The Spitfires – Year Zero

Through their first two albums, it is fair to say that The Spitfires have established themselves as one of the UK’s most enticing emerging bands. Both variously acclaimed releases lured potent attention to the band’s weave of punk, dub, and ska spiced rock, a sound growing by the record to embrace plenty more flavouring and now a fresh captivation within new encounter Year Zero. Their third full-length is the Watford quartet at their most imaginative, bold, and accomplished yet; a release which fuses energetic revelry and melodic enticement with lyrical sharpness.

From our first encounter with debut album Response in 2015, we like most have been unable to avoid offering up comparisons to the early exploits of The Jam, that continuing with its successor A Thousand Times the following year. Again there are times Year Zero embraces that open inspiration as well as essences for us which remind of bands such as Purple Hearts and The Cortinas. They are hues though which add colour to The Spitfires’ increasing individuality which is in rich bloom across the latest inescapable lure of an album.

Remains The Same opens up the release, its initial keyboard tempting thick intimation leading to the track’s spirited heart and web of hooks and lures. Punk and ska entangle as the song bounces along with varying urgency, the lead vocal prowess of guitarist Billy Sullivan for company with his potent tones as ably and infectiously backed by those of bassist Sam Long. The fresh addition of trombone adds to the adventure, its flames adding to the rousing roar inciting ears and attention in swift order.

The outstanding start continues with Front Line, bass and guitars immediately casting their contagious enterprise over ears as the crisp beats of Matt Johnson land and the keys of George Moorhouse flirt. Long’s bass pulsates with an earthy lilt within the virulence as Sullivan’s vocals once again easily entice. As with its predecessor, there is familiarity and catchiness to the song which grabs body and appetite but coming with an individuality which in turn switches on the imagination.

Next up Over And Over Again just as quickly and skilfully has the body bouncing and listener participation enrolled, its indie meets a Madness-esque scent joyous incitement becoming bigger, bolder, and more involving by the second. Contagion comes in various designs and strengths, the track pretty much one unstoppable infestation of energy and creative invention as too in its own unique style is Something Worth Fighting For. Swinging along on with a reggae nurtured gait as currents of dub bred enticement shimmer, the track effortlessly got under the skin in moments only increasing its hold as vocal, melodic virulence, and the band’s united craft colluded.

Further into the album you go greater adventure rewards, the following By My Side an enthralling piano led ballad with the guest vocals of Emily Capell pure radiance within the song’s own creative glow while Move On is a compelling dub lined brew of magnetism akin to Ruts and The Redskins meets Dub Pistols.

There is no avoiding giving a strong hint of next up Sick Of Hanging Around by comparing it to Paul Weller and co but again though it is a track which foremost is The Spitfires alone; the spicy blasts of trombone and the suggestive caress of keys a big part in ensuring its individual character in sound and imagination is forefront. As strong as its presence and the enjoyment felt is, the track is quickly and firmly eclipsed by The New Age. A boisterous punk and indie pop bred stroll with a power pop lining and dub ska underbelly, the outstanding track is glorious a call to feet, energy, and to arms.

The final pair of the album’s title track and Dreamland completes the release; the first unveiling a Ruts DC like saunter enveloping the senses like a celestial sunspot and its successor with the same infectious seduction in many ways echoing its title, a luminous melodic trespass on the state of society today.

More impressive and addictive by the listen, Year Zero is the coming of age of The Spitfires’ song writing and sound but with still plenty more to offer and explore in its evolution ahead. The world might be spiralling out of control but it is inspiring some striking reactions as this.

Year Zero is out now through Hatch Records; available @ https://thespitfires.tmstor.es/and most online stores.

