Carnivora – The Vision EP

mkramer_Reputation Radio/RingMaster Review

Boston metallers Carnivora first caught our attention with an appearance on the excellent Bluntface Records compilation Operation: Underground. It featured a track from the band’s debut album Eternal, which after investigation turned out to equally be a stirring and attention exciting proposal. Now the band returns with the vicious exploits and temptations of The Vision EP, a ravenous and thrilling declaration of all the band’s skills and even bolder creative enmity.

Everything about The Vision is a step up from their impressive and acclaimed 2013 debut, the EP’s four tracks a cauldron of fierce imagination and volatile invention cast in maelstroms of diversely sculpted extreme metal. Groove and melodic metal enterprise colludes with death and thrash animosity in slabs of unpredictable and brutally irritable incitements, but furies ripe with captivating sonic adventure and melodic expression. Its release follows a successful couple of years which saw the band tearing up festivals such as the New England Metal & Hardcore Festival, Rockstar Energy Mayhem Festival, The Summer Slaughter Tour, and Rock And Shock Festival, all last year, with their merciless sound and share stages with the likes of Cannibal Corpse, Behemoth, Overkill, Trivium, Job For A Cowboy, Avenged Sevenfold, Morbid Angel, Shadows Fall, and many more. The Vision is Carnivora now snarling viciously at broader and more intensive spotlights and a global awakening to their presence sure to be on the cards such the EP’s dramatic persuasion.

CARNIVORA_VisionCover_jpegReputation Radio/RingMaster Review     It opens with A Vision In Red, a song venomously driving through ears straight away, swiftly getting under the skin and invading into the psyche. Riffs and grooves from Cody Michaud and Mike Meehan swarm maliciously over the senses, their addictive presence and prowess addictive bait to which the raw vocal squalls of M. Scott Lentine unleash a diversely delivered and magnetic hostility. It is a gripping proposition, the barbarous swings of drummer Dan DeLucia and serpentine tones cast by the bass of Cam Hunt, an addictive spine around which the guitars blossom and expand rich acidic textures bred in sonic imagination. As unpredictable as it is fascinatingly virulent, increasing in both the further it evolves its creative landscape, the song provides a tremendous start to the release.

Its success is quickly matched by Pessimist’s Tongue, its opening suggestive ambience subsequently whipped up into a tempestuous climate of blistering and rancorous intensity. The guitars lay out a melodic invitation even in the stormy climate of the song, a beckoning impossible to resist despite rhythms hailing down on them and the senses. The vocals, singularly and as the band, soon bring another shade to the encounter, offering a cancerous trespass and rally cry for thoughts and emotions. The song is a glorious violation with underlying temptations such as an understated but seductive lure of keys, solidly backed by Razors & Rust. Arguably more restrained than its predecessors, well slightly more merciful, the track stands toe to toe with the listener raging vocally and emotionally whilst guitars again entangle their enterprise around body and imagination. It does not quite have the spark of the first two tracks but easily entices ears and thoughts into exploring its rich depths and textures to a success similar to that found by those before it.

With a thrilling end to its creative ire, the track departs for EP closer The Reek Of Defeat to provide a final bracing and abrasive ravishing. It carries an almost mischievous flirtation to its melodic design and adventurous gait yet there is little about the song which not predatory or fuelled by bad blood. Its consuming maliciousness leaves ears ringing and emotions high and enjoyably completes a thrilling onslaught of a release.

Carnivora has climbed to new plateaus with The Vision EP yet you can only feel it is just the start of new and greater creative grudges, which in turn is a thought and anticipation to savour.

The Vision EP is available from 23rd June via Manshark Entertainment @ http://carnivora.bandcamp.com/ and http://carnivora.bigcartel.com/

https://www.facebook.com/carnivoramass   http://www.twitter.com/carnivoramass

RingMaster 23/06/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard on Reputation Radio @ http://www.reputationradio.net

 

The NX – Night Heaver

Photo Credit_ Robbie Shakeshaft Radcliffe Studios

Hitting the listener like a venomously swung sledgehammer in its first breath and proceeding to increase in hostility and brilliance from thereon in, Night Heaver simply blows thoughts and emotions away. The debut EP from British hard rock/metallers The NX, the four track onslaught is a dramatic and breath-taking introduction to a band sure to make a major impact on the UK music scene if their first trespass of the senses is any evidence.

Possibly the strength and quality of Night Heaver could be expected as The NX features former members of The Casino Brawl in its line-up; nothing is ever guaranteed though and the band swiftly show they are a unique and potential drenched proposition in their own right with the EP. Formed a few years ago in the north east of England, The NX soon bred a potent reputation and following as they proceeded to ignite venues with their live presence, which over the years has seen them play with the likes of The Chariot, This Is Hell, Enter Shikari, Bring Me The Horizon, Penknife Lovelife, Heights, Yashin, Job for A Cowboy, The Casino Brawl, Deaf Havana, Devil Sold His Soul amongst many more. Returning from a prolonged hiatus, the band unleashed their creative fury again from the end of 2013, a new line up and appetite to create more contagiously aggressive shows and sounds driving the band’s return, which has included so far successful tours with Funeral For A Friend, Hacktivist, and The Blackout. It has all added to a growing anticipation for the band’s debut EP, and there is no doubt that Night Heaver feeds all hopes and wants with ease whilst providing much more.

