Lost Without Cause – Revival

Karly Edge Photography

It has been a while since outfit Lost Without Cause had ears and appetite grabbed with mini album Take Back Everything, six years in fact, but now they are back with a brand new release and a sound which has matured and blossomed into one powerful statement. The Revival EP is an encounter which if it does not get you first time around will on its second sweep through ears. Each of its four songs comes blessed with melodic enterprise and instinctive infectiousness, traits admittedly just as open in its predecessor, but bred with a new confidence of imagination and craft which alone commands attention.

Hailing from the South East of England, Lost Without Cause consists of vocalist/bassist Simon Marks, drummer JamesJJ’ Jaggers, and newest member in guitarist Tony Stead. Formed in 2004, the band swiftly stoked eager fans and attention with their pop infused alternative rock sound. 2011 saw Take Back Everything stir up a whole new ball game of recognition with its lead single, Trigger and accompanying video, being heavily featured on Kerrang TV and supported on national and online radio shows. Live the band has shared stages with the likes of Bastille, Kids In Glass Houses, Fozzy, Don Broco, Lower Than Atlantis, Sacred Mother Tongue, My Passion, The Crave, Koopa, Fei Comodo, None The Less, Saving Aimee and many more. Revival in some ways reflects the ‘return ‘of the band and what is sure to be a regenerated rise in their reputation and presence within the British music scene.

Breathe starts things off and the track instantly has attention hooked as the dark grumble of Marks’ bass lines up alongside his strong expression carrying vocals. JJ‘s beats in turn hit with relish before it is all wrapped in the melodic enterprise of Stead.  Instantly appetising and swiftly infectious, the song proceeds to stroll with wild nostrils and flirtatious hooks, its melodic jangle a teasing lure in the jungle of more exacting rhythms. It is fair to say that previous song Trigger has been the marker for Lost Without Cause up to this point but no longer as Breathe steals its thunder.

The following Depleted brings a Green Day-esque feel to its rousing canter, a hue soon immersed in the band’s own character of sound and invention. Great vocal harmonies and support to Marks across the band light up an already earthily anthemic incitement; swinging rhythms and spicy grooves all adding to the riotous yet skilfully controlled encounter.

Teardrops and Cigarettes in contrast is a mellow aired, warm seduction playing like a blend of China Crisis and Placebo with a further spice of Jimmy Eat World involved. Its gentle but lively sway has hips quickly involved, the sultry strains of the guitar courting the imagination as swiftly though it is the vocal unity again and the song’s adventurously imaginative landscape which seals the deal, not forgetting one glorious finale of emotion and power.

The EP finishes with Another End, a slice of rock pop which might not quite match up to those before it for personal tastes but only adds to the overall pleasure with its catchy rock ‘n’ roll and sonic dexterity.

Listening to Revival, it is easy to feel that Lost Without Cause’s time to make an indelible mark is imminent, if not with their fiercely flavoursome new EP with whatever comes next.

Revival is out now across most online stores.

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Pete RingMaster 10/10/2017

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Brightlight City – Our Future’s Not Dead

Having impressed with debut EP, Adventures in 2015, British rockers Brightlight City now reveal the blossoming invention and increasing maturity in their sound with successor Our Future’s Not Dead. Hinted at by a pair of singles last year, the new release is evidence of a band building on an impressive start and potential with stylish adventure whilst nurturing a whole new promise for continued growth.

Surrey bred, Brightlight City weave in inspirations from the likes of Hundred Reasons, Million Dead, Yourcodenameis:milo, At the Drive-In, Biffy Clyro, and Jimmy Eat World into their sound; indeed sparking comparisons to the former and others such as Thursday and Hell Is For Heroes with their melody rich and harmonically honed songs. Equally there is a fresh and potent catchiness and steel to Our Future’s Not Dead which as suggested was first glimpsed within last year’s singles Gravity and Thieves. It is a growth in sound which has come with an increasing reputation and praise for their live shows through the quintet sharing stages with Max Raptor, Fizzy Blood, Bad Sign, and Blood Youth and playing alongside Rise Against and Millencolin at Envol et Macadam Festival in Canada in 2015as well as their own shows.

Recorded with Matt Hyde (Funeral For A Friend, Bullet For My Valentine, Slipknot), Our Future’s Not Dead is likely to spark another bout of attention and hunger for Brightlight City, setting out its persuasive strength with opener It Depends On You. Skittish beats alongside vocal and guitar offered temptation bring the song into focus; their low key yet agitated attitude soon a full roar as vocalist Jamie Giarraputo heads a web of melodic enterprise from guitarists Jonathan Staunton and Justin Giarraputo, the latter adding his own potent vocal expression to the mix. Anthemic in heart, imposing in rhythm as the hefty jabs of drummer Ben Bell court the brooding lines of bassist Tom Stock, the track roars with energy and passion.

With a mellower air Leave A Light On follows, wiry melodies swimming round a throaty bassline as emotive vocals entice with distinctive expression. Once again there is an instinctive catchiness at work, never wavering as fiery textures evolve and unite in a livelier blaze of sound and emotion. In some ways it is a less intricate proposition than its predecessor but only to its strength as each element is a flame of craft and drama before making way for Heart Stops. The third track comes coated in the infectiousness of the opener, its swinging body almost pop punk like and relentlessly coaxing listener involvement with its vocal harmonies and controlled but boisterous swing; a tenacious essence just as open in the calmer moments of a song taking best track honours.

The EP is brought to an end by Past/Future, a track epitomising the evolution in the Brightlight City sound with its rounded fusion of melody and energy amidst a new depth of contagiousness and invention. As all the songs within Our Future’s Not Dead it is a memorable and lingering encounter going to make a thoroughly enjoyable and impressing release. The Brightlight City sound has yet to become something truly unique but as the EP shows, it is well on the way and providing some rather tasty encounters along the way.

Our Future’s Not Dead is out now through Undead Collective Records.

https://www.brightlightcityofficial.co.uk/   https://www.facebook.com/brightlightcityofficial   https://twitter.com/blcband

Pete RingMaster 12/04/2017

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Hellbound Hearts – Film Noir

Like all music fans we breed real anticipation for certain and numerous releases each year but few as eagerly as that for the first album from British rockers Hellbound Hearts. Because of a pair of rousing and acclaimed EPs, the Yorkshire hailing trio has stirred a real appetite for their fervour driven rock ‘n’ roll. Now we can say that those early successes were just appetisers because without doubt Film Noir is the main meal from the band.

One of the things which could have been said about both the EP’s, Outside and The Proximity Effect and also their self-titled debut before that, was that the Hellbound Hearts sound was whilst individual not always truly unique in the crowded landscape of alternative rock, though certainly evolving with every release towards that aim. It is something the trio of vocalist/guitarist Danny Lambert, bassist Craig McLaren, and drummer Lee Brook took note of as explained by Lambert when talking about their first album and how it turned out not as originally intended. “It wasn’t working“, he recently admitted, “we’d had some changes and time to reflect, and whilst the songs were good, we strongly wanted to be our own band and not be like a 1000 others flooding the market. So we canned the album, went back to the drawing board and re-grouped, re-composed and wrote a bunch of new songs, much more fitting with our sound.”  The result of that bold move and concentrated effort is an album which comes alive from its first breath, never relaxes its energies and arousal of ears until the final note, and unmistakably provides a singular body and character of adventure.

Produced by Matt Ellis (Black Spiders, Terrorvision), Film Noir gets right down to business with its opener and recent single Suffering The Radio. Dark brooding keys hug ears initially, the melancholic air of a piano just as swift in its suggestion before from within their shadowed caress a strike of guitars sparks a rumble of riffs and rhythms. Stirring and arousing, the deluge of temptation shows restraint as it welcomes the potent tones of Lambert backed by McLaren and Brook, a union aligning with swinging hooks and a great grumbling bass groove. Inescapably infectious and boisterous, the track hooks ears and listener involvement, inhibitions dismissed for a peach of a persuasive chorus as the heart of real rock ‘n’ roll descending on the mundane and mediocrity of the modern music world above the underground.

