Homage: Insignificant

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There is not a great deal we can tell you about Canadian melodic hardcore band Homage, the band sketchy in the extreme with their information but with their EP Insignificant, the Toronto quintet make the only truly important declaration, of just how promising a band accomplished a band they are. The five track release is the evidence of a band evolving into a creative and expressive force and though like most releases it has flaws there is nothing which excuses thoughts of not being impressed.

Consisting of Emmett Johnston, Jon Lundrigan, Spencer Schiralli, Travis Dupuis, and Waley Gao, Homage opens up the EP with the evocative Groundwork. Entering with a lone melodic stroking of the guitar amidst a vocal sample and brewing ambience, the track stretches its arms to weave an agitated wash of sonic beckoning and carefully crafted melodic flames against which passionate boisterous group vocals squall their intent. It is a brief introduction which sets up the following fierce encounter, Albeit. Imposing muscular rhythms open up the ear allowing the harsh caustic vocals growls and scowls to intimidate and stake their claim on the senses before leading the elevated intense charge of the track. As the guitars spiral within the almost bleak intrusive voice of the song their skill and sonic persuasion is impacting and emotive, forging the perfect temper to the aggressive vocals and grasping energy. As the track continues to shift its gait and mass through elegance and ferocity with the drums and basslines matching with firm and complimentary craft, the band dish thoughts and satisfaction a filling meal.

Definitive is an immediate brawl upon the senses in sound, vocals, and intent. The ravaging dual vocal attack grazes the surface of the listener to lay foundations for the throaty bass and crisp unforgiving drums to bruise further. As previously the guitars create a compelling web of acidic melodic enterprise and sonic intrusion which settle the nerves if not the burdening intensity of the track. Like its predecessor the song as it brings in great group vocals and at times an addictive djent/tech metal manipulation, ignites real interest in and pleasure from the inventive abrasion.

As Release Relief unveils its sensitive and emotive caress, the band shows a strength in songwriting and diversity which seamlessly fits alongside the previous confrontations but offers an expansive element to their invention. Certainly the track is forceful and imposingly demanding but there is a groove and infectious breath to the song which sets it apart and to the fore of the whole release. The bass work is again excellent, a realisation which actually creeps up in many ways and is finally declared openly at this point, whilst the guitars continue to impress and sculpt impassioned aural paintings with their imaginative flourishes and sword like sharp touches.

Closing with It’s Becoming An Integral Part, a furnace of a song where shadows and emotive fires collide into a tempest of intensity, passion, and uncompromising attitude. As the whole release, the track leaves one in no doubt that Homage is a band with as much potential as they have passion, and that is a well with a deep bottom. It is also a band in evolution one feels, their unique voice still to be found but there is little to doubt going by Insignificant that they will not realise it. Aside from the lack of a defining element or hook within songs to lift the band away from the head of the pack and for personal tastes a further diversity within the vocal bruising, the EP raises keen anticipation for what comes next from Homage, it is destined to be noteworthy at the very least if this release is a gauge.

The Insignificant EP is available as a name your own price download @ http://homageband.bandcamp.com/album/insignificant

www.facebook.com/homageband

http://www.homageband.com/

7.5/10

RingMaster 28/02/2013

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