Lonnie Johnson’s Greatest Hit is an immediate raging bellow in the ears but equally a compelling web of heavy rock grooves and spicy hooks with a tempestuous rhythmic incitement. Quite swiftly like a blend of Every Time I Die, Turbonegro, and Cancer Bats with its own distinctive roar, the track takes no prisoners. The venomous vocal squalls of Warby Warburton intrude and entice with rasping causticity whilst the spicy hooks and scorching grooves of Mark Thirtle seduce and scar with equal tenacity. There is also great unpredictability to the track which shines out, PromoImagethe sudden twists and dips into intriguing and at times sinister invention, mouth-watering and ear catching.

It is a potent start but personally just an appetiser for bigger and better things to come, starting with The Great Unwashed. The second track immediately has a dirty air to its breath and opening riffs, an antagonistic nature which is urged in by the great bassline cast by Glen Holmes and spread with intensity through the swiftly following blaze of guitar punctured by the viciously swung beats of drummer Luke Walker. Every syllable spat from Warburton comes with a soaking of malice, a rancor matched by the rest of the track though it too is unafraid to offer catchy hooks and anthemic vocal calls against the clanging steely tone of the guitars and an overall merciless ferocity.

Yet another plateau is breached with the following The Day It Rained Forever, the opening grouchy coaxing of another irresistible bassline aligning to thumping beats for the first potent bait from the song. Soon though it is prowling and seducing as great cantankerous vocals, which initially hold a sobering air, add their interest in proceedings before they are venting with rich malevolence amidst a web of tangy grooves and psychotic rhythmic enterprise. As hardcore punk as it is metallically infused, the song is a glorious maelstrom which twists and turns as if it has the creative mania of St. Vitus Dance. Equipped with a closing noise fostered chorus which is impossible to leave alone, the track is one big reason for suspecting The NX will take their history to new major climes.

It is a suspicion done no harm by the other songs and especially the raging Let Sleeping Dogs Lie which brings the EP to an immense close. In a way opening in similar fashion to how its predecessor parted, the track brawls and violates the senses with another hardcore bred ferocity and corrosive inventiveness. Every riff scowl and hostile vocal expression exhausts and smothers the senses which in turn are invigorated by an incitement of hard rock melodies and spiky hooks which erupt and surge from time to time across the ever evolving provocation.

The song is an outstanding end to a tremendous release, the kind of debut fans were hoping and delivering a startling and thrilling adventure which declares The NX as a new inescapable force in British rock ‘n’ roll.

The Night Heaver EP is available from February 23rd on EP and digitally via Footloose Records and all stores.

https://www.facebook.com/thenxofficial

RingMaster 23/02/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard from http://www.thereputationlabel.today

Flourishing on other’s scorn: an interview with Greg Burgess of Allegaeon

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   The past two years between previous album Formshifter and its successor Elements of the Infinite has not been an easy time to say the least for US melodic death metallers Allegaeon. The departure of band founder and guitarist Ryan Glisan alone offered a threat to the future of the band and seeds to doubters of their ability to continue to be a potently impacting force within metal. Overcoming those obstacles and determined to prove certain people wrong, Allegaeon has not only shown itself to be as powerful and impressive as before but unleashed one of the albums of the year and their finest incitement yet. Keen to find out more about the time leading up to the new album, the difficulties it faced, and the heart of Allegaeon itself, guitarist Greg Burgess kindly spared a chunk of his time to reveal all…

Hello Greg and thanks for taking time out to talk with us.

It is a few days after the release of your outstanding new album Elements Of The Infinite, a definite album of the year contender in our book. How are the emotions and expectations as it starts seducing the world with its sounds?

Thanks so much man for having me, it’s mixed for me. I’ve been so busy making sure things go right and with all the jobs I have, I haven’t been able to fully enjoy it. That being said I kinda feel a little vindicated from some of the hate mail I received saying we were shit without Ryan.

Does Elements Of The Infinite feel more of a triumph because of that then, because it comes after the departure of as you mentioned band founder guitarist Ryan Glisan and drummer Jordon Belfast as well as other obstacles which came the way of the band in the past couple of years?

Well Jordon hasn’t been with us for like what 4 years now? He hasn’t been in the equation for us as a band for a long time, but the Ryan thing absolutely. Like I said in the previous question there were a lot of people that thought we were gonna crash and burn without him. I’ve always written half of the albums up to this record, why people thought I was incapable of writing more than that pissed me off. I found their lack of faith disturbing, so yeah I feel I triumphed a little bit. This has nothing to do with Ryan by the way, I wanna make that clear, we only wish the best for that dude, and I really hope he’s successful in his pursuits. But sometimes having a point to prove can really lead to good things. Look at Mustaine’s career, a whole career based off of getting even with Metallica; I think he was very successful.

Enlighten the readers of other problems around that time. It was a serious threat to the future of Allegaeon?allegaeon_photo06

Well I mean after our tour with Job For A Cowboy, we came home and basically lost a guitar player, the van’s transmission was shot, and we had no drummer. It was a lot to overcome. I guess it’s all in attitudes. We looked at it as an opportunity to excel instead of walls. I think that is what propelled us further. When we were offered the Wretched tour, Metal Blade basically said to us, “Hey look if you wanna do this, figure it out and do it. If you don’t well then we’re not sure you have a future with us.” It wasn’t harsh; it was just a reality check. We launched an indiegogo campaign, and the fans basically saved our asses. After that I got some fill in’s and we did the tour, and it basically was a new beginning for us.

Tell us about new members Michael Stancel and Brandon Park, how did the link-up with the guys come about?