The superb start is matched by the virulent exploits of Broken Hearted where again aggressive textures and warm melodies entangle in a contagious roar. Riffs and rhythms prowl with rapacious relish whilst hooks and vocals come littered with infectious enterprise. There is a touch of Jimmy Eat World meets The Wildhearts to the song but already the album is deep in unveiling a Hellbound Hearts only owned proposal, revealing more with every passing minute and songs like next up Poor Disguises. Taking its time to rise up, almost stalking the listener with its predacious beats and subsequent bass groan, the song stands tall with hungry riffs which in turn spark a punk fuelled charge of attitude and energy which continues to infest the song’s tenacious and grouchy rock ‘n’ roll. Lambert’s warm tones bring a fine temper as too melodies though they have a touch scorching senses like licking flames; everything adding to a stomping slice of punk ‘n’ roll.

New single The Light We Cannot See follows with its own galvanic nature and air, again rhythms and riffs carrying a heavy and heady thump as grooves entangle their menace with flirtatious and catchy endeavour. Calmer twists and suggestive textures add to the track’s lively drama and wistful emotion before the reflective Still We Wait ebbs and flows with initial emotive grace. It is a coaxing though into a far darker and tempestuous realm, surges of almost Rob Zombie like riffs and intensity bursting free whilst surf rock kissed melodies shine radiantly upon the turbulence, both contrasts merging for passages of pure ravenous rock ‘n’ roll. With the growling breath of McLaren’s bass and Brook’s dynamic rhythms, the anthemically fuelled track is quite glorious.

There is a great whiff of Therapy? to next up Blood, at times of Pitchshifter too, yet the song entangles ears and pleasure in wiry creative tendrils openly peculiar to Hellbound Hearts while Wake Up flirts with a mixture of pop punk and hard rock for its easy going and firmly captivating enticement before We Are All Alone shares its own moment of reflective honesty against an increasing gnarly bassline, rapier like beats, and metal urged sonic dexterity. The track does not quite light personal tastes as powerfully as many of those around it even with its Terrorvision spiced hues but easily leaves satisfaction greedily content.

The album is closed off by firstly the insatiable heavy rock growl of Fortunes and finally the hellacious incitement of Silent Horror Movie, both tracks in their individual ways webs of stylish temptation and instinctive infection with the former a more pop rock soaked contagion and the latter a ferociously hungry roar uncaging the primal rock ‘n’ roll.

Hellbound Hearts have been no strangers to praise and success but Film Noir leaves all before it dead in the water. It is an exhilarating slab of rock ‘n’ roll which truly only gets better and more irresistible with every listen.

Film Noir is released April 7th through https://www.hellboundhearts.com/   and digitally across most online stores.

Upcoming Hellbound Hearts Dates

8th April – LEEDS, Key Club (album launch show)

16th April – BOLTON, B-Festival (Alma Inn)

3rd June – KEIGHLEY, The Exchange

23rd June – DUNDEE, Firefly

24th June – EDINBURGH, Bannermans

8th July – WESTCLIFFE ON SEA, The Venue

11th August – LEEDS, Yorkshire Rock And Bike Show

https://www.facebook.com/wearehellboundhearts    https://twitter.com/hbhuk

Pete RingMaster 06/04/2017

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Tirade – Self-Titled EP

tirade_RingMasterReview

With its virulent pop swing, it is hard to say that the Tirade sound lives up to the fierce tone of the band’s name, but certainly it makes a sizeable, attention grabbing impact going by their richly enjoyable debut EP.  Consisting of seven eventful and resourceful tracks, the self-titled release is a feisty and bubbling fusion of alternative rock and pop punk which employs familiar strains and textures in something potently fresh and increasingly enjoyable.

Hailing from Manchester, the quartet of lead vocalist/bassist Jake Tilley, vocalists/guitarists Josh Pearl and Alex Young, and drummer Stevo Somerset draw on inspirations ranging from Lower Than Atlantis, Press To Meco, and Don Broco to We Are Carnivores and Reuben for their praise luring sound and songs. Formed last year, Tirade are becoming the eager whisper on an ever growing wave of lips, a secret we expect soon becoming an open and loud shout as their EP nudges national awareness.

With moments of really striking moments, the EP is a consistently enjoyable encounter opening up with a band. Snakes and Social Ladders quickly has ears and appetite engaged as jabbing beats and nagging riffs collude. Soon the song is boldly romping, springing sonic intrigue and tasty hooks all the while across its body. It does hold its full energy in relative restraint, turning it into a gripping infectiousness as the guitars create a repertoire of sinewy, melodically endowed enterprise further coloured by Tilley’s impressive vocals and equally strong harmonies.

tirade-tirade-front-cover_RingMasterReviewThe great start is soon eclipsed by the following theatre of Punch?, a song which is as unpredictable as it is catchy. From its first breath sing-a-long vocals unite with sonic espionage as the guitars twist and turn with technical revelry and math rock spiced invention. The rhythms of Tilly and Somerset drive the song relentlessly, adding to its infection as the imagination of the band, not always as forceful elsewhere, has a field day.

Knives In Your Eyes entangles ears in another flavoursome hook within seconds, its spice surrounded by fiery suggestiveness before the song settles into a calmer stroll expelling that initial heated drama throughout. As with the last song, there are essences which spark thoughts of Swound!, a spiky invention aligned to the melodic prowess of Jimmy Eat World/ Lower Than Atlantis. From start to finish, the track hits the spot with ease as too its successor We’re Having Fun. As rhythms punch, harmonies shine with a trio of voices that blend perfectly across another slice of real catchiness. Even with its contagious instincts though, there is a bite to the Tirade sound, a creative snarl as bold as anything within this tenaciously captivating stomp of a song.

For personal tastes, the sparks which help its previous songs spark a lusty appetite for the release are less prominent from hereon in upon the EP though there is no doubting the appeal and enjoyment found in Travel Agent for Guilt Trips and the following, increasingly compelling Optimism. Again both tracks are a marriage of thumping rhythms and harmonic warmth bound in ear pleasing dynamics but lacking the stronger inventiveness and snap of their predecessors.

The EP concludes with The World Isn’t On Your Side, another highlight closing the release as impressively and raucously as Snakes and Social Ladders opened it. Cantankerously bold, the outstanding track is the heaviest moment of the release, almost predacious as Tirade reveals another string to their creative bow.

It is hard not to think Tirade as a band on a certain rise after this fine release, and once the potential shown here is realised as something truly distinct and unique in sound and songwriting, that loud whisper just might become a raging roar.

The Tirade EP is out now @ https://tiradeuk.bandcamp.com/album/tirade

https://www.facebook.com/TIRADEbanduk    https://twitter.com/tiradeband?lang=en-gb

Check out the video for We’re Having Fun @ https://ringmasterreviewintroduces.wordpress.com/video-selector/

Pete RingMaster 29/11/2016

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Unbridled arousals and stomps: exploring The Conniption Fits.

The Conniption Fits_RingMasterReview

Formed in 2004, The Conniption Fits create their own ear catching mix of alternative, progressive, and indie pop; rock ‘n’ roll which rouses the senses and imagination and has so across a host of releases. Drawing comparisons to the likes of Jimmy Eat World, Green Day, Foo Fighters, Silversun Pickups, U2, The Police, and David Bowie and having shared stages with artists such as Weezer, Panic at the Disco, Kings Of Leon, Train, 3 Doors Down, Fastball, Mighty Bosstones, 7 Mary Three, Blue Oyster Cult, Mountain, Warrant, and Cinderella among many over time, the New Hampshire hailing trio make a noise which easily sparks the appetite. Grabbing the chance to learn more about the band, we had the pleasure of chatting with member and The Conniption Fits co-founder Stevens.

Hello and thanks for taking time out to talk with us.

Can you first introduce the band and give us some background to how it all started and what brought you all together?

That’s a long story.  I’m Stevens Blanchard, lead singer guitar player for The Conniption Fits.  The drummer, Shawn Snyder and I met back when we were kids.  My current band needed a drummer and he was a friend of a friend, not to mention a fantastic drummer with tons of attitude.  When that band broke up, we founded The Conniption Fits.  Jamie Hosley, or bass player, came along when we were looking for a new bassist.  Again, he had a reputation as being “the man” when it comes to bass, naturally we had to have him.

So The Conniption Fits is not the first band for you? Has previous projects had any impact on what you are doing now, in maybe inspiring a change of style or direction?

I think I just answered that above, but yes.  We had a previous band, Motorplant, which did quite well for about 8 years.  You can still find all of the music that Motorplant produced all over the web including iTunes and Spotify.  When Motorplant disbanded, we wanted to head in a slightly more alternative direction.

What inspired the band name?

If the conniption fits, wear it.

Was there any specific idea behind the forming of the band and what you wanted it and your sound to offer?

Far from it…We just enjoy playing and entertaining.  As far as the sound goes, I just want to create ear candy.  Songs with depth sonically and lyrically that are accessible and a bit unpredictable at the same time.

Do the same things still drive the band when it was fresh-faced or have they evolved over time?

Always evolving…You can tell album to album.  Every record seems to represent where our minds were at musically at that period of time.  I’m always hearing new bands that are doing really cool things that we want to incorporate into our own stuff.  I’d say we listen as much, or more, than we play.

TCF2Since your early days, how would you say your sound has evolved?

We deliberately try new things.  Sometimes it works, sometimes it doesn’t.  On our second album, A Heaping Helping of Perspective the guys thought it would be cool if we recorded live without a click track.  I hated the idea, being a stickler for tempo.  It led to a different album and different songs for sure.

Presumably across the band there is a wide range of inspirations; are there any in particular which have impacted not only on the band’s music but your personal approach and ideas to creating and playing music?

Too many to mention, from Jazz to Metal…Speaking for myself I’d say bands like Nothing But Thieves, The Shins, Bear Hands, Coldplay, Eve6, Green Day, Foo Fighters, Kongos…  I love creative rock/pop/alternative songs that still have a hook, but avoid the same four chords and progressions that are so typical.

Is there a particular process to the band’s songwriting?

I am usually the idea man then we flush it out as a group.  Sometimes I’ll record the whole song then we will replace the drums and bass later. I’m into results; I don’t care how we get there.

Where do you, more often than not, draw the inspirations to the lyrical side of your songs?

Life; I’ll sing lyric variations to a demo while I’m out for a run.  I usually find cool ideas that way.  I also hear the parts that suck and need to be changed.

Can you give us some background to your latest release?

I Need You (Ay-O) is an old relate that became new again when it started treating on-line. We’ve always loved the song and are happy to have it finally breaking through the “clutter”.

Give us some insight to its theme.

I need you is about wanting to leave a relationship, but continuing to be drawn back in; then dealing with the fact that needing somebody can be for very different reasons.

Are you a band which goes into the studio with songs pretty much in their final state or prefer to develop them as you record?

I own the studio we record in.  It’s an amazing luxury because we are not “on the clock” burning money.  So we just show up with nothing and play.  Often I’ll have scraps of ideas ready to jump off from.

Tell us about the live side to the band, presumably the favourite aspect of the band?

Yeah, live is where we bring it.  We entertain.  We always have a great time and that usually transfers to the audience.  It’s also the only real way we’ve made any money.  So we play live to survive, and we love it.

It is not easy for any band to make an impact regionally let alone nationally and further afield. How have you found it your neck of the woods? Are there the opportunities to make a mark if the drive is there for new bands?TCF_RingMasterReview

Not easy, but work hard and offer something great.  It doesn’t even have to be unique, just great.  Make people say “holy shit!”, and you’ll do fine.

How has the internet and social media impacted on the band to date?

The internet grants everyone access, even the garbage.  I think we handle it well, but there is that constant drive needed to stand out in all the noise.

Once again a big thanks for sharing time with us; anything you would like to add or reveal for the readers?

Check out our website, http://www.conniptionfits.com/ to listen to all of our songs for free and look for our new EP this summer!

https://www.facebook.com/conniptionfits/  https://twitter.com/conniption_fits

Pete RingMaster

The Ringmaster Review 01/07/2016

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

I Plead Irony – The Solution Is The Problem

IPI_RingMasterReview

Just a handful of months short of three years ago, UK trio I Plead Irony uncaged one of the most rousing and creatively imaginative rock ‘n’ roll albums heard that year and to be honest since. This Statement Is False was compellingly equipped with ferocious and virulently contagious alternative and punk rock roars which, though frequently acclaimed, never quite got the rich attention it and the band deserved. Fair to say though, the Farnborough hailing band was certainly recognised as one of the UK’s most exciting emerging bands by a great many. Now the biggest spotlights are under serious tempting once again with the release of the band’s second album The Solution Is The Problem, it another creatively raucous and energetically incendiary slab of sound and invention to get lustful over.

In many ways, The Solution Is The Problem takes over from where its predecessor left off; imagination stirring and inventively mischievous songs to the fore but swiftly it reveals the broader landscape of creative tenacity and imagination now colouring the fresh maturity in songwriting and sound. Managing to provide more of the riveting same whilst unleashing a whole new character of insatiable adventure, the album is an inescapable arousing of spirit, imagination, and greedily devouring ears.

Formed in the early days of 2011, I Plead Irony was a growing force on the south eastern live scene from its first steps. Sharing time with its members’ other projects such as Ipanema, The Fins, Atomic Garden, and Welcome The Howling Tones, the band released This Statement Is False in 2013, their debut mixed by French producer Guillaume Doussaud. It awoke a new wave of national ears and appetites to the presence of the band and in turn a new host of fans to excite with their renowned live prowess. Now The Solution Is The Problem is the bait to really stir things up; an enticement which has all the qualities and potential to make the threesome of vocalist/bassist Rauf Jordan, guitarist/backing vocalist Paul McDonald, and drummer/backing vocalist Lawrence Arnold, the name on eagerly sharing lips and recommendations.

The album impressively opens with Tiny Violin which enters on a rusty cinematic coaxing. Soon after, a wiry guitar invitation winds around ears, hefty rhythmic swipes and a brooding atmosphere soon in close attention. In no time, the track is strolling with eager intent through ears, the excellent vocal presence of Jordan leading a thick mix of textures and flavours busying themselves within the song. There is a touch of Hundred Reasons meets Japanese Fighting Fish to the track, a spice within a sound which is swiftly and increasingly recognised as prime I Plead Irony. It is simply superb, a rousing and dramatic proposal thick in emotion and intensity entangled in strands of inventive endeavour.

art_RingMasterReviewThe potent expanse of diversity within the album is soon beginning to reveal itself with What If. From vocals to sound, it carries a rockabilly meets melodic rock ingenuity which simply seduces as the track, with the bass on the front foot, prowls ears. Hooks litter every lure of the song’s invitation whilst a virulence of emotive and creative dexterity infests the imagination and psyche. As its predecessor, the track is aural gold and an unstoppable manipulation of the body and listener participation, much as Not The Face which follows straight after. It too is quickly in command, its buoyant infectiousness aligned to imposing aggression and anthemic tenacity with a Billy Talent like resourcefulness to it all.

Already the album is an addiction in the throes of success and strongly backed by the feisty persuasion of Sisyphus and even more so its successor Just A Machine. The first of the two is a relatively reserved and reined proposal but with the bracing edge and slightly cantankerous nature that frequents the I Plead Irony sound. If without sparking the same lusty response as those before it, the sonically fiery song has ears and pleasure full before the second of the two steals the limelight with its Foo Fighters toned incitement. From the delicious crankiness of the bass and the lung roaring vocals of Jordan through to the maze of off-kilter dynamics and ever evolving energy, the track is an anthem to stir the passions and a tapestry of unpredictable invention to ignite the imagination.

What’s Best For You bounces along next with a Jimmy Eat World infectiousness and agitation though yet again any references offered are mere hues in a thick slice of I Plead Irony originality, as evidenced by the rumbling rock ‘n’ roll of Unsung Champions straight after. Jordan and Arnold needs little time to create a web of rhythmic seduction and intimidation which McDonald binds in melodic and sonic enterprise as the vocalist’s vocals shine with narrative and expression. There is nothing about the song not to greedily like; every chord and rhythmic roll the prelude to a theatre of discord lined imagination and spirit inflaming flirtation, it all honed into rock ‘n’ roll alchemy.

The body is soon lost to the addictive shuffle and contagion of Prove Me Wrong; its imposing catchiness wonderfully aligned to a metal inspired trespass as magnetic as the track’s virulence is epidemic like. The song is also another reflection of the bigger and bolder landscape to the band’s writing and invention, an aspect pushed further by the equally intrusive and dynamic Divide[…]Collide. A tenacious snarl is never far from the surface, even as a melodic saunter works with the darker tone of voice and emotion , but similarly the band’s striking imagination is consistently there leaning in on every unexpected twist and resourceful turn of the excellent encounter.

The Solution Is The Problem is brought to a thrilling close by firstly the web of intrigue and galvanic textures making up the Kill The Crow and finally Tragedy Debut, a glorious slice of punk ‘n’ roll which sends the listener this way and that whilst having them, like a puppeteer, physically and emotionally dance. Both tracks hit the sweet spot with the closer especially exhilarating with its invasive and memorable theatre of blues, punk, and muscular alternative rock.

Such the might of This Statement Is False, it was never going to be easy to follow it up but The Solution Is The Problem makes light work of the challenge with its bigger and bolder, not forgetting thrilling plateau of invention and persuasion

The Solution Is The Problem is out now via Rose Coloured Records @ https://ipleadirony.bandcamp.com/

http://www.ipleadirony.com   https://www.facebook.com/ipleadirony   https://twitter.com/ipleadirony

Pete RingMaster 12/04/2016

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

For more exploration of the independent and promotional services check out http://www.zykotika.com/

Elements – Where We Once Begun

Elements Promo Shot_RingMaster Review

The band’s bio states that this year a line-up change for UK alternative rockers Elements has coincided, maybe sparked, a new sound from the band. With their new EP Where We Once Begun our introduction to the Southampton hailing quintet, we cannot say if the shift is dramatic or subtle, but for sure thanks to five tracks of rousing rock ‘n’ roll, their new release shows it has been a potent one.

Formed in later 2013, Elements quickly made a mark locally with their self-titled debut EP and a live presence which has earned them a reputation as one powerful proposition and seen the band share stages with the likes of Bad Rabbits, The Afterparty, DEAD!, Ashestoangels, The Hype Theory, and Public Service Broadcasting. As mentioned the band has recently undergone a personnel change which, taking the Phil Gornell (While She Sleeps, Bring Me The Horizon, Me Vs Hero) produced Where We Once Begun as our evidence, seems to have lit a fire in the creative belly of the five-piece.

Elements Cover Artwork_RingMaster Review   Once EP opener Shaman storms through ears, rapidly stirring up enjoyment and appetite, the band without being wholly unique, reveals freshness and adventure to their music which just grabs attention and sets them apart from the masses. Fair comparisons have been raised to bands such as early Biffy Clyro, YouMeAtSix, and Don Broco but there is plenty more rippling through songs suggesting something individual to Elements. The first track aligns winey blues wrapped tendrils of guitar with a flirtatious almost electro shuffle which is not too far away from the persuasion Blondie once blossomed. It blends well, the song brewing a virulent tempting to which the skittish beats of Ash Martin and the dark lures of Max Bakker’s bass add their own potent seduction. Vocalist Graham Rogers is just as vibrant and inviting, his powerful tones backed well by those of Bakker and guitarist Ollie Butler who alongside fellow string craftsmen Robin Small spins a web of hooks and melodic spicery to match. It is a contagious riot of sound and energy, and a quite irresistible start to the release.

High Time For Being Free comes next, emerging without a breath from its predecessor with its own brand of sinewy riffs and heavily coaxing grooves ridden by the vocal roar of Rogers. As the first track, it leaps on and bounces through ears with an infectiousness which is muscular and tenaciously anthemic, whilst showing a different shade of colour to the band’s sound. Major surprises, as across the EP, are not open bait yet there is again that fresh air and rich enterprise to it which only lures you in deeper before Plotting Treason Or Saving The World uncages its own chest beating anthem littered with blues honed grooves, merciless hooks, and a sultry air which dynamically ignites in a blaze of the chorus.

Up next is the melodic shimmer and emotive energy of Make It Out Alive which takes release and listener into another new landscape of sound and adventure. Again the imposing strength and sonic muscle of the band is a heady proposal but employed in a new strain of sonic fire and provocative drama. The track does take a little longer to grip but leaves a flavoursome and inventive taste in the mouth before Torchlight brings the EP to a fine close with captivating and aggressive melodies courted by tangy grooves and flaming vocals.

Where We Once Begun is not going to set the alternative rock world back on its heels but it does announce Elements as one of its more exciting emerging bands, so much so that already there is a tingle of anticipation for their future something akin to that felt when Jimmy Eat World first broke.

The Where We Once Begun EP is available from August 17th through all stores.

RingMaster 17/08/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright