Volunteer – Goner

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It might not be the most startling thing to assault your ears this year, or stalk a new vein of originality within the varied sphere of noise rock but Goner, the new 10” release from Milwaukee trio Volunteer is a thoroughly appetising and magnetic beast of a release. Consisting of four tracks which are heavier than, and delivered with the suffocating intensity of a landslide, the band’s new EP is a richly satisfying and enjoyable onslaught. No it does not leave you jaw-slacked in awe but offers plenty to spark a hungry attention towards its sculptors.

Formed in 2013, Volunteer consists of guitarist/vocalist Francisco Ramirez, bassist Martin Defatte, and drummer Mark Sheppard, formers members of bands such as Traitors and Gasoline Fight, Stock Options, and Forstella Ford. Within weeks the threesome had recorded their debut release, a self-titled 6-song EP via Chicago’s Underground Communique Records which drew potent interest and responses upon its release last October. Now the band has prepared the ground for a more focused spotlight with Goner, an accomplished and imposingly pleasing proposition which hits ears hard and holds attention tight.

Released in collaboration with Chicago label Forge Again Records and the band’s own Triple Eye Industries, Goner immediately assaults the senses with the weighty presence of Nein. From its first breath riffs offered by the baritone guitar of Ramirez snarl and awaken a greedy appetite whilst the bass of Defatte soon offers its own grizzled enticement. Punctured by the similarly heavy swings of drummer Sheppard and permeated by the grouchy gruff vocals of the guitarist, the song consumes ears with a voracious and blistering energy. Grooves are submerged in the background more than the track’s vibrant foreground, but still make a potent lure in the overall tar thick persuasion of the song. As mentioned of the Volunteer-Goner_cover1200x1200whole EP, the song does not leap out or set new templates for heavy rock but certainly provides an inescapable contagion.

The same can be said of its successor Free-er Bird, a track which emerges from a sonic call to uncage a lumbering senses smothering gait which crawls venomously over the senses. Rhythms cast a slightly more urgent bait within the sonic consumption whilst the deep throaty tone of Ramirez guitar again seduces an already in place hunger, as bred by the likes of Karn8 and Morass of Molasses, for such propositions. Though there is another infectious edge and enticement to the track it is a solid and formidable wall of noisy enterprise lacking the spark of its predecessor and definitely the remaining pair of songs on Goner.

The first of the final two songs is the release’s title track, an instantly gripping and far more adventurous sonic incitement from the band. Grooves and riffs swiftly lay a web of unpredictable and tenacious enterprise, punctuated by the constantly dramatic and hostile bait of rhythms. The song swings with an antagonistic and compelling creative ferocity, scarring and flirting with ears at every turn and through each twist of ideation. You still would not announce its proposal as anything majorly new but it is impossible not to grant its declaration of being virulently addictive and severely enjoyable, whilst setting a lofty peak for the EP.

Goner is brought to a close by I Love You So Much It’s Killing Us Both, an impressive cover of the Jawbreaker track. Lurching with a rhythmic predation and a similarly inflamed ravaging of caustic riffs, the track infests the imagination and emotions through scuzzed up effect loaded vocals, venom dripping grooves, and an irresistible baiting from the bass. It is a toxic treat which brings a fine release to intensely pleasing end.

Goner is a healthy consumption of noise and skilled resourcefulness which fans of band such as Melvins, Unsane, and Jesus Lizard will lick their lips over. It might not be a template maker or soaked in overwhelming originality but it provides a deeply enjoyable and flavoursome encounter to get greedy over and another potential fuelled powerful step in the emergence of Volunteer.

Goner is available via Forge Again Records/Triple Eye Industries digitally and on Ltd 10” vinyl (100 on black and 200 on translucent red vinyl with black swirls) now @ http://wearevolunteer.bandcamp.com/

http://wearevolunteer.com

RingMaster 15/10/2014

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The Males – Her Golden Blood EP

MALES BAND PHOTO

Dirty, fuzz lit, and pungently unfussy, the sound of UK noise rock band The Males is a proposition which just crawls under the skin and gets feet right through to passions dancing to its feverish tune. The band’s new EP Her Golden Blood tells you all you need to know about the emerging band. Consisting of three songs which are just as grunge/stoner fuelled as they are noise spawned, it is an encounter which does not make massive waves but ripples and smoulders very nicely to leave a lingering and raucously reminding indent in thoughts and emotions.

The Males was spawned from the creative coming together of guitarist Will Goldstone and vocalist/drummer Lewis Young at Bournemouth University during the mid-2000s. Eventually joined by bassist Ben Smith, the trio set forth as The Males and were soon drawing attention and eager ears towards their noise bred rock ‘n’ roll. With inspirations from the likes of Shellac, Black Sabbath, Jesus Lizard, Fugazi, The Melvins, the Misfits, Refused, Queens of the Stone Age and AC/DC spicing up their invention, the London based trio uncaged a self-titled demo in 2012, a raw and unruly incitement of sound sparking the imagination and a growing spread of fans. The single Wolves followed in the October of 2013 with a teaser from their debut EP, Golden Gates touching ears earlier this year. All has helped inspire keen anticipation for the new EP, an appetite easily and potently fed by Her Golden Blood and its potential drenched roar.

Opening track Cut Her Off from its first breath leads ears and feet into its immediate inescapable bait, punchy rhythms and raw riffing leading to addictive behaviour upon which sonic designs and the strong vocals add extra tempting. THE MALES EP MASTERThe song flirts with hints of bands, though the ones which most spring to mind and certainly not influences on The Males being as new as they, is Feud and The St Pierre Snake Invasion. There is an expectations feeding aspect to the song in some ways but also a more prominent refreshing energy and coarse rabidity. It is a tenacious encounter with caustic melodies, increasingly dramatic rhythms, and a glaze of sonic enticement simply luring the listener in further.

The track is a strong and masterful start to the EP which the following Golden Gates backs up solidly. It wraps tendrils of sonic coaxing around ears first, an acidic scuzz lined lure which is soon joined by weighty rhythms and an even bigger bass incitement, its tones bulging with devilish intent. The vocals again bring an expressive and eager revelry to the highly satisfying encounter though ultimately there is not quite the same spark of imagination to the body of the song as its predecessor. It certainly offers enough to intrigue and keep thoughts on their toes though, especially to the latter stroll of the track where it seems to find a more virulent persuasion with an irresistible groove.

The final song Hot Blood has an old school punk flavouring to its fiery waltz of moody basslines, agitated rhythms, and squalling riffs. It is hard to define who it reminds of but there is definitely a nostalgic tang to the track which colours its impressive enticing even more potently. The best track on the release, it is a compelling protagonist to imagination and ears, a track which hints at riots and brawls with its energy yet resorts to primal seduction for the main to ignite once again an already greedy appetite.

Her Golden Blood is not going to lead to declarations of The Males being the next big thing but it undoubtedly has the potential and weight to earn the band a stronger spotlight and reputation in their continuing ascent.

The Her Golden Blood EP is available now @ http://males.bandcamp.com/

http://themal.es/

8/10

RingMaster 21/07/2014

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Conjuring Noise: The Great Sabatini Interview

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Having inflamed like so many others, our passions with their blistering intensive and thrilling album Matterhorn, Canadian noise metallers The Great Sabatini returned earlier this year with an even greater mouthwatering proposition. Third album Dog Years is a masterful tempest exuding virulently destructive and invasive sonic devilry; an enthralling examination and manipulation of the senses. Not needing to be asked twice, we rifled questions at Sean from the band to discover the depths of The Great Sabatini, talking about origins, lyrical intimacy, musical magick and much more…

Hey Sean good to meet you and thanks for giving over some of your time to chat with us.

Tell us about the birth of The Great Sabatini and the time leading up to the uncaging of the band in 2007?

Hey, nice to meet you too. It’s our pleasure to talk a bit about our dumb selves. All of us came together when bands we were previously in collapsed. We all decided to start moving away from the kind of things each of us had been doing with past efforts, musically. It seemed to come together easily, naturally. We just kind of went with the flow.

How did the four Sabatini’s meet?

Rob and I have been playing music together since we were 15 or so. We’ve played in bands together since that time. We knew Joey from other bands around town, and even shared a jam room together years before we started playing together. We met Steve in Sudbury, 2004 at a really crappy weekend fest that both of our bands at the time were playing. We became fast friends, and the rest is history.

Did the band start out with a specific intent and is that still the same driving force now or has it evolved with your music?

I think the only intent really was to move away from our previous musical comfort zones. Rob and I were used to writing more technical metal things in standard tuning, so there was a focused effort to distance ourselves from that. We bought baritone guitars and started slowing things down naturally, due to the nature of the much lower tuning and feel of the instruments. You can’t be as busy sometimes when you’re playing in a lower register, so riffs start slowing down for clarity’s sake. In regards to intent, it’s the same as it was from day one; keep challenging ourselves to create music that subverts our own comfort zones as artists. It might not be a huge leap from record to record, but there is movement, and growth, with every new project we take on

You sound is a unique brew of noise, sludge, doom, progressive rock…and plenty more. How would you describe it to simplify things?

As a kind of inside joke, we refer to our sound as “swamp trench arithmetic”. Maybe it hints at a sludgy math-rock vibe… Usually I describe us as a sludge band, because for all the variety rolled into our songs, all of it is pretty grimy or sludge-based. The end result is sort of wrapped up in this sludgy package.

We discovered you through your second album Matterhorn, a startling and riveting treat to our ears. How would you say your music and 1964881_815898598424769_284230856_ncreativity has changed and evolved from your first days, through that great album and onto the just released Dog Years?

I think that, as songwriters, we focus on making things simpler; communicating ideas in a simpler way. Part of that is recognising our strengths, and reining them in. We want to include a myriad of ideas and influences into our sound but feed them through our creative process in a way that results in more a more cohesive end result. I suppose one might call it “nuance”… Not something that most folks associate with brutal, loud music, but I feel that there’s more and more depth and nuance to our songs as we go. Matterhorn was the first time I really felt like we’d accomplished a certain level of that in our music. The songs are relatively simple in structure and riffing, and seem straight forward production-wise, but there’s a subtle balance of feels and ideas stitched together throughout. I think Dog Years employs this much better. Taken at face value, it’s a loud, raw, angry record, but there’s a lot going on in the songs, in a way that isn’t like an overt genre mash-up kind of thing.

We feel the brilliant Dog Years, and it is, is less cruel and destructive than its predecessor but has a more intensive and precise examination of the psyche which makes it just as exhilarating and threatening. Is that something you would agree with?

I do agree. Matterhorn was about cruelty and violence and the harshness of life, ‘cos that’s what I felt when I heard the music we were writing. Dog Years, musically and lyrically, is kind of exploring the things that drove us to play music initially. It has some throwback moments with the punkier parts, and maybe it rocks out a little easier. I still feel like it’s a punishing, loud, angry record but maybe you picked up on the focus of the record. It’s hard to tell sometimes, as the creators of the music, how much of what we’re saying is obvious and how much is completely buried in the end result, but Dog Years is more of a look inside OUR heads and our history, to some extent.

Did you approach the writing and recording of your third album in any way differently to the previous release?

Well, we usually do a lot of writing together in the jam room but a few small bits were demoed separately and sent out via email to the guys, and then tweaked and moulded by each of us on our own time. The songs are totally malleable… they can change easily before we hit the studio. In the past, a lot of our material, especially the Matterhorn stuff, was played on the road a lot before it was recorded, so the songs adapted and changed a bit more, but almost all of the Dog Years material was written and then quickly recorded with less time to mutate. Maybe that gave it a bit more immediacy, or urgency.

I guess the studio and recording process is something always bringing new lessons and discoveries which can be used or avoided next time. Was there anything from Matterhorn which had that inspiration and any new things learned with Dog Years?