Both of the guys started off as just tour fill in’s, they did such an amazing job and we had such a good time with them that it became clear very fast that they were our guys. They were fans to begin with and their attitudes were hungry. It felt great having new blood in the band, and honestly we needed a full line-up since we’d been in pieces for the past 3 plus years. I knew Mike from his other band Artemesis. The other guitar player in that band was my student so I knew the guy could play. Brandon just was persistent on Facebook, and really wanted the gig. We’d played with his former band Suffer The Wrath so I knew the dude was good, it was just a chemistry issue.

Taking the evidence of your first two albums alone, Fragments of Form and Function and Formshifter, for a non-musician and knowing the technical level and imagination you guys are at it would be a prospect to intimidate many guitarists and drummers joining the band. Did you find a full or sparsely filled queue applying or were Michael and Brandon your prime suspects anyway?

Well to be honest we were looking elsewhere to fill the spots. Our buddy Peter Joseph who was in the Absence was slated to take Ryan’s spot. I had been talking to him for a while and the talks were really really good. Mike did the tour and was just killing it every night; every band on the tour was like you should just take Mike. My biggest concern was respecting Peter, so we didn’t give Mike the job outright, but when we went through Tampa Peter basically said “dude you should just take Mike he’s rad”. It kinda just was right. As for Brandon, it’s a little more complicated. We actually got JP who played on Formshifter to join the band for like a couple of weeks, but he couldn’t do this tour we had lined up. I just couldn’t take the risk of it being a recurring problem. It sucked cause JP is incredible, and one of our best friends. After JP I asked our last touring guy Shawn McGuffin to step in, he wasn’t interested. So I got into that desperation mode. Our buddy Jeremy Portz who’d performed on all the Vale Of Pnath albums we kept going after, but it just wasn’t coming together. So we were just drummer less once again. I needed a drummer for the tour, and I remembered Brandon. I’d had reservations about Brandon due to association through other people. The first time I ever saw Brandon play this dude came up drunk off his ass, and started bashing our guy, saying we should get Brandon to do it. I was immediately pissed ‘cause our guy was great, and this dude was just disrespecting him to our faces. So that was kinda strike one against Brandon. Next we were playing another tour in St. Louis and another “friend” of Brandon’s came up trying to get us to do coke with him. It was automatically guilt by association. Both these dues claimed to be friends of B Park, one was an ass the other was a coke head. No Thanks!! I don’t want that shit screwing up what we got going on. Then Brandon said something on Facebook about how stupid drugs were or something so, I reached out. It’s so funny now, ‘cause these dudes almost blew this opportunity for Brandon, and getting to know B Park, he’s completely the opposite of everything I thought about him. Crazy! We can laugh about it now, but I was really concerned at first. After the first show with Park, I knew he was our guy. We did a few more shows on that tour then our van broke down. B Park works on a farm so he’s really good with machines. The dude fixed it and got us up and running again…so here we are sitting freezing our asses off in our busted van, and I’m like this dude is so hired.

Allegaeon-ElementsOfTheInfiniteDid you approach Elements Of The Infinite any differently to your previous albums, especially with Ryan no longer part of the process?

Very much so…My work load was double! Not only did I have to write all the material but we had to take over his responsibilities. He usually communicated with the artwork guy and he worked with Metal Blade on the fine details. I had the most free time so I just took it up. Also getting Joe Ferris on board to collaborate with all the orchestra stuff, yeah it was the hardest I’ve ever worked on an album.

How long did the album take to make?

To record, about a month and a half.

There has obviously been plenty of pressure to the making of Elements Of The Infinite so was it as enjoyable as other releases to bring to life?

It’s early days yet, but so far I’d say the opportunities we’ve already gotten from this record have made it the most enjoyable record we’ve done. I am definitely proud of it. I certainly feel all the hard work is paying off for once.

You recorded the album as the others with producer Dave Otero, he seems to add an essence and presence which your sound requires and flourishes even further with?

Well Formshifter wasn’t recorded with Dave it was done with Daniel Castleman. We really liked working with Castleman however after the split with Ryan, and the Pyrithion EP, and everything going on there, and the Lambesis fiasco on top of it, we really wanted to separate ourselves from it. Plus my friendship with Dave had grown a lot over the years, so it felt really good coming back. We really sought out his producer role, since I thought my objectivity was compromised from writing so much material. I needed a fresh perspective, and we really respect Dave to not pull punches. I’d ask him straight up, I have no idea if this part is good or it sucks, what do you think? I even wrote multiple solos for parts going, hey man which do you like better? He was very helpful to us.

How would you on the inside say your sound has changed just between Elements Of The Infinite and Formshifter?

Well Formshifter was interesting ‘cause we went in cold, and there was a lot of trust developed between everyone. We didn’t have a drummer so we kinda didn’t know how the album was going to sound. This one, I was meticulous. We had the track listing, all the preproduction done before we even stepped into the studio. We knew everything about this album before it was even recorded. That helped keep the vision. We even had all of Joe’s stuff ready to go before we got in. It made the process go really smooth.

Has it been an organic evolution or something you have been working towards or had in mind for a while?

I think it’s been organic. The decisions on this album weren’t spur of the moment, they were all thought out, and methodical.

Talking to you and reading other interviews members have made, it feels like the band was as much as anything just trying to produce a strong and potent album to keep the band on track. Has the fact that for us and a great many it sees the band at a whole new plateau and creative ingenuity surprised you, either the reactions of the fact that it is that good?

I think so. I mean I was just hoping that this record wouldn’t lose ground…that we could make a point that we were still relevant. The fact that not only we seemed to achieve that, but also the vast majority of the reviews think we’ve surpassed our previous efforts is very rewarding. The band is more a family now than anything we’ve had before. We look out for one another. Everyone is happy within our organization, and that’s the way we aim to keep it. It makes for a great working environment.

