Buñuel – The Easy Way Out

If the soundtrack to the fall of the world is The Easy Way Out, the new album from Buñuel, then our arms for one can easily embrace the demise of all. The eleven track tempest is simply glorious, a collusion of sonic and emotional dissonance within a voracious carnival of noise which devours as it seduces.

The Easy Way Out is the successor to the quartet’s acclaimed 2016 debut album A Resting Place For Strangers, a release pushing the walls of the former’s ferocity, imagination, and psyche twisting trespass far further. The US/Italy hailing foursome create an often suffocating, frequently corrosive, and perpetually rousing assault of invention from within its walls, taking ears and emotions on an visceral rollercoaster ride fronted by the vocal prowess of Eugene S Robinson, already renowned for his part of Oxbow. Like a barker to its twisted sideshow but decisively more ringleader than narrator, his lyrical inharmony breeds a vocal dissidence and tenacity which is pure magnetism. Equally the ravenous sounds cast by bassist Pierpaolo Capovilla and drummer Franz Valente (both One Dimensional Man, Il Teatro Degli Orrori) alongside guitarist Xabier Iriondo (Afterhours) inspire as they corrupt, arouse as they deviously manipulate.

Opener Boys To Men emerges from its dark depths on a ponderous yet hypnotic prowl, Robinson instantly crawling all over its muscular drone bred awakening with vocal aberration as delirious as it is lucid. Inescapably transfixing across its increasingly tempestuous, intense fibrous yawn, the track invades like something akin to Swans meets Pere Ubu, and simply had ears and imagination afire.

The Hammer / The Coffin follows and instantly takes its own tight grip on attention as the feral temptation of Capovilla’s bass aligns to the swinging rabidity of Valente’s beats. Vocals and guitar toxicity are soon infesting song and listener, their carnivorous discord raw contagion as the noise rock seeded invasion swiftly has body and thoughts bouncing with equally bedlamic eagerness before the track releases its puppet into the waiting subversive rock ‘n’ roll jaws of Dial Tone. Harmonic toxins vein the boisterously bruising stomp, lighting up its heavy tenebrous flood of sound to easily get under the skin whilst exhausting the senses though it in turn is just a warm up for the even more debilitating roar of A Sorrowfull Night. With strand like hooks recalling The Fall within its tsunami of voluminous sound, the track is a post/noise punk trap to which capture and addiction was a done deal within its first few breaths.

Next come the monotonous sludge thick advance of The Sanction where rhythmic and citric enterprise bewitch alongside the ever compelling presence and dexterity of Robinson while Happy Hour twists and turns straight after like a punk dervish, flinging visceral grooves and sonic splinters with relish. The first of the two epitomises so much of the album with its mercurial landscape, its unpredictable terrain of imagination evolving and wrong-footing with ease, the second a less pronounced but just as inspired echo within its carnal punk ‘n’ roll.

Next up is The Roll which is simply magnificent. From its opening dance of keys against the raw discordance of the bass, the song invites as it taunts. Female vocals alongside Robinson similarly grab ears as they light the hungry onslaught before Augur stalks and fingers the senses with its rock ‘n’ roll schism. Like a meeting between Big Black and The Filthy Tongues with Shellac looking in yet truly unique to Buñuel, it is raw magnetism from start to finish.

Shot is just wild noise punk at its best, fifty seconds of anarchy before Where You Lay intimidates, threatens, and physically harasses the senses and psyche. Vocally, Robinson is as imposing and invasive as the sounds uniting around him, the track like a disconnected tangle of sinews and tones coming together layer by layer never disguising the portentous corrosive outcome their unity will bring.

The album concludes with Hooker, a final but accepting fissure on the album’s theme within a sonic misting as toxic as it is deceptively calm; a last corroded breath in the stark, barren outcome of the album’s sonic apocalypse.