There’s always a learning curve. We’re always learning things and trying to apply them the next time around. I can’t think of any major things that happened with Matterhorn that wound up shaping Dog Years in an obvious way… we’ve always strived to make things sound more raw, natural or live-sounding on our records and Matterhorn was a nice step in that direction, but Dog Years, I feel, has a bit more of that raw thing going on.

How long was the new album in the making?

We started writing in earnest at the start of 2013. We spent a lot less time on the road that year and really just focused on writing. By December 2013 we were in the studio and by February of this year the record was mastered. It was a pretty quick turnover, for us.

Like a great many bands do you have to struggle and deal with obstacles of everyday life when it comes to creating and certainly recording a record?

Obstacles are always present. But we’ve been a band for almost 7 years and we deal with things together, in a focused manner, quite efficiently. Making records is something we’re always trying to get better at, but we’ve all been doing it for over ten years and our collective experience is constantly being employed to overcome any obstacle. Thankfully, we’re all really good friends, so we’re good at working together to accomplish our goals

There seems an intimacy at times to the lyrical side of your music which suggests inspirations often come from things close to home and personal experiences. Give us some idea of stories or situations to songs upon Dog Years.

Some of the songs relate to people or things in our personal history. Pitchfork Pete is about a guy Rob and I knew many years ago. Some of the songs deal with our rituals, our perception of our lives as romantic black-magick purveyors of the Almighty Riff. When the reality of being a penniless touring musician sets in, the thing that keeps us going is the magic. Music is total magic and we have fun projecting some kind of cartoonish self-importance onto the band. It’s much more fun to think of ourselves as traveling Riff-Warlocks spreading the unholy gospel of Satan through amplified guitar riffs than it is to see ourselves as the jaded, ageing heshers that we ACTUALLY are. We’re following our dreams. Dog Years is a glimpse into that world, we hope. Lyrically it’s all about that… the world we’ve created for ourselves, full of feral beasts, oracles, war-cries, Viking battle-lust and strange visions. But sometimes this kind of fantasy shit collides with the naked truth of our choices in life, and that’s where the “Dog Years” thing comes in. One day, maybe, we’ll be old men looking back on these times as our Dog Years, all that time we spent hammering away at our dreams.

487212_598817973466167_250606339_nHow does the creation of songs more often than not transpire in the band?

More often than not, Rob and I write riffs or ideas in our own time, and then, when we get together, the ideas are presented and everyone puts forth their own takes on the riffs and we arrange the structures together. There isn’t any one mastermind. Everyone’s fingerprints are on the end result.

Is there a particular moment or twist in Dog Years which gives you an extra inner tingle of pride or just satisfaction?

I think each of us probably has his own moment like that, but for me, Akela was one of those. I wasn’t thinking that would be on the record, but the guys heard my demo, and wanted it to be there. It’s a pretty naked thing, for me, to have a song like that on there. There isn’t any wall of noise to hide behind. I recorded that in my room at home and everyone agreed that to re-record it might ruin it. So, I feel pretty happy that Akela is on the final cut.

Tell us about the great ‘scary’ album cover.

We wanted the cover to reflect our childhood in some weird way. We were aiming for an image that looked borrowed, from another time, not from 2014. I made the puppet, and he represents a certain aspect of our collective personality. Rather than actually steal an old image that may have worked just as well, we opted to create this thing ourselves and hopefully imbue that aspect into it in a subtle way. Really, I want people to see it, react to it, and fill it in with whatever feeling they think is best.

The album has been released on the great Solar Flare Records. How did that come about and is it true that the equally brilliant Sofy Major has some inspirational input?

We met Sofy Major first in North America when they came here to make a record and tour a bit and then later when we played with them in France. Sofy Major/Solar Flare are the raddest dudes on the planet, so their interest in Dog Years is incredibly flattering. Those dudes have been through a lot and suffered it all with a smile on their faces so that alone is a huge inspiration to us. Their music is incredible… I don’t wanna butter them up too much, but getting to work within that particular family is a huge privilege.

What is the Montreal metal and rock scene like right now and specifically in regard to your style of creative mayhem?

Montreal is always a hotbed of awesome music. In recent years, more of the sludge, doom, noise-rock and stoner rock stuff has been surfacing, which is nice, but I feel like everyone here is reacting to their surroundings, in a nice way… nobody is trying to sound like anyone else, I feel. Everyone that I know kind of does his or her own thing and tries to blaze their own trail. Sometimes it’s hard to be heard among all the amazing bands and artists, but we have our niche.

What comes next for The Great Sabatini across the rest of 2014?

We’re just about to get home from the first stretch of touring. We’ll probably do a few small things this summer but in the fall we head out again to do some touring in the U.S and then get ready to hit Europe in the spring of 2015.

Once again big thanks for sitting down with us; any final words for us to contemplate?

Thank you for your interest and support. Final words? Ummmmmmmmmmmmm……

And lastly give us an idea of the biggest inspirations on you musically and individually.

Take your basic 80’s/90’s generation stuff, all the grunge, punk, metal and hardcore, and throw our dad’s old Beatles, Zeppelin, Sabbath, and King Crimson records in there too. We’re all just disciples of this great tome of Rock. Finding a nice balance is the hardest part when starting a band, but ALL of that stuff is in our music, and album covers, lyrics etc. You could get real specific and say things like Melvins, Today Is The Day, Helmet, Jesus Lizard, Napalm Death, King Crimson, or what have you, but there’s just too huge a range of stuff influencing us to make for an easy answer.

http://www.thegreatsabatini.com

Read our review of Dog Years @ https://ringmasterreviewintroduces.wordpress.com/2014/06/02/the-great-sabatini-dog-years/

Pete RingMaster

The RingMaster Review 21/06/2014

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Whores – Clean EP

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It is generally agreed that the Ruiner EP of 2011 was one exceptional introduction to its creators, a release which thrust US intensive noise rockers Whores straight into the centre of eager attention and marked them out as a band with the promise and armoury to become a possible tour-de-force to come. Their new release, the Clean EP not only confirms those early suspicions and expectations but in many ways blows its impressive predecessor out of the water whilst still declaring there is still plenty more to come from within the Atlanta trio. It is an unrelenting juggernaut of power and invention, a brute before which the passions soon fall to gleefully bask in the merciless ravaging triumph it unleashes.

Formed in 2010 Whores took little time in igniting the energies and hunger of fans locally with their rapacious heavyweight blend of aural provocation which plays like a voracious mix of Helmet, Jesus Lizard, Melvins, and UK band The St Pierre Snake Invasion. Their Brutal Panda Records released debut soon placed the band before worldwide awareness, its ferocious no hold barred invention an undoubted gripping entrance. With acclaim and success breeding around the band for that release and their live performances which has found the band alongside the likes of Torche, Kylesa, The Atlas Moth, Royal Thunder and many more, Whores now unleash their sophomore attack and quite simply the Ryan Boesch (Melvins, Helmet, Tomahawk, Fu Manchu) recorded Clean is the band taking another major step forward.

Again unleashed via Brutal Panda, the EP immediately stands snarling at the ears with the guitar opening of Baby Bird. The riffs of 1006024_605198922834746_308244883_nChristian Lembach are a cantankerous rub soon joined by the earthy bass growl of Jake Shultz, its throaty prowl instantly irresistible alongside the swinging thumping rhythmic assault of Travis Owen. It is a potent combination which takes on another guise and toxicity when Lembach restrains his fingers to let his vocals impressively swagger across the now primarily rhythm cast crowding of the senses. The track is an evolving, exhilarating contagious brawl of punk predation and riff clad incitement which feeds the senses as well as the already brewed hunger to the fullest enterprising meal of nose rock.

The immense start is continued through Last Looks, another track with a carnal breath to its bass and sonic endeavour and an antagonistic ingenuity to its invention. Vocals and guitar provide a rapacious presence which crawls over and permeates the psyche with intimidation, though it withholds any violent intent to make a seductive caustic embrace rather than a vicious assault upon the senses. Like its predecessor there is a rampant imagination to the track and a craft which elevates every lure and idea to another potent depth whilst its infectiousness defies any refusal from thoughts and passions.

      I Am Not A Goal-Oriented Person from its first seconds is a stalking temptation, the bass a cantankerous reptile coring the tempest whilst the sonic web of guitar and aligned riff rabidity oppresses the ear with a deliciously magnetic sonic squall of adventure and senses ravishing toxicity. Without quite matching the previous tracks, the song still easily feeds the awoken keen appetite for Clean which its successor, Cougars, Not Kittens equally matches and inspires a little more greed from. Verging on psychotic in its early sonic breath and exhaustingly expressive vocals, the track unfolds a groove which winds pleasingly around the ears before the heavy tempestuous doomy aspect of its heart takes the brief and impacting slab of muscle to a pungently intensive conclusion.

Next up Blue Blood lumbers through the ear with a sludge rock texture to its virulent bait, a heady full on weight which across the leviathan of a song steps aside for rivetingly addictive restrained garage punk spawned teases and lures where vocals and slowly chugging riffs play over an awaiting rhythmic confrontation. It is a masterful animalistic hunt sculpted with invention and epidemically enthralling mastery, a mix of Queens Of The Stone Age and Mclusky honed into an imaginative sonic scourge.

     I Am An Amateur At Everything completes the EP with a fire of sonic infiltration and rhythmic badgering, both aspects driven brilliantly by the ever compelling vocals and equally dramatic and corrosive bass marauding. It is a song which manages to be immediately addictive and also a smouldering slow burning entrapment of the passions to thrillingly close out an outstanding and aggressively intoxicating feast of noise. Skewering the passions with every barb on every hook offered whilst ensuring that anticipation for future releases from Whores will be impatient and rabid, Clean is one of the highlights of the year and another declaration of just how major Whores is destined to be.

https://www.facebook.com/pages/Whores/108004672554176

9.5/10

RingMaster 28/10/2013

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Cattle: Self Titled EP

AT18 - Cattle - EP front cover. Eunuch version. Black and white scan.

When approaching the site for a review of their new self-titled EP, UK noise distressers Cattle described their sound as ‘noise rock in the vein of Big Business, Jesus Lizard and Godheadsilo’. That just about sums up their outstanding release though they forgot it also has a very healthy vein of Morkobot about it too. The four track behemoth of noise and sonic intrusion is simply a masterful brawl upon the ear and one of the first real treats of the year so far.

From Leeds, the trio of Tom, Ant, and Chris manipulate air, thoughts, and synapses by unleashing the primal passions of voice, bass, and drums into a tempest of corrosive splendour. The band formed in the summer of 2012 with all members previously featuring in local bands over the years. It is band for which the term DIY was invented, the members in every aspect of their musical presence and upon the release produced each and every turn of its muscular confrontation from  mixing and recording to packaging and its release.

First track Rockets opens with a lone resonating bass thought, its presence emotively languid and to be honest not necessarily the most obvious of invitations. It is just a melancholic breath though, an aural sigh before the instrument picks up its head and starts to capture the imagination and attention with skilled and devious expertise. With magnetic unpredictable beats and air hassling vocal squalls the track evolves into a grooved conspirator which in no time has caged and fired up a lustful ardour for its virulent sound. Vocals soon score and graze the senses with their scowling spite whilst the drums pick the ear with lethal, concise, and uncompromising accuracy. By the time the track is reaching its compelling climax there is a maelstrom of irresistible invention and caustic passion at play which entices like a devilry conjured by a hybrid mix of again Morkobot and Rip, Rig & Panic.

The following Whoa Bessie initially teases with melodic bass incitement soon accompanied by resonating forthright beats and then gradually expands into a sludge lent swagger and corruptive intensity. Into its magnetic stride the track greedily ravishes the atmosphere, its raw distorted voice a sonic abrasion at its most delicious and the vocals themselves an undisguised fury with a wonderful lack of definition and restraint. The bass perverts the clarity of its notes into a twisted and riled grind with a touch upon the senses as vexatious as a sand blaster giving extra venom to the glorious scourge upon person and thoughts, and though it does not reach the contagion of the first it is a persuasive and thrilling irritant.

Sun Fangs and Wide Eyes is a sonic seduction from its very first breath, the cleaner yet still roughly glazed vocals given a clear run at the ear as the bass and beats pick their punches and spots around them. A storm soon consumes the ambience of the song though to envelope the listener in another infectious quarrel of noise and fuzz coated energy. Like all the tracks it brings dissidence to its encounter which impacts and excites whilst continually scarring and exploiting  already smarting wounds each delivers with insidious craft to leave one breathless and hungry.

Final track Pyramid Shaped Hole has improv looseness to its tempestuous stomp of snarling riffs, tempting rhythms, and jazzy wantonness. Like throughout the release, the sound is a thick and imaginative wash with the carnally driven side of the bass especially irresistible and intimidatingly entrancing, but on the closer everything finds extra mischief and riveting imagination to ignite the same in the listener.

Cattle is a band you know will only get better and better which on the evidence of their outstanding EP is a truly exciting thought. Noise has never come in a finer blistering sonic frenzy and is waiting for attention as a name your price download @ http://cattle.bandcamp.com/

www.facebook.com/CATTLEBAND

9/10

RingMaster 01/03/2013

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Super Luxury – Mystery Thriller Teen Drama EP

You can hear so much promise and potential within the debut EP from UK band Super Luxury that it is hard not to be excited about them and their future.  The three track Mystery Thriller Teen Drama EP just bristles with energy and musical contempt let alone mischief to ignite a strong eagerness to follow their evolution and creativity ahead whilst sparking real pleasure in the now.

From Leeds, the quintet of Christobel Jacobs, Hamish Samsonite, Ace Nodwell, Si Cartwright, and Charles C. Bell, formed in the merging weeks of 2010 and 11. They could be classed as punk, rock, garage punk, noise or…but to be honest they do not slip wholly into any category yet involve all in their abrasive rock n roll sounds. Their influences are listed as bands such as AC/DC, Big Black, Jesus Lizard, Minor Threat, Black Sabbath, Frank Zappa, Ween, and Laughing Hyenas, and you can hear those seeds in their sounds but they offer much more of their own conjuring. Their music like the release is raw and relatively lo-fi, an unpolished gem, and you can only hope no one does come along and adds a sheen or gloss to the band to surely dissipate their potency and uniqueness.

The title track steps into view upon bold consistent beats spearing light scythes of guitar and discord with keys bubbling behind lying in wait. The brew is soon agitated into a riot of vocal squalls, caustic guitar abrasions and hypnotic rhythms, and as a spidery groove scampers over the ear the song expands its reach. Scorched discord dipped guitars send shards of sonics across the song as the bass and drums control the cage of sound one is willingly sucked into. The song never explodes into the storm it suggests yet is all the better for the defined restraint holding back its hunger. The track is well crafted and deliberate without sounding at any point contrived or forced, a impressive and compulsive start.

The following Kellogg’s Wasps starts off with a classic rock swagger and group shouts to stir up attention before exposing its veins of niggling guitar manipulations which buzz around the head in the suggested manner of its title subjects. Lyrically one can only interpret the intent, its intrigue as striking and open to thought as the aural narrative and provocative sonic stings alongside.

Ghostesses completes the release just as impressively as the other tracks stated their case. It is a blistered rant of persistent beats, expressive slightly desperate gaited vocals, and fiery guitar play. The track sits more in the noise arena than the other pair, its acidic rushes bringing a full whisper of bands like The Gaa Gaas and Raised On Replicas but with a stronger raucous garage air.

It is a fine finish to an excellent first release from the band. Admittedly the production is too low key for the songs and they maybe lack a fuller punch considering it is a five piece, but it does not detract from the obvious quality and promise of the band. Super Luxury have the skills and imagination to evolve into something quite special with every step going on the evidence of Mystery Thriller Teen Drama, going to be a unpredictable and eagerly followed joy.

Get your name your own price copy of  the EP @ http://superluxury.bandcamp.com/

http://superluxuryofficial.blogspot.co.uk/

RingMaster 09/10/2012

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