There are strong evocative orchestral elements across the new album; who composed and brought those to provocative life?

Being a studied classical musician, this is something I’ve wanted to do for years. We’ve just never had the technology until now to pull it off. The composition of the orchestral and choir elements was a direct split between Joe Ferris and I. Working with him couldn’t have been more exciting, and he’s definitely part of our writing team now. I’d write these choir and string parts and he’d flesh them out or just revamp them in some cases. In others he would just run with an idea he had, and made it truly awesome.

Give us some insight to the themes and premise behind the album and songs.

OK from the beginning. Threshold Of Perception is a look at death. It’s a look at it from a sociological and chemical standpoint. Tyrants Of The Terrestrial Exodus is about the evacuation of earth and some of the corruption that will inherently be present in the choosing of who gets to go. Dyson Sphere is about building super structures around a star, The Phylogenesis Stretch is about Goldilocks Zones…the distance where life as we know it can exist around a star. 1.618 is about the golden ratio. Gravimetric Time Dilation is about gravity and mass, and how it effects time. Our Cosmic Casket is about black holes. Biomech II is about 3D printing organs. Ages of Ice is about an Ice Age that comes as a result of a meteor hitting earth. And lastly Genocide for Praise is about the 10 plagues of Egypt as it is described in the Bible.

allegaeon_photo03You guys have a passion for science or just lyrically it suits your musical ideation?

It’s really just what we’re interested in. We love it, we love learning about it. It truly is a pleasure to write lyrics about this stuff you learn a lot.

Is there a particular moment or aspect to Elements Of The Infinite which gives you the greatest pleasure or satisfaction considering it’s kind of harder than expected journey into being?

Just that we achieved what we set out to do and it’s broadened our goals to expand onto the global stage.

Now the album is uncaged and out there, what comes next for Allegaeon?

Lots of touring…we wanna crush these couple of US tours we have lined up and then head overseas.

Thanks again for chatting with us, any final thoughts you would like to share?

Thank you to everyone who’s supported us, and to all the new fans, we couldn’t do this without you!

 

Read the review of Elements Of The Infinite @ https://ringmasterreviewintroduces.wordpress.com/2014/06/25/allegaeon-elements-of-the-infinite/

http://www.facebook.com/allegaeon

Pete RingMaster

The RingMaster Review 13/08/2014

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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Life and Death Experiences: an interview with Corey Skowronski of American Standards

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Things are starting to happen for US hardcore band American Standards in awareness and stature, though the Arizona quartet have been brewing up a fine reputation ever since forming a few years back. Their Still Life EP pulled strong attention towards the band with its exciting blend of punk and noise rock within the hardcore intensity whilst their live performances have made the four piece one of the most talked about and thrilling proposition emerging from the US rock underground. Recently signed to Victory Records we thought we should learn more about the band, their music, and their promising to be explosive future. Thankfully bassist Corey Skowronski was more than happy to help our exploration of American Standards and let us in on a secret or two.

Hi Corey and thanks for sparing time to let us find out more about yourselves and the band.

First of all simply introduce the band for us and tell us about the origins of American Standards.

American standards started a few years back in 2010 and in the course of two and a half years we’ve really come along way.

How did you all meet?

With the new line-up we’ve all met through mutual friends and playing shows together.

Was punk and hardcore the music which you grew up to or did you have a wider ‘soundtrack’ to your informative years which your music does suggest?

Growing up punk was a genre of music I was heavily into and other than that just old metal but for the most part I listened to a little bit of everything. If it sounded good to me I’d listen to it.

What was the spark to actually decide to start the band?

For me personally it was always something I wanted to do, to play in a band. I had quit the job I was working at the time in 2010 and was ready for something new that’s when I decided that I would commit to the idea and the dream and begin looking for people to start a band with, and here we are now

You come from Phoenix, Arizonia, apart from the obvious names coming from the city like Jimmy Eat World, The Bled, and Job For A Cowboy, is there a vibrant bed of punk and rock talent in the more underground scene?

Everyone that I know of in bands from here has talent that needs to be heard. There’s all the band that we help with and are close to like Your Young, Sleepwalker, The Last March Of The Ents. Then there’s the old Column III dudes and Lariats of course.

Many bands say their home town/city has influenced or made a big impact on their music, is it the same for American Standards?AS2

Honestly I don’t feel that at all. We write music that we like to play and as far as actually playing here, yeah there are people that are in the scene and care but for the most part it ain’t what it used to be…

Last year you released your excellent Still Life EP how did you find the recording process and what did you learn from it which will impact on future recordings?

Me personally I like to write the song, record it, listen to it, then add or take things out that don’t fit. That’s the time to kind of experiment, in my eyes, with all the ideas you have for that song that you have accumulated over the whole process.

I feel that we did do that for the Still Life EP and with J & M they were totally cool with that. The one thing I think we will try now with the new stuff is to get everyone involved in the experimenting with ideas stage so every song has something from everyone and it shows.

Talking of recordings you are working on your debut album I believe?

Sort of…Geoff and Brennen our drummer and guitarist are stepping down but we are having Mike Cook of Your Young drum and Craig Burch of The Last March of the Ents play bass. I’ll be swinging over from bass to guitar and am very stoked. The songs we have recorded right now are going to be released as an EP titled The Death of Rhythm and Blues and after that we’ll then start on the all new full length.

You are known as a DIY band so how did the link up with Victory Records who will release your next release come about?

We were at a point where we felt ready to take the plunge into looking at possibly teaming up with a label and at the time we had many offers and we decided that Victory and the sub label We Are Triumphant was the most promising.

946270_660704840625239_2035397775_nCan you give us some ideas as what the EP will hold and does Still Life give a good indication of what to expect, more diversity and sonic/noise exploration?

The way I look at it, The Death of Rhythm and Blues is the second half of Still Life.

Have you approached the new songs and EP differently to how Still Life was created?

A little…We definitely worked together more in writing the songs and took our time with it. We didn’t want to pump a song out and call it a day.

When can we expect the EP?

The 14th of September is the date.

Tell us more about the it and what you have developed further in the new songs from those on Still Life.

New songs are great we have worked on a few things in them to give them that cherry on top and their own character and like I mention I feel this is the second half to Still Life. It feels that way at least to me.

How does the writing process within the band work?

We all come together with either a riff, half of a song, or just a little idea and we give it some structure. We jam it out and more ideas come to mind and we try and incorporate those as well.

So it is a democratic process within the band for songs and stuff?

Definitely democratic, we want to give everyone in the band their voice. Every one of us has ideas for songs and good or bad we want to hear them cause who knows what can come from them.

You have a great reputation for your live show, any particularly memorable moments or shows to date?as3

The show we just played in Tucson, InFest, that was a great show. We had a lot of fun. For me a long time ago we played a show in Tucson again, at the old Skrappys. We were getting down and playing and somehow I smashed the head of my bass into my own head and I just started pouring blood. I kept playing, can’t stop the good ole’ boys in American Standards. That story has never been shared with the outside world until now. You are all free now to make fun of me for hitting myself in the face.

Is the live aspect of the band the most thrilling for you or more the creation of new songs and records?

Writing, recording, and hearing the new songs matter. With all the songs we’ve done, once we finish them I’m stoked on them, and when I can play a song that I get stoked on, the energy I pull from it just kicks in and that’s when we can go crazy and let it all out.

Once released the energy from those songs just takes over and that’s what I love. When a song can take you from one point, one mind set and in the course of two and a half minutes it carries you to a completely different one.

Once more thank you to talking with us, anything else you would like to add?

September 14th get the new EP and let us know what you all think.

Lastly would you like to give us the five most influential records on you personally?

The Fall of Troy – Manipulator

Pantera – Reinventing the Steel

Phil Collins – No Jacket Required

Norma Jean – Oh God the Aftermath

Smashing Pumpkins – Mellon Collie and the Infinite Sadness.

https://www.facebook.com/AmericanStandards

Read the Still Life review @ https://ringmasterreviewintroduces.wordpress.com/2013/06/27/american-standards-still-life/

Pete RingMaster

The RingMaster Review 25/07/2017

 

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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RISING EURO METAL CREW PROMETHEE RELEASE EXPLOSIVE VIDEO SINGLE!

Promethee Online promo photo
Up and coming Swiss slayers ‘Promethee’ set loose their spanking new video single ‘Life/Less’, out now.
Pitching ‘Born of Osiris’ against ‘Job For A Cowboy’, and merging the melodic death metal craft of ‘Darkest Hour’, Promethee are here to shatter your world with their stunning blend of original modern metal.
Formed in Geneva, Switzerland, Promethee started life back in 2008. The metal upstarts soon began to play shows throughout their native land, and in 2010, the quintet struck out to France, Germany, Austria, Belgium, Switzerland and Hungary, including an influential appearance at the Greenfield Festival playing alongside HIM, Rammstein, The Prodigy and The Dillinger Escape Plan, among others. Not ones to rest on their laurels, the industrious five-some continued to progress and played a successful mini-tour in Canada before releasing their debut EP, which secured creditable praise throughout the UK and mainland Europe.
Last year the band released their debut album “Nothing Happens. Nobody Comes, Nobody Goes” and it helped to redefine the noise-niks’ place as Swiss metal leaders. The record also garnered widespread acclaim in the UK from Kerrang!, Metal Hammer, Rocksound, Terrorizer and Big Cheese magazine, and by undertaking rampant European touring and high profile festivals, including the Loudfest 2013 (Heaven Shall Burn, Architects, August Burns Red) and the Aries Festival (Knuckledust, TRC, Cutdown), the band’s stock has firmly risen to a European scale.
Promethee are now continuing their climb with the release of their explosive new single and video ‘Life/Less’, taken from ‘Nothing Happens. Nobody Comes, Nobody Goes’. The single is a powerful slab of ferocious edgy metal that clearly showcases the band’s devastating brilliance. Future festival appearances will follow this summer in support of the release, along with extensive touring of Europe.
* The stunning video for ‘Life/Less’ is out now and can be viewed at – http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=q58hSsXgs_Y&feature=youtu.be *
 

Kill With Hate – Voices Of Obliteration

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From making an immediately contagious introduction at its start to ending up as one of the most enjoyably violating brutal romps to come along this year to date, Voices Of Obliteration the debut album from Hungarian death metallers Kill With Hate is an album all extreme metal fans should make an acquaintance with. From its mighty start the album is a constant treat with extra fires of quality emerging throughout and though it is questionable as to how much originality the Budapest quintet has forged into their release there is no denying it’s invigorating and thrilling impact.

Formed in December 2007, the band took no time in becoming a potent presence in the metal underground scene of their homeland. Sharing stages with bands such as Onslaught and Moonsorrow, Kill With Hate released their first EP in 2010. Evolution of the Beast was well received from fans and media and helped lead the band into playing with the likes of Job For A Cowboy, As I Lay Dying, and Belphegor. Some line-up changes followed as well as the chance to support The Black Dahlia Murder in 2011, followed by shows with Origin, Psycroptic, Leng Tch’e, and Cannibal Corpse over the next year. 2012 also saw the band record Voices of Obliteration and at the beginning of this, they signed with PRC Music for its CD release.

After the ok intro Revelation (It’s Just Murder), only really notable for its didgeridoo and male cloister union, the album kicks kwh_lowoff its corrosive tempest with Submersion. The track falls upon the ear with riffs and intensive rhythms crowding and abusing their recipients. Taking a brief breath for the grooves and intensity to stake its claim the song explodes again into a tirade of bone snapping drums punches from Bence Turcsák and deliciously insistent riffs and grooved temptation from guitarists Ákos Olt and Márton Hartvig. All the while the bass of Patrik Pornói prowls with predatory malevolence to further intimidate whilst the guttural scowls of Krisztián Gyémánt reap caustic treachery with the lyrical intent to exhaust the emotions further. With a latter flame of sonic melodic teasing which is enjoyable if short on impact, the track is a very satisfying murderous confrontation with destruction on its mind.

The short roll of crisp drum raps aligned to a deep bass groan opens the way for another furnace of violence from The Beast Within. The track is an outstanding carnivorous fury with  death and black metal styled vocals unleashing their dual malice upon a driving energy of riffs and vengeful rhythms. Unrelenting and merciless, the carnage of the torrential hellacious drumming and equally demanding and imposing riffs taking its toll on body and psyche, it simply leaves a wasted carcass grinning from ear to ear in its wake. At this point the album has made a strong persuasion and ignited greedy passions which the following Servant of God, Epistle of Fire, and Pray for War confidently and competently continue. Fair to say the trio of songs do not live up to their predecessors or others to follow but all leave a depth of pleasure and accomplished temptation which for many other releases would be their highlights.

A new heightened barrage of vindictive enterprise breaks free within Doubt to return the experience to the levels forged at the beginning and take them beyond. A ravenous sacking of the ear coursing with the now expected ferocity from the band and their imagination, the song wrongs foot by going against type with a scintillating twist of melodic guitar and similarly gaited bass lines  which offer a rock voice within the cavernous aural vehemence around and above them. It is a surprising and exhilarating thrust of invention within ultimately a tsunami like blitzkrieg. Imprisoned then takes over to offer an individual and equalling marauding storm of invasive spite. Mixing up vocal styles again as well as rippling with sonic intrigue and mastery from the guitars, the riff and rhythm incursion chains and enslaves with blistering efficiency. It is a maelstrom of energy, sounds, and black hearted passion honed into a tumultuous and inescapable nasty pleasure.

Completed by Speeches of the Defendant and a decent cover of Internal, a song of old Hungarian death metal band Extreme Deformity, Voices Of Obliteration is an excellent album from which it is hard to find anything not to hungrily like. Originality is debatably scarce maybe but the great sounds and violently aggressive encounter given, more than makes up for it. With this album, Kill With Hate is poised to find awareness well beyond their home borders one suspects.

http://www.killwithhate.com

http://facebook.com/killwithhateband

8/10

RingMaster 17/04/2013

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Corroosion: Dirt Awareness

Like the effect of sand in a wind tunnel notched up to the maximum, the new album from Italian deathcore band Corroosion is as abrasive and lethal as their name gives hint to. It is a nasty and destructive piece of work, a sonic blistering without mercy or respect. It is also corruptively magnificent. Dirt Awareness is not the easiest of listens or probably not the most appealing for some at times but stare it right in the eyes and it is becomes one of the more rewarding albums to assault the senses this year and has the makings of an insatiable addiction.

From Turin, Corroosion emerged from the ashes of Hekatomb in 2005. Consisting of vocalist AnD, guitarists Sentenza and Lino, bassist Marco, and Dave on drums, the band made their first mark with their 2008 demo Maze Of Human Deprivation. Relentless gigging followed as well as the six track EP Two Steps Before The Vein, the band all the time creating attention grabbing strokes with their storm of extreme metal leading them to sharing stages with bands such as The Acacia Strain, Deicide, Neaera, Annotations of an Autopsy, Knights of the Abyss, and Slowmotion Apocalypse. Mid 2009 and the band signed with Rising Records and set to work on their debut album Punish The Mind with producer Alan Douches (Killswitch Engage, Emmure, Carnifex, The Acacia Strain, Cannibal Corpse),which was released the following year. 2011 saw the band destroy stages alongside the likes of The Ghost Inside, Bleed From Within, Suffokate, Trigger The Bloodshed, For The Fallen Dreams, before working on their second album. Produced by Fredrik Nordstrom (At The Gates, Job For a Cowboy, Bring Me The Horizon, Dimmu Borgir, In Flames) and released again on Rising on July 23rd, the album is a titanic treat of invention, imagination and outright violence.

The album creeps up on the ear with the opening to Awareness as echoes of war emerge from the sinister whispers to be replaced by the intrusive windings of guitar grooves and flesh grating vocals. At full stretch the track badgers the senses with crisp punchy rhythms and bruising riffs through an attack which seems tempered, as if the band is simply teasing and taunting its victims. The intensity though is oppressive throughout and heightened in the climaxing storm of scowled group vocals, rigid beats, and manipulative guitars, and the song itself the intimidating beginning and appetizer for the annihilation ahead.

The crushing and quite brilliant track The Loser Slave flies for the jugular within seconds of its appearance, air flaying riffs and grinding grooves to open up the deepest sores laying siege upon the senses. The song evolves into a raging stomp of sounds and bestial borne vocals with a ravenous hunger not to be denied. It is pure malevolence brought with the surest ferocity but dive beyond the surface and there is a continual evolution of invention and sound going on which makes every rampage a new offering. It is this which has the band standing out over other similar bands and makes Dirt Awareness far more than a great album.

More impressive brutality comes in the form of the greedily consuming and relentlessly raging Crimes Of Fathers Times with its dehabilitating diversity of riffs and rhythms skewered with a cruelly niggling groove and the stunning Polarity, both further scarring on the ear and scrambling of synapses with sharp twisting manipulations. The second of the two is a maelstrom of hellacious energy and sounds which use their notes like kinder to spark an inferno of fury and creative excellence to bring one to their knees.

The release is simply one continual high quality and imaginative brute with just the intensity and the caustic covering uniformal. The songs twist and turn within their skins, tempo disruptions, unexpected breakdowns, and perfect unpredictability raging in the eye of every storm such as in further triumphs like Collective Humiliation, Falena, and Repulsion, though every track deserves a mention such the depth of excellence.

The suspicion is Corroosion is still an unknown most have yet to discover but with Dirt Awareness the days of that secret is numbered with the band surely on the verge of deserved major attention.

https://www.facebook.com/corroosion

RingMaster 11/07/2012

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Interview with Jonny Davy of Job for a Cowboy

With a new line-up the mighty Arizona death metal quintet Job for a Cowboy have lit up 2012 with their  magnificent new album Demonocracy. Returning with a continued evolution in musical maturity and technical excellence, the band retain their claim to being the most hostile, visceral, and exciting bands in death metal. As expected the album does not give an easy ride but is genuinely one of the most rewarding you could wish for. As ever we wanted to find out more about the album and look behind its sounds, as well as hearing more about the band itself. With pleasure we were able to do so with vocalist Jonny Davy who kindly tackled our questions.

Hi Jonny and many thanks for taking time to talk with us.

We will cut straight to the chase and the new album Demonocracy. Wow impressive, has it emerged even more powerfully than you at first envisaged?

Absolutely. We ended up changing parts and experimenting ideas within the studio. Something we haven’t really done before. I’m glad we took the time and effort to rearrange parts and hash out new ideas. We are all super happy with the product.

I admit I am no expert on the back catalogue of Job for a Cowboy but from the previous album Ruination there feels not only a distinct evolution in sound but in maturity, the songwriting and song construction especially, is that something that has been simply organic or have you worked particularly on that?

It is organic only for the fact that our motto in the bands writing system was to ALWAYS progress as a band. We are here to impress ourselves and others amongst the band. A lot of bands find their niche and safe zone, writing the same material record after record. We are entirely opposed to this and continue to enhance our sound as much as possible.

How much has the addition of new members guitarist Tony Sannicandro and bassist Nick Schendzielos, sparked the changes in the band sound?

A new lineup always sparks a fire under everyone’s ass’s. The reality is, every time we find new members we make sure that they are a step up from the previous ones. I know that it is cliché to say, but this is the strongest lineup that we have ever had, and if any of these members leave… it will be the end of Job For A Cowboy.

You are never an easy band to listen to haha, you demand a focus other death metal bands ignore but offer deeper rewards for that but with Demonocracy there is maybe a more instant aspect to parts of the music with the solos etc, would you agree?

Haha, yes I agree. I feel like this is the type of record where you really have to listen to a few times before really digesting it all.

The album and band is still as aggressive and hungry, that is very apparent on the album but is there a fine line between expanding your sound and direction ahead and losing the impact you have always brought to date to be wary of?

You know, it is hard to say. We don’t necessarily nit pick our music at that angle. We just try to have fun with it and try to make sure it is an improvement from the past.

Many bands would have used the acclaim and success of Ruination as the base for the next album but you seem to have started with a clean slate though it is still obviously a Job for a Cowboy sounding album.

I think every album for us is a clean slate. We don’t want to focus on one record and work around that. We want to keep making new ideas and stepping forward.

How does the songwriting work within the band and has it changed in any way with Tony and Nick on board?

It has changed dramatically. In the past, we always wrote and even lived together in Arizona. Now, guys live in Boston, Denver, Seattle and Phoenix. All across the United States. We had to shoot our ideas through email and home recordings. I think giving everyone space however let everyone hash out their ideas without the distractions of other members knocking them down before they could really progress.

Tell us about the theme and inspiration for the songs and lyrics.

Obviously from the title they are very political. So many bands in our genre from a lyrical perspective write about the stereotypes of death metal. Anti-Christianity, gore, death, murder… We stray away from this stuff and have a much more punk rock attitude.

You have again worked with producer Jason Suecof, he seems to have a real understanding of what you are as a band and want to bring to your music?

Jason is awesome. He has become a great friend and we really respect what he does in the studio. It is nice walking into something and know what to expect. That is why we keep working with Jason.

The album cover is immense, a welcome into Demonocracy as powerful as the music. Can you tell us about it and who designed it etc?

Brent Elliott White, who also did the cover for Ruination did this cover as well. He is an amazing artist just in the sense that you can give him so little and he can create so much with it. I gave him a rough idea on the lyrical content and he nailed it right on the head.

As mentioned you have two new members, so was the band set back a little with the departure of Bobby (Thompson) and Brent (Riggs) and can we ask the reasons for their leaving and was it something  that was on the cards for a while?