With the amount of releases we are blessed to be sent it is not too hard to find plenty to get excited over but to be truly blow away by it a rare occurrence but one The Easy Way Out achieved. It is a definite album of the year contender with already a grip on top spot but easy to suggest also one of the decade’s most essential moments.

The Easy Way Out is released July 27th via La Tempesta International and Goodfellas Records.

https://www.facebook.com/Bunuelband/

Pete RingMaster 24/07/2018

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Hogs – Fingerprints

Playing hard rock with a tantalising blend of funk, blues, and other varied flavours to it, Italian band Hogs have just released second album Fingerprints. It is an encounter which builds on a debut from Italians which certainly courted keen attention and has all the imagination to take the Florence outfit to a far broader placed audience.

The band’s seeds began in 2012 with guitarist Francesco Bottai, bassist Luca Cantasano, and drummer Pino Gulli; their creative union the spring board for the emergence of Hogs. The band’s line-up was subsequently completed by vocalist Simone Cei. 2015 saw the release of debut album, HOGS in fishnets via Red Cat Records who the band has again linked up with for Fingerprints. It was an encounter openly suggesting potential and imagination within its accomplished body; intimation now realised within its highly enjoyable successor.

Fingerprints opens up with Man size and instantly chunky riffs tempt with tenacious rhythms in close quarter. As it settles down, a blues spicing fires up within its classic rock setting, Cei’s potent tones at the core matched by the guest vocals of Carlotta Cocchi. Catchy in its swing, robust in its touch and wonderfully unpredictable in its enterprise, the imagination is soon caught in its drama, its array of styles and flavours woven into one strong magnetic start.

Stinking like a dog follows and is instantly casting a tantalising shuffle shaped by the dextrous swings of Gulli and the animated touch of Botta’s guitar. Hips could not escape the effect of the song’s swing, its funkiness, driven by the excellent tenacity of Cantasano’s bass, soon getting under the skin.

The infectious exploits of Mr. Hide is just as manipulative; its bluesy stroll and melodic rock shaped tempting a captivating launch to sonic flames and vocal reflection before making way for the warm sonic climes of Australia summerland. Again there is a classic rock breath to the song and though it misses the more unpredictable and adventurous twists of its predecessors, it leaves ears and appetite more than satisfied especially with the individual craft of the band in full display.

The jazzy air and touch of Down to the river needs little time to stir the imagination next, its reggae flavoured instincts just as magnetic as the organ of Federico Pacini; its inviting sway and the heart bred expression of Cei, a rich lure on top.

Across the likes of the boisterously magnetic Another dawn and the rousingly raucous Man of the score, enterprise and imagination fly from the speakers. The second of the pair is especially compelling with its animated rock ‘n’ roll while the increasingly captivating Can’t find my home is a web of alternative, hard and blues rock which teases with the familiar and refreshes with the individual. Pacini adds his keys to the escapade once again as too in Jewish vagabond which follows, this song a ballad with a lively smoulder and melodic elegance which too just became more magnetic by the minute and play, country borne sighs courtesy of Paolo Giorgi’s peddle guitar adding to the sunshine of the song.

Both songs relish the imagination open in varying degrees within the album, unexpected turns which surprise among more recognisable strains of enterprise and to be found within the closing pair of Don’t stop moving and Just for one day. The excellent first is one of the songs which seems so familiar from start to finish yet only pleasures and recruits keen participation alongside the imagination. The final track is a calm emotively cast ballad; a sunset of melodic and vocal intimation which caresses as potently as it flames around ears.

It is fair to say that the Hogs sound is not one we would naturally be drawn to but Fingerprints is a release we just took too. It is one which also grew in potency and persuasion play by play so worth a good look at we reckon.

Fingerprints is available now through Red Cat Records/7Hard now through most stores.

https://www.facebook.com/hogsband

Pete RingMaster20/05/2018

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Paola Pellegrini Lexrock – Lady To Rock

Professional criminal lawyer by day, devout rock guitarist/singer/songwriter by night, Paola Pellegrini is an Italian artist with numerous strings to her bow and a sound just as versatile. She plays rock ‘n’ roll, a collusion of hard rock, punk, and metal which as proven by new album Lady To Rock is very easy to raise a healthy appetite for.

Hailing from the city of Florence, Pellegrini has been playing and writing songs since a child. Having played with various bands she began her solo career as Paola Pellegrini Lexrock, releasing her debut album Agape in 2013. Two years its successor, Dreams Come True was unveiled through Qua’ rock Records. Lady To Rock is her new collection of songs; a release which maybe evades major surprises in some ways but embraces fresh adventure in far many more.

For Lady To Rock, Pellegrini linked up with bassist Franco Licausi, who played for 20 years with Negrita and currently with Litfiba, and drummer Simone Morettin of folk metallers Elvenking. Produced by Giuseppe Scarpato and Paolo Baglioni at Wall Up Studio in Florence and mixed and mastered by Giovanni Gasperini, the album roars into life with No Half Way. Instantly riffs and grooves surround ears, rhythms punchy company before the quickly engaging tones of Pellegrini step forward to complete a potent persuasion. A tenacious slice of heavy rock ‘n’ roll, familiar but infectiously magnetic, it provides Lady To Rock with a great start to.

It is a beginning though which is quickly built upon by the excellent Lovely Man. More restrained in its charge but even more enticing in its hooks and beats, the track strolls long like a blend of The Kut and Australian outfit Shadowqueen. Punk and hard rock are brought together in its virulently infectious temptation, a rousing concoction which easily had us bouncing, the following Avuta Mai matching its depth of persuasion. The only non-English sung track on the release, it is an inescapably catchy proposal unafraid to slip into sonic shimmers and unpredictable twists as raw riffs and melodic enterprise unite behind Pellegrini’s vocal prowess.

The catchy prowl of Cut The Chains similarly had ears and attention wrapped round inventive fingers, the song teasing with its confident swagger, seducing with its melodic and harmonic captivation before Endless Begin uncages Pellegrini’s punk heart with simultaneous energy and grace. We mentioned that across the album, uniqueness was second to familiar strains and aspects of rock but as this excellent track proves, songs still comes with an individuality and adventure which sets album and artist as one appetising proposal.

Through the raw rock hues of Wild Shot, a Plasmatics meets Girlschool spiced stomp, and the pop rock exploits of Making Love Forever, variety, enterprise and pleasure rise in tandem while What I Like sonically grumbles and melodically serenades with imagination fuelled contagion. As with all tracks, little time is needed for hips to swing and enjoyment to boil up; fun and anthemic persuasion in close quarters as echoed yet again within You Better Believe. It too had participation engaged within moments of its first play; a magnetic slice of rock ‘n’ roll very easy to be manipulated by.

The album concludes with All My Love Has Gone, a final cut of all that is good about the fiercely enjoyable Lady To Rock. As its companions, the song feels like a friend even before it runs through its first verse, even as soon as its first clutch of chords, yet is as tantalising and refreshing as any track on any rock album heard so far this year. At its core rock ‘n’ roll is about great times, boisterous fun, and arousing spirits something Paola Pellegrini proves very adept at creating with Lady To Rock.

Lady To Rock is out now via Red Cat Records / 7Hard across most digital stores.

http://www.lexrock.it/    https://www.facebook.com/paolapellegrinilexrock/   https://twitter.com/PaolaLexrock   https://www.instagram.com/paola_pellegrini_lexrock/

 Pete RingMaster20/05/2018

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Polar Station – Lowlands

Listening to the sound of Italian band Polar Station is like waking up in the morning sun. It is warm, perpetually tantalising with just a hint of indefinable intrigue bringing the unknown to the senses and imagination and within their debut album, Lowlands, just captivating.

Hailing from Frosinone, the 2013 emerging quartet consists of Silvia Zambon (vocals / synth / vocoder), Cristian Angelini (guitar), Daniele Gabrielli (synth / programming / FX), and Manuel Bianchi (drums /electronic percussions). The band released two EPs in 2014 and ‘15 respectively which received good praise and attention. Both showed their sound to be a magnetic blend of electronic variety with dream pop sensitivity and magnetism, aspects now colluding to make for one infectious and compelling exploration within Lowlands.

The album opens with the band’s well-received single of last year, What It Feels Like. Vocoder spawned vocals initially lure ears amidst a synth cast crystalline shimmer before the angelic yet earthbound tones of Zambon embrace the senses. Her voice is pure beauty, essences of suggestiveness and melancholy lining its grace and magnetism, the latter a description which perpetually repeats across the whole landscape of the album. The instinctive sway of hips told all about the persuasion of the irresistible encounter, a temptation just as vocal within its successor.

Wake up Call makes a gentler entrance but one just as vibrant, stretching its elements and essence around the golden coaxing of Zambon and elegant melodies from Angelini. The song continues to slowly rise with every second of sound and voice pure sunshine for ears and spirit until finally drifting away into the more industrial lure of Something. Its earthier synth beckoning is soon enclosed in the seduction of Zambon’s vocals, synths and guitar teasing and tempting with melodic enterprise and mystique alongside. Both songs never find the boisterousness of the first yet each provides a sublimely bewitching and individual kiss on the senses and imagination to be just as potent.

Through the creative and emotional drama of Silence and the haunting elegancy of Fragile, the album reveals new shades of sound and light whilst stretching its captivation. The second of the two is a brief almost interlude like moment yet rich in heart and melodic suggestion to be its own potent moment within Lowlands before Ordinary Life dances romantically on ears and thoughts with melodic temptation and electronic delicacy as rigorous in intimation as it is gentle on touch. There is flame to its breath though, heat shaped by the excellent touch of Angelini.

The shadow kissed smoulder of Midnight is equally as romancing on the ear, its dark but radiant layers enthralling under the alluring glaze of Gabrielli’s ever tempting synth while Committed to What provides noir lined atmospherics over an inescapably catchy shuffle pulsing with the creative manipulation of Bianchi. Again both songs bring fresh angles to the sunspot that is Lowlands, each a new transfixing escape.

The album closes out with Golden Flares, a starry serenade of voice and sound with bold strength to its depth and a hint of tempestuousness to its heart. As the album, it is a song which instantly grips attention and appetite but only blossoms to greater heights over time and listen.

Polar Station is a band most likely in the colder reaches of attention for most but after Lowlands could and should be a blaze on the broadest radars.

Lowlands is out now on iTunes and Spotify.

https://www.facebook.com/PolarStation/

Pete RingMaster 02/05/2018

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

StormWolf – Howling Wrath

StormWolf is a band from Italy who has just released their debut album in the shape of Howling Wrath. Though formed in 2014, the release will be the first real introduction to the Genoa heavy metallers for most and makes one powerful statement even for those of us without a natural infinity for their chosen genre.

Starting out as a studio project formed by vocalist Elena Ventura and guitarist/principal songwriter Francesco Natale, StormWolf eventually found its way to current line-up of bassist Francesco Gaetani, guitarist Dave Passarelli and newest member in drummer Tiziana Cotella alongside the founding pair, the latter joining the band last year. Fusing classic and fresh heavy metal with essences of the blues and their own individual imagination, the band released Swordwind in 2015, an encounter primarily destined just for labels, radio, fanzines etc. It was a well-received encounter followed by StormWolf earning the opportunity to open for to Lacuna Coil and Necrodeath among their live successes the following year. With their current line-up in place, the band set about creating their official debut, Howling Wrath last year with its release coming through Italian label Red Cat Records.

It opens with The Phoenix, the track rising up through stirring winds with immediate sonic flames and enterprise. Ventura swiftly commands attention and impresses with her vocals, though the amount of words she tries to get into certain lines of the chorus is maybe too much a mouthful but no issue, while Natale and Passarelli weave a similarly magnetic web of sound and craft around her. With firm rhythms creating a thick and alluring spine and Natale further conjuring on his guitar, the track gets the album off to a potent and captivating start.

Winter of the Wolf is just as eager to engage the listener, riffs and rhythms climbing and rapping upon the senses driven by the rapacious energy inspired by the guitars. There is a caustic edge to the track too which only adds to its quick appeal but tempered by the melodic tendrils and twists which bring an array of worldly spices. As it marches through ears or tenaciously smoulders on the senses, the song seals keen attention with Ventura again escalating the persuasion.

Next up, old school hues line Marathon, band inspirations such as Van Halen and Judas Priest an easy guess as the song boldly strolls with familiar flavours and blossoms around them with StormWolf’s own imagination while Fear of the Past mixes up its attack and adventure with zeal and invention. Both tracks hit the spot though maybe not as fully as Swordwind which throughout had bodies bouncing and vocal chords indulging as its anthemic battlefield unfolded.  An unexpected slip into calm and melodic elegance only added to its success, that and the already notable prowess of Ventura, Natale and co.

Through the blues scented, hard rock lined Lightcrusher and the riveting instrumental weaving of Thasaidon, the album only tightened its hold, the second of the two especially outstanding while Soulblighter brings a feral almost primal graining to its part predacious fully compelling trespass. Though not quite matching the heights of many before it, the track offers moments of real magnetism.

The final trio of All We Are, One False Move, and Me Against the World unleash their own highly agreeable lures, the first a Maiden-esque fuelled anthem, its successors respectively a melancholic romance of a ballad moving in a funereal march and a ballsy rock ‘n’ roll romp. The latter pair both are bonus tracks upon Howling Wrath and each a Lizzy Borden cover, the penultimate song one of the major highlights of the album.

It is easy to hear why StormWolf is beginning to draw broader acclaim and attention their way with more surely to follow through Howling Wrath. As mentioned, heavy metal especially classic does not exactly spark real excitement here but the Italian’s album was full enjoyment from its first to last breath which says it all.

Howling Wrath is out now via Red Cat Records /7hard Records.

 https://www.facebook.com/Stormwolf.it/

Pete RingMaster 29/03/2018

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Gianluca Magri – Reborn

Reborn is the debut EP from Italian guitarist Gianluca Magri; five tracks of instrumental rock which courts and runs with the imagination. Never showing off but proudly sharing the craft and enterprise of its creator, it is a record which just dances on the ear.

Teaching himself guitar at the age of 17, Magri subsequently studied at Cortina d’Ampezzo music school and at the MMI in San Biagio di Callalta. The years since has seen him as well as teach at the Music Area Academy in Belluno and at the Music and Soul school of Venas di Cadore play live with his solo band and with a couple of covers bands and from 2011 to 2016 play in metal outfit Phaith who released the well-received album Redrumorder. The autumn of 2017 saw Magri record Reborn, uniting since with Red Cat Records Inst Fringe for its recent release.

With its songs inspired by the likes of Gary Moore, Joe Satriani, Leslie West, Led Zeppelin, and Whitesnake, Reborn begins with its title track. Instantly its boisterous gait and infectious invitation had feet tapping and ears attentive, Magri entwining the latter with spicy grooves and tenacious melodies brought with a deft touch on his strings. Across the songs on the release, Magri is joined by bassist Diego Maioni and drummer Raffaele Fiori, their rhythms skilfully grounding the adventure of the guitar and egging on the listener’s physical participation with the growling tone of the bass adding a nice dark contrast to further grip attention. Just as Magri never over indulges his swiftly obvious ability, his songs never dally or linger, the opener just stirring up the senses and appetite, feeding both, and leaving with as enterprising punch.

The following Cloudbreaker brings a calmer climate though soon shows a lining of volatility which never quite erupts but adds drama and colour to the imagination nurturing encounter. Magri again weaves a magnet picture of sound, hips eagerly swaying to his composition as the imagination plays with rhythms adding earthier texture to his lofty and often fiery but always composed enterprise.

Snowballed is next up, the piece a fresh and boisterous affair with mischief in its smile and energy in its stroll while A.D.R. has a thicker body and touch but still one with a spirit warming brightness to its melody and air. Both songs spark ears and thoughts, thoughts easily conjuring alongside the sonic intimations as enjoyment of Reborn only thickened.

The EP closes with acoustic track Atlas Bound, Magri’s fingers gliding over his ‘canvas’ with suggestive craft and firm magnetism. It is a captivating end to a fine debut encounter with the guitarist. It is fair to say that we are quite fussy in our enjoyment of instrumental music and maybe have not yet defined what it is that lights our personal fires. We thoroughly enjoyed Reborn though across its every note and second so maybe the answer lies within; certainly pleasure does.

Reborn is out now via Red Cat Records Inst Fringe and available @ https://gianlucamagri.bandcamp.com/releases

https://www.facebook.com/gianlucamagriguitar

Pete RingMaster 29/03/2018

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

The Lotus Interview

The Lotus is a rock band with its roots in Italy but is currently based in Manchester, UK. It is also a creative adventure which embraces an array of flavours and styles in “a visionary and characterful musical journey”. With a new album in the works, we threw a host of questions at the band to discover its beginnings, latest release, what fuels their creativity and more…

Hello and thanks for taking time out to talk with us.

Can you first introduce the band and give us some background to how it all started?

Hi everyone and thank you for interviewing The Lotus. The band started in 2004 when first Rox met Luca: we initially began playing some covers as many kids do but we immediately realised we wanted more and we immediately started working on some ideas and riffs.

That’s how it started really: in 2008 Kristal and Marco joined the band and that was the real start of a professional band as we decided to record and release our first album, which eventually came out in 2011.

Have you been or are involved in other bands? If so has that had any impact on what you are doing now?

Apart from Luca, actually all of us are still playing with many other bands! Mostly metal and rock bands though and I think that always influenced our music in same way.

Rox is playing with Italian prog rockers InnerShine and UK progressive metal band Prospekt, and also with pop folk singer and songwriter named Sukh. Marco is the drummer of two of the most famous Italian metal and rock bands, which are Elvenking and Hell In The Club, and Kristal is the lead singer of melodic death metal band called Lost Resonance Found.

What inspired the band name?

The band’s name was chosen randomly by our first guitarist who was in love with R.E.M.’s song Lotus. We liked it and we realised then, that it was the perfect name for us. A few months later we also found out its meaning of purity and rebirth and we realised that was the name we really wanted.

Was there any specific idea behind the forming of the band and also in what you wanted it and your sound to offer?

As we said before, as soon as we got confident in playing together we immediately started to feel the need of composing our own songs and being rock stars! LOL

Regarding the sound, well, that’s a tricky one: we have never had an established sound or a path we wanted to follow, we just write songs we like and lyrics from experience and feelings we have during our own life.

If you listen to our songs you can really understand there’s something that binds everything which is not the genre.

Since your early days, how would you say your sound has evolved?

We would say we’ve evolved as musicians and composers rather than our music’s evolved. We’re still writing what we want, without any boundary and we love what we’re doing: we’re just better in what and how we play and write!

Has the growth within the band in music, experiment etc. been an organic process or more the band deliberately setting out to try new things?

We always wanted to try new things so actually nothing’s changed since 2004 from this side: probably being mature musicians affected our way to play and compose music and you can probably hear that on our latest releases.

Presumably across the band there is a wide range of inspirations; are there any in particular which have impacted not only on the band’s music but your personal approach and ideas to creating and playing music?

We grew up with completely different music backgrounds and this colourful music palette brought the unique sound we have today. We are big fans of Queen and Muse, as you might have already understood :), but also Pink Floyd, Metallica, System Of A Down, U2, Depeche Mode, or even some heavier stuff like Slipknot.

Is there a particular process to the songwriting within the band?

Normally Rox brings the main ideas and Luca some lyrics inspiration: back to our earlier days we used to mainly compose our songs in the rehearsal room but now, thanks to technology we often produce full demos on the computer.

We actually have to do this way also because Marco and Kristal are living in Italy and rehearsing would be definitely not very much affordable. 🙂

Where do you, more often than not, draw the inspirations to the lyrical side of your songs?

Lyrics are mostly inspired by our everyday experiences and translated into a more poetic and hermetic way.

We talk about love and death, and human life: as we do for our music, we don’t have any limit in our lyrics’ themes as well!

Could you give us some background to your latest release?

We’ve released our latest EP in June 2015 just before we moved to the UK. Its name is Awakening and is actually a mini concept album. It’s an ambient Prog Rock opera which will delve into your inner core.

We are currently producing our new album with Muse early producer Paul Reeve (Showbiz), and we have already released three new singles: Mars-X, Perfect Love and Five Days To Shine. They are very different from our past works, simpler song structures, more melodic but still very ‘creative’. Someone said: ‘If Muse and Deftones met in a pub and had a cheeky couple of Sambucca’s and hit the town and ended the night with a ride on a spaceship, that’s exactly what this song sounds like.’

Give us some insight to the themes and premise behind it and its songs.

Our latest song, Five Days To Shine, is very personal and we think the more you listen to it (or watch the video) the more you understand that. It basically talks about a man who waits for five days to know his fate with his girl. He thinks that’ll be alright but he knows the future isn’t bright.

We made the video representing this man as a kind of ‘creator’, who’s trying everything to restore what he’s lost but eventually he gives up. We filmed it in a stunning place in Manchester called Hulme Hyppodrome.

Are you a band which goes into the studio with songs pretty much in their final state or prefer to develop them as you record?

We used to go into the studio with rough demos and we’ve always struggled to work with limited time. That’s why now we tend to basically go to record with all the songs pretty much finished, so that we can concentrate on instruments’ sound and performances.

Tell us about the live side to the band, presumably the favourite aspect of the band?

We’d define our live shows as heavy metal. Even though our music is mainly rock, The Lotus as a live act is more energetic, more aggressive. I think that’s one of our main strengths. We have played more than 120 shows in our career but we’re definitely looking for doubling it within the next few years!

It is not easy for any new band to make an impact regionally let alone nationally and further afield. How have you found it your neck of the woods?

We are coming from a different background which is in Italy, so we’ve definitely found a more fertile place to keep on growing our seeds.

However, these days it seems more and more difficult to have a solid fan base which follows you everywhere ‘physically’ and not only on social media.

If you’re not convinced on what you’re doing it’s better you choose another job!

Talking of social media, how has the internet impacted on the band to date? Do you see it as something destined to become a negative from a positive as the band grows and hopefully gets increasing success?

We think internet and social media are both good and bad thing.

They really give anyone the opportunity to get out from the anonymity and be the star you always wanted to be, but the problem starts when music is not enough anymore. You really need to let everyone come into your life. Everyone must know who you are, what you are doing, when you are doing it. Even all the pretty small things you want to keep secret; just let them go and share them with everyone. We find this a bit scary but that’s what it is now, so you have to get used to it. And we are getting used to it!

Once again a big thanks for sharing time with us; anything you would like to add or reveal for the readers?

2018 will bring a lot of new things: we will go back to the studio to finish recording the album between March and April. Then we are expecting to release the fourth single as soon as we have everything in its place and the album immediately after that. If you want to be updated on what we’re doing you can visit our Facebook page at www.facebook.com/thelotusofficial  or our website www.the-lotus.com . Thank you!

Pete RingMaster 08/02/2018

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright