Dark Hound – Dawning

Without a plaintive twang in sight, Dark Hound presents a new side to the assumed Nashville music scene though new album Dawning. Hear the Tennessee capital’s name and you automatically think country music in its glory but the ear grabbing quartet prove that its metal scene is in pretty good shape too.

Dawning is the band’s second album and sees them more than build on their well-received Oceans EP of 2015. That followed a self-titled debut full-length from a year earlier which itself sparked strong support across the local rock and metal scene. Formed in 2009, Dark Hound has persistently built and earned a potent reputation for themselves highlighted by Oceans and now set to be escalated by the Kaelin Tauxe/Dark Hound produced Dawning.

The band’s sound is a magnetic mix of flavours; heavy, alternative, and groove metal as prevalent as more progressive and voracious flavours. It is a blend which swiftly grabs attention within opener album Ashes of Your Worth. Instantly riffs ride the senses, the just as persuasive tones of vocalist/bassist ET Brown melodically surfing their tenacious waves. With grooves swiftly winding around ears as a grunge wash descends the track only tightens its grip, guitarists Evan Hensley and Preston Walls weaving a mesh of enterprise as crafty as it is imposing. The track is superb, taking little time to incite and inflame an appetite for stylish yet instinctively rapacious rock ‘n’ roll.

The ticking bomb of Josh Brown’s beats leads in the following Guilt Tripper, his bait accompanied by citric soaked grooves. The punk coated attack of ET’s voice soon joins the thrash spiced temptation, his bass invitingly throbbing as melodic hues infest voice and sound; the cycle repeating with greater endeavour as the track embraces fresh flavours each round. The song bears some of the inspirations to Dark Hound, essences of bands such as Megadeth, Iron Maiden, and more so Testament rising in its heavy metal exploits before making way for the equally infectious trespass of Carnival of Youth. ET’s seemingly calm tones again have an underlying snarl in their arsenal, it igniting with raw dexterity to match the fire of the sounds around him led by the rapier swings of Josh. Captivating from beginning to end, the track reminds of UK band Promethium a touch, the Dark Hound sound infusing their individual invention with more familiar ingredients to fine effect.

The opening whirl of guitar in The Answer had ears totally enthralled, its craft irresistible and continues to tempt across a song which to be honest otherwise did not make the same impact as its predecessors yet was the centre of attention in its increasingly enjoyable company before Crisis of Hope takes centre stage. It too makes a transfixing entrance, its hook fuelled lure Skids like and subsequently coring an emerging Jane’s Addiction-esque stroll. As the previous song, it was bit of a slow burner on ears though making a more than decent first impression, but grew minute by minute, listen by listen into another highly enjoyable encounter within Dawning if still missing the heights of the first trio.

Predacious in tone and sound Thrown to the Wolves quickly hits the spot next, the track almost crawling over the senses even with its eventual lively gait and nagging persistence while Stripped Away aligns acoustic flirtation and creative drama for its own gripping theatre. Considered and seductive, boisterous veering on rabid, the song is a carousel of adventure making a big statement for best song, both tracks in the running and matched all the way by the raucous yet harmonically teasing Balancing Act. Again recognisable flavours collude with strong surprises for a proposal which infested ears and appetite like an aural addiction.

Through the shadowed lined charge of The Jagged Edge pleasure was constant though certain moments did not connect with personal tastes as firmly as others, nothing though to dismiss the increasingly persuasive encounter over, while Thrashgasm delivered exactly what you would expect with its title with aggression and creative passion energy, the snarl of the bass and the ever energetic vocal incitement especially enjoyable.

The album concludes with Here Lies Truth and immediately trespasses ears with carnal riffs and teasingly salacious grooves. Again vocals simply draw involvement as guitars badger and conjure, rhythms imposing and driving song and spirit in fine style alongside as Dawning closes on another high

After the first couple of involvements we would have said Dark Hound had something worth checking out, numerous listens later it is a proposition which needs to be explored. This is a fine band in the making with an album we have found ourselves only getting greedier over.

Dawning is released digitally and on CD January 19th, available @ https://darkhound.bandcamp.com/album/dawning

https://www.dark-hound.com/    https://www.facebook.com/darkhoundband    https://twitter.com/darkhoundband

Pete RingMaster 19/01/2018

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

IAmFire – From Ashes

With the self-titled debut Mary Beats Jane album one of our all-time favourite releases, we have kept a close eye on the exploits of vocalist Peter Dolving especially with his time in The Haunted. So there was certain anticipation when news of a first album from IAmFire emerged, a project originally seeing Dolving linking up with bassist/vocalist Mikael Ehlert, guitarist Peter Ahlers Olsen, and drummer Ulf Scott. Now completed by drummer Jakob Mygind with Rasmus Revsbech, the Copenhagen outfit swiftly and increasingly surprise, feed, and captivate with From Ashes and its feast of heavy psychedelic/stoner rock bred adventures.

From its first breath From Ashes imposes its presence and qualities upon ears and imagination, opener Magpies and crows forcibly prowling the senses with ominous riffs and hefty beats. It soon settles into a heavy footed magnetic stroll though as the contrasting but equally tempting warm tones of Dolving settle upon the trespass. Fusing essences akin to Electric Wizard, Black Sabbath, and Kyuss with the grungier spicing of a Gruntruck, the track submerges the listener in a weighty embrace of sound and hypnotic charm.

It is a compelling start carrying on into next up Did you find your name, the song sauntering in on a mellow melodic breeze driven by boisterous and instantly rousing rhythms. As its predecessor, its presence is immediately contagious, Dolving vocally and the band musically weaving a celestial tapestry of suggestion with a lurking lining of shadow bred implication. That dark inclination erupts with increasing intensity as the song twists and turns, its rapacious Palms spiced heart sharing its creativity with melodic stimulants and increasing imagination.

Burn your halo shares a more irritable nature in its grunge lined rock ‘n’ roll next with its successor, Eyes wide open, descending into psych rock foreboding and seduction, again with an ever present edge which keeps the senses wary and ears transfixed. Both songs infuse unpredictable and tantalising twists in their already riveting bodies, the second casting a sonic incantation with a raw Jane’s Addiction like air, and each leave ears and appetite just wanting more.

That need is potently fed by For what it´s worth, its tribal rhythmic predation and invasively dancing grooves as addictive as Dolving’s vocal incitement which carries as much portentousness as reassuring calm. Bordering ritualistic, the track is creative manipulation with increasing dexterity before a similar but individual persuasion is cast by Beamer. It too has a volatility which maybe threatens rather than erupts but adds to the song’s body and imagination involving mastery with the drums an addictive ringleader once again.

The album concludes with firstly My mistake, a ravenous cosmic infestation, and lastly through the caustic yet suave tenacious shuffle of Inside. As the album overall, both tracks simply get under the skin with the puppeteer qualities of the rhythms and irresistible trespass of the grooves, they just two aspects in their individual multi-layered and flavoured examinations.

From Ashes is psych/stoner manna with rabidity in its enterprise controlled by an imagination which barely recognises restraint itself, in its midst Dolving may be exploring his own finest moments yet. Simply it is striking irresistible stuff; so seems we have another to add to our persistent favourites.

From Ashes is out now via Elevation Denmark and available @ https://iamfirerocks.bandcamp.com/album/from-ashes

https://www.facebook.com/IAmFireband/    https://www.instagram.com/iamfireofficial/

Pete RingMaster 21/11/2017

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Zedi Forder – Self Titled

Some bands and artists just click with ears and imagination from their introduction and for us one was definitely UK trio Zedi Forder. Maybe it is more accurate to say the creative force behind the band crafted the connection because previous adventures for the duo of vocalist/drummer/primary songwriter Chris Kerley and guitarist Mark Carstairs have equally seriously enticed and stoked the passions. They are also the creators of Tricore, An Entire Legion, and Rind Skank; all distinctly individual bands releasing some of the most exciting and imaginative adventures in recent years though each being sadly missed or ignored by a tide of major attention. Zedi Forder is their latest project, with bassist Richard Tomsett alongside, creating a bold and multi-flavoured mix of alternative metal and voracious rock ‘n’ roll which fuels a self-titled debut album that quite simply deserves greed driven recognition.

In some ways because of previous seductions of our passions, Zedi Forder get a head start in a want, or should that be need, to hear its exploits and an assumption of having some level of appetite for what may be on offer. Equally though, it makes expectations much more demanding and triggers the question of can the band create something unique and fresh enough to be truly new from past endeavours as much as those around them. Many bands or musicians struggle in one guise but across a few it is a rare success. The release of an also self-titled EP in 2015 suggested the Woking hailing outfit could and would, their first album now a striking confirmation going well beyond simply bearing out that proposal though understandably it also gives delicious slithers teasing at earlier explorations which adds to rather than defuses the originality.

The Zedi Forder bio says it is a band with a split personality. “One side is driven by the musical aim of being bold and ever hopeful. The other side is fearless and judgmental, with music that reflects this.” The album certainly reflects this suggestion, its songs, sometimes within themselves, twisting from creatively free-swinging and swashbuckling to imaginatively mischievous on to proposals forceful and emotionally edgy and cutting but all crafted with an instinct for rousing sounds, manipulative rhythms, and daring diversity.

The album opens up with Killakarta and instantly consumes ears with rapacious riffs and jabbing beats as a bass growl courts a thick wiry groove. Kerley’s distinctive and ever magnetic vocals are soon in the heart of the mix, steering the song’s muscular stroll with expression and flair. That initial groove, carrying a growl far more vocal in the bass of Tomsett, winds around the imagination; it trespass enjoyably toxic and addictively refreshing. A slip into a mellow climate is just as tempting, accentuating the song’s unpredictability before being overwhelmed by a more primal expulsion of sound and intensity, reclaiming its moment as a great jazzy lilt infests the bass.

Seductive and predatory in equal measure, the track is a glorious start to an emprise of imagination and craft backed by the arguably less mercurial Machines though it is no slouch in raising its temperature and dynamics across a persistently eventful body. Kerley’s beats bite as Carstairs’ melodies spin a web of suggestion; his trap of enterprise further ignited by possibly the most virulent and catchy hook lined groove you will hear this year.

Dark Mook is a kaleidoscope of sound and texture, its opening noisy glaze slipping into a funky pop tinged stroll of melody and harmony before grungier flames escape guitars and bass as Kerley consistently croons with his never wavering melodic dexterity before I’m the one offers its own individual tempting for an already aroused and on the brink of lustful appetite. The fourth track also opens with a bracing surge of raw sound but is soon entangling the listener in a flirtatiously earthy bassline with funk in its genes and as quickly catchy vocals and beats with a sense of devilry in their gait. Carstairs’ weave of melodic teasing is a riveting net to get caught up in, ensnaring the senses before things get dirty and feisty though Kerley is still keeping the instinctive catchiness flowing in touch as the track to re-establishes its unbridled virulence. The song is another early pinnacle; an irresistible treat with a great 12 Stone Toddler meets KingBathmat scent to its revelry.

Darker shadows wrap the melodic beauty and volatile turbulence of next up My Moon, the song drawing on electronic tenacity to colour its variable and perpetually alluring atmosphere above a rugged terrain of invention. Across its roar, thoughts pluck at comparisons to the likes of Sick Puppies, Voyager, and Soundgarden; all slightly inaccurate but potent hints to the great track.

The grin loaded Nachoman comes next, the song a compelling tongue in cheek but earnest tease of social commentary. It has voice and hips hooked within its opening Red Hot Chili Peppers smoked swerve and only proceeds to tighten its vice like grip through heavier spices and inventive condiments of sound while Open Wide grabs attention with a bullish tirade of sound before flirtatiously dancing in ears with its Jane’s Addiction like funk metal meets System Of A Down seeded versatility. Melodies and emotions fluctuate in character and intensity across the song, as too vocals and rhythms with the latter an evolving torrent of enticement and aggression.

They love it more is a cyclone of sound and energy within an oasis of reflection and melody, never truly settling but always in control of its volcanic fusion of rock and metal while successor Smooch is a predator of hips and imagination with its boisterous shuffle courted by barbarous rhythms and emerging sonic hostility again spurned on by the spiky beats of Kerley and the irritable tone of Tomsett’s bass. With an infection loaded and at times psychotic groove sharing lures with an inherent catchiness, the track as its predecessor hits the spot dead centre, burrowing deeper with every listen, as quite simply does the album.

The growling Time after time leaves no stone of temptation unturned, its grunge/metal snarl maybe the most creatively untwisted track on the release but as bold and naturally infectious as any others such as the following On the run, a slab of classic metal and heavy rock with a nod to the likes of Zeppelin and Sabbath in its heart infused with the progressive and melody conjuring imagination of Zedi Forder.

Though not the actual final song, Lonely One closes things off with its melodically haunting, sonically searing, and rhythmically imposing blaze which alone shares all you need to know to hear why its creators warrant unbridled attention.

With a bonus quartet of mesmeric acoustic tracks which alone prove why we rate Kerley as a vocalist so much, each also unveiling a new drama and shade to the original’s aspects, the album is manna for body and soul and a real bargain as it seems it is being released as a name your own price download. Covering their first EP we said “it would be rude not to go off and discover its majesty “, for the album substitute ‘rude’ for ‘stupid’ because you will surely not hear anything more gripping and exciting than what Zedi Forder have in lying wait.

The Zedi Forder album is released June 10th wit pre-ordering available now @ https://tricore.bandcamp.com/album/zedi-forder-the-album-out-10th-june-pre-order-to-get-4-tracks-entire-flame-wiz-album-now

http://www.zediforder.com/     https://www.facebook.com/zediforder/   https://twitter.com/ZediForder

Pete RingMaster 02/06/2017

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Dearly Beloved – Admission

 

beloved-12_RingMasterReview

It would have been hard to imagine Canadian band, Dearly Beloved majorly outdoing their last album Enduro at the time of its release, it one glorious slice of garage rock inspired sound built on instinctive and striking imagination, but they have done just that with its successor Admission. If there is such a thing as the perfect record, Dearly Beloved come so close with their new offering. Yet again the band recruits and manipulates the imagination with their sonic tapestries, embracing even greater adventure and variety whilst fully uncaging their rock ‘n’ roll instincts. If the last album was glorious, Admission is majestic; quite simply a primal and ingeniously conjured, addiction sparking roar.

As with its predecessor, the Toronto based band leapt upon and recorded fifth full-length Admission in quick time, using up fourteen days at Dave Grohl’s Studio 666. As ever centered around the vocal pairing of bassist Rob Higgins and Niva Chow, the quartet linked up with produced Daniel Rey (Ramones and Misfits) to record the album, using the famed, 70s era Neve 8028 analogue console that spawned Nirvana’s Nevermind. The result is a proposition which grips ears with vice like tempting while taking feet, hips, and rock ‘n’ roll instincts on a ride of their life.

RIP kicks things off, instantly chaining attention and an eager appetite because of previous successes with a grumbling yet vibrant bassline matched by senses rapping beats. A momentary breath uncages a torrent of hungry riffs and antagonistic rhythms, that in turn the prelude for a controlled yet ferocious rock roar. It is a fiery incitement perfectly contrasted rather than tempered by the warm inviting tones of Higgins and Chow, together a riveting lure in the creative storm. More virulent than the common cold, the track is pure dominance, irresistibly enslaving hips and feet as easily as ears and emotions.

The sensational start is more than matched by These Data, it too fleecing the passions with an opening lure of bass, a swinging groove woven coaxing infesting the psyche as a sonic shimmer sizzles around it. Beats dance with creative tenacity around that prime draw, Higgins again vocally captivating with Chow a similarly magnetic support as the track rumbles and grumbles. It is riveting stuff with guitars adding a great sour spicing to the mix as punk and grunge essences join the garage rock natured proposal.

admission1_RingMasterReviewI Tried To Leave brings a lighter poppier tone next though bass and drums still have that enjoyable crankiness as the pair explores a more Jane’s Addiction flavoured adventure. Every twist and turn in its intoxicating blaze brings fresh ingredients to devour, a psych rock invention only adding to a mouth-watering stomp before Who Wants to Know turns the album’s charge into a prowling, dark toned trespass. Vocally Higgins and Chow conjure a bewitching union whilst sonically the song sears the senses as rhythms dance on the debris with ridiculously infectious wantonness. A subsequent passage of relative calm enables a blues laced groan to emerge, its restrained air remaining as the track expands again until its volatility surges through ears as Chow’s harmonic lures beckon like a siren.

Through the kinetic punk ‘n’ roll of Strobe-Dosing and the abrasive funk of Currents, band and release use the listener like a puppeteer, the first as much pop natured as punk belligerent as it courses relentlessly like blood through veins into the psyche and passions. Its successor holds back its instinctive urge to career through ears, allowing its rhythmic heart and harmonic beauty to entice the senses like a raw blend of Shriekback and Ex Norwegian though as ever, a Dearly Beloved song is never slow in developing new detours and twists to enjoy.

The garage punk devilry of Blood In The Water provides the next major highlight of Admission, its dark heart and tantalising slow rhythmic prowl almost crawling over the senses as electronics atmospherically play and guitars toxically simmer. As vocals and harmonies radiate and yet another wicked bassline from Higgins grips, the track moves and burns like gothic lava.

Its startling presence is matched by that of Boxing Days straight after, the song aural seduction from its bewitching vocals and crabby bassline to its harmonic romancing and infectious tempestuousness. From a fascinating simmer it grows into a conflagrant eruption of sound and intensity impossible to evade not that you will wish to.

It is fair to say there are no weak moments within Admission; no times it comes close to loosening its masterful hold and creative success as proven once more by the closing creative outcries of When You Had The Choice and Future Shock. The former is a romping slice of rock ‘n’ roll with an unmistakable Foo Fighters like boisterousness and aggression in its punk heart while the latter skilfully blends calm and clamour in its own garage rock/punk driven trespass, each entwining a host of flavours in their spirit rousing traps.

It is very easy to keep heaping more praise upon Admission but the evidence is in the sound and time shared with it, though Dearly Beloved need little of either to convince and prove themselves one of the most exciting bands out there.

Admission is out now via Aporia Records across most online stores and @ https://dearlybeloved.bandcamp.com/album/admission-2

http://www.dearlybelovedmusic.com/    https://www.facebook.com/TheBeloveds/    https://twitter.com/thebeloveds

Pete RingMaster 31/01/2017

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Chainflower – The Broken & Lovely

chainflower_RingMaster Review

Earlier this year, we found ourselves treated to one ferocious blaze of compelling psyche twisting rock ‘n’ roll from US duo Chainflower, and now we have another from the same protagonist to sets ears and passions ablaze. The band’s new scorching persuasion is The Broken & Lovely EP, a thrilling successor to their outstanding and acclaimed self-titled debut EP. It is a two track offering just as impacting and gripping in its blend of varied rock flavours but has something extra to out shine its impressive predecessor. It is an indefinable essence that makes The Broken & Lovely EP eclipse a release whose songs we suspect might have been possibly written and also recorded at the same time as the new EP, but something to help Chainflower’s latest offering reach up to another plateau in songwriting and sound, not forgetting temptation.

S02_5x5.125_Sleeve.eps_RingMaster Review     Chainflower is the creation of guitarist and songwriter Kelly Wheeler, a veteran of the L.A. music scene who as well as having played with members of Jane’s Addiction and Tool in his career, uncaged his highly praised and supported bands SexTapes and Ultraject, the first which is now on hiatus, featuring long time Guns N’ Roses member Chris Pitman on lead vocals. Uniting with vocalist Erika Renee, who had ‘applied’ for the newly vacant vocalist spot in Ultraject at the time, the pair emerged as Chainflower and quickly got to work on the local live scene whilst joining producer and engineer Doug Grean (Stone Temple Pilots, Velvet Revolver, Scott Weiland, Sheryl Crow, Cyndi Lauper) to record that first EP.

A few months on and also recorded with Grean, The Broken & Lovely opens up with Lewd Blues which is instantly bewitching ears with its bluesy, almost intoxicated haze of guitar. Things only get spicier and more gripping as the distinctive tones of Renee unveil their lures and the song’s narrative, punchy beats, and a great grizzled bass tempting provided by Eliot Lorango add to the increasingly magnetic and sizzling seduction on offer. The grooves of Wheeler relentlessly wind around the senses and imagination, perpetually teasing the passions even when switching from a delta blues lined coaxing to seventies psych rock imagination, Renee all the time riding his weaves and sways like a surfer with her delivery.

Second song on the EP is Hell’s Roll; a more predatory stroll again coursing a fuzzy maze of guitar prowess covered by darker shadows conducted by the hefty but controlled swings of guest drummer Brandon Pertzborn. Never elevating from its riveting prowl, the track spins dark rock ‘n’ roll and dirty blues textures into its mystique kissed adventure of sound and vision, firmly holding ears and attention as enthralled as the imagination.

Like an endearingly twisted mix of My Baby, Karn8, and at times Morass of Molasses, both tracks just excite and inspire whilst reinforcing Chainflower as one rather thrilling proposition.

The Broken & Lovely EP is out now @ http://chainflower.bandcamp.com/album/the-broken-lovely

https://www.facebook.com/Chainflowermusic

Pete RingMaster 22/10/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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Blacklist Union – Back To Momo

blacklistunion_RingMaster Review

A few short weeks back, US rockers Blacklist Union unleashed their single Alive N Well Smack in the Middle of Hell, a magnetic stomp of a song providing an inviting teaser to the band’s new album Back To Momo. If you too took up its enjoyable invitation to rebel rouse let us tell you now, as good as it actually was, it barely touched on the might and enterprise flooding the band’s fourth full-length. It is persistently rivalled and at times just outshine by the thrilling incitements offered by Back To Momo, which tells you just how outstanding the album is.

Formed in 2004 by frontman Tony West, the Los Angeles hailing Blacklist Union was soon stirring up attention, especially from the 2006 release of debut album After The Mourning. The band’s reputation and stature continued to grow as the band emerged on the US rock scene, second album Breakin’ Bread With The Devil two years later luring keener fan and media focus which its well-received successor Til Death Do Us Part in 2012 pushed much further. Now it is the turn of Back To Momo to try and breach the broadest spotlights, a success hard to bet against such its rebellious and anthemic might.

BLU-Momo-Cover-smBlacklist Union - Back To Momo   With guitarist/bassist Todd Youth and drummer Matt Starr alongside West, Blacklist Union opens up Back To Momo with that aforementioned single, Alive-N-Well Smack in the Middle of Hell. A lone guitar stirs the air first, it’s coaxing soon pierced by a vocal shrill and joined by tangy grooving. Part hard rock, part punk ‘n’ roll, the song hits its stride with a swagger and a closet full of irresistible hooks and sonic enterprise from the guitars. Addiction is the order of the day with the song and as it has feet and emotions fully involved, it is easy to think rock ‘n’ roll does not get much better than this, but oh yes it does, and often across Back To Momo.

The following Shake It Off has a more restrained canter to its blues washed hard rock, and a sense of familiarity which is only enriched by the excellent delivery and vocal attitude of West. Expectations are fed a touch by the song, surprises less bold than on tracks around it but again it has ears and enjoyment settling into a keen appetite before the outstanding Mirror, Mirror on the Wall turns the creative heat up. Erupting in a surge of rhythms and sonic flames, the track quickly swings boisterous hips and frees contagious resourcefulness as an equally riveting vocal adventure jumps in. The track is glorious, a rousing blend of The Stooges, Turbo Negro, and Jane’s Addiction with just the right amount of glam metal, and easily the best incitement upon the album, and the next single surely?

Both the actual upcoming single Evil Eye and Superjaded keep things fiercely bubbling. The first is a scintillating swamp of prowling beats, nagging riffs, and blues bred hues with again an irresistible vocal tempting from West whereas its successor merges the infection of rock pop with the tenacity of punk and the revelry of hard rock, it all contained in a vibrant but restrained embrace which only seems to intensify the invention of the song. Both tracks come with a wealth of flavours and styles, another great feature across the rock ‘n’ roll of the album, and maybe it is no surprise they do given inspirations to the band range from Guns N’ Roses to David Bowie, Bad Brains to Bauhaus, T Rex to The Mission and The Ramones, to name a few.

With a title like Rock N Roll Outlaw you pretty much have an idea of the type of sound on offer and true to pleasing form, the song is an enticing blend of southern and classic rock coated in that twang that gets the taste buds grinning. The music itself does not hold the biggest key to the song’s success, as flavoursome as it is, but the invention and mischievous twists the band put into it is what excites the imagination most before the album’s title track uncages some more punk lined rock ‘n’ roll which simply radiates belligerence within a anthemic blaze. With a skeleton of pulsating rhythms within melodic and infection oozing creative flesh, the song entwines echoes of Alice in Chains, New York Dolls, and Shark Tape.

We Are Not Saints, as It’s All About You right after, flirt with some invigorating strains of garage rock for their individual designs, the former twisting it into a predatory prowling of the senses and serious ignition of the instincts to rock ‘n’ roll whilst the latter, taking an even richer dose of sixties/seventies garage ferocity, weaves a tonic for body and soul bristling with sonic tendrils, sparkling hooks, and psych rock breeding. The rhythms from both bass and drums are wicked seduction whilst West again shows he is one of the most magnetic and dynamic frontmen/vocalists in rock right now.

Things remain infectiously hot with the enthralling Meet Me on Zen Street, a song veering on the brink of horror punk at times, and again through the dirty scuzz lined Graveyard Valentine. Rock ‘n’ roll needs a healthy dose of filth and attitude, and there is plenty on show in voice and sound in this irresistible proposal, the grouchy deep throated bass leading the way. Punk again rears its welcome head, and not for the first time on Back To Momo, there is a touch of Canadian duo The Black Frame Spectacle to the thrilling stomp.

The album is completed by firstly the niggling temptation of Wined, Dined, & 69’d, the song simply classic bred, glammed up rock ‘n’ roll, and lastly Read Between the Lines, a track which again prowls the listener with dazzling lures and spicy enticements. It does not quite live up to earlier peaks yet as all songs, only leaves a licking of lips and want for more.

Back to Momo is not bulging with sounds that are unfamiliar yet from start to finish it is commandingly fresh with an insatiable spark sure to ignite any day. The single Alive N Well Smack in the Middle of Hell was and still is a mighty way to join the Blacklist Union, whilst the album shows it has much more to thrill and incite with. . After this if the band has not breached major attention then world rock is a fool.

Back To Momo is available now via BLU Records.

Ringmaster 13/08/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Los and the Deadlines – Perfect Holiday EP

Los and the Deadlines_RingMaster Review

With more distinctive hues to their creative tapestry of sound than colours in a drag queen’s make-up palette, UK based Los and the Deadlines unveil their new EP to cast a captivating enticing which is as dynamically refreshing as it is imaginatively inflamed. There is adventure on every corner and inventive devilry within each creative breath of the Perfect Holiday EP, exciting times coming with increasing persistence over each and every listen. The band has sparked intrigue and enjoyment with previous releases but those just pale against the vibrant and bewitching exploration of this new Los and the Deadlines encounter.

The seeds of the band began when Arizona bred lead vocalist/guitarist Alex LoSardo moved to London in 2010. After being introduced to guitarist Neils Bakx, common interest and already existing musical thoughts began to bear fruit between the pair as they began writing and composing together whilst studying for their undergraduate degrees. A few line-up changes ensued as the band established its sound and presence, the time offering up a pair of strong EPs in the shape of Metro Talk in 2012 and Part One: Bank last year. Italian drummer Alberto Voglino had joined the band before the release of their second EP whilst Israeli bassist Rotem Haguel linked up more recently after another change in personnel. Whether he was the missing link to the band’s full potency others can decide, but there is no doubting a new spark and maturity, not forgetting energy, to Perfect Holiday which declares a band coming of age.

cover_RingMaster Review    The band’s sound is often and understandably tagged as art-rock but as opener Feel At Ease quickly reveals that barely hints at the evolving brews of grunge, stoner, punk, noise, and many other rock ‘n’ roll spices woven together in the EP’s individual exploits. The first song is an immediate throaty groan of heavy bass, discord deranged guitar, and jabbing beats. It is an almost menacingly brewed lure which never flinches as the spoken delivery of LoSardo opens up a just as pungent narrative. Fresh predatory air hits all areas before the song opens out into a catchy and melodically tempting chorus, its appearance another trigger as the song returns to its stalking but with a hungrier and livelier nature. We would suggest as this and all songs play, each listener will find their own references and hints to compare songs with, and here, thoughts of early Squeeze, Split Enz, and just a touch of Pere Ubu nudge these thoughts.

The outstanding start is followed by It Could Be So Much Better, an instantly grittier and more classic rock toned saunter resonating to metallic swipes on drums and blossoming a bluesy tang to the winding grooves of the guitars. Melodic vocals only add to the sultriness whilst off kilter scythes of sonic invention ensures another song not here just to feed expectations, even if it is arguably less adventurous than surrounding proposals with its fiery Red Hot Chili Peppers like smoulder. That is not to suggest the track has an air of predictability, just that it is less creatively ‘psychotic’ compared to the likes of The Youth’s Opinion which follows it. Once again the band opens a track up with the richest bait, rhythms and riffs compelling enticement with a touch of grouchiness which soon expands into a maze of wiry grooves around a Queens Of The Stone Age melodic revelry. Addictively virulent and tenaciously imaginative, the song swings and dances on ears, treating them to further sonic and warped resourcefulness which it would not be too far from the mark to suggest plays with a Melvins spicing.

From one glorious incitement to another as Batshit Crazy steps forward, its entrance a merger of crispy beats and a heavy, dark funk bred bassline around more greatly alluring tones of LoSardo, the vocalist potent whether speaking or singing across songs. Though restrained in its energy and assault, its title sums up the song’s nature perfectly, a funky Jane’s Addiction like prowess colluding with Dog Fashion Disco like imagination. To be fair all references offered never weaken something original to Los and the Deadlines, and as mentioned everyone will hear someone different within the band’s unique waltzes.

The shadowy flirtation of the track makes way for closer We Lust To Shop For Nothing, another with a Josh Homme like touch to its inventive colouring though in no time the song expels a blaze of rock ‘n’ roll which is more I Plead Irony like but constantly creating its own addiction sparking, ridiculously infectious emprise of sound and ingenuity. As all tracks, there is, for want of a better word, bedlam at the heart of the song, a ‘crazed’ weave which is as fluid and magnetic as it is relentlessly surprising.

As suggested earlier, Los and the Deadlines have suddenly blossomed from an enticing potential fuelled prospect into a beast of ravenous and mouth-watering rock ‘n’ roll, though again that really only hints at the thrills found within Perfect Holiday.

The Perfect Holiday EP is out from July 13th

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RingMaster 13/07/2015

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