Upcoming Live Dates:

Fri 05 Oct – Southend, Chinnerys

Sat 06 Oct – Norwich, Arts Centre

Fri 02 Nov – Dover, Booking Hall

Sat 03 Nov – Brighton, Patterns

Fri 09 Nov – Leamington Spa, Zephyr Lounge

Sat 10 Nov – London, Islington Assembly Hall

Thu 15 Nov – Birmingham, Hare & Hounds

Fri 16 Nov – Glasgow, Broadcast

Sat 17 Nov – Edinburgh, Mash House

Fri 23 Nov – Bristol, Fiddlers

Sat 24 Nov – Exeter, Cavern

Thu 29 Nov – Newcastle, Cluny

Fri 30 Nov – Carlisle, Old Fire Station

Fri 07 Dec – Leeds, Hi Fi Club

Sat 08 Dec – Northampton, Roadmender

http://www.thespitfires.org/   https://www.facebook.com/TheSpitfiresUk/   https://twitter.com/thespitfiresuk

Pete RingMaster 02/08/2018

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Boomin – Now That’s What I Call…Boomin

Tagged as “Simply the greatest live party band on the planet!” UK pop rockers Boomin prove why they can be considered so with new album Now That’s What I Call…Boomin. The band’s renowned fun and mischief surges through its title alone but equally it is a name which sums up the release as a whole.  Containing sixteen tracks pulling from 35 artists, it is the ultimate collection of covers squeezed and moulded into medleys, mash ups and simply straight renditions all recreated and twisted in the unique Boomin way. With many songs we instinctively did not like in their original form there was no real expectation of being enthused about the release but in the hands of the little tinkers we simply felt nothing less than rich enjoyment at their and the album’s antics.

Consisting of guitarist/ vocalist Adam Langmead, bassist/vocalist Rory O’Grady, and drummer/vocalist Edd Langmead, Wigan hailing Boomin emerged in 2006. Since then the band has won numerous band competitions, shared stages with the likes of The Script, Scouting For Girls, McFly, Ultrabeat, Basshunter, and Ndubs among many more, and seen their debut album, Original Junkie reach reached No 22 in the iTunes Rock Chart and No.121 in the Album Charts. It was a potent introduction to the band’s pop infused rock and the instinctive fun which now floods Now That’s What I Call…Boomin.

Opener Thuglife sees a medley of tracks from Beyoncé, Christine Aguilera, Dr Dre, and Coolio in the grasp of Boomin, the track setting the tone, character, and revelry of things to come. Each portion flows into the next, the trio rather than re-inventing songs fingering them with their own devilry to stamp their own imprint on them.

Because of that inherent dislike of certain songs, some tracks certainly got under the skin more than others but all left a smile on the face especially tracks like Smells Like Billie Jean, a glorious mash up of the Nirvana and Michael Jackson classics. There is a vein of unpredictability to the song even with their extremely well-known sources which teases, as good as grins at the listener as song and band romps.

Other moments joining it on the front line of captivation include an impertinent take on Pulp’s Common PPL, a rousing stomp with Sum 42’s Fat Lip, and a bluesy hard rock lilted roar with Come Together from The Beatles. Alongside, the shameless fusion of Björk’s It’s Oh So Quiet and Sinatra’s New York, New York is pure incitement for vocal chords and energetic revelry from band and listener alike, but as suggested the whole album gives plenty for body, imagination, and energy to dive into, the irrepressible King Of The Swingers testament to that.

We will leave you to discover the rest of the album and your particular favourite moments to run riot with and you will more than once whether drunk or sober.

So Boomin the ultimate party band? Well Now That’s What I Call…Boomin offers little to deter such a statement, in fact nothing at all.

Now That’s What I Call…Boomin is available now @ https://boominmerch.bigcartel.com/

https://www.boominband.co.uk/   https://www.facebook.com/boominband/

Pete RingMaster 27/07/2018

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Nine Dart Finish – The Misadventures of…

Nine Dart Finish is a British outfit drawing on the wide influences of the likes of Weezer, Supergrass, Queen, and Ian Dury for their pop fuelled rock ‘n’ roll; The Misadventures of… is their debut album which unapologetically has the body bouncing as fun floods every pour of its magnetic enterprise. The trio from Birmingham has already lured potent attention from fans and media alike with a handful of singles especially potent; appetites for their boisterous sound which their first album can only multiply.

Consisting of former Coffeeshop member in lead vocalist/bassist Daz Yardley, guitarist/vocalist Christopher Mobbs, and drummer Andy Proudman, Nine Dart Finish first drew ears with debut EP Fall To Pieces late 2015. Since then their hook loaded pop ‘n’ rock has grown and become more creatively mischievous by the song. The Misadventures of… brings all the enticing dynamics and lusty grooves of the band’s sound as well as those devilish hooks the threesome seems to instinctively conjure together in one rousing enjoyable place.

Bringing the lively antics of recent singles, highlights of that first EP and new tracks together in one captivating union, The Misadventures of… roars into view with the outstanding The Cut of Your Jib. The track is wild rock ‘n’ roll, almost feral in its energy as riffs and rhythms harry ears just as eager vocals blaze. As the album continues it is easy to see why certain tracks were chosen and potent as singles and teases for the full-length but for personal tastes it is tracks like the raucous rock bred opener which trapped the keenest attention and passions. With a touch of Queens of the Stone Age to its contagious tempest, the track is a garage rock lined clamour getting the album off to a magnificent start.

The following Fall to Pieces is a far calmer proposition as a melodic jangle colludes with vocal harmonies before the track settles into its warm catchy swing. There is no preventing the quick shuffle of feet to its stroll, keys adding to its summery scent as vocals and melodies entangle before In the City uncages its own rock ‘n’ roll flame. Within its slightly rawer attack, hooks tease and tempt as riffs nag, Proudman’s beats striking with relish as they drive the infectious escapade.

Recent single Kicking & Screaming is next, a song which blossomed by the listen as its organic rumble aligns to melodic enticement. The former gives the otherwise gentle seduction a volatility which imposes without truly erupting, a combination gripping ears within a grunge pop like proposal while Charlie Bonkers offers up a melody woven slice of Brit Pop nurtured enterprise. It is fair to say that the song did not impact as potently as those around it on our tastes yet as honest to admit it had the hips swinging and vocal chords playing without any trouble.

You Don’t Bother Me similarly did not quite grab as strongly as many of its companions with its sixties hued pop but again involvement in its enticement was unavoidable as with the blues kissed rock of Falling for You. Both tracks epitomises the band’s knack at weaving varied and seriously catchy adventures though each is swiftly overshadowed by the album’s finest moment consisting of its final three songs.

From its initial melodic caresses Fabio’s Overture blossoms into a truly mesmeric slice of pop rock, emotive strands in voice and sound entangling another lure of virulent catchiness as inescapable whether the song is ablaze or simply smouldering. Its thick enticement leads into the rousing devilry of You’re so Cool. As again pop floods its bold rock ‘n’ roll, the track nags and taunts attention with relish. With something of UK duo The Sea about it, the track is superb rivalling the opener for best song honours though they are equally matched by the tenacious stomp of album closer London. There is a certain mod like hue to the song which only adds to its outstanding character and roar.

Though as mentioned there are some tracks which undoubtedly eclipsed others for us, The Misadventures of… is one thoroughly enjoyable involvement from start to finish. Nine Dart Finish have a sound with open growth in every new song so expect many more lustily fun times ahead as well as right now with their new offering.

The Misadventures of… is out now through iTunes and other stores.

http://ninedartfinish.co.uk/   https://www.facebook.com/NDFmusic/   https://twitter.com/ndfmusic

Pete RingMaster 17/07/2018

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Chris Mullin – Sooner or Later

Last year Chris Mullin, the bassist/co-songwriter of Liverpool outfit The Sums, took time out to explore the solo side of his musical imagination, the result a debut EP which was as richly enjoyable as it was heartfelt. This year he has done the same. Momentarily taking time away from recording The Sum’s third album, Mullins has created and unveiled a new collection of tracks in the shape of the Sooner or Later EP, an encounter which simply puts its impressive predecessor in the shade.

Also former member of Hurricane #1, Mullin has been a potent part of his home city’s current musical fabric through The Sums, his other projects and writing and also producing. As shown by the previous Myself Fooling Me EP, his solo side music has the potential to be just as impacting; indeed the introduction to his own sounds easily drew acclaim and attention. As suggested, Sooner or Later builds on and eclipses the emotively woven and sensitively delivered sounds of its predecessor. It has a spring in its step contrasting the melancholic gait of the first release but still embraces its calm and intimacy with fresh adventure and imagination.

Released on his self-owned Nowhere Music, Sooner or Later opens up with the immediately infectious Lonely Fools. Its initial melodic clang easily tempted ears, the subsequent reflective stroll centred by bass, voice, and guitar captivating them as melodic shimmers and sonic caresses surround the Mullin’s lure. Though not exactly in sound, there is something of Pete Wylie to the outstanding track, a slice of indie pop intimation and infection which just lit our ears and appetite.

The following Just Want You to Know is equally as magnetic, its instinctive catchiness aligned to personal openness in tone and word. Rhythms again entice as keys suggest and guitars weave, vocals making their earnest declaration with equal allurement and sincerity. As the first, the song is nothing less than contagious pleasure, third song, Dissatisfied Mind, enticing from the same instinctive template. Its shadows come with hopeful light, its emotional insecurity with a vibrancy that wants to escape within a weave of sound which just seduced ears.

The track completes easily the three best songs from Mullin’s solo work yet, a trio alone making Sooner or Later one irresistible proposition with the icing on the cake being its title track. An acoustic croon with imagination embracing orchestration, bold adventure, and organic catchiness understated but lively as it infests the spirit, the track just enthrals as it pleasures; those few words pretty much summing up the Sooner or Later EP as a whole.

The rumour is that Mullin’s next offering might be a full-length adventure; we for one are not only up for that, after Sooner or Later, we are greedy for it.

Sooner or Later is out now on Nowhere Music, available as download only from most stores and https://chrismullin.bandcamp.com/album/sooner-or-later

https://chrismullin.net/   https://www.facebook.com/chrismully   https://twitter.com/chrismullin74

Pete RingMaster 24/05/2018

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

The Tuesday Club – Art Is Magic

Trials and turbulences are no strangers to most bands but few as acute as that which impacted on British outfit The Tuesday Club and almost brought it to an end. Now though they are poised to release “unlikely album 3” in the shape of Art Is Magic, a slab of multi-flavoured rock ‘n’ roll which certainly gets under the skin in no time but an itch which just gets more delicious and addictive by the listen. It is their finest moment built across ten bold devilish tracks embracing old and new sounds with a unique imagination and their inimitable touch.

Formed in 2011 in Walmington-on-Sea, the renowned setting for British legendary comedy Dad’s Army, The Tuesday Club was an eight piece extravaganza of sound and creative revelry embracing the sights and mischief of their home town’s TV heritage. Their sound blossomed with the punk nurtured DIY attitude and inspiring sounds of the late seventies yet from day one cast its own aural image as proven by debut album See You Next Tuesday in 2013. It was a proposition though which was evolving from that first release and in open exploration by the band’s second album which was released as a quadrilogy of four EPs.

Devastation hit after the release of the first EP when drummer Terry Super Cockell tragically died. Though the band completed the album’s unveiling it was obviously without zeal; as they say the following EPs released in a ‘daze’, with the band falling to its knees and closing in on demise as members subsequently left. It was a challenging, life questioning and changing time which was not so obvious to the outside world at the time such the quality of those releases but maybe now best understood by checking out Reverse Family’s current project 365 days of songwriting, the band the solo project of TTC’s founding member Andreas Vanderbraindrain though he goes by Dermot Illogical for it. It is a still on-going colossal collection of tracks written across those times released as an EP a week for a year, many of its songs spawned from the darkness he personally fell into through those times.

TTC did survive though, its remaining members regrouping and finding a new breath and energy, stripping away “much of the old ‘glamour’ replacing it with a new urgency and directness.” Alongside vocalist Vanderbraindrain, the band now consists of guitarist Dave Worm, bassist/keyboardist Rogerio Marauder, and drummer Blairdrick Sharpely. As they suggested, the quartet has stripped back the TTC sound and brought forward its raw breath and instinctive imagination whilst broadening yet honing its creative flavourings and adventure.

Art is Magic opens with its title track, slipping in on a rhythmic coaxing until a lash of sound sparks a post punk lined stroll led by Vanderbraindrain’s distinctive tones. The song prowls the senses, keys simultaneously providing a melancholic yet mystique lined caress; it all uniting in an infectious swing and call to join its arcane devilry. Captivation was swift and only escalated as the track tempted and teased with its seventies lent enterprise.

It is a thickly potent start to the album keenly backed by the poppier rock exploits of Always taking things too far. It bounces around like a mix of Athletico Spizz 80 and Mammal Hum, a fusion of new wave and art rock which poked the appetite initially, whetted its lips further before thereon in fully teasing eager greed by the listen. It is a trait of the album as a whole, making an attention grabbing first impression but spawning lustier reactions by the play though some songs like Soulless City Syndrome had us instantly drooling. Its opening noir tinted intimation simply nurtured intrigue, the following electronic and tenacious punk ‘n’ roll of the song sparking the passions as it cantered lustfully through ears. The best track on Art is Magic, it twists and lures like an Adicts meets Zanti Misfits inspired dervish wearing a cape woven with threads of The Monochrome Set for one unique and gorgeous encounter.

It is a hard task to follow such a pinnacle yet Fruit Salad Girl with its spiky pop rock makes relatively light work of it, the infection loaded romp a nagging rock ‘n’ roll roar which had the body bouncing and vocal chords blaring in no time before Drowning My Sorrows allowed a breath to be taken with its folk pop saunter. Not that it is a dormant on the catchiness, its easy going but boisterous swing leading feet and hips away like a collusion of The Farmer Boys and Swell Maps.

Put your Faith in what you can control similarly has a laid back but tenaciously catchy gait and demeanour, again the band’s lo-fi instincts breeding a richly appetising temptation as rhythmically persuasive as it is melodically and lyrically sharp. Thus eager involvement was swift and as forcibly recruited by the bolder rousing punk ‘n’ roll of We are the Team, a song which is the band announcing they are undefeated and returning with new vigour and invention whilst creating a personal declaration for all to embrace.

It would be a shock not to have the scent of early Adam and The Ants somewhere within a TTC encounter, Let the kids run the country the irresistible moment within Art Is Magic as the band source their own earlier traits and another influences’ for a greed brewing slice of aural virulence before the darker tone and shadows of Rock and Roll’s not a science infests ears and psyche like a viral infection you cannot shake off, or in this case want to. The song reminded of short lived Welsh punks The Table at times but again TTC spin a web of sound and addiction all their own.

The album concludes with Who and youz army, a rhythmically tenacious and infectiously barbed slice of punk rock which would have aroused air punching crowds back in the day just as now. Its hooks are familiar yet inescapable and its character old school with the irritability of today; ingredients ensuring Art Is Magic goes out on a major high.

Listening to their album just hits home what we would be missing without The Tuesday Club and how lucky newcomers will be now discovering them through such a glorious romp.

Art Is Magic is released May 6th with its launch party the same night @ The Lower Red Lion in St. Albans pre-ordering available now @ https://theperfectpopco-op.bandcamp.com/album/art-is-magic

http://thisisthetuesdayclub.co.uk/    https://www.facebook.com/thisisthetuesdayclub/   https://twitter.com/thetuesdayclub1    https://twitter.com/Vnderbraindrain

Pete RingMaster 30/03/2018

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Reverse Family: 365 days of songwriting

Last August we gave you a first look and insight into the epic new project from Reverse Family. Starting the following October, the plan with 365 was to release 52 EPs as one a week for a whole year, each of their songs representing a single day in the inspiring life of its creator.

Reverse Family is the solo project of Dermot Illogical, though you may know him as Andreas Vanderbraindrain, the frontman of British outfit The Tuesday Club. With its brainchild embracing the various talents of others, Reverse Family first grabbed keen attention with debut album My Songs About Life Mid Crisis in 2016. In so many ways 365 is a whole new ball game for the band, a project taking the listener into the heart and thoughts, not forgetting darkness, Dermot personally experienced as he came to terms with personal despair through the death of a great friend and band mate, going through divorce, dealing with the serious illness of both parents and other traumas taking Dermot to the edge.

Since that first collection of songs sent our way to announce the release of 365, the project has been in full swing with some more teasers sent for our ears to explore. So time to give you more insight into a collection of songs which we can say to date has grabbed the imagination and pleasured ears in varying persistently enjoyable ways by focusing on a few more which have recently been unveiled.

Day 20 provides The Suns rays are just like birthdays, an inviting stroll built around a great post punk bassline as crispy beats align to the distinctive tones of Dermot. Reflecting on the radiance of the weather as emotions rise and fall, the track is a thickly infectious affair nagging away at ears like a pleasurable itch.

There is great diversity to the sound and personas of songs with 365 too, Was I a good man (day 15) swinging along with a sixties garage pop hues as guitars offer their psych kissed jangle while No Reason to run (day 6) has the rhythmic shuffle of a King Trigger aligned to an off kilter twee/ indie pop croon. Hugging a melody which enthrals in its nagging simplicity, the track is simply mesmeric, almost shamanic in its virulent enterprise.

Equally irresistible is the bricks and mortar snarl of Sunshade City (day 21). It has a gnarly tone around the pulsating shadowy lure of the bass, both at the heart of its post punk/industrial examination while with matching success We Got It (day26) sees Reverse Family embrace early Adam and The Ants textures in its resourceful punk dance. With so many tracks unveiled already it is hard to pick a favourite but this always figures in any contemplation as too does  the twang lilted Keep Being the Good Guy (day 25). Its country punk tinge and another irresistible bass line and tone court the ever virulent vocal delivery of Dermot, it all uniting in one seriously catchy persuasion.

Seductive acoustic discord flirts from within Dark pop (day 7) and insatiable askew pop punk is bred through the rousing antics of Pay the price (day 3) while School gate politics (day 64) is a prowling harassment with menacing shadows and post punk intimation, kind of like a Bowie meets Artery contemplation. All three are additional pinnacles in the lofty landscape of tracks released to date and definite favourites with us among so many more.

It has to be said though that Movin’ forward (day 74) is the cream of the crop, its repetitious swing and hook lined lure simply irresistible; a real ear worm as dark as it is vibrant. There are numerous potent ways to get into 365, such as the delicious lithe tenebrific pop ‘n’ roll of Your wandering hands (day 82) but Movin’ forward is addiction in the waiting.

There is so much more to discover already with 365, aside from our glimpses, with EPs released currently standing at 19 as you read, and all there for your exploration, @ http://reversefamily.co.uk/  with plenty more adventure to come which you can keep up with through the Perfect Pop Co-Op magazine. 365 is DIY majesty with drama to be found at every turn and so much pleasure too.

https://www.facebook.com/reversefamily/    https://twitter.com/PerfectPopCoOp

Read our introduction to Reverse Family and 365 @ https://ringmasterreviewintroduces.wordpress.com/2017/08/26/day-by-day-with-reverse-family/

Pete RingMaster 06/02/2018

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

The RingMaster Review Top 40 2017 Pt 1

A rich year for ear gripping sounds and releases, 2017 has been eagerly devoured and savoured one more time by The RingMaster Review and squeezed into the forty encounters covered on the site which most lit our fires. Here we share the treats from 21 to 40 that got the juices flowing…

21 1919 – Bloodline

https://ringmasterreviewintroduces.wordpress.com/2017/03/06/1919-bloodline/

22 KingBathmat – Dark Days

https://ringmasterreviewintroduces.wordpress.com/2017/07/04/kingbathmat-dark-days/

23 Pink Muscles -The Signal

https://ringmasterreviewintroduces.wordpress.com/2017/05/09/pink-muscles-the-signal/

24 Hypochristmutreefuzz – Hypopotomonstrosesquipedaiophobia

https://ringmasterreviewintroduces.wordpress.com/2017/08/15/hypochristmutreefuzz-hypopotomonstrosesquipedaiophobia/

25 King Satan – King Fucking Satan

https://ringmasterreviewintroduces.wordpress.com/2017/06/20/king-satan-king-fucking-satan/

26 Twelve Boar – No Forgiveness

https://ringmasterreviewintroduces.wordpress.com/2017/09/15/twelve-boar-no-forgiveness/

27 Frauds – With Morning Toast & Jam & Juice

https://ringmasterreviewintroduces.wordpress.com/2017/12/19/frauds-with-morning-toast-jam-juice/

28 Siberian Meat Grinder – Metal Bear Stomp

https://ringmasterreviewintroduces.wordpress.com/2017/10/26/siberian-meat-grinder-metal-bear-stomp/

29 Chronic Xorn – For These Sins Who Must Die

https://ringmasterreviewintroduces.wordpress.com/2017/12/19/chronic-xorn-for-these-sins-who-must-die/

30 SECTLINEFOR – Anorexic Insect

https://ringmasterreviewintroduces.wordpress.com/2017/03/01/sectlinefor-anorexic-insect/

31 Dirt Box Disco – Poppycock

https://ringmasterreviewintroduces.wordpress.com/2017/03/16/dirt-box-disco-poppycock/

32 Spunk Volcano & The Eruptions – Not Wired Up Right

https://ringmasterreviewintroduces.wordpress.com/2017/08/01/spunk-volcano-the-eruptions-not-wired-up-right/

33 Bloodclot – Up in Arms

https://ringmasterreviewintroduces.wordpress.com/2017/07/28/bloodclot-up-in-arms/

34 Temple Of Lies – The Serial Killer Suite

https://ringmasterreviewintroduces.wordpress.com/2017/07/12/temple-of-lies-the-serial-killer-suite/

35 The LaFontaines – Common Problem

https://ringmasterreviewintroduces.wordpress.com/2017/11/01/the-lafontaines-common-problem/

36 Voice Of Addiction – The Lost Art of Empathy

https://ringmasterreviewintroduces.wordpress.com/2017/08/09/voice-of-addiction-the-lost-art-of-empathy/

37 Jack of None -Who Shot Bukowski

https://ringmasterreviewintroduces.wordpress.com/2017/08/03/jack-of-none-who-shot-bukowski/

38 Johnny Kowalski and the Sexy Weirdos – European English

https://ringmasterreviewintroduces.wordpress.com/2017/10/11/johnny-kowalski-and-the-sexy-weirdos-european-english/

39 King Salami and the Cumberland 3 – Goin’ Back To Wurstville

https://ringmasterreviewintroduces.wordpress.com/2017/03/22/king-salami-and-the-cumberland-3-goin-back-to-wurstville/

40 Jingo – Make Some Money, Buy Some Love

https://ringmasterreviewintroduces.wordpress.com/2017/02/22/jingo-make-some-money-buy-some-love/

41 As A New Revolt – Speechless

https://ringmasterreviewintroduces.wordpress.com/2017/12/19/as-a-new-revolt-speechless/

An extra mention of bands which pretty much gave us as much of a buzz as those above with their offerings…

Ventenner, Mala Ruckus, Das Fluff, To Bear Sir, Kabbalah, Of Allies, NoSelf, Ward XVI, Oh! Gunquit, Kinasis, Circle of Dust, Discomister, Dearly Beloved, Lauren Hoffman and The Secret Storm, Gravves, Bokassa, Black Mirrors, Widows, SΔCRED ΔPE, The Hangmen, Madjive, Show Of Bedlam, Rum Thief, Death Blooms, The Parallax Method, Dead Cross, Rooster Cole,  The Vintage Calvinos, Riffocity, Bool, All At Sea, Figures, Spreading The Disease, Loom…