Hardcore Anal Hydrogen – Hypercut

When covering The Talas of Satan, the last album from Hardcore Anal Hydrogen we called a particular track a “beautiful meshuga.” It was a suggestion which undoubtedly applied to the whole release and is even more apt for the French outfit’s new wild adventure, Hypercut. Both halves of that description has been escalated within the new album, a release which it is best not to try and make sense of but one to just sit back before and immerse its crazed manna and manipulation.

Hardcore Anal Hydrogen is the manic creation of vocalist/programmer Sacha Mouk (Sacha Vanony) and guitarist/programmer Martyn Circus (Martyn Clement), a project emerging in 2009 and releasing debut album Fork you :​(​)​{ :​|​:​& };: that same year. Two years later, its successor Division Zero was unleashed with the band’s truly eclectic sound fully fledged but still growing and evolving as the mighty theatre of The Talas of Satan showed in 2014. As expected, things have not stood still since then, the pair’s imagination never taking a rest as they boldly breach another plateau in suggestive sound, diversity, and craziness with Hypercut, a release not so much schizophrenic as simply loco.

Everything from electro to rock, jazz to every shade of metal you can think of and more is entangled in Hypercut, much of which colluding to make album opener, Jean-Pierre, vigorously irresistible. Tenacious beats and electronic squirms grab ears first, guitars and rhythms swiftly involving their rapacious coaxing before the vocals of Mouk bounce in like a demented cartoon character. Raw metal trespasses burst as the song throws its self around dervish style; riffs, hooks, and grooves colliding like wayward atoms as keys conjure suggestion. Unsurprisingly twists and turns come at a rate of knots too, keeping the imagination dancing like a cat on a hot tin roof. It is a stunning start, prime but fresh Hardcore Anal Hydrogen offering up essences of artists such Pryapisme, Aphex Twin and Cryptopsy in varying degrees.

If the first is a tangled web, the following Coin coin is spaghetti of sonic wires all twisted up like the knack iPod headphones have when in the pocket if only for a few seconds. Circus’ guitar is a creative thrashing of enterprise yet with a composure and coherence which paints individual pictures as around it jazz flames and psych rock tendrils ignite and explore.  More progressive hues similarly escape the metal nurtured cage, Jean Michel Jarre-esque elegance honing an atmospheric landscape as wildlife voice their involvement before the track eventually drifts into the sunshine.

The Cajun opening of La roche et le rouleau is a deceitful prelude to rock ‘n roll time in the asylum;  a wacked out stomp again involving an array of flavours in its contagion and even managing to keep feet and hips involved as it slips into a sultry noir lit jazz detour, coming out the other side with even more certifiable zeal. It is a madness which is even lustier within Paul, a track which has fifties in its breath, dark gothic theatre in its air, and blackened dementia in its heart. Many bands weave a tapestry of diversity but as this track alone echoes, few can rival Hardcore Anal Hydrogen in the organic fluidity it comes in or the bedlamic mastery.

Next up, Blue Cuts provides a piano spun jazz saunter for a relatively ‘normal’ caress of the senses while Charme oriental creates a Mad Capsules Markets like sonic holler in a carnivorous extreme metal dissonance, but a fusion as infectious as it is invasive especially once Eastern hues join the musical curiosity. Both tracks simply enthral but are still eclipsed by Phillip. It is a sinister slice of musically and emotionally suggestive espionage; dark drama and deeds soaking every note in every twist and turn. In a moment in time where spying and death is headline, it manages to be a perfect echo yet has an intimacy of inner threat and turmoil just as potent. Its eight plus minutes conjures a cinematic tale in thoughts, no doubt one again sure to be individual to each listener but a rich one all the same.

Through the rhythmically tribal and aggressive spectacle of Murdoc and the glorious vocal and musical delusion of Entropie Maximum, one already lustful appetite just could not stop drooling; the second especially incendiary with its mischievously screwy, seriously catchy, unhinged romp. It has the body bouncing, spirit racing, and shoulders hunched in puzzlement; pure bliss.

In turn Sproutch savages the senses, electronics and metal at their carnivorous best and though only thirty seconds long leaves an unforgettable impact before the cosmic ingredients of Daube carotte unite with barbed hooks and hellacious metal in another rousing incitement, though it too has some intimation fuelled downtime where the imagination is even more stretched and pleasure overfilled.

Automne 1992 provides a slow prowl through rain drenched scenery and darkly shadowed threats. It did not quite grab the senses as its predecessors fair to say but has plenty for the imagination to weave with, 6:33 coming to mind once or twice while Bontemmieu brings the other side of climate with its summery charms and ethic festivities, though again there is just a tease of darker flirtation.

The album ends with Alain, l’homme télévitré, a track just epitomising Hardcore Anal Hydrogen eccentricity and their bizarre craft. Yet there is much more to it, as all tracks, a truly smart and inventive core which twists the listener around physically and emotionally whilst providing all the tools and ingredients for them to paint their own pictures and tales. It is not going to be for everyone but Hypercut is simply creative manna, the fullest sonic ambrosia yet from Hardcore Anal Hydrogen.

Hypercut is available now via Apathia Records @ https://hardcoreanalhydrogen.bandcamp.com/album/hypercut   or https://apathiarecords.com/en/releases/hypercut

http://hardcoreanalhydrogen.com    https://www.facebook.com/hardcoreanalhydrogen

Pete RingMaster 10/03/2018

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

We Are Band Nerds – Forget Me Nots

When something is self- described as “Deftones meets Outkast” you just have to have a sniff but it was a mighty lung full we subsequently grabbed when diving into the debut album from US outfit We Are Band Nerds. That description certainly fits the Dallas sextet’s sound, though we would also suggest The Kennedy Soundtrack at times in their blend of alternative hip hop and nu metal, yet there is so much that is individual to the band that it is one imagination grabbing adventure within a debut which just demands plaudit loaded attention.

We Are Band Nerds consist of Brandon Cross (Lead Singer/Rapper), Tony Lucas (Rapper/Vocalist), Dorian “Scullie” Thomas (Guitarist), Carlos “DJ Sol*Los” Juarez (DJ/Sampler), Stephen “S Dot” Bonilla (Drums), and Santos “Sandman” Johnson (Bass). They all bring individual craft and loves into a united sound keenly embracing further diverse styles from jazz, metal, electronica, rap, and varied rock music. Within their first full-length, Forget Me Nots, it quickly proves to be a fascinating mix. Lyrically too the band transfixes, never pulling their punches whilst showing honesty fuelled insight and craft which whether with subtlety or force bewitches as firmly as the sounds around them in songs exploring the depths of everything from relationships to racism, poverty to life’s experiences.

From opener Hunger Games it grabs ears and imagination, electronics almost teasing as they suggest and lure before embracing a current of metal nurtured riffs, dancing beats, and the vocal prowess of Cross and Lucas. The snarl of the guitars is gripping and portentous; vocals matching their angst and irritability with the pair of singers and their individual styles a magnetic union.  All the while the melodic instincts of the band add a mesmeric glaze to veins of creative suggestion and the encounter’s natural rawer rapacity. It is a compelling mix of threat and contemplation in word and sound and a gripping start to the album.

The following Whore has an instinctive catchiness from its first breath of voice and bass, their natural swing controlled but bold and setting the tone for the outstanding track. Like a clock, each note ticks by with consistency and intimation, vocals matching their gait yet all the time volatility in the song’s belly is brewing and stirring, never truly erupting but adding a rousing trespass between the crystalline breaths and organically bred emotions. Like Palms meets Mudvayne in an unexpected way, it is simply glorious and reason alone to check out band and album.

Fake In You similarly has a relatively calm climate within which turbulence and intense shadows lie, essences which burn bright at times but are tempered by the atmospheric glides of the keys and the smooth blend of rap and clean vocals. That tempestuousness does take hold momentarily towards the song’s close but again is dampened down by the tranquillity and beauty of melody before Dreamer opens its heart and diminishing hopes through elegance, grace, and corrosive intensity. As with all songs, hindsight brings a sense of familiar hues within the inventive drama but there is no chance of predicting the landscape and enterprise of each encounter as hearts are shared and thoughts turned over.

Without quite stirring the passions as thickly as those before Under Water still holds attention tight with its evocative drama in sound and word amidst rapacious metal encroachments while American Trash springs from an electronic breeze of an interlude/intro into a heady windstorm of sonic manipulation and lyrical dissonance, though never breaking from its restraints to truly create a blistering tempest.  That control just makes the song though, ensuring its portentous air is a tantalising harassment behind more of the stirring blend of mellow and ire sealed vocals.

The industrial bent Hagel Trumpf is a prowling predator breeding addiction and lust for its senses preying beauty lit with nu metal stalking while Savage borders on the carnivorous, in comparison, but too holds its ferocity in an embrace of suggestion soaked harmonics and melodic intrigue. Both are mutually unique and magnificent, just two more reasons to be excited about their creators and lustfully keen to recommend the album they grace.

Forget Me Nots concludes with Fade Away, a scalding slice of rap and rock infused metal which is the band at their organically rawest on the album but once more infused into a searing irradiation of melodic beauty. It is a compelling end to an album which we can only repeat, must be checked out especially if those comparisons at the beginning hit the spot but equally atmospheric metal/rock in general.

Forget Me Nots is out now via Pavement Entertainment across most stores.

http://www.wearebandnerds.com/    https://www.facebook.com/wearebandnerds/     https://twitter.com/wearebn6

Pete RingMaster 09/03/2018

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

TaxiWars – Fever

Kris Dewitte

Kris Dewitte

We will be honest, jazz is an intriguing mystery to our usual musical investigations as too the possible inspirations to the new TaxiWars album, but there is no secret hiding an irresistible sound and provocative prowess within Fever. Offering ten mouth-watering adventures, the album, to use the term found in the release’s press release, flits between jazz and the avant-garde. It persistently provokes the senses as it flirts with the body and sparks the imagination like no other encounter heard this year.

TaxiWars is the inspirational collaboration between dEUS frontman Tom Barman and saxophone player Robin Verheyen, the pair joined by the just as absurdly creative bassist Nicolas Thys and drummer Antoine Pierre. Their self-titled debut album swiftly nurtured critical acclaim in 2015 and all we can say not having heard it, yet, is that if it matches up to the ingenious eclectic beauty of Fever, it deserved every breath of praise offered.

Fever opens with its title track, a proposition which alone makes the album worthy of attention. Instantly Verheyen’s sax is seducing ears with its intoxicating strikes, the metronomic beats of Pierre soon in close quarters as rock ‘n’ roll brews in bass and the creative tones of Barman. A flirtation for hips and feet alone, the grooving slice of dark jazz ‘n roll soon infests body and psyche alike becoming almost shamanic in its lure and tone with a relatively restrained yet salacious dance in its heart. At times and increasingly bordering on the deranged, the track is pure suggestive alchemy setting off the tone and instinctive seduction of the album in masterful style.

The following Soul Repair is similarly groove bound and imposingly suggestive; blending flirtatious energy driven by the tenacious throaty enterprise of Thys’ bass with mellower though no less gripping twists. Once more the imagination is as inspired as bodily involvement, its smoky shadow teased canvas a sure lure for creative thoughts and the lyrical and vocal imagination of Barman.

taxiwars_2_cover_RingMasterReviewBridges is next, coaxing attention like a mix of Dizraeli & The Small Gods and Charles Mingus; teasing ears with its melodic seduction and the ever sultry warmth and incitement flaming from Verheyen’s ingenuity. Rhythmically just as addictive with Barman alone an incitement to hang the imagination upon, the exceptional track is more than matched by the flirtatiously prowling Soliloque (Sans Issue). Sung in French, the song is even greater bait for language restricted thoughts to weave their own ventures; escapades further shaped by the brass coaxing of Verheyen and prompted by the noir lined stroll of the rhythms.

Romancing ears next is Trash Metal Ballad, a smouldering slice of creative beauty with Barman enticingly strolling scenery of gentle but insistent and evocative rhythmic coaxing courted by the hazy poetic flames of Verheyen. The song is glorious, an exploration at times on the verge of Shatner’s Bassoon like bedlam but always pulling back to slip back into the smouldering foxy fascination it emerged with.

As gentle as the song is, it is a livelier proposal compared to next up Airplane Song, though it too has infectiousness in its minimalistic invention which is as spirited as anything within Fever and cored by another simply enslaving bass jaunt from Thys. The song epitomises the tapestry of sound and suggestion woven by all four elements of the band perfectly, each as creative and essential as the other in an inescapable flirtation of body and emotion.

As calm and aurally reflective as the previous pair are, Controlled Demolition is a tenaciously energetic and dynamic proposal. Bedlamic and punky with an array of seemingly random twists and turns fuelled with schizophrenic urgency, the track is a powerhouse of invention and individual craft leading the listener on a hectic race against time and far too short given its ridiculously addictive fertile innovation.

Living up to its name, a compelling dose of the blues comes with the shadow rich Honey It’s The Blues, another suggestive noir lit encounter providing street corner light on a jazz room romance in thoughts, both centred on the blaze of Verheyen’s sax and Barman’s hazily coated descriptive prowess as an organ colours the surrounding depths.

That quality to inspire the creativity of thoughts is an ever present within Fever and again at eager play within En Route, its bass nurtured repetitive but persistently imaginative rhythmic engine a road trip for the senses through a landscape of brass drawn scenery and vocal intimation with a backing lure simply impossible not to get hooked on.

The swarthy atmosphere and climate of Egyptian Nights brings the album to a sublime close, TaxiWars dancing with the imagination as African rhythms and exotic textures surround the vocals while infusing their playful romance into keys and sax.  It is a memorable and lingering close to a simply wonderful release, Fever a drop-dead treat of sound and imagination capable of igniting the passions whatever the once preferred flavour of sound.

Fever is out now via Universal Jazz across all stores.

https://www.facebook.com/taxiwars/    http://www.taxiwars.be/    https://twitter.com/taxiwarsmusic

Pete RingMaster 13/12/2016

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Creative espionage and inventive intimation: an interview with Aiming For Enrike

 

Photo: Marius Mada Dale

Photo: Marius Mada Dale

Without doubt, one of the year’s most exhilarating and inventive propositions has been Segway Nation, the new album from Norwegian duo Aiming For Enrike. The encounter is a fascinating instrumental adventure in sound and captivating aural suggestiveness; a multi-flavoured infectiousness created by drummer Tobias Ørnes and guitarist Simen Følstad Nilsen. Offered the chance to learn more with the duo, we set about discovering the creative heart of band and album.

Hello and thanks for taking time out to talk with us.

First of all can you tell us about yourselves as individuals?

We are two quite calm persons; a guitar player and drummer. We love making and playing music, so we spend a lot of time in the rehearsal space, practicing, jamming, and composing.

When did you first meet and what sparked the idea to form the band?

We met in 2010, when we attended a music school in Oslo. We were both into experimental noise rock music. After seeing some mind-blowing bands like Monolithic and Zu, we wanted to do something like that as a duo. By using loops we managed to get a huge sound even though we were only two. In the beginning we had more of a noise/prog sound but over the years the songs developed into more conventional song structures where we have incorporated a lot of influences from electronica, funk etc.

Is there a specific meaning behind the band name?

Yes, but not worth sharing 😉

Photo © Haakon Borg / Magpie

Photo © Haakon Borg / Magpie

It is wonderfully difficult to pin down the Aiming For Enrike sound for us, how would you describe it to newcomers to the band?

It’s an adventurous band with good melodies, cool grooves, and lots of energy. It has a very distinct sound, but still the music can go in many different directions.

What and who have most inspired your musical ideas and subsequently sound would you say?

Our sound is kind of schizophrenic and has a lot of layers because of a wide range of influences. Of course we can be inspired by other things in life, but I think it is only music and music gear that have a direct influence to our sound. Aiming for Enrike is the result of two people and sounds like something none of us would have made by ourselves.

Here are some names: Miles Davis, Josh Homme, James Brown, Nels Cline, Radiohead, Sonic Youth, Greg Saunier, Hot Snakes, Glen Branca, Mike Patton, Moha…

I am no expert on the broad expanse of the Norwegian music scene right now, generally coming across the diversity of metal and rock bands from there, but I get the feeling that your music is a one of a kind there; something unusual to the Norwegian landscape of sound. Is that the reality and if so how have they taken to it?

In Norway it is very common to have musical collaborations across genres. If you look at the jazz and improvisational music scene, you have lots of artist who play music that have more in common with pop, rock/metal, electronic music than traditional jazz. In jazz festivals you can go and see pop acts, and in commercial festivals there are jazz bands playing. So I think in general people are very open to new stuff.  Most artists are not so focused on sounding like the other one. It is a good thing to be original, and have your own thing going. We don’t know of any other Norwegian band that sounds like us but way more people than we would have guessed have been positive and open to it.

You have just released new album, Segway Nation; a release which had our imagination as busy and enthralled as ears and feet. Where does a ‘typical’ Aiming For Enrike song start composing wise?

We always start by just playing. We spend a lot of time just improvising, or trying out different kind of ideas. It is important that we are inspired when we play, and that there is a fun factor. We try to follow our intuition, and not doubt our choices too much. Then we record our ideas and make tunes out of them.

Throughout the album, there is an organic freedom, almost as things were created, played, and improvised in the moment. Tell us about the recording of Segway Nation; were songs already AimingForEnrike-SegwayNation_RingMasterReview2400written before recording them or was there an element of conjuring twists and turns there and then?

Everything is played live in the studio, without any click track. That might create a more «free» or improvised feel. On Segway Nation we composed all the songs before we recorded them, but there are some parts in the songs where we improvise. It can be open sections, or written parts played in different ways. That keeps it interesting for us, and hopefully for the listeners. Some of the more «free form» songs like Minitrue and Phone Phobia are the result of some improvised recording sessions.

Another great aspect to the album is the way it inspires the listener’s imagination to create its own adventures. Can you tell us about some of the actual themes and inspirations to the tracks and their suggestive dramas?

We didn’t have any specific plans for this. But it is a good thing if the listeners make up their own adventure in the music. I don’t think there are any specific themes to the songs, but there are specific inspirations to some of the songs. It can be a groove, melody, riff etc.

The past few years has seen some impressive and ear striking duos emerge with varying styles and dynamics within their union. Often it seems that the slimness of personnel allows a band to bring its live presence much more easily to recordings. It is the same with you guys; there is a feeling that listening to Segway Nation would be like standing in front of you on stage. Do you think there is some validity in that thought from your perspective; less bodies and minds leads to less of a leaning on technology and tricks when recording music?

There is more space in the music when you are a duo, and that makes it easier to follow your intuition and play in the moment. Since we record our music live in a room, the recording becomes very representative for us as a band. There are very few options sound wise with only a guitar and a drum kit, so I think it is hard to lose the live feeling in the recording.

Marius Mada Dale

Marius Mada Dale

Tell us about your live side; how you translate the dynamics of songs to the stage?

It works really great! We played the songs live many times before we recorded them. So the recording is not much different from a live performance. With the live performance you will also get the visual aspect and a bit more playful approach to the material.

What is next for Aiming For Enrike now that the album is out and earning acclaim and new hearts?

We are working on new material, which is turning out really good! And we have some festivals coming up this summer; first there´s Nattjazz festival in Bergen, then Øya festival in Oslo. We are planning a European tour in the fall! So lots of cool stuff coming up!

Once again many thanks for giving your time to us. Anything you would like to add?

Check out our album Segway Nation, and also the live in Rohdos garage videos on YouTube.

Read the review for Segway Nation @ https://ringmasterreviewintroduces.wordpress.com/2016/05/06/aiming-for-enrike-segway-nation/

https://www.facebook.com/aimingforenrike    http://www.namemusic.no/aimingforenrike/

Pete RingMaster

The RingMaster Review 04/06/2016

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Aiming For Enrike – Segway Nation

Aiming For Enrike_RingMasterReview

There seems to have been a bit of a buzz brewing up around Norwegian duo Aiming For Enrike and now with the release of new album Segway Nation, it is very easy to see why. The twelve strong imagination and body inciting instrumentals are a captivating and fascinating adventure in sound and aural suggestiveness revealing two musicians in total creative sync whilst embracing the infectious essences of everything from funk and jazz, post punk to rock ‘n’ roll with plenty more included.

Aiming For Enrike consists of drummer Tobias Ørnes and guitarist Simen Følstad Nilsen, a pair creating refreshing and virulent sounds through intricate polyrhythms within compelling grooves and melodies from a drum kit, three guitar amps, and a rich selection of loop and effect pedals. Inspirations seem to come from the likes of Hella, Lightning Bolt, and Monolithic but across time and debut album Mao Miro, now backed by Segway Nation, Aiming For Enrike has undoubtedly developed something distinct to their own adventure and imagination.

The album opens with the band’s latest single Newspeak, a track which has feet tapping within seconds and hips swinging after a few more inviting moments of its sonically informative body. The track is a keen shuffle of flirtatious rhythms and intrigue lit melodies amidst darker grumbling hues. They all build into a resourceful and magnetic coaxing into the waiting full landscape of Segway Nation and the expanse of the Aiming for Enrike sound. With additional fuzz and a busy nature to its rock ‘n’ roll, the track has attention and appetite firmly hooked before handing both over to its successor.

AimingForEnrike-SegwayNation_RingMasterReview2400Riget similarly has ears snared from its first throws of imagination; post punk/noise rock psychosis leaping at the senses with matching rhythms. It nags and niggles away like a glorious itch that scratching can only deflect momentarily, each strain of temptation more compelling and irresistible than the last while the following Mad Driver is an over active ride which is almost like being locked in a car crazed computer game; like a jazzy version of Mario Kart.

Already there is an open freedom to each piece of music. It is almost as if the band is physically busking in ears with the suggestion that each play of a track by them will always differ from another, something replicated in a way by new aspects being revealed with every listen to the album. New twists and turns certainly make up each highly enjoyable venture into Billion Year Contract, a spatial almost sci-fi spiced flight though shimmering melodies and fiery textures escorted by restrained yet tenacious percussion.

Through the brief distorted scenery and discord of Minitrue and the riveting drama of Ushikawa, the album continues to enthral and add to its already potent persuasion. The second of the two is especially contagious and rousing as it inspires thoughts of mystery and intrigue involved in dark escapades though throughout it reassures the senses with a celebratory air to its hooks and melodies. The track is superb and swiftly matched by the sonic dissonance of Now Watch This Drive. Again its drama holds numerous twists and suggestive turns to try and interpret or simply cast one’s own adventure from, the increasing volatile beats of Ørnes perfectly framing the building creative theatre of Følstad Nilsen’s guitar.

There is little time for the imagination to relax across Segway Nation either. Both the exotically unpredictable Necrocratic Republic and the sinister yet haunting Phone Phobia lay stronger temptation after bewitching temptation on body and mind to engross and almost mentally exhaust when added to the busy adventure already offered while the album’s title track expands the shadowy context of its predecessor with its own rhythmic and sonic slice of emotional espionage and inventive intimation.

Brought to a close by firstly the low key, melancholic ambience of Almost All of Them and finally the dynamic tango of Nakata Johnny Walker, a track which again has the body bouncing from first to last second with its catchy swing and often off-kilter devilry. The closing flames of brass and cosmopolitan hues ensures it and album leave the listener absorbed and ready to go again, something so easy to do.

Segway Nation is one of those album’s you would probably not go explore without a hint or two, so consider this a big nudge and go treat yourselves.

Segway Nation is released May 6th via Name Music across most online stores.

https://www.facebook.com/aimingforenrike   http://www.namemusic.no/aimingforenrike/

Pete Ringmaster 06/05/2016

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

For more exploration of the independent and promotional services check out http://www.zykotika.com

Rangda – The Heretics Bargain

art_RingMaster Review

The Heretic’s Bargain is the new album from instrumentalists Rangda, a trio who take ears and imagination on tantalising and feverishly unpredictable adventures of sound and intent, as evidenced by the five temptations making up their latest release. The album is a kaleidoscope of flavours and exotic hues, an incitement as psychedelically sinister as it is melodically sultry and perpetually hypnotic.

Rangda is the imagination fuelled union between drummer Chris Corsano alongside guitarists Richard Bishop (ex- Sun City Girls) and Ben Chasny (Six Organs of Admittance/ Comets on Fire). 2010 saw their debut album False Flag released with two years later its successor Formerly Extinct unveiled, both on Drag City who also release their new carnival of sound and invention. With also the live 10” offering Rangda Live in Krefeld and a split album with The Dead C under their creative belts, and the experience of featuring on over 400 albums between the three of them, it is fair to say that something new from the band is highly anticipated by a great many, something The Heretics Bargain rewards in magnetic style.

Starting with To Melt the Moon, Rangda provide a maelstrom of suggestiveness for the imagination which will undoubtedly create unique tales for each immersing in the song and album’s escapades. The opener instantly ruffles ears and appetite with its direct shuffle of niggling riffs and feisty rhythms. It is eager bait which in no time then slips into something mystique wrapped; melodies toying with thoughts as the perpetually nagging lure of guitar and drums entices. Within its other-worldly landscape, surf rock colludes with psyche rock; psychobilly and blues rock scented hues further adding to the cinematic yet intimate nudging of hips and thoughts.

Rangda_RingMaster ReviewThe track is glorious and quickly matched by the compelling and devilish canter of The Sin Eaters. Once again grooves and melodies entangle spicy hooks as the crisp jabs of Corsano create an alluring frame. They are all sinisterly seductive ingredients courted by hidden dangers in the song’s shadows as the track becomes a tenacious soundscape of drama and tangy temptation, much as its successor Spiro Agnew. Bishop and Chasny explore in the same scenic emprise as the previous pair, where Middle Eastern flirtation romances the senses whilst sparking in thoughts a tapestry of interpretations of the sound soliciting ears with every listen; that a success found by each track in their individual ways.

Sonic smog with deranged rhythms descends on the senses as Hard Times Befall the Door-to-Door Glass Shard Salesman smothers ears next. Straight away Bishop and Chasny create a cauldron of discordance and sonic trespasses as the beats of Corsano court their own deranged challenge. From this electric dust storm calm eventfully emerges, a mellower passage which still unbalances thoughts and emotions with its jazzy, seemingly improvised but expertly conjured exploration of depths soaked in melancholy led emotions.

From its haunted body, Mondays are Free at the Hermetic Museum slips out, the nineteen minute exploration a gallery of musical and emotive avenues clad in humid sonic invention and sweltering melodies soaked in an air of romance and dangerous intent. Perpetually evolving from start to finish, with moments of lively festivity merging into dark strains of emotional espionage and vice versa, every turn a whole new outlook of scenery and suggestiveness, the track alone makes the album a worthy sharing of time with.

Coming new to Rangda, we cannot suggest how it compares to its predecessors, but certainly we can say for coherently exhilarating, experimental, and creative drama, The Heretics Bargain is a temptress very hard to say no to.

The Heretics Bargain is out now via Drag City @ http://www.dragcity.com/products/the-heretics-bargain

https://www.facebook.com/RANGDA-Ben-Chasny-Chris-Corsano-Richard-Bishop-381243065276869/

http://www.dragcity.com/artists/rangda

Pete RingMaster 22/02/2016

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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Ape Machine – Coalition Of The Unwilling

ApeMachineband2015_RingMaster Review

Called Coalition Of The Unwilling, there is little about the new album from US rocker Ape Machine that would surely cause anyone not to enlist in its creative campaign to ignite ears and imagination. The six track romp is an invigorating tapestry of sound and imagination, a kaleidoscope of melodic colour and sonic tantalising which is as bluesy as it is jazzy, as funky as it is a roar inspired by a diversity of rock music from across the decades. Quite simply it is a rock ‘n’ roll blaze that leaves body and emotions in a very good place.

The Portland bred band follow up their acclaimed 2013 album Mangled By The Machine with a new volcanic weave of styles and sound. Recently signing with Italian label Heavy Psych Sounds, Ape Machine take little time igniting release and ears with their potent fusion of adventurous enterprise and sound, starting things off with Crushed From Within. It looms from a sonic mist seemingly cast in the echoes of time, a lone guitar flirting as it triggers a mesmeric stroll of sludgy intensity and winy sonic tempting. A great analogue inspired breath wraps the songs, and indeed the album and its individual parts, enticing a swiftly keen appetite as easily and potently as the fine vocals of Caleb Heinze and the revelry of rhythms cast by bassist Brian True and drummer Damon De La Paz as well as the stringed exploration and infection sprung by guitarist Ian Watts. Managing to feel as much part of seventies/eighties heavy rock as it does current rock ‘n’ roll devilry, the track is a thrilling start to the release.

ApeMachineCoalitionOfTheUnwilling_RingMaster Review     The following Disband is just as openly inviting and fiery with its blend of rich hues and revolving enterprise. Equally it quickly hooks keen involvement from body and mind, feet and hips bound and inspired by the incitement of grooves and rhythms as the imagination dips into a host of references without settling on any as a specific comparison; the reason being that they are woven into a flirtatious adventure individual to Ape Machine. The track is a storming rocker, bluesy with a stoner-esque scent to simplify things but a much fuller weave of rock music in persuasion, just like the outstanding Give What You Get which comes next. The track is sublime, every aspect honed into an incitement of rousing rock ‘n’ roll temptation and toned with inescapable anthemic tenacity.

The track is a stomp any rock band would sell their bodies for; the perfect invitation to others to check them out, but then again almost any track within Coalition Of The Unwilling is that as proven by the excellent Under This Face. Entering on an almost confrontational air aligned to a rhythmic wake up call, the track soon uncaps a virulent swagger of incendiary beats and hook laden ingenuity. Grooves sizzle and riffs blaze, that alone with the riveting slavery cast by De La Paz irresistible bait, but add atmospheric keys and reflective calm into an ever evolving mix led by the constantly impressing vocals of Heinze, and you have manna for ears and soul.

It is seriously rivalled by the cauldron of instrumental flirtation that is Ape’N’Stein straight away though, the track funk and blues fire, with the latter flavouring more regular old school rather than the delta inspired hue within its predecessor. Its seventies scent is a thick essence too, adding to the enjoyment before it makes way for closing track Never My Way. Initially sultry verging on sonically salty, the guitar weaving surf seduction is a bewitching coaxing aided by bass and voice. It is a reflective enticing erupting quite quickly in a boisterous and emotive crescendo though but then returning to its hypnotic romance to begin the transfixing cycle again.

It is a fine end to a tremendous encounter; a release which can be described and tagged in many ways but is just rock ‘n’ roll to get lustful over. To be honest Coalition Of The Unwilling is our first taste of Ape Machine but for sure it will not be the last.

Coalition Of The Unwilling is available from November 20th via Heavy Psych Sounds.

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Pete RingMaster 20/11/2105

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