Slippertails – There’s A Disturbing Trend

 

Slippertails_COVER

     US rock band Slippertails is a bit of a mystery you will find when looking for info on the creators of new album There’s A Disturbing Trend. Based in New Jersey and formed by its members in Bloomington, Indiana where they roomed together, the band is apparently a duo though the only name seemingly offered up is that of frontman Nick Casertano who recorded demos alone in his basement which would eventually become this album. Other than that it is pretty much left to the imagination to wonder what the band is about, but what is not a secret is the stirring addictive sound band and release persuades with. A merger of sludge bred tendencies within an alternative rock/garage punk narrative and steered by a hypnotic vocal drawl which at times embraces shoegaze mesmerism, Slippertails creates a presence which worms deep under the skin and into the psyche with irreverent contagion.

     The album is not a flawless affair if being critical but such its potency and potential it is hard not to be excited about the prospects and future creativity of the band whilst glossing over any small negatives. Varied in fuzz drenched sonic spice and caustic imagination which sears and scores the senses, There’s A Disturbing Trend has a nagging almost pestilential beauty which just empowers and improves over time and though a raw lo-fi proposition which maybe will grate on some, the nine track tempest of noise is a masterful slice of sonic alchemy. The immediate description of the band’s sound which comes to mind is Frank Black meets Everclear, the latter thanks to the vocal delivery and alternative rock/grunge tendencies of songs, with plenty of Melvins juices in the mix but that is only part of the story to be honest as the songs soon reveal.

     Opening with its first single Hip New Jerk, the album makes an energetic entrance with keen punchy rhythms puncturing the instantly compelling smog of scuzzy guitar. The vocals of Casertano soon seize control with a Frank Black like presence which infuses into the heavy garage punk sounds too. It is an irresistible lure of a starter with a very relaxed breath which fits in perfectly with the more boisterous and scowling aspects of the song. A great single and opener it makes an early strong plateau for the album to maintain which the following Failure matches with its different type of temptation. A slow almost stalking encounter for the ears, the track seduces and intimidates with equal efficiency, flames of guitar smouldering in the air whilst bass and rhythms scowl belligerently beneath them. Again there is a Frank Black like suasion which predominantly seems to guide the inspirations for the whole album but it is not so overpowering as to dismiss any of the uniqueness of Slippertails.

     Both Walk and Garden State Of Mind ignite the appetite into a hungrier state of eagerness; the first from a hypnotic drum coaxing evolving a garage punk tempting which latches on to the exceptional rhythmic bait whilst a sonic web of guitar toxicity and effect showered vocals play out their narratives. It is one of those songs which holds a virulence which the emotions unavoidably get infected by whilst its successor with another crawling sonic festering of an approach, wraps its fuzz sculpted arms acidically around the ears before serenading them with delicious vocal harmonies alongside the ever engaging core vocal causticity of Casertano. The pair only inflates the already buoyant pleasure spread by the album and though it at times takes time to fully recruit the passions There’s A Disturbing Trend by this point already has full command of thoughts and emotions.

   The following pair of Gold Tooth and I Will Peel You Open move into that Everclear side of things, the vocals very much reminding of Art Alexakis whilst the expressive emotive sonic casting is a close cousin to that created by the Oregon band. It is fair to say that both songs fall short of what comes before them, the second almost labouring in its persuasion, but still the two ultimately convince with a craft and infectiousness which can and does only enhance the presence of the album. Things are soon back on course though with the brilliant All Seeing Eye, a song which sounds like Jesus and Mary Chain in tandem with House Of Love as they seduce The Walker Brothers. It is a transfixing mesmerism which leaves imagination and senses lost in a fuzz drizzled evocation of an emotively crafted sunset.

     The brief punk surge of Altar Wine also has a sixties temperament to its aggressive outburst whilst closing song I Wanna Take Pills With You is a psyche addled piece of sultry enchantment, a shadowed soaked melodic psychedelic glow of danger and seduction. It is a slow burning conclusion which like the album just gets more potent and magnetically thrilling over time and plays. There’s A Disturbing Trend is a striking encounter which makes you work for its rapture but pays handsomely with some quite enchantingly abrasive treasures.

https://www.facebook.com/pages/Slippertails/487759917932606

8.5/10

RingMaster 14/01/2014

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Pink Mexico – Pnik Mxeico

Pink Mexico

More magnetic than Charlize Theron skinny dipping and as radiantly shimmering as the waters lapping around the lady’s body, Pnik Mxeico the debut album from Pink Mexico is simply an enthralling sonic glaze upon the senses. A vibrant brew of garage rock and indie pop with healthy essences of grunge, punk, and shoegaze kissed alternative rock, the release is a seductive hug which refreshes the senses and awakens the passions. It falls short of being a classic debut but hits the target dead centre with a thrilling and imagination igniting presence which tantalises and caresses with passion and adventure.

Pink Mexico is the solo project of former Anything But Animals drummer/vocalist Robert Preston, though recently and post album the band has grown in number with the addition of John Chambers. Attempting to “individually capture the sound he had been eager to achieve since pre-puberty”, Preston entered a Brooklyn ‘booze-drenched party basement studio’ with producer/musician Jon Granoff who engineered and mixed the subsequent recordings to emerge as Pnik Mxeico. Self-released by the Los Angeles hailing Preston earlier this year the album now gets its re-appearance through Fleeting Youth Records to charm all those who missed its first sonic caress of the world.

The album opens with Seabird and a sweet haranguing of riffs under soaring falsetto led vocals from Preston. Like a delicious mix of My Bloody Valentine, Jesus and Mary Chain, and Jane’s Addiction with loud whispers of Jan and Dean plus the Strokes, the song immediately taunts the passions to come out and play, which they do with eagerness as the song romps on with a scuzz lilted breath and riveting imagination. There is a familiarity to the song which subsequently pervades the whole release; a feeling of a previously met friend adorned with new melodic and sonic endeavour. The track is garage punk at its most contagious and diverse, a cloak of persuasion the following A Head Full of Slime is as happy with and as inventive in using. With a smaller stride than the opener but just as keen in its appetite to please, the song roams the senses with a mischievous air and vocal attraction which is irresistible.

Both Daisyface and Shrub Fuse continue the impressive start, the first parading a Nirvana like groove from the guitar aside effect clad, harmony kissed vocals and an anthemic rhythmic coaxing whilst the second adds extra garage punk causticity and a rhythmic battering to its sultry stomp of punk pop and shoegaze unity. With teasing keys adding extra devilry and temptation, the song romps with an elegant rabidity recruiting just as hungry reception from ears and heart. By this point on the album though all tracks have individual characters and presences there is a similarly bred and cast essence to their suasion which asks for that extra focus at times which songs and album undoubtedly reward richly for the effort with a full infectiousness to bask in.

The likes of Paperclip Toothpick with its smouldering heat and emotion, and the grunge spawned senses grazing Mold continue the album’s addiction sculpting lure, both almost insidious in their tempting suggesting the devil’s hand or promised souls are involved whilst Hussy Woofer parades a sixties pop flavouring which is often hinted at in previous tracks but has a full flame going here to again excite and inspire the imagination. Thoughts of a union of 13th Floor Elevators and the Everly Brothers comes to mind as the song dances rigorously within the ears as well as at times Black Rebel Motorcycle Club but for all the references sparked, Pink Mexico has a sound which stands uniquely to the band.

The closing acoustic and vocal kiss on the ear Not Alone brings the outstanding release to a potent close, its melodic caressing mesmeric and provocative. Pnik Mxeico is a luscious express of vocal and musical beauty with a raw breath and caustic edge which simply seduces the passions. Simply a must investigate release to end the year.

http://www.pinkmexico.bandcamp.com

https://www.facebook.com/flamingpinkmexico/

9/10

RingMaster 18/12/2013

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Deathline – Every Dying Breath

photo Beki Cowey

photo Beki Cowey

    Taken from second album Nova which came out last year, London/Helsinki electronic rock duo Deathline release new single Every Dying Breath to once again stir up and bring a compelling caustic breath to air and senses. A blend of industrial rhythmic provocation, swarming dirty electronics, and post punk starkness veined with tender melodic tempting, the singles is a magnetic confrontation which without igniting burning fires in the passions stokes them up into a healthy hunger for the band’s invention and imagination.

Consisting of Jennie Werlemar (vocals/bass) and Kaoru Sato (guitar/programming), Deathline bring a reworked version of Every Dying 17628_10152039361214056_1908301005_nBreath coating it in a hazier almost suffocating atmosphere and acidic ambience. It is a creature which permeates every pour and thought whilst engaging them on a corrosive dance of enterprise and enchanting mystery. The opening call of the song is a close relation to Blondie’s Atomic, a whisper which never truly evaporates as the track wraps its causticity and temptation around the ear. The vocals of Werlemar are dark and sinisterly seductive complimenting the shadows of the track whilst the keys and guitar temper each other’s strengths to sculpt a union which pulls appetite and imagination deep and eagerly into the song’s textured depths. With elements of Artery and Jesus and Mary Chain also making their essences open within the psychedelia licked sonic soup, the song is a vibrant and enthralling lure which earns and offers stronger rewards with each journey within its stifling beauty.

Two remixes of the track follow to differing effects. The first is from Danish electronica duo holm/mirland and clears away the sonic smog of the original but loses the depth and crowding entrapment which works so well. It is a decent enough take but stripped down even with a more electronic punctuation, the track is merely a passing smile between the broad dark grin of the lead track and the riveting lip spread of the following Shaken Not Remixed version from The Dead Zoo. Again this track receives a clean-up but in its place a stringed embrace and orchestral wash fills the dramatic gaps left empty by its predecessor. With a Bond like breath and smouldering melodic heat the track is an immersive and absorbing flight which even makes a valid suasion on our less than eager thoughts on remixes.

The release closes with a demo version of The Death Line, the track a beguiling conspirator with shadows for an emotive, filth littered sonic waltz which leads the imagination into a fall within a noir narrative and aural isolation. It is a pleasing end to an equally satisfying and eventful release. Every Dying Breath is an attention grabbing riveting tempter for both Deathline and Nova for all new recruits and confirmation of the band’s qualities for existing fans.

https://www.facebook.com/theDeathline

7/10

RingMaster 07/10/2013

 

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Exit Calm – The Future Isn’t What It Used To Be

Exit-Calm-550x366

After a relatively quiet couple of years since the release of their debut album in 2010, UK rock band Exit Calm returned earlier this year with the well-received single The Promise and now fully step into view with the new album The Future Isn’t What It Used To Be. The nine track release of soaring epic melodies and matching textures continues on where its predecessor left off though finding a stronger emotive and compelling depth to wrap the senses and lose the imagination within. It is a skilfully crafted and beautifully imagined collection of songs, and though a release which ultimately does not ignite any real sparks and fires inside, leaves the listener with a healthy appetite and easily provoked satisfaction.

The South Yorkshire quartet of vocalist Nicky Smith, guitarist Rob Marshall, bassist Simon Lindley, and drummer Scott Pemberton, certainly stoked up a strong wealth of acclaim and hunger for their previous album and live performances which has seen them play alongside the likes of Modest Mouse, Echo & The Bunnymen, The Boxer Rebellion, and Soulsavers as well as lighting up stages at the likes of the V Festival and Tokyo’s Liquid Rooms. Embroiled in the inspirations of the likes of the moodier guitar led bands of the nineties, the sound of Exit Calm has a calming yet provocative effect on the ear and the new album is primed with plenty of fire hot impacting sounds. It is probably not too harsh to say that there is not a wealth of moments and songs which linger in the memory past their company but within their embrace the listener is immersed in some striking and potently enterprising adventures emotionally and aurally.

The first single from the album The Rapture opens things up, guitars conspiring to raise tingles with their resonating voices and sonic ec_album_covercaresses. The throatier call of the bass brings welcome shadows whilst the melodic and sonic flames lick with restraint but potency at the ear awaiting the entrance of the excellent vocals of Smith. With a scorching breath to the climactic spires of melodic and passionate intent, the song swamps the senses in a pleasing and heated hold of imaginative narrative and impacting reflective sound. There is an early U2 whisper to the track especially vocally which does it no harm, and a feel of My Bloody Valentine to its body that makes for a satisfying and beckoning temptation.

Both Albion and Fiction continue the strong start, the first a reserved but heated flame of melodic textures and evocative hues and its successor a wash of jangling guitar teases and bass shadows around a vocal and melodic expression which pulls in the essences of Jesus and Mary Chain into the band’s own distinct poetic sound. Though neither song reach the heights of the first, both cast an absorbing and magnetic lure over ear and thoughts, the second of the two almost finding a presence which leaves a mark on the memory away from its caress.

New single When They Rise adds a little Oasis like confidence to its energetic yet reined in swagger and with an Inspiral Carpets gaited infectiousness makes an obvious lure into the album for newcomers even if the track is not the strongest on show, that honour belonging with ease to Holy War which follows the quietly contagious and slowly persuading Higher Bound. The simmering ballad is ripe with tender and descriptive melodies which outshine the vocals but against the pinnacle of the album The House Of Love toned song has a fight to stand out. Holy War instantly has a drama and imposing presence to its entrance and progress, a guitar scripted blaze and rhythmic mystique making a sirenesque plea to the passions whilst the band offers an invention and entrapment which dances and incites the imagination. The melodically colour strewn song stands head and shoulders above the rest of the album and is the one time the release repeatedly makes a suggestive and vibrant return away from the record.

The Promise slips in to a sixties wrapped elegant glaze upon a shoegaze wash, though one which is unafraid to add some muscular tempting especially through the drums. This brings a Birdland toned fire to the smouldering though without the scuzzier raw aspects they were renowned for. Glass Houses equally grabs attention with an intense heat to its sonic ceiling under which guitar and bass around the fine vocals paint an emotive picture, whilst the closing Open Your Sky provides a final nostalgic tease with its opening melodic gambit raising thoughts of The Walker Brothers to evolve into an Echo & The Bunnymen sounding embrace with psychedelic flames kissing the surface.

There is no doubting that The Future Isn’t What It Used To Be is a fine and impressively crafted as well as presented release, but apart for one maybe two moments it fails to grasp and find a memorable hold on thoughts and passions away from its body. In its arms though the album is a satisfying pleasure which confirms if not stretches the already impressive status of the band.

http://www.exitcalm.net/

8/10

RingMaster 22/09/2013

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Friday Club – All I Wanna Do Is

friday club pic

One of those insatiable riots you know you have to climb on board with as it teases and taunts the ears, All I Wanna Do Is the new single from UK rockers Friday Club is an irresistible flame of invigorating unpolished fiery rock ‘n’ roll. It grabs you from the first second and exhausts your energy as it takes limbs and voice on a charge of sonic mischief and blues edged aural addiction. The Birmingham band has been earning some very potent reactions and support over recent months and with ease the single shows why.

Earning strong acclaim with their live shows which has seen them in their short time as a band playing This Feeling and supporting the likes of Chase & Status, Labrinth, and Black Tambourines, Friday Club added extra fuel to their seemingly instant rise when putting up the live demo of the track Fall Down Kids, the song breeding more ardour their way, as did the putting up online the lead track from this single (the ‘unclean’ version named All I Wanna Do Is Fuck) , its appearance grabbing over a thousand listens within its first week. Recorded live the new single is set to accelerate things again, it has all the weaponry and temptation required it just needs ears.

All I Wanna Do Is instantly sears the ear with a sonic lance of guitar coaxing soon backed by rhythmic hustling from drums and540877_432364740174910_15284868_n bass and an expansion to the acidic melodic guitar wash. Settling into a slightly less urgent gait as the strong vocals add their expressive touch, the song is a blaze of compelling and contagious persuasion with climactic infection soaked choruses which ensure that if the listener is not already stomping in league with the aural bait they cannot resist any longer. I have to be honest and say the omission of the word ‘Fuck’ in the chorus is a mistake or certainly should have been replaced by something as the sudden pause/pull up does feel like a blip in what is an outstanding song. Nevertheless it is a thrilling bad boy of a track which with its slight Jesus and Mary Chain jaunt and scuzzy House of Love like melodic drive makes for a riveting and passion inciting encounter.

The accompanying Tropical is a wonderfully raw and again fire emblazoned sonic  wash, its surf rock like sirenesque lure a delicious heat over the raucous dirt covered rock ‘n’ roll floor of the song. With undemanding but firmly gripping rhythms and sizzling guitar grazes, as well as a great caustic snarl to the vocals, the song is an aurally mischievous brawl which like its co-conspirator steals the passions.

For rock music with a devilish swagger to its attitude and impossibly virulent call to its raw honest body, All I Wanna Do Is has all the ingredients of a classic and the band all the imagination and passion to become a real inventive force.

https://www.facebook.com/FridayClubBand

8.5/10

RingMaster 22/06/2013

 

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Waves Of Fury: Thirst

Sounding like the deliciously steamy hybrid from a union of Sam Cooke, Thee Vicars, Rocket From The Crypt, and Jesus and Mary Chain, Thirst the debut album from sonic teasing crew Waves Of Fury is quite magnificent. Consisting of ten garage punk filtered rock n roll/R&B classics, the release pulsates with an instinctive and inspiring brew of infectious sonic grazings wrapped in warm and refreshing imagination. It is excitable yet equally held by a restraint which allows every individual element and idea to shine within the acidic surface smouldering of sound. Quite simply Thirst is a triumph of noise and heart.

The Somerset based quintet of Carter Sharp (vocals, guitars), Jamie Bird (pianos, vocals), James McPhee (drums), Fil Ward (guitars, vocals), and Bim Williams (horns), has been making distinct waves both sides of the pond, the band undertaking  successful tour of Southern States in the US before venturing into the studio to record their album. With its magnetic charms and sounds Thirst is destined to spark an even fuller and wider recognition, it is hard to imagine a release this dynamically compulsive doing anything less.

The album opens with Death Of A Vampire, its initial shadowed music hall like echoes the introduction to a storm of fiery horns and fuzzy guitars paced by flattened chilled keys. As the distinct hollow lilted vocals stroll within the sounds the track flares up again and again with shimmering melodic expulsions and contagious enterprise. It is a merciless lure, a barbed splendour to envelop and seduce the senses and passions, something which can be applied to Thirst as a whole. There is a tomb like atmosphere to the song which only accentuates its immediate and masterful inventive presence.

From the incendiary beginning the following I Don’t Know What To Make Of Your Fucked Up Friends and Businessman’s Guide To Witchcraft offer their own caustic fires to overwhelm the heart. The first is a riled Motown gaited piece of magic which like an insidious puppeteer controls limbs and voice whilst unleashing its own cutting intent and opinions. The second is an amazing mix of shall we say Joy Division and The Four Tops, a constrained riot of sound and passion yet unbridled in its mesmeric strength and teasing. It is glorious, arguably best track on the album though that does wander as a choice with each listen of Thirst.

As tracks like the dark and schizo spiced Killer Inside Me with its scuzzed breath the perfect shadow to the melodic shards hooks and barbed horns, Pretender Soul, and The Everlasting Thirst state their claim on the affections the strong variety to the songs and writing of Sharp is unmissable. The second of this trio is a gentle emotive breeze within a flesh burning sonic heat whilst the latter is an acutely driven stomp across the ear with spotlights of horns sparking up a dazzling sheet of nagging sonics and consuming energy. The album is a perpetually twisting joy, each track bringing something new and unexpected but with a swagger to turn heads and ignite desires for much more.

After the brief Buddy Holly like pleasure of Nervous Exhaustion, the album closes on the mighty Viodrene, a song which just hypnotizes with its varied ideas and noise wrapped in a furnace of raw guitars and explosive horn crescendos. With an excellent break midway to allow a breath before the equally staggering conclusion, the track is all you need to know about Waves Of Fury and their quite brilliant sound. Lyrically the album is inspired by gothic writers like Poe and Saul Bellow but also by life and everyday manipulations, this song dealing with celebrity culture in an acerbic and mischievously skilled ingenuity.

Waves of Fury have created an album and songs which take all the wonderful discord and cryptic facets of melodic and sonic elegance and conjure them into their own unique and irresistible beauty. Thirst is outstanding and will easily makes a late and formidable impression on those best of year lists.

https://www.facebook.com/pages/The-Waves-of-Fury/204286162955259

RingMaster 29/10/2012

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright