Spreading The Disease – Insurrection

Getting our claws into their outstanding debut EP at the beginning of last year, we suggested that UK metallers Spreading The Disease had “much bigger and bolder trespasses waiting to be nurtured and uncaged as the band evolves.” The release of their first album Insurrection has more than confirmed that thought and realised those hopes in uncompromising and rousing style. The album is a furnace of creative irritability and ravenous imagination, a rabid cauldron of metal bred flavours and angers which confirms Spreading The Disease as one of the most exciting propositions emerging on the British metal scene.

The creation of bassist Steve Saunders, formerly of another fine proposition in The Self Titled, Kent hailing Spreading The Disease emerged in 2014 and quickly lured keen attention through the single Bulldozer and their explosive live presence. Last year the Viral EP stamped the band as a new beast on the UK metal scene, its plaudits garnering release backed by a year scorching venues and ears to equal acclaim. Insurrection is the next step in the band’s evolution and rise; an encounter roaring with the new maturity and invention fuelling the band’s songwriting and sound and snarling with even greater ferocity and quarrel.

The band’s lined up has gone through major changes since Viral, Saunders and guitarist Martin Osbourne being joined by vocalist Connor Russell Snyder and drummer Jack Apella. Whether the spark or just coincidence, the new line-up has coincided with that new evolution and creative breath in an already striking sound. When starting up Spreading The Disease, Saunders wanted to “produce a sound and music that although draws from many bands and influences throws it all into a melting pot and comes out the other side with something that in this day and age is hard to achieve, a sound of their own; a distinctive style that cannot be pigeon holed to say the least.Insurrection announces the band has achieved that aim; yes there are plenty of recognisable flavours but woven into something compellingly individual to the quartet.

The album opens up with Find My Path and a lure of melodic metal with a darker bass resonance which increasingly looms in on the senses before igniting in a blaze of emotive ire and sonic intensity. Even so it holds its tempest in check, teasing and coaxing attention whilst intriguing the imagination with its unpredictable bait. As it slips into the ethers, the following Words Unspoken is boiling up to launch its sonic lava on the senses. Within seconds a great groove has body and spirit inflamed; its open Pantera inspirations extra pleasure as it burns away. There is a disorder to the song, a tempestuousness which threatens as it pleasures with the band’s vocal backing to the magnetic growls of Snyder excellent, an anthemic call in the heat of the song’s furnace.

There is a ‘calmer’ air to the following Dischord, well a less corrosive tone though it too is a bear of a proposal which is as caustic as it is imaginative. Osbourne paints the trespass with magnetic enterprise, his melodic tendrils and searing grooves as potent as the cantankerous riffs which escape his strings whilst the bass of Saunders springs its own invasive grooving to thrill. Though living up to its title in tone and presence, the track is a web of raw adventure though soon outshone in that department and might by the song Spreading The Disease. Already the album is the source of great variety in sound and style, pushed further by the fourth track and its fusion of nu and groove metal with far darker metal bred textures courting hardcore nurtured antagonism. The song is outstanding, a brawl in the waiting and raw seduction in the making.

Through the Stone Sour/ Sick Of It All spiced Greed, a striking and virulent invasion of punk infused groove metal which just gets more addictive listen by listen, and the similarly textured but far more savage Save Me, the album hits another plateau. Song by song to this point it has just grown in stature and impressiveness, a peak which Whores Of War nurtures to another high with its melodic suggestion and feral antipathy. Its attitude born rancor and sonic annoyance swiftly grabs ears and appetite; the rhythmic vindictiveness of Saunders and Apella as rousing as it is carnivorous and superbly bound in the captivating enterprise of Osbourne. Snyder skilfully bawls from the midst, his power and emotion undoubtedly giving Spreading The Disease a new weapon in their arsenal.

Even darker depths are tapped into by Method To My Madness, Saunders leading the way with his malevolence spewing bass with the band soon uniting in open crankiness and imposing dexterity. The track does not quite match up to those around it yet it grips attention and enjoyment from start to finish with moments where its creative psychosis just hits the spot before Can’t Let Go offers its plaintive reflection, again Stone Sour hinted at within its increasingly volcanic cry. Female vocals add to its magnetism, again the band pushing their imagination and the landscape of the album.

The Rage Against The Machine natured Brexit Wounds snarls and hollers next, Spreading The Disease once again twisting open inspirations into an aural rage of their own design. Plenty of other spices blossom as the song grows and spills its aggravated heart, whiffs of Red Hot Chili Peppers and Slayer arising in the excellent attack before the album closes up with Last Goodbye. It too embraces a Zack de la Rocha and co flavouring, melding it to a hardcore/groove metal furor as skilfully sculpted as it is ferociously delivered.

It is a storming end to an album which sears the senses and ignites the spirit. Insurrection is a brutal imagination bound treat from a band which we will not say has come of age as you still feel there is much more for they and pleasure to plunder ahead but has certainly established a new plateau for their sound and their position within the UK metal scene.

Insurrection is out now across most online stores.

 

 

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Pete RingMaster 01/11/2017

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Buffalo Theory MTL – Skeptic Knight

photo - Benoit Nantel

photo – Benoit Nantel

Creating a bruising and boozy riot of rapacious rock ‘n’ roll, Canadian quintet Buffalo Theory MTL are releasing their latest uproar of sound and attitude this month in the boisterously muscular shape of Skeptic Knight. The five-track EP is a roar of debaucherous intent amidst heavy cantankerous sound which, without any major surprises, simply gets you in the mood to feverishly brawl and party.

Hailing from Montreal MTL consists of guitarists Pat Gordon and Yannick Pilon of Vantablack Warship, bassist Gary Lyons, drummer Brian Craig, and vocalist veteran Anton Parr. Between them, they have been part of very well-known Quebec groups such as the Ghoulunatics, Les Ékorchés, and Arseniq 33 whilst Parr’s history includes playing in thrash bands in Brazil. Together they brew a thick and predatory breed of stoner metal infused with thrash fury; a sound which, since the band formed in 2009, has fuelled an early demo followed by debut album Heavy Ride in 2012 and two years later, the Murder Trilogy EP. Both have been well-received proposals backed by a live hunger which has seen the band share stages with the likes of The Atomic Bitchwax, The Naked High, Diamond Head, Skull Fist, Thor, Misery Index, BARF, Insurrection, Iron Giant, Tunguska Mammoth, and many more.

Mastered and mixed by Peter Edwards, Skeptic Knight is Buffalo Theory MTL in full adrenaline pumped, rock ‘n’ roll embracing, voraciousness which Lyons describes as “…our best material to date and it’s damn heavy as usual”, adding “ It has a different sounding production that we like a lot. We completed 5 songs for the release. There were lots of riffs just waiting to be completed and it was hard to choose which ones to release first as we are already prepared to unleash another EP by next year to follow it. We always prefer to gather a few good songs and go into the studio being ready to release something new more often, rather than waiting too long for a LP type of setup with 10+ songs.

BTMTL-Skeptic-Knight_RingMaster ReviewOf course proof of word and success is always in the eating of the pudding and there is no doubting that opener Conspiracy in Paranoland alone is one tasty incitement of new yet prime Buffalo Theory MTL rampaging for ears and appetite to devour. A track knocking around since the band’s early days, it comes built on ravenous riffs, scything rhythms, and a prowling growling bassline to get lustful over. The song initially appears as a proposal just to have a rousing time with but it is soon showing itself a predator. The guitars offer a predacious flirtation led by the boisterous raw tone and vocal delivery of Parr but tempered with spicy grooves and a great guitar and bass nagging which simply helps whip up lustful enjoyment.

The following Punishment is an equally invasive character but centred round an even more bruising thrash seeded ferociousness, a fury bound in acidic grooves and vocal hostility with Pilon potently backing the roar of Parr. With a Pantera/Down like causticity and virulence to grooves and vocals alone, the song romps and stomps with the passions before Get On It swings its sinew sculpted hips as rebellious attitude colludes with bad-blooded rhythms entangled in psyche trespassing grooves. In contrast though, vocals and hooks breed their own more merciful strong anthemic persuasion, adding to devilry to get eagerly involved in whilst being battered around the senses.

The EP’s title track comes next, instantly showing the heaviest presence and thickest web of invasive textures heard yet on the release. It makes a slow, almost lumbering, bestial entrance, relaxes then breaks into a groove infested canter which has body and imagination on board within a mere handful of seconds. That instinctive enticing is helped by the spiciness coating grooves and the arousing impact of the riff driven rabidity which consumes the senses. It is a sonic war machine in hungry motion, the kind of inescapable protagonist which refuses anything less than full involvement in its roar, much like Psychic Enclosure. Like Rage Against The Machine meets Black Sabbath meets Sleep, the closing track riles up and rages against the senses whilst uncaging an imposing contagion of flesh searing grooves and corrosive riffery stalking by merciless rhythms.

It is a fine end to a thunderous encounter leaving ears and pleasure full. Skeptic Knight is heavy duty rock ‘n’ roll to be intimidated by and greedily feast upon. Uniqueness is maybe rare but enjoyment is unrestrained; a proposal few can turn down.

The Skeptic Knight EP is available via Stand Records from February 26th @ https://buffalotheorymtl.bandcamp.com/album/skeptic-knight

https://www.facebook.com/pages/BUFFALO-THEORY-MTL/243777113598

Pete RingMaster 26/02/2016

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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Insurrection – Prototype

Insurrection - High Press Photo

Though not exactly an album breaking in new ground, Prototype the new album from Canadian metallers Insurrection, is a rather decent slab of creative death metal which certainly in its company makes for a pleasing and adventurous experience.  Whether it offers and holds enough to capture the memory away from its brutal touch is yet to be proven, as after numerous exploits within its tempestuous walls tracks have still to emerge as lingering accomplices to thoughts and passions beyond its departure, but side by side stalking its ravenous scenery and intent Prototype makes a quite satisfying persuasion.

Formed in 2003 by vocalist Stef Jomphe and guitarist Martin Samson, Insurrection built a strong reputation initially in the local underground scene evolving to be a strong force in Canadian metal in general. Their technically carved rapacious metal has earned the band a potent fan base which 2009 debut album Prologue and its successor Fracture the following year pushed further afield outside their homeland. Now with the Topon Das (Fuck The Facts) produced Prototype and its death metal predation, you can only feel that the band will be widening their presence further even if the album seems a little bit like a lost opportunity, the release failing to really go for the jugular as its body potentially suggests.

Released via Quebec label Galy Records, the album introduces itself through the industrial crafted intro Overprocessed, an ok lure which Album Cover - Insurrection - Prototypesets the scene before the gripping Abattoir launches its malevolence. Grooved riffs and a carnivorous bass growl leap through the ears from the first full track whilst the rhythmic battering from drummer Philippe Moreau Latreille shows little respect for restraint or predictable enterprise. It is a captivating start which only grips tighter as the vocals of Jomphe scowl and graze the narrative with a strong presence and the guitars of Samson and Vincent Laprade Séguin cast an intriguing and exciting web of sonic mystery and enjoyment.

It is an appealing strike soon matched by The Chronophobes, a track which twists and turns with imagination to secure full attention with its inventiveness. As previously suggested, away from its temptation it is hard to bring a groove or hook back into focus but inside its storm with the bass of Francis Girard a moody bestial provocateur, the track is a formidable encounter just like its successor Checkmate, a fury of a track which blazes away with creative spite and scorching adventure to songwriting and its realisation. There is undeniably across song and album a compelling ingenuity to the structure and sound of tracks, a rhythmic bait and sonic temptation which is never prone to predictability or taking easy routes to achieve its intent, but again there is a lack of that killer element or potent enticement which lingers and infiltrates the imagination long term.

One of many great things about the album is the mix of English and French sung batterings upon the senses, the mix adding extra pleasing flavour and texture as shown through the likes of Sueurs Froides, where the bass of Girard reaches into its primal depths to forge a rabid predatory voice to its sound, and the virulently swarming Trois Minutes De Carnage, the track a magnetic pestilence with senses licking grooves and acidic enticement around thumping rhythmic incitement commanding the emotions and imagination.

The album seems to raise its heights from here on in, starting with Archetype. The track leads the passions into a ferocious sonic squalling which is perfectly honed and crafted to wrap the ears in a riveting entanglement of enterprise and aggressive causticity making its company irresistible. It is a thrilling lift to the album which is only one step as the title track next shows, the song similarly gaited and structured to thrust the listener on a raging yet calculated contagious scourge. The technical skill of the band once again grips attention whilst the bass voice and similarly grilling vocals brings the appetite an intensive hunger even if again the track misses creating something irreversibly addictive.

Completed by the rigorously engaging They Rise, a track which takes time to burn its venom into thoughts but emerges as a certain highlight of the album and the outstanding Bruits Sans Fin with its rampaging snarl and vindictive ingenuity, Protypte is an impressively accomplished and satisfying onslaught. It may have a lack of weaponry or the claws to retain its place in thoughts and passions away from its lures, something you can only feel as it plays with the senses were lurking in the shadows, but it is a release you can easily recommend as a doorway into the growing presence of Insurrection.

www.InsurrectionMetal.com

7/10

RingMaster 16/10/2013

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