Khaidian – Penumbra

The release of the debut album from UK metallers Khaidian has been long time coming, seemingly expected and all geared up to be unleashed in 2016. But as ears and the passions are finally being infested, those patient many will feel it has been more than worth the wait and can assume they will soon be joined by tides of new hungrily impressed and lustful hearts. Penumbra is quite simply superb; a cauldron of imagination and intensity wrapped in a rainbow of melodic enterprise amidst a tempest of technical and multi-flavoured dexterity.

Listening to Penumbra, there is no surprise at the rising reputation and stature of the London based outfit; both recently given boost by a trio of lead tracks to the album. Weaving a web of rich intrigue and thick persuasion bred from a fusion of progressive and technical metal, the band’s sound is just as inventive and tempting with its alignment to eager strains of electronic cunning. It is something akin to a fusion of the voracious flavours and touch of Gojira, Sikth and The Browning with the ravenous/melodic adventuring of Tricore/An Entire Legion; even so Khaidian pull it all to a proposition which is as unapologetically unique as it is greedily captivating as Penumbra forcibly proves.

Founded in 2010 by guitarist/programmer John Tyrell (ex-Interlock), Khaidian found its first few years as much a difficult journey to find the right mix and line-up of people as an adventure in nurturing and breeding their vision and sound. In fact, the perfect mix of personnel only really appeared once drummer Paul Fowler (ex Dragnerve) was enlisted to join Tyrell, vocalist Andy Hutton (ex-Stoopi/Dragnerve), and bassist Joseph Perumal (Mortad/ex-Almamorta). It was Fowlers departure leading up to the original release date of Penumbra which he plays upon which played a big part in its delay it seems but the band has since found the equally striking and agile percussionist in Kris Perrin (Gravil, ex-One Fell Down, Faux Fighters), he completing the current line-up last year.

Now with everything firmly in place Penumbra has been unveiled and we for one can only suggest it is the first leap in a massive and surely certain ascent for the band into the broadest spotlights. The album opens with Pearls Before Swine and immediately had ears pricked and appetite keenly intrigued as sonic and electronic enticement colluded with already stirring rhythmic lures. Just as swiftly the equally potent and enticing vocals of Hutton step forward; his clean, calm yet emotive tones an alluring bridge between the band’s sides of physical trespass and suggestive melody, their indeed their technical hunger and electronic intimation. The track continues to stomp and dance with the senses, a mix of the familiar and boldly fresh creating a whole new vehicle for ears and imagination to ride with.

The striking start is only reinforced by the band’s outstanding new video/single Dominion. Its entrance is even more rapacious but almost instantly wears a portentous calm before its predacious instincts unite with inventive and somatic catchiness. Pure persuasion with increasing enslavement of the senses, the track embraces further hues resembling those cast by Voyager and Fear Factory as it twists and turns with relish but never breaking its fluidity or charm carrying rapacity.

The following Trigger The Landslide glides in on electronic shadows around a slim but copious melodic insinuation; all the while its air brewing an intensity and threat which turns into a senses harrying stroll. Still the menace is part anger, part seduction; the song never choosing sides even as its body and imagination boils across another devilish landscape of thought, emotion, and craft. As with all tracks some kind of participation is inevitable with the increasingly blossoming and thrilling encounter, a manipulation just as potent within next up Thrive and in turn Sense Of The Spherical. A Korn-esque scent pervades the first of the outstanding two, its carnivorous breath colluding with the skittish flirtation and bite of rhythms and the tantalising yet voracious almost rabid lures of guitars. Hutton again is a matching magnet in its midst as the track creatively and vocally writhes while its successor similarly draws dark and esurient strains of sound and intent with melodic and flirtatious enterprise to tempt, seduce, and infest ears and imagination in tandem with the body.

The album concludes with the pair of Evasion and Dramatic Professions Of Martyrdom, the band getting under the skin with relish in the first where again whiffs of Korn meets Fear Factory share its own inescapable  individuality, and through the second’s musical irritability, melodic and electronic espionage, and simply unique prowess. Both tracks enslaved as heartily and strenuously as those before, the bounce of bodies enough to suggest eager submission, the following lust unbridled confirmation.

No release is going to win over all but with its thick mix of flavours including at times spices of grunge, alternative metal and more alongside sheer invention, Penumbra is one which is going to conquer far more than most and with ease we suggest. Though in theory three years late it is one of the freshest most thrilling things heard here in a long time and Khaidian one of the most exciting propositions.

Penumbra is out now through Armalyte Industries; available @ https://armalyte.bandcamp.com/album/khaidian-penumbra

http://www.khaidian.com/   https://www.facebook.com/khaidianmusic/   https://twitter.com/khaidian

Pete RingMaster 30/01/2019

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Tribazik – Data Warfare

 

TRIBAZIK

    Describing the sound of UK band Tribazik is easy, early Killing Joke meets Pendulum with healthy doses of the raw power of Pitchshifter, the fiery electro snarl of The Prodigy, and the rhythmic swagger of seventies band Red Beat, except as is loudly evident on new album Data Warfare, it is only part of the scintillating recipe. Forging something unique and irrepressibly contagious through the merging and rigorous gene altering of alternative rock, psychedelic metal, industrial, techno and much more, the London based trio rampage through the imagination like a sonic tornado, organic electro and rhythmic teasing entwined with hungry rapacious grooves and psyche igniting invention. It is a glorious pulsating confrontation which has already brought the band eager and potent attention though you suspect that will be nothing in comparison to the acclaim once the album reaches out and out.

     The band is the brainchild of Jerry Kandiah (vocals/guitar) and Hedge Seel (drums/samples), two musicians with a rich experience in metal based bands and having their own sound system on the underground rave scene. Linking up the pair explored styles which lit their own passions with a new and boundary pushing invention, the first results including the track Yang To Yin which caught the attention of Killing Joke bassist Paul Raven. His invitation to support his band led to two European tours alongside Killing Joke and Jaz Coleman guesting on a track from Tribazik’s Andy Gill (Gang of Four) mixed debut album All Blood is Red in 2009. Following its acclaimed release the band was then permanently joined by Syan whose previous band Interlock had released the critically acclaimed album Crisis//reinvention in 2004. The recording of the new album was hit by the death of the band’s manager Gary DS but such the force and energy to the breath-taking tempest you can only feel they used the loss to drive their creativity and passion in tribute to the man. Self-produced and mixed by Youth (Killing Joke, The Orb, The Verve), Data Warfare is a sumptuous kaleidoscope of sound and imagination, an inventive fury which transports the listener into lyrical skirmishes looking at ‘the imminent hostilities facing the human race’, and broiling sonic soundscapes woven with aggressively stirring imagination and voracious creative energy.

     A cyber enticement starts things off as Too Dead To Care emerges from an electronic cocoon to incinerate the air with a a2136431759_2furnace of sound and riffs before settling into a deliciously agitated yet perfectly poised enveloping of the ears. Immediately that Killing Joke and Pitchshifter reference coaxes thoughts as electro driven rhythms and pulsating energy fuses with the ravenous guitars. It is a senses dominating introduction to the album, one bold in its invention and unafraid in its dramatic and persistently evolving provocation.

    The intense and breath-taking start has lips of anticipation being licked and soon satisfied as Atom soon followed by Life Force Energy parade their ingenious contagion. The first of the two flirts with and peels away the surface of the senses with a skittish almost acidic electro irritant whilst behind riffs and rhythms carve out a formidable and incendiary canvas for the vocals of Kandiah to paint the lyrical narrative. His tones are very Jaz Coleman like across the whole release which only accentuates that Killing Joke resemblance, but never to the detriment of the adventure and distinctive Tribazik presence. The second of the pair from another subdued but sinister intro erupts into a blood pumping and exhaustive consumption of the senses, riffs growling with every heavy note and the beats of Seel reinforcing the tantalising damage with sharp and incisive animosity. As now expected it is just one facet of the enterprise escorting the emotions into a near rapture, melodic swarms and thought provoking craft washing and twisting around the uncompromising pulse and heart of the track.

     Without allowing the listener a breath unless they use the pause button, Tribazik keep the riveting creative pressure on with 12th Disclosure and Sonar Sumeria, the first a sonic bred incident filled experiment wailing with aural warning signs, caustic sirens, and perilous intimidation all filtered through a dangerously magnetic swamp of techno radiance and industrial predation. It is a masterful seduction taken to even greater heights by Sonar Sumeria, a celestial journey through rave spawned, psychedelic coloured, sonic romance. Throughout a vociferous energy equally brews up resulting in a sultry and elegant evocation which Pendulum would have loved to have sculpted.

    The album continues to fire up the passions and greed in an already gluttonous hunger as firstly the restrained but predatory Hacktivism with its unrelenting electro bait and metallic rabidity seduces and abrases the senses. Just as keenly a virulently addictive groove brings slavery to the imagination before the rhythmically toxic Spacetime Collapse takes over laying a wonderfully wanton and irresistible hand on the emotions as spirals of unpredictable transfixing ingenuity expand the already dexterous invention. With an additional dub coating to its expanse reminding at times of Ruts DC, the song provides another pinnacle on the lofty range of the album before the dark and menacing presence of Bloodline Crossbreed infects and magnetises an admittedly ready to drool over anything appetite for the album. Arguably not as colourfully imposing as previous tracks but with an evocative melody enriched ambience merging with the intensive atmosphere it is on the frontline of intriguing, sophisticated alchemy.

   That deliberately sculpted and thoughtfully layered turn of the album continues through the final two songs, though no song lacks invigorating intelligence and artful ingenuity in its makeup. The melancholic yet vibrantly rousing Absence Of Proof comes first with female calls lighting the surface of the emotive exploration lyrically and musically whilst the closing Tools Of Mass Creation delivers a world of sonic emprise all of its own, it a resourcefully elegant and vivaciously daring flight of moving imagination. The pair makes a mentally and emotionally mesmeric end to an exceptional encounter; Data Warfare a sensational dawning of Tribazik and their time to take the rock world by storm you suspect and hope.

http://www.tribazik.com

10/10

RingMaster 21/02/2014

 Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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