagerly on the ear. Their loud whispers soak numerous songs in their melodic and raw rock embrace to add extra spice to what are already flavoursome encounters, and immediately evident in the scintillating opener Monday Morning. From its first beat and note the song dances on the ear inspiring feet to replicate their keenness to move and stomp across the floor. There is a swing to the rhythmic gait of the track which is quite irresistible whilst Younger colours its surface with a jangly guitar enterprise and equally boisterous vocal and lyrical rock ‘n’ roll romp. With an infectious melodic hook which is epidemically tempting the track is the perfect start and announcement of Younger and his stylish sound.

The following Sleeping Alone drops into an even paced stroll of fresh and again catchy persuasion, this time with an Arctic Monkeys like lilt to the vocals and descriptive heart of the song. Once more the guitars have a great jangle to their sound whilst the rhythms thump along to raise the temperature of the sultry air already permeating another impressive song. It does not quite match its predecessor but easily unveils more of the varied enchanting songwriting and imagination of Younger to seduce the passions, as do the likes of the soon up Running Wild, a great blaze of addiction causing pop with an Elvis Costello feel to its potency and The Attractions spice to the bold colourful sound, especially the keys, and the country rock twanged Two of a Kind which also has a Costello scent to its smouldering heart and sizzling tones, though more from his Trust era.

Four songs in and to be honest Feelin’ American would be earning strong acclaim for its offering no matter what followed but as tracks like the Petty lilted We Are Lovers, the compelling Never Easy with its imaginative and sirenesque melodic caresses behind the roaming enterprise, and the quickstep shuffling Do It Again unload their epidemic of inventive and fascinating ideas and irresistible hooks only stronger ardour for the album is sparked. The last of the three has a Joe Jackson like charm to its vulnerability and refreshing hue which like many other songs is recognisable but only adding to the wealth of variety and pull from the release.

Every song on the album is instantly impressive, those mentioned and not, all leading the listener into a summer waltz of pop and rock mergence, which the closing What Comes After The Weekend ensures ends on another striking high just as the whole thing began. With a tropical saunter to its sultry fascination the song leaps and bounds over the emotions, grabbing them by the hand for an almost riotous party along the chorus and an evocative walk through the lyrical picture of the verse. It is a tremendous end to an equally pleasing album.

Throughout Feelin’ American the guitars play with the ear with skilled revelry whilst the bass is a deep inspiration alongside the punchy rhythms. Vocally Younger at times recalls others such as Joe Jacksonbut it adds to the picturesque fun and lure of the release. James Younger will make a strong mark ahead and it all starts with this treat.

https://www.facebook.com/jamesyoungermusic

8.5/10

RingMaster 05/07/2013

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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