I’ll start with Bobby. He simply wanted to start the family life back at home. He actually helped write Tarnished Gluttony on the record. Great friends to this day, he just couldn’t handle the touring life with what he wanted to do at home anymore. As for Brent… Well, drugs became his first priority. He fell into the black hole of caring about drugs over everything else. He had to leave.

What was it about Tony and Nick that made you realise they were the guys to help out firstly touring and then to be added as permanent members?

We knew Nick from Cephalic Carnage, he still plays bass for them to this day. As for Tony, he was with Despised Icon for a couple years. They were both easy fits, especially from a personality perspective.

What have they brought to the music that was possibly lacking before?

Much much much much more technicality.

Has the new dynamic and ideas the two have brought in made you return to older songs with a slight re-invention in mind?

No, I think people like to hear our older songs the way they are. We don’t want to pull a George Lucas and recreate Star Wars.

I am no musician but was wondering when you bring a new guitarist in alongside the existing one is there a change required in both in regard to how they have played previously or in the existing member’s role within the already written and established songs?

It just turns into a new collaboration. We want our new members to do everything freely as they want.

One can assume you will be touring the ass off of Demonocracy?

Yes! Nonstop!

How do you think the live shows will change with the new guys on board compared to before?

A lot more energy.

You all seem to love every aspect of Job for a Cowboy but one senses the live arena is where you have the biggest thrill from?

Absolutely, we have toured nonstop for years. It is our true passion.

Too early I know but anyway what is next for the band and you as individuals?

More and more touring across the world.

Once more many thanks for taking time out to talk with us and good luck with Demonocracy, though one feels it will not be needed.

Would you care to leave us with any last words or thoughts?

Check out the new record!

Read the review of Demonocracy @ https://ringmasterreviewintroduces.wordpress.com/2012/04/04/job-for-a-cowboy-demonocracy/

The RingMaster Review 16/06/2012

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Job for a Cowboy: Demonocracy

Job for a Cowboy return with a new line-up, new ideas, a continued evolution in musical maturity, and in Demonocracy their new album, one of the most formidable releases so far this year. The sheer power and quality to the songwriting and its realisation means that even if you are not a fan or the songs within the album do not grab you the musicianship and technical excellence is still unmissable and undeniable. Demonocracy is not a put on and listen once or twice and it clicks type of release, though for many it will do just that, this album demands your focus, attention, and at times your patience before divulging the ingenuity and excellent varied construct within the brutal onslaught it consumes with.

Released April 10th via Metal Blade Records the album follows up the widely acclaimed Ruination of 2009 by moving all aspects of the sound and songwriting of the Arizona quintet forward. From listening to Demonocracy it is evident there was no temptation to rest on their laurels even a little after such a strong and deep affection thrown over the previous album. For sure the change of personal has brought a natural change, the fact that songs now contain solos and at times the guitars take the lead suggests that, but there is an apparent organic shift too, a determined intent to find a further progression to themselves as musicians and the band as a whole.

The time between the two albums has seen the departure of guitarist Bobby Thompson and bassist Brent Riggs. Their replacements have not just come in to fill the slots but from the evidence on Demonocracy have instantly added a new dimension to compliment what their predecessors and the band had already impressively created. Cephalic Carnage bassist Nick Schendzielos and session guitarist for Despised Icon Tony Sannicandro initially were brought in as touring musicians but the chemistry that was immediate from playing and the songwriting ideas they brought into the band on the 2011 Gloom EP saw the arrangement become a permanent one. Alongside vocalist Jonny Davy, guitarist Al Glassman, and drummer Jon “Charn” Rice the pair has added a different dynamic which has also created another within the band as a whole to make their new release something that grabs the attention on every level.

From the opening onslaught of Children Of Deceit, Job for a Cowboy unleash their recognisable death metal/metal power but with a fuller and one can almost say more elaborate sound and texture. The track scrapes flesh from the ear as it thrusts its muscular riffs and full intensity through seeking to consume the senses but it is veined by guitars, melodies, and technical manipulations that are as scorched and venomous as you will find anywhere.  As mentioned now solos appear on tracks and though something almost unexpected and new for the band it is an easy and impressive fit.

As always listening to Job for a Cowboy is a testing and challenging experience, they are a band that requires a deliberate focus rather than a passing listen to appreciate all their attributes and this album is no different but the new progression to their sound and the additives brought from the new members and the determined ideas of the band as a whole are openly audible and enjoyable and again understood and complimented by returning producer Jason Suecof (The Black Dahlia Murder, Whitechapel). Tracks like the excellent Nourishment Through Blood, Imperium Wolves with its excellent cello/keys ending though the song as a whole blisters and abuses perfectly, and the tumultuously intense Black Discharge, leave one numb, bruised and fully satisfied from being obliterated by a band that has found something very flavoursome to add to their already mighty sound.

Tongueless And Bound and The Manipulation Stream are the two songs that really ignited the most on the album, both slicing though the senses with technical precision whilst tearing the wounds wider with a pummelling that aches rather than numbs. Every track on the album is immense but this pair offer extra sparks from the guitar work of Glassman and Sannicandro through to the dehabilitating rhythms of Rice and Schendzielos. Davy too has upped his game on the album offering more variety to his delivery whilst still spewing and spitting the politically and socially themed lyrics as vehemently as ever.

Demonocracy will not be the album of the year for everyone as the band demand much more than most are willing or able to give with their hungry and intense sounds but it is hard to think of a death metal album as fulfilling and inspired as this for a long time. Job for a Cowboy might not be a flavour for everyone but with the new album they offer much more for many more making it at least a definite investigation.

RingMaster 04/04/2012

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