The Cavemen – Too High To Die/I’d Kill

burgos-11_RingMasterReview

It has been a busy year for New Zealanders The Cavemen from just releases alone. April saw the unleashing of their exceptional self-titled debut album followed in June by the just as rousing and wonderfully arrogant two track single Juvenile Delinquent. Now the quartet of vocalist Paul, guitarist Jack, bassist Nick, and drummer Jake Caveman have freed new offering Too High To Die/I’d Kill ahead of yet another album; the single two slices of the band’s distinctive garage bred punk ‘n’ roll which is impossible not to get lustfully off on.

Now UK based, The Cavemen have arguably unearthed their most primal and trashiest sound for their new single; breeding both tracks with the kind of punk rock which has ignited and corrupted rock ‘n’ roll since the days of Gene Vincent and Jerry lee Lewis, through the likes of Hasil Adkins and The Stooges, and on to the likes of The Cramps, Gun Club, and The Ramones and more. Raw and cast in lo-fi manna, the single sizzles on the senses as it infests the body and purges the psyche like a predacious attack of sonic leprosy.

too-high-frontcover-copy_RingMasterReviewToo High To Die rumbles and grumbles from its first sonic lancing of ears, rhythms cantankerously bouncing as deranged vocal urgency colludes with the winy enterprise of the guitar. The whole song is like one giant chorus such its rousing catchiness with the fiery guitar solo additional toxicity to greedily devour.

Companion I’d Kill is just the same, a virulent stomp from first note to last but even more soaked in seventies punk with a touch of bands like The Saints and The Lurkers to it. A belligerent snarl with more contagion to its persuasion than any plague, the track alone but definitely in union with Too High To Die sparks even more impatient anticipation for The Cavemen’s impending second full-length.

Too High To Die / I’d Kill is out now via Dirty Water Records @ http://www.dirtywaterrecords.co.uk/shop/#!/The-Cavemen-Too-High-To-Die-b-w-Id-Kill-download/p/70351208/category=18119001

https://www.facebook.com/thecavemennz

Pete RingMaster 23/09/2016

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Sassy Kraimspri – Cock Fight

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Bringing the band’s trilogy of Cock Fight EPs in one riotous slab of essential rock ‘n’ roll, multinational rockers Sassy Kraimspri have unleashed a must have punk ‘n’ rock album of 2015 for all those yet to lay their destined to be lustful paws on the band’s previous releases. Consisting of musicians hailing from Norway, America, and Australia, the Stavanger hailing quartet have a sound to turn a party into a riot and a riot into unbridled debauchery, as evidenced in full explosive might by Cock Fight.

Sassy Kraimspri now consists of vocalist/guitarist Ida Collett Belle, guitarist Richard Belle, bassist Linda Pedersen, and Etienne on drums, the band itself emerging in 2006 with a sound which is part heavy rock, part punk, part rock pop, and all merciless seduction on body and soul. 2008 saw the release of debut album Dirty White Lies, the band just a duo back then of Ida Collett and drummer Tash Adams, who found success in Australian band SheRex. Three years later The Pussy Magnet EP was uncaged from the foursome, a well-received encounter recorded, as the Cock Fight EPs with producer Russ Russell (Napalm Death, The Wildhearts, Dimmu Borgir). Alongside these and the subsequent releases now making up the album, the band’s live presence has only grown and drawn continual acclaim, Sassy Kraimspri sharing stages with the likes of Skambankt, Melissa Auf der Maur, Casiokids, and Djerv along the way whilst playing in countries such as Canada, Norway, Australia, China, Germany, and the UK. The Cock Fight EPs awoke a new blaze of support and recognition in 2014, but together as Riot they forge one inescapable persuasion breeding full pleasure and in turn anticipation for the band’s sophomore album they are currently working on.

Looking at the songs in the order of the promo sent over (the actual order may differ on the release), the energies are ignited straight away with opener When It Rains, It Pours. Instantly gripping beats set ears and appetite off, their bait swiftly reinforced and matched by a heavily throated bassline. They alone set the tone for the enjoyment to be found across the release, but are a mere teaser for the rest of the track, and its subsequent companions, as guitars and vocals engage in magnetic enterprise and invigorating incitement. The song is a contagious affair, relatively restrained compared to some but an unrelenting weave of grooves and hooks that takes a firm hold of ears and appetite before making way for the outstanding Like a Drug. A spicy bass groove sets the lustful fun in motion, its gravelly twang the spark to a rhythmic swagger and similarly striding riffs. Like a blend of L7 and Breeders with the virulence of Spinnerette and punkish unpredictability of The Raincoats included, band and track bounce through ears like a sonic epidemic, infecting senses and psyche with its ferocious devilry.

COCK FIGHT coverReputation Radio/RingMaster Review     Current single Riot brings its riveting brawl forth next, again grooves and hooks an almost salacious flirtation as fiercely enticing beats and a grizzly bassline set down a primal lure. As its predecessor, the track has its claws in body and vocal chords quickly, it’s anthemic drive and roar a puppeteer under the influence of Ida Collett’s bellowing voice. The exceptional incitement is followed by the punk rock tenacity of Bad Disease, a track expelling antagonistic beauty like a mix of Bikini Kill and The Donnas with a little touch of The Slits to it. Submission is immediate and long term as it is with the punchier and more predatory Clay Pigeons. Again it is an offering with a virulent swing as it heads towards a delicious crescendo posing as a chorus where an excellent mix of raw vocals burst from across the band.

Addiction is a full flooding by this point of the release and only intensifies as the song Cock Fight snarls and launches its predacious provocation on ears. With harmonically seductive vocals glancing off its muscular stroll, the track roams ears and emotions with a hard rock adventure to its tempestuously hued landscape. It does feel like it is ready to swing aggressive rhythmic punches and sonic causticity at the drop of a note or syllable but stays in check for another prowling infection, which also best describes the spicier lure of its successor Dig It. A bluesy tinge adds to the drama and resourceful adventure of the song, and though it does not quite match up to the plateau of those before it, a meaty bassline and rumbling rhythms beneath that ever enthralling vocal temptation, ensures it is another unmissable stomp.

Say What is pure rock ‘n’ roll manna, sonic endeavour from the guitars winding around ears as a sultry air hugs smouldering vocals to seduce senses and passions. The song is aural eroticism; a reason to immerse in Sassy Kraimspri all on its own, though that is something you can lay at the romping feet of most encounters within Cock Fight.

There is one last blaze of rebellious revelry on the release, a storming cover of Great Balls Of Fire which lives up to its name in heat and energy whilst taking the punk of Jerry lee Lewis to a new and modern ferocity. It is simply a great end to an outstanding rock ‘n’ roll uproar. If you have the previous EPs making up Cock Fight, you will have to wait a little longer for a new thrill whilst enjoying the encounters you already have but for newcomers to Sassy Kraimspri  or part owners of their last trio of offerings, this is all your birthdays for the next decade in one exhausting and thrilling rampage.

Cock Fight is available from June 1st via Lady Luck Records digitally, on CD, and on vinyl.

http://www.sassykraimspri.com/   https://www.facebook.com/SassyKraimspri

RingMaster 01/06/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard on Reputation Radio @ http://www.reputationradio.net

MFC Chicken – (Get Outta The) DJ Booth and Lake Bears!

 

(Pics: Lorenzo Pascual & Dena Flows)

(Pics: Lorenzo Pascual & Dena Flows)

After two ridiculously infectious and excitable slabs of rock ‘n’ roll devilry posing as albums, London based MFC Chicken in their own words “figured it was time that we gave the DJs out there something to spin when out in the wilds. A full length album is great for playing at house parties but in a sleazy cellar bar with some frantic dance floor action the DJ’s gonna want a proper vinyl 45.” So that is what the band came up with, not one but two slices of MFC Chicken revelry to ignite the dance-floor, a pair of incitements which simply throw feet and emotions into a blissful frenzy.

It is fair to say we unknowingly had a sweet spot lying in wait for a band like MFC Chicken, an inner instinct stroked and seduced by the band’s two frantic slabs of R&B fuelled rock ‘n’ roll going by the names of Music For Chicken in 2012 and Sold Gravy two years later. With hooks and beats inescapable bait, vocals virulent incitement, and flames of sax an intoxicating bedfellow to all around them, both releases created an insatiable stomp of surf and garage rock within a web of Rhythm and Blues embraced vintage rock ‘n’ roll. There is no stopping the MFC Chicken sound once it takes hold, or a live presence which has seen them the darlings of festivals, venues, and differing countries alike. And it continues in potent style with the new singles, the quartet of Spencer Evoy (tenor sax, vocals), Alberto Zioli (guitar, vocals), Ravi (drums), and Zig (bass) on fine and irrepressible form once again.

DJ Booth sleeve(Get Outta The) DJ Booth opens with its title track and a vintage guitar tang which kisses ears before beats and vocals add their potent spices to the fifties bred rocker. Like a mix of Ray Charles and Bill Haley, the song managing to have the fiery essence of the former in firm collusion with the cleaner sounds of the latter, it blazes away with rampant keys and melodic tenacity as rhythms continue to stomp through ears and into the passions. It is a simple, busy, and irresistible encounter matched perfectly by accompanying song Colonel Sanders’ Bastard Son.

The second song has the kind of nostalgic swing which was never out of place in either a Chick Berry stroll or a Connie Francis pop persuasion. It soon takes on a rawer, almost dirty nature though, leaning much more towards the bluesy garage enterprise of The Sonics thereon in. This is tempered by the sonic imagination of the guitar and the ever inflammatory call of the sax, each individually offering a warmer but no less mischievous enticing to envelope the lyrical revelry. As its predecessor, the track is gorgeous, and the single alone enough to make MFC Chicken the focus of current attention.

Of course there are two offerings and Lake Bears! is just as compelling and thrilling an encounter. Its first track is Lakebears Theme and in some ways has an even more anarchic and Lake Bears Cover Spread.inddvoraciously devilish manner to its presence and sound than on the other release. Imagine Little Richard even more over excited than normal whilst Screamin’ Jay Hawkins and Jerry Lee Lewis bring their own distinct slightly salacious invention, then you are close to the two minutes of rock ‘n’ roll rampage going on.

Second track is called Theme From Lakebears, a devil fuelled instrumental with voodoo beats and demonic sonic lures around tribalistic vocal urges. A lively shimmer of surf rock adds even more sinister qualities to the outstanding tempting of ears and imagination, providing if taken as one, a blissful end to four increasingly magnetic new MFC Chicken products.

Roll on another album is all we have left to say.

(Get Outta The) DJ Booth (Dirty Water Records) and Lake Bears! (FOLC/Dirty Water Records) are both available now on 7” vinyl and download via http://www.dirtywaterrecords.co.uk/shop/#!/MFC-Chicken/c/2990295/offset=0&sort=addedTimeDesc

https://www.facebook.com/MFCChicken   http://www.dirtywaterrecords.co.uk/mfcchicken

RingMaster 02/05/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard on Reputation Radio @ http://www.reputationradio.net

Sperø – Pride EP

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Crafting a sultry weave of blues and folk rock which is as intriguing as it is openly magnetic, US rock band Sperø makes a richly flavoursome proposition which is just as potent for the imagination as ears. The quartet has just released the Pride EP, a spicy collection of songs which sparks everything from feet through to emotions with sublime ease. Its initial touch admittedly was strong if not striking but by half way through the first track there was the realisation that it had wormed under the skin and seduced the psyche with inescapable majesty, and from there submission was inevitable.

The beginnings of Sperø come with self-taught guitarist Jesse Hofstee and classically trained pianist Hillary Laughery rehearsing together daily in Southern California in 2013. Exploring and crafting a sound which infuses classic and modern influences from the likes of Neil Young and Manchester Orchestra, the band subsequently expanded with the addition of bassist Nick Hankins and drummer Ryan Malette. They were soon taking their unique rock ‘n’ roll around the San Diego area to an increasingly growing and inflamed fan base. That first year saw the release of the well-received debut album Rational Paths, a potent entrance backed by the band’s live expansion touring up and down the West Coast and appearing at RedGorilla Music Festival. Now they unveil the Pride EP, a release “written as a testament to the great benefits of believing in yourself and working hard to get what you want”, and a proposition to seduce a new wealth of hearts and appetites it is easy to suspect.

Recent single Can’t Get More opens up the release and soon has ears grasped by vocal harmonies and fiery riffs. It is an attention sparking start which as swiftly relaxes into a smouldering Spero_Pride_Coverstroll of inflamed grooves cored by a tangy bassline ridden by the vocals of Hofstee. It’s a potent coaxing but still does not ignite a lot more than intrigue initially. That changes once Laughery opens up her rich and seductive tones as the chorus suddenly comes alive and feistily tempts, which in turn seems to incite the rest of the song. As mentioned earlier it is around halfway that feet and voice find themselves involved and that enslavement is realised and binding. The track is a glorious slice of emotively hued expression under a sultry climate, but even with its rich persuasion soon surpassed by the outstanding Friend.

From the first stroke of its acidic and irresistibly captivating groove the second song is in command of thoughts and passions, it’s aggressively shimmering air, a gripping wrap to the two vocalists and the dramatic elegance of Laughery’s keys. Growing with every chord and syllable, the track is soon rocking speakers and ears with a mix of blues and old school rock ‘n’ roll, a stomp sounding like The Black Keys meets Jerry Lee Lewis under the persuasion of The Lumineers. It is a blaze of a treat, a song as comfortable and commanding whether gently coaxing or rigorously stoking the fires of it and the listener’s passion.

The EPs title track idles in next, a lone acoustic guitar beckoning before welcoming the mischievous drama of beats and keys. As with the first two songs, there is a swagger to the encounter which even in its initial slow steps is unmistakable and inviting. There are also outbursts of creative urgency and intensity, again as in the previous song, which only ignites air and imagination as a tenacious blues tempting binds the whole climactic web. Everything aligns for another irresistible highlight of the release before the full on seduction of Better Man. With a shimmering crawl of a slim evocative melody courting the delicious vocals of Laughery, the song simply glows as it sublimely and tenderly enthrals the senses. Unbridled temptation from its first breath and atmospherically cinematic throughout, the song is pure magnetism of voice and electrified strings, with only the restrained ambience of keys for company.

The pungent presence of Talking Up makes the perfect contrast next, its bulbous bassline and electro baiting a thick shadow to the again sultrily laying sonic endeavour of guitar and keys around compelling vocals. Its psychedelic blues tinged air over another slowly strolling gait makes the brilliant track as gripping in drama and sound as anything before it, whilst the expulsions of sonic flame courted by just as inflamed vocals is pure mesmerism.

The release closes with the acoustic led revelry of They Say, a track part folk quick step and part funk induced devilry which with its layers of blues tempting and classical hued keys, ensures the EP leaves on richly lingering persuasion. The diverse two prong enticing of vocals is just as unpredictable and thrilling as the sounds around them and leave their and the band’s infection deep rooted and burning in appetite and emotions.

The Pride EP is a gem of an encounter from a band which manages to turn recognisable essences and spices into something unique and impossibly addictive. Quite simply Sperø and their sound is a hex on the ears and quite irresistible.

The Pride EP is available now https://speroband.bandcamp.com/

http://www.speroband.com/

RingMaster 13/11/2014

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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The Creepshow – Life After Death

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With a shakeup in the band line-up having marked the past year or so, Canadian rockers The Creepshow unleash their new album to easily answer any questions, or doubts which may have risen over the period concerning the change. Life After Death is a thumping treat of a riot, a bruising and seductive blaze of multi-flavoured rock ‘n’ roll which feeds all the constant hunger for the band’s distinctive sound within fans whilst expand their sound to its fullest adventure yet. The eleven track stomp sees the Toronto quintet sculpting songs from a fiery mix of rockabilly, psychobilly, punk, and hard rock, a rangy blend which stretches the imagination and energy of the band arguably to its greatest potency to date. It is a storming encounter which ignites the senses and passions as only The Creepshow can.

Formed in 2005, the band has built a formidable place within psychobilly bred adventure through their impressive albums and dramatically riveting and raucous live shows which has seen the band alongside the likes of Rancid, Tiger Army, TheUnseen, Agnostic Front, Mad Sin, Demented Are Go to name just a few and ignite numerous festivals such as like Ink’n’Iron, Festival Of Fear, Mighty Sounds, and Rebellion over the years. Their releases from debut album Sell Your Soul of 2006, the exceptional Run for Your Life two years later, and the equally incendiary They All Fall Down in 2010, have helped thrust the band to the frontline of rock ‘n’ roll bred voraciousness but certainly the departure of vocalist Sarah “Sin” Blackwood to focus on her involvement with Walk Off The Earth last year raised some questions about the band’s future sound. The truth, as shown by the new release, is that the change has only drawn a fresh breath into and energy from the band, a new appetite which has honed Life After Death into an exceptionally vibrant and compelling confrontation.

Stepping into the gap left by Blackwood is Kendalyn “Kenda” Legaspi, her vocal fire and guitar craft a stylish hungry presence which takes the snarl of the band into a fresh rapaciousness and devilry to match the movement of the band’s sound. Life After Death also sees new drummer Sandro Sanchioni and guitarist Daniel Flamm (Ski’ s Country Trash) alongside Legaspi, bassist Sean “Sickboy” McNab, and Kristian “The Reverend McGinty” Rowles on keys, a fresh union which finds The Creepshow arguably at their most powerful and gripping.

Opener See You In Hell storms through the ear with a greedy charge of badgering rhythms and adrenaline coaxed riffs, the track a Press_Cover_03psychobilly contagion which without creating new realms for the style provides a predatory thrill which ticks all the right boxes for the passions. The vocals of Legaspi on this song have initially a voice close to that of Blackwood but as the album expands she shows her distinct and unique presence potently alongside the musical adventures. With the upright bass craft of McNab as delicious and inciting as expected with the band’s invention, the track is a stonking start to the album which is soon backed by The Devil’s Son. The song from its opening second has a sultry lure and heated breath to its rockabilly prowl, keys a smouldering glaze over the rhythmic caging of the imagination and the seductive Wanda Jackson hinting vocals. Insistently infectious the song merges a fifties swagger with a sixties keys narrative which with the excellent vocal harmonies just captivates and mesmerises the imagination.

The first single from the release Sinners & Saints bounds into view next, the song a feisty energetic dance of juggling rhythms and bass provocation beneath a melodic flame of easily accessible and inventive temptation. For personal tastes it is not the strongest or preferred song to tempt people into the album but it is still a pleasing and enticing encounter which sets up an even greater appetite for the following gems of Born To Lose and Settle The Score. The first is a song which maybe should not work but does magnificently. Like a merger of Jerry Lee Lewis and Meatloaf, the fusion of classic rock ‘n’ roll and seventies hard rock with glam tendencies leaves the senses breathless and intrigued. A track which walks the fine line between being crazy and sparking total adoration, it is ultimately a riveting slice of invention which challenges and explores the imagination for the strongest satisfaction. Its successor like the first song of the album, is less adventurous rather sticking to a straightforward rockabilly stance but at the same time has no lack of punch and virulent bait to continue the impressive body of the album.

Failing Grade makes a grab for the passions next, its brawling intensity and confronting energy caged within a rhythmic irresistibility sheer magnetism. There is a punk rabidity to the song which urges it on whilst vocally, Legaspi backed again by great band confirmation steals prime attention. Like a mix of Spinnerette and Tiger Army it is a major joy with the keys of Rowles casting an absorbing evocative weave over the heart of the song with his imagination. One of many highlights upon the release it is not standing alone for long as immediately both Second Chance and Last Call state their claims for top spot on the release, the first an elegant stomp soaked in sixties inspired keys and veined with rockabilly punctuation whilst its successor is a glorious fire of punk and blues rock ‘n’ roll. Like a blend of Flogging Molly and Bill Haley with King Kurt the Ringleader, it is a terrific unpredictable gem with McNab leading the vocals across a scintillating brass flame of inventive temptation.

Just as right across its length the album closes by unloading another mass brawl of mighty allurements, Take It Away first igniting the ears with its anthemic rockabilly antagonism before making way for the outstanding punk ‘n’ roll predation of Can’t Wait To See You Fall. The song with another psychobilly and punk explosiveness within a sweltering melodic sky leaves the hunger rabid for more, with the sensational vocals of Legaspi a sirenesque temptress which she repeats upon the closing title track. An exceptional conclusion to an equally immense album, the song ensures that Life After Death is a lingering battling enticement of pleasure.

The Creepshow just go from strength to strength and have not let a little matter of changing front ladies diffuse their invention, imagination, and might. Punk ‘n’ roll album of the year…it just might be.

http://www.thecreepshow.org

9/10

RingMaster 22/10/2013

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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Thirteen Shots – Tales That Start With A Whisper

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After the success of their excellent debut album Vaudeville just over a year ago, UK horror punk n rollers Thirteen Shots teased the appetite further with songs like Zombies From The USSR, a track which made up one of their contributions to a split release with fellow raisers of the dead, Trioxin Cherry and Raizing Hell. Little did it and fellow song Get In My Crypt fully reveal was the step forward and extra adventure the Birmingham quartet had explored for their outstanding new album Tales That Start With A Whisper. Employing even richer flames of numerous genres and decades, the nine track release is a riot to ignite the senses and passions, a seemingly uncomplicated yet fully involved feast of dirty decaying invigorating rock n roll.

Formed in 2011 by vocalist Johnny Rose and guitarist Joe Public, long-time friends who moved from the hard rock sound they had earned a good name for into bringing a unique form of horror punk n roll, Thirteen Shots immediately drew attention with the release of debut single Danzig in the September of their first year. Completed by guitarist Izzy, bassist GMT, and drummer Chelsea, the band had over 300 downloads within a week of the release of the single. As the year rested in its grave and the new broke free, the five-piece entered the studio to record their first album, Vaudeville which was self-released on April Fool’s Day 2012. With a subsequent re-release via Psycho-go-go Records, the album drew great and eager acclaim and set the band up for two full tours across the UK. With the band also having gnawed and infested audiences alongside the likes of Demented are Go, The Peacocks, Rezurex, Howling Wolfmen, Graveyard Johnnys and more, across the years and finding great appetite for their sounds not only from fans but people such as Michale Graves through that first single, Thirteen Shots stand at the gate to the widest recognition within all shadowed corners of rock n roll, the new album promising to be the key to swing the iron clad entrance wide open.

As their previous releases, Tales That Start With A Whisper finds the band infusing elements and textures of sixties rock n roll, front covergarage blues, and horror punk with plenty of spice from psychobilly, punk, and rock, but this time it is all sculpted into brawling encounters which are more rounded, sure of their intent, and in league with each other whatever their individual stance in attitude and style. Whereas Vaudeville at times lost its way and has an undulating effect, its successor is one big eclectic bang on the senses; simply the band has come of age with a maturity honed into their sound for one insatiable and perpetually rewarding treat.

Opener Death Jam 2000 steps forward with a Jerry Lee Lewis like fired up hungry rockabilly call, with blues driven guitars flaming up the air and the vocals of Johnny snapping at the ear. With punchy rhythms caging the senses the song romps across the senses for the perfect start, simple, dramatic, and inciting not forgetting exciting. It is an easy introduction to the release which hands over to the outstanding Zombies From The USSR, an anthemic lure which never loses its potency and success no matter how many times you face its charge. With an intimidating riff driven gait and challenging breath, the song prowls and claws at the emotions, its crowding unrelenting stalking of the ear a restrained but deceptively quick and lethal hook to match the raptorial groove and vocal recruitment; it is the perfect soundtrack to any George Romero or modern zombie film. Having heard the song enough times to recall its declaration and words before remembering the names of all family member there is still the impossible to resist itch to hear the song at least twice before moving on to the rest of the album such its addictive hold.

The excellent Bewitched comes next, its scuzzy breath a fire within the garage punk unpolished embrace of the belligerent sonic confrontation and rhythmic caging. The bass of GMT is an exceptional temptation, its throaty grizzled snarl a contagious predator to menace and pushed the shadows of the song forth from behind the burning flames of the guitars. It is not the most infectious of the songs on the album but still consumes the passions with unbridled vehemence leaving Psycho Jukebox to work on the addiction side of things. Starting off with an Eddie Cochran like beckoning, the song then merges ska carved strokes and surf rock persuasion for a ridiculously catchy persuasion whilst its chorus is where the storm has its wildest greedy moments. Again bass and drums steal their share of the limelight with skilled mischief and again a different tone to their invention whilst the guitars simply sizzle with enterprise and swagger.

Get In My Crypt is another fiery garage punk rampage that sparks full participation and ardour, everything from guitar to vocals and harmonies to rhythms conspiring to leave an exhausted rapture clinging to its refreshing corpse whilst Nekro Sexual is a salacious and provoking slice of dirty devilry, a b-movie driven suggestiveness with a chorus of ‘Stomp On my Balls’ which defies anyone not to shout it persistently during and long after its devilment.

The album closes firstly with the brilliant title track, a groove laden addict making beats of a track writhing in classic/glam rock misbehaviour and horror rock roguishness not forgetting hook loaded grooves which would do the Buzzcocks proud. It is followed by two live tracks, Dead Girls Don’t Scream and This Looks Like A Job For Batman which tells you all you need to know about the band on stage and why you should not miss them if at a venue near you.

Anticipation and expectations were high going into the album but Thirteen Shots and the Freaky Pug Records released Tales That Start With A Whisper left them behind in their triumphant and impressive flesh chomping attack. A must have album for all horror, garage, rock, and punk fuelled fans.

https://www.facebook.com/thirteenshotsband

9/10

RingMaster 26/04/2013

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard from

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Arranging the alternative: an interview with Mike Doughty

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Never reluctant to keep us guessing, intrigued, and thrilled by his consistently inventive creativity and releases, Mike Doughty recently gave the world his new album The Flip Is Another Honey. The release was an enthralling collection of covers given the unique imagination and vision of the Brooklyn singer songwriter, songs teased and seduced into little irresistible jewels crafted with mischief, invention, and inspired vision. The release of the album gave us a great opportunity to talk with Mike again and find out the inspiration and heart to The Flip Is Another Honey and more…

Hi Mike and welcome back to The Ringmaster Review.

Before we move on to your new album it seems you have been very busy since we last talked to you around the release of Yes And Also Yes. Are you a man who has to be creatively active or are you able to find down time in that respect to re-energise the artistic batteries?

I guess I don’t really do down time, artistically. I’m always working on something, even when I’m not working on something. When I’m on vacation, I relish journaling in an unusual place, and when I wander around, half my mind is on what I’m going to write about what I see.

You have just released the wonderful album The Flip Is Another Honey. I read you got the great title from an old Variety review in 1956 of the Jerry Lee Lewis single Crazy Arms. How did you come across this and how does it relate to the contents of your album?

The review was quoted in Nick Tosches’ “Hellfire”, which is a biography of Jerry Lee. Great book. The phrase basically means, “the B-side of this single is also really good.” I don’t know if I had a logical reason for picking the title–just an intuitive one.

Are the tracks you cover on The Flip Is Another Honey ones you grew up with, ones which inspired you at certain times, songs 487617_10151459081085200_1323909964_nwhich inspired ideas just for the release, or a mix of all?

They’re songs I’d been playing by myself in the green room, before and after shows. Some of them, improbably, sounded good in my voice-those are the ones I recorded. There are plenty songs I love to sing that sound shitty in my particular style, (and, on the ones that I sounded good in, I often had to omit or duck a high note in there someplace).

I learned “Country Roads” to impress my girlfriend, who’s from West Virginia (and, apropos of nothing here, has a giant tattoo of the cover of “Trout Mask Replica” on her ribcage.)

How long has the album been in the making from the first seeds of the idea and how long did the actual physical recording take?

It was quick. I had the tunes selected when I hired Kevin Salem to produce–we set a date six weeks later, I programmed and arranged the songs, and then I came up to Woodstock to lay it down. It took–four days? I think. Maybe five.

How easy or difficult was it to settle on the chosen 15 on the album?

I do my best to make those kinds of choices quickly, and intuitively, without a lot of psychic self-torture. So, easy.

Apart from three tracks with your long time collaborators pianist Dan Chen and cellist Andrew “Scrap” Livingston, you played every sound on the release. Does that also apply to the ideas and way you approached each song or did you engage thoughts of others on those?

I like to coax something unique out of the people I’m working with, rather than dictate. The people I play with are adept at jumping into a song with very general directions from me, and able to bring their full selves into the instrumental parts they create.

Obviously, I wrote all the parts on the album, but I also worked with Kevin, the producer, as I’d work with a musician–I tried his suggestions, like, “Why don’t you phrase the vocal like such-and-such?” Along those lines.

As much as I would love to ask questions about every track on The Flip Is Another Honey, we will look at the songs which lit the biggest fires inside if that is ok.

OK!

Firstly can I ask about your version of Take Me Home, Country Roads, a song I will admit I have never taken too and as good as your take on it is I am still not convinced but that is personal taste only ha ha. You brought the wonderful voice of Rosanne Cash into the song with you, how much persuasion did she need if any to lend her vocal charms to the song?

Virtually no persuasion. Super bizarrely, she’s a big fan of mine.

The album opens with the excellent Sunshine where you sample John Denver’s vocals to merge with your rapping. Where did the idea to approach it this way get its inspiration and when gaining permission from the John Denver estate for the use of the Denver sample did they have any inkling of how you would wonderfully interpret the song?

Often times, when listening to songs, I’ll pick out sample-able parts–it’s kind of a tic. I guess I just was listening to it on my headphones on the subway, and suddenly I heard the sample.

I was terrified that the John Denver estate would be super affronted that I’d messed around with their dude so oddly–I sent them the completed track–and I was thinking of other singers to do the part when they wrote back to say they were ultra-enthused about it. Weirdly. So great.

Mike DoughtyThe song is a major highlight on the album for us; did the track emerge on the finished record as you initially envisaged it when coming up with the idea?

Oh yeah. Being based around samples, there were fewer variables

Tell us about the two Cheap Trick covers Southern Girls and Reach Out. There is a passion in the tracks which suggests maybe this band had a big impact on you and your heart. 

Yes yes. Actually, when I was 13, I waited outside Eisenhower Hall in West Point, NY, to meet them. I asked Rick Nielsen to play “Reach Out”, and he was totally confused by that. I guess it was a song they threw onto the soundtrack of the animated movie “Heavy Metal” (super corny and great 80s sci-fi), and didn’t think much about. It was written by the bass player who filled in for Tom Petersson, when he was absent for a couple of years–maybe that indicated an also-ran-ness. But I loved it.

Reach Out merges seamlessly into the Josh Wink anthem Higher State of Consciousness. What sparked the allying of the two songs in one compelling encounter and was it always your intention or something which evolved during recording?

Totally evolved. As we were tracking guitars, I played the riff, absent-mindedly, as the playback track faded out, and Kevin was like, “Oh my god, play that part again.” He didn’t realize it wasn’t something I was just improvising!

For us the biggest pinnacle on the album of nothing but great heights is Ta Douleur. You give it a new breath and energy which escalates in the passions for an insatiable almost lustful pleasure. Tell us about the song and its meaning to you, the Camille original and what you have done with it.

I heard it on the radio–WFMU, which is a great New-York-area musical treasure–and iTunes’d it instantly, and listened obsessively. I have a pretty believable French accent, because my dad worked in Belgium for a year when I was a kid–didn’t pick up much of the language, but I absorbed the pronunciations–and I messed around with the tune just to see what it was like–and I liked it. Now, I did have to eliminate the sections that I was unable to sing, which excise a little bit of the elegance, but turn the song into kind of an unstoppable train. Honestly, I could only pick out a few phrases here and there that I could understand in French, and didn’t really understand the overall until I Google-translated the lyrics.

Some songs you have covered faithfully in your own inimitable style and others you have re-invented. What sparked either decision on each song which way to approach them and have any subsequent ideas not used for the album stayed alive in thoughts for an unveiling at some future point?

I made a deal with myself not to do any Magnetic Fields covers. I’ve done a whole bunch of them, throughout my recordings. But, I have ideas for arrangements of covers of three or four more Magnetic Fields songs! It’s an involuntary function of my consciousness.

Claudia, their drummer and manager, asked me to open for them on a tour a few years ago–I already had my own tour booked, and it broke my heart that I had to say no. I literally could’ve gone to them and said, “Listen, whatever songs you’re not playing in the show, I’ll play them–I will do the part of your repertoire you’re not doing!”

There are a couple of show tunes on the album too, is that a medium you would consider writing for, like to create a soundtrack for a musical?

I actually studied playwriting, intensively, and still write one-acts for the 24 Hour Company, sometimes. Couple years back, they did a benefit on Broadway and I had Julia Stiles and Michael Kenneth Williams–the guy who played the iconic role of Omar on “The Wire”–in mine.

But, no plans, as yet.

Is The Flip Is Another Honey a project you might follow-up with a similarly inspired release at some point?553922_10150926960595200_77130733_n

Quite possibly. I think that, as singers get older, they become more nuanced interpreters of songs–both their own, and others’

What is next for Mike Doughty, creatively and to narrow it down musically?

I’m messing around with songs I wrote for Soul Coughing, trying to figure out how to reclaim them.

Many thanks for taking time to talk with us Mike.

You’re very welcome–thanks for your support!

Would you like to send give us a sales pitch for people to check out your excellent album The Flip Is Another Honey? 😉

THE FLIP COMES WITH FREE CANDY AND PIE!

And finally are there any other songs that you would love to put your distinct touch upon which did not come up on the album?

Allow me to delve into fantasyland for this question–I so wish I could do justice to Sam Cooke’s songs. What an incredible voice that guy had.

The RingMaster Review 08/03/2013

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