The LaFontaines – Class

The LaFontaines_ Reputation Radio/RingMaster Review

Tagged as Scotland’s biggest independent band, there is no doubting that anticipation for The LaFontaines’ debut album has been in full swing on the back of acclaimed releases and a live presence seeing the band headline shows in New York, tour the UK and Europe with Watsky, and play their biggest headline sold out show to date at Glasgow’s ABC amongst numerous successes. The majority of that happened in a triumphant 2014 for the band but it is easy to expect bigger, more forceful spotlights upon the band in this with the release of the thrilling and fascinating Class.

static1.squarespace.com_ Reputation Radio/RingMaster Review   Formed in 2010, the Motherwell hailing quintet first snatched attention with the All She Knows EP in 2013, following its success the following year with the similarly eagerly received Under The Storm EP. The absorbing diversity and sounds of the Matt O’Grady (You Me At Six/Don Broco) produced Class now blends the qualities of those previous releases with a new adventure of invention and enterprise. It is at times a startling release, persistently a striking one, and even when its persuasive energy slips a touch, album and indeed band just enthral as they brew up an impassioned and tenacious incitement. The words of frontman Kerr Okan probably describes it best when he says, “We’ve spent the past 3 to 4 years leading up to this point. Everything we’ve seen on the road or experienced together as a band has finally made its way onto record. It’s guaranteed to shock those who assume we’re simply just the best live band in Scotland. There’s so much depth to these songs, a load of pain and struggle, but underlying throughout all of the writing, is some real grit and determination.

There can be few albums this year with as rousing a start as Class offers through Slow Elvis. From a distance the song looms on ears, hitting them on arrival with pungent anthemic rhythms and fiery riffs. It is not particularly aggressive or explosive yet within seconds the opener has ears and appetite seriously aroused and hanging onto its swing. Spatial sonic endeavour fills air quickly too, surrounding the swaggering vocal rap of Okan as bass and drums intensify their bait with a snarl and punchy attitude. Additional vocal calls and melodic revelry only adds to the incendiary brew, the track evolving into a Rage Against The Machine meets Lazy Habits encounter wrapped in the sultry hues of Muse.

The sensational start is quickly backed by the similarly electrifying Under The Storm, a burst of guitar sparking handclaps and melodic vocals with fire in their breath. The track is soon shrugging off any restraint and with sinews flexing, it strides resourcefully through ears behind scythes of guitar and bass which in turn are led by the stirring mix of clean and rap cast vocals from bassist John Gerard and Okan respectively. Though openly unique compared to its predecessor, that description of references again applies, and like the first song is twisted into something unique to The LaFontaines. Unpredictability also is a ripe asset to both songs, and indeed the album, that and the great Scottish lilt fuelling the jabbing potency of the rapping.

     The album’s title track comes next, a gentle caress of melodic temptation crooning over the senses as rhythms fling their enticement around in a robust dance. Once more the mix of vocals is a magnetic tempting in the indie seeded and lively serenade of the song, the melodic lure of Gerard as potent as the creative jangle of guitar from Iain Findlay and Darren McCaughey. Revealing more of the depth and imagination in the band’s songwriting and sound alone, it is replaced and emulated by Castles. This too has a reserved touch yet its heart is a blaze of sonic expression and evocative intensity. A sizzling start slips into a mellower embrace around Okan’s delivery, both taking ears and thoughts by the hand and leading them into new eruptions of emotional drama. Without quite matching the plateau of the first few tracks, the song easily steals full attention with its Biffy Clyro meets The Kennedy Soundtrack like canvas evolved into something distinct to this new breed of Scottish rock ‘n roll.

King steps up next, its great bluesy guitar twang an immediate tasty enticing to which a throaty bass groan from Gerard and the punchy spits of Okan bring their own irresistible tempting. Featuring guests Luke Prebble and Michael Sparks, the song whilst wrapped in the tangy keys of McCaughey and vocal harmonies prowls rhythmically and emotionally. Gospel like in ambience, mischievous in imagination, the track has ears and appetite hungry, their need fulfilled by Junior Dragon. Not for the first or last time, drummer Jamie Keenan stirs up body and emotions with his skilled incitement from which the song exposes an even grittier and volatile side to the band’s sound. Arctic Monkeys like in devilry, Freeze The Atlantic like in energy, and Able Archer like in creative grandeur, the track grows into a rich bellow of voice and sound for another major highlight of Class.

A fiercely shimmering persuasion comes with All Gone next, another with a predacious edge to its rhythms and character backed by a great rapping stroll from Okan but maybe for the only time on the album a strong impact slips as the melodic and harmonic side of the song flows. Nevertheless the track captivates and solidly pleases if without finding the spark which ignited earlier songs, an ingredient the outstanding Window Seat has in strength. A more smouldering persuasion, it takes time to reveal all its rich levels and qualities but over time becomes a mighty peak of the album. It is an intense slice of emotional balladry built on a muscular frame, this draped in quite superb and mesmeric vocal strengths. It might be ballad like but there is a tempest at its heart which makes the song a volcanic croon and just irresistible.

Enjoyable but less dramatically engrossing is All She Knows, an easy going and arguably formula song in respect to the band’s songwriting. It is relatively unique to outside references but finds it difficult to stand out in the richness around it, though again to be fair the track is only enjoyment for ears, something which again applies to Paper Chase. Its eighties indie pop essences definitely add something fresh but once more the track struggles to linger like the insatiable successes elsewhere upon Class.

The album closes with the thick and shadow enriched caress of Pull Me Back, keys a melancholic but dramatic expression against the anthemic beats of McCaughey. They are a mere moment in the ever evolving landscape of the excellent song of course, every second, note, and syllable from across the band just inventive theatre.

It is a fine end to a thoroughly exciting release. Certainly there are moments when Class slips from its loftiest perch but it is generally down to the brilliance of some songs in comparison than the failures of others. As suggested, the first album from The LaFontaines has been long and greedily awaited and now here it undoubtedly lets no one down.

Class is available now via 889 Records from most online stores

http://www.thelafontaines.co.uk/   https://www.facebook.com/thelafontainesmusic

Ringmaster 17/06/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard on Reputation Radio @ http://www.reputationradio.net

 

 

 

Vienna Ditto – Circle

Vienna Ditto _Reputation Radio/RingMaster Review

With every song and single released, UK duo Vienna Ditto has enhanced the seductive hex they have laid on certainly our ears since being infected by the band’s Ugly EP in 2013. Now the pairing of Hatty Taylor and Nigel Firth has set free their long awaited and highly anticipated debut album, and fair to say that their melodic voodoo has just got seriously enslaving. Bringing some old fan favourites together with re-workings of older releases and brand new slices of sonic devilment, Circle is a bewitching romance of sultry atmospheres, bordering on sinister melodic beauty, and psychedelic sunspots of harmonic alchemy.

Originally meeting when Firth taught Taylor the guitar when she was 11 years old, the duo began writing and creating together in 2009 after meeting by chance again in the street. Within a week of that moment, they recorded an electronic version of the Johnny Cash classic Ring of Fire and in a matter of another seven of so days created and unveiled their own first song Long Way Down. This quickly managed to find itself played on Huw Stephens’ Radio One show, leading to Vienna Ditto playing the BBC Introducing stage at Glastonbury. 2011 saw the band’s self-titled debut EP get a well-received release, its temptation the beginning to greater attention and responses earned by a couple of singles and more so the Liar Liar and Ugly EPs two years later. With further singles only enhancing and confirming the duo’s potent emergence and increasing evolution of sound, there has been a greedy appetite brewing amongst a great many for this first album. Now here it is easy to say that no-one will be disappointed and for newcomers, well simply welcome to a new musical lust.

The encounter opens with This Is Normal, a song instantly luring ears through a minimal but potent bassy riff and the siren-esque tones and expression of Taylor’s voice. As crispy beats and additional guitar enticing joins the mix so the song’s energy also elevates, though it is quickly back into the low key gait so things continue to be potently intriguing and unpredictable. As electronic invention springs its bait next, the track eventually slips into a magnetic stroll with Morningwood like revelry but yet again things only get twisted and turned around to relentlessly excite ears and imagination.

Owly circle_Reputation Radio/RingMaster Review    The irresistible start is emulated and surpassed by the following Feeling Good. With garage rock hooks colluding with surf and sci-fi shimmers, the song is quickly teasing and flirting like a sixties Venusian temptress. Also though there is simultaneously a climatic and sultry air enveloping the senses whilst beneath it a smouldering Tarantino cultured landscape becomes the home for an irresistible dance of vocals and grooves. The song is pure musical and emotional drama, an infection getting under the skin and into the psyche whilst providing the first major pinnacle of the album.

A melodic calm caresses ears next through the mellow charm of Wintertime. Comparisons to Portishead have been a regular offering since Vienna Ditto began and easy to see why with the golden kiss of charm offered by the tantalising third song on the album. It has its own intimacy and individual, almost raw innocence and beauty though as it casts a lingering peace which eventually makes way for the off kilter cosmopolitan enticement of A Happy Car is a Stolen Car. With a ska shaped bassline and exotic melodic hues within a spatial atmosphere, the song is a fascinating waltz of warped imagination and enterprise. The effect hugged vocals of Taylor court the bedlamic shuffle of the song and again a sixties pop hued psyche rock twisted soundscape. It takes a couple of listens or so to fully explore and understand the wonderful turbulence of ideas and bold adventure at work but rewards patience with another major highlight within Circle.

The band takes ears back into the dusty climes of a Morricone like terrain next through Pale Horse Rider, voice and strained guitar strings a compelling lead into a continually evolving and absorbing immersion of sound and emotion. Beauty again is the keenest description to lie at its door before the first of the band’s two current singles step forward side by side. Oh Josephine which we are led to believe is a tribute to dancer and civil rights icon Josephine Baker, has a haunting and pulsating shine to its air, a glow which resonates across every aspect as rhythms and the simply catchiness of the song steal body swerves and lustful thoughts from the listener. The following Long Way Down is an epidemic of addictiveness and brilliance. Primarily garage punk and rock across its numerous strands of temptation, the song also weaves a funk and synth pop lure encased in psychedelic salaciousness. Think Chick Quest meets MGMT with a touch of Jingo for good measure and you have a closer clue to the brilliance of the song.

     Both the hypnotic almost oppressive psychedelic wash of A Wheel Within a Wheel and the bulging devilry of Hold On enthral and thrill; the first a song bordering on psychotic with its kaleidoscope of sonic colour and melodic seducing aligned to off the wall ingenuity. The second of the two is jazz/funk pop twisted out of shape and stretched on muscular rhythmic sinews, then infused with guitar jangles and electronic mania before being given to Taylor to bind in her ever alluring vocals. The result is one virulent dance of unbridled infection and enjoyment though it is soon overshadowed by the sensational Hammer and a Nail. Opening with a caress of southern guitar and the endearing tones of Taylor, the song soon spreads into again Morricone seeded scenery within a dusty hot ambience. It is a transfixing maelstrom of mystique kissed sounds and emotional drama which toys with ears and imagination. The more revealed the darker the track becomes, its rapacious throat and intensity an encroaching clouding over the open beauty and sultry resonance of voice and melodies. As a single this incitement was glorious but reshaped and re-coloured for the album it is simply majestic.

The gentle croon of Liar Liar Quietly is almost an anti-climax initially after the previous glory but soon has ears and thoughts firmly in its soft and persuasive melody soaked hands. It is a spellbinding kiss with a need to spill eighties post punk like invention from within its serenade, again the band reaping seeds from earlier decades to enrich their own scintillating invention.

The album closes with a smouldering slice of gospel bred psyche balladry; I Know His Blood Will Make Me Whole another cast in the dark country of psychedelic rock ‘n’ roll. As expected the track spins a mesh of perpetual unpredictability and off beat exploration which just gets darker, bolder, and more addictive with time and age.

There is also a bonus track on certainly the digital version of Circle called Squeaking Wheel and it too is a sensational romp, one built on a blues sound and craft wound in creative mischief and ingenuity. Whether this or I Know His Blood Will Make Me Whole completes the album, Circle is easily one of the most scintillating and invigorating thrills of the year so far. Full of surprises and originality, album and Vienna Ditto deserve all your attention with the only losers being those not taking a listen.

Circle is available now @ https://viennaditto.bandcamp.com/album/circle

http://www.viennaditto.com/ https://www.facebook.com/viennaditto

RingMaster 16/05/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard on Reputation Radio @ http://www.reputationradio.net

 

Backslashes And Bad Ideas – Sad Is The New Black

DSC_0196_2_Reputation Radio/RingMaster Review

Recently signing with Imminence Records, US quintet Backslashes and Bad Ideas have just released a limited edition 7” single Sad Is The New Black via MKT Records to spark fresh attention. Containing the songs Mid Twenty Something and its title track, the release gives a potent example of why the Staten Island hailing band has been grabbing attention since forming in 2010 whilst setting the scene of their pungent sound for newcomers.

The band’s music is a blend of indie invention, emo angst, and aggressive pop punk contagion, and in full roar on the new release. Consisting of vocalists/guitarists Nick DePalo and Josh Cronopulos, guitarist Ricky Abolt, bassist Rob Castiglione, and drummer Ed Mone, Backslashes And Bad Ideas self-released their debut EP Nothing Left To Give in October 2012 to strong responses. The following year its successor There’s No Place Like Home came out to even greater reactions and now with the linking up with Imminence Records, the time looks right for the band to break into broader and wider spotlights.

Cover_Reputation Radio/RingMaster Review   The single opens with Mid Twenty Something and straight away the band are awakening ears with a guitar caress and stronger vocal persuasion. In no time the track saunters along with striking rhythms and expressive sonic enterprise but really hits its true persuasive and appealing stride once it unleashes its full energy and passion. From start to finish the song has ears gripped but it is the rich weave of rhythmic tenacity and melodic flames when in full swing that turns a good if underwhelming song into something with a real punch.

The following Sad Is The New Black similarly makes a low key entrance but is quicker in finding its hearty creative resourcefulness and adventure. Hooks and melodic lures quickly spin a web of intrigue and enterprise whilst the dual attack of vocals has an even more defined and fluid union on the second song to also immediately impress. The sonic interplay between guitars around a tempestuous spine of riffs equally shines whilst the drama of the track emotionally and musically just builds a richer compelling success.

The first of the two tracks is highly enjoyable but simply overshadowed by its companion, though both only spark an interest and anticipation for the band’s next offerings with their new label. If new to Backslashes And Bad Ideas now is the time to introduce yourself to their lively and powerful sound, with the potential of bigger, greater things to come included.

Sad Is The New Black is available now via MKT Records on 7” vinyl @ https://backslashesandbadideas.bandcamp.com/ in a choice of Black Vinyl (ltd to300 copies), Orange, Green and Black Half Splatter Vinyl (100), and Teal and Black Half Splatter Vinyl (100)

https://www.facebook.com/backslashesny

RingMaster 16/06/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard on Reputation Radio @ http://www.reputationradio.net

 

Shark Tape – Marathon

Picture 9

Filtering the best essences of punk, pop, indie, hard rock and more into their own industrious rock ‘n’ roll revelry, US band Shark Tape is a band which has been creating a buzz of their side of the globe for the past couple of years or so. Now their energetically flavoursome sound is concentrating on stirring up British attention through the UK release of debut album Marathon. A collection of songs as united in contagious enterprise as they are individual in character and imagination, the release is a sure fire incitement to body swerves, broad smiles, and feeling good.

Hailing from Philadelphia, Shark Tape emerged in 2007. They went through various project names before settling on the name we are now embracing. The trio of vocalist/bassist Stephen Lorek, guitarist Niles Weiss, and drummer Dylan Mulcahy released a pair of EPs in 2012, a self-titled debut and Eyes On You which were both well-received with the latter especially earning potent radio play from East Coast radio stations. Late 2013, the band linked up with renowned engineer Jeff Ziegler (Kurt Vile, War On Drugs) to begin working on their first album, Marathon receiving its acclaimed US release last November and now looking at sparking the same enthusiasm in the UK. With a host of inventively crafted songs bound in imaginatively woven sounds, it is easy to assume it is already a done deal in making the strongest persuasion over here too.

Picture 8     The album gets off to a seriously rousing start with Bronco, vibrant riffs and attention causing hooks instantly inescapable bait matched in potency by the varied vocal tones. The guitars jangle and entice right away with flirtatious indie rock endeavour, leading the listener and an already greedy appetite into an addiction forging chorus which swiftly enlists the listener’s vocal help to join their body’s already keen involvement. Like a mix of Weezer and UK band Asylums, the song is unbridled contagion and matched all the way by Marathon’s title track. Unveiling its own unique hooks and melodic temptation, the track has a healthy hard/glam rock urge in its fiery invention amidst another uncontrollable infection for ears and imagination. Totally different in sound it maybe, but song and indeed album not for the last time, shows the same instinctive ability to create hook laden, uncomplicated but precisely woven punk pop as bands like The Undertones and Buzzcocks, and with more encounters like this the potential for a similar status for Shark Tape ahead might be on the cards.

River Runs Deep comes next, opening with an eighties electro rock like welcome, backing it up with harmonious vocals before adding tempering through vivacious shadows from the bass. Swinging beats and more exotic electronic hues bring new colour to the slimline but rich landscape of the song as it grows, and though it cannot quite emulate the previous pair in strength it keeps the flames of satisfaction burning nicely before the more agitated charms of Long Time Coming take over. Lorek’s bass has a delicious dark tone as it brings the song into view, riveting coaxing quickly wrapped in the indie sparkle of guitar and vocals. As its predecessor there is also an essence of eighties colouring, a new wave pop invention infused with a rawer nineties rock pop that works away to create another choice proposal within Marathon.

Slightly mellower but no less compelling, Smell of Sirens provides a vibrant croon of melodic suggestiveness next. There is a sturdy rhythmic frame and emotional nature to it keeping its spatial melodies and airy atmosphere grounded as vocally and lyrically the song unveils its heart. Revealing further depth and strength in the band’s songwriting the track drifts away to be replaced by the captivating Neverlast with its more sombre but relentlessly catchy stroll. It is one of those songs which works away on the listener almost without them realising, making a deeper, more potent impression than first thought to return at will with its hooks and stirring melodies. Both impress but are soon overshadowed by the outstanding roguish presence of Black Panther. Surely bred from a diet of The Ramones and The Clash, the track is mischievous punk pop with robust rhythms and heavy duty bass riffs led by rebellious vocals. Equipped with a searing guitar solo, barb loaded punk hooks, and bracing rock ‘n’ roll tenacity, the track is nonstop anthemic devilment.

   Through the more controlled Runway and straight after Top Rock Seller, band and album continue to ignite ears and thoughts. Though the first of the pair is more restrained than the last song, its resolve is permanently taunted by the predacious bass tones escorting it through ears, its devilish stroll trying to incite greater aggression in energy to match the aggressive imagination of hooks and ideation around it. The second of the two tracks offers a post punk meets shoegaze suggestion initially but soon moves towards a dusty rock presence sporting essences of grunge, melodic rock, and punk. It is a fascinating mix which has you searching for references to its flavours, Psychedelic Furs one hinting thought, but basically coming up with little by the time it is replaced by the excellent Silly Things. Its successor explores a similar tapestry of ideation but is a more sinister and heavily darker proposition; one pierced by shards of harmonic and melodic light amidst surf seeded sonic spicing.

The album is brought to a close by the acoustically sculpted Dying to Know, a song which from its minimal seeds blossoms into a fascinating web of rhythmic traps and sonic enterprise within an orchestra driven evocative breeze. The song is glorious, a final fanfare for the invention and craft of the band in writing and invention.

With highlights which reach classic song standards and lesser successes that most other albums would cry out for, Marathon is one of those treats all rock fans need in their lives. Remember how excited you got when you first heard bands like Weezer, The Smiths, and Wheatus, well you might just find yourself getting those self-same tingles again thanks to Shark Tape and their debut album.

Marathon is available now @ https://itunes.apple.com/gb/album/marathon/id937432092 or http://sharktape.bandcamp.com/album/marathon

https://www.facebook.com/SharkTape

RingMaster 15/06/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard on Reputation Radio @ http://www.reputationradio.net

Peur – Future Architects EP

Gas STN B&W_Reputation Radio/RingMaster Review

Only days in and June 2015 is proving to be the source of some striking and seriously exciting encounters across a wealth of styles and genres. Another to add to that potent list is the Future Architects EP from UK trio Peur. Uniting their past two attention grabbing singles with new imagination loaded tracks, the Manchester band easily and forcibly confirm their growing stature as one of the more mouth-watering prospects on the British music scene.

Formed in 2013, the threesome of guitarist/vocalist Joe Lomax, bassist Ryan Greenhalgh, and drummer Sam Tempest quickly sparked support and attention with first single Anarchy and following debut EP We Can Build Astronauts in their band’s first few months. Live they did not take long in making a strong, acclaim earning impression either, 2014 seeing the band sharing stages with Empty Yard Experiment, DZ Deathrays, Allusondrugs, and Dearly Beloved. It was a busy and successful year which has continued into this with the release of a trio of singles, including This Will Destroy You, and now the Neil Treppas produced Future Architects.

The band’s inspirations includes artists ranging from Biffy Clyro to Nine Inch Nails, essences amongst many which make a swift spicing in the EP once the atmospheric Intro lays down the almost dystopian air of the release. The brief sonic narrative slips into the following They Have Destroyed Everything, and immediately the guitar of Lomax is casting melodic veins of acidic expression through the encroaching shadow thick landscape of the instrumental. That oppressive ambience is an imposing hue over pungent rhythms and a striking electronic colouring but suddenly lifts as the music in turn seamlessly flows into the gripping stroll of Explosions.

FA_Reputation Radio/RingMaster Review   An open and immediately magnetic Queens Of the Stone Age bred groove ignites ears first, its swinging persuasion matched by the rhythmic tenacity of Greenhalgh and Tempest. Contagion is a quick infestation of the song whilst drama and emotion is as rich through the enjoyable vocal tones and delivery of Lomax. That Josh Homme like spicing is an on-going tempting but as it expands and proceeds, the song explores a Muse like croon in chorus and voice where the early dramatic quality enriches every irresistible hooks and addictive groove within the encounter; familiarity and originality aligning for one voracious roar of a proposition.

     It Ends Before It Starts steps up next and it too is quickly enslaving ears and thoughts with healthy grooves, the thick lure of the one conjured by the bass especially captivating. Though it does not quite have the consistent swagger of its predecessor the track ebbs and flows with powerful energy and evocative invention. At times it offers a reflective, angst hued sigh and in others a bellowing expulsion of passion and intensity with both contrasts as potent and alluring as the other. Once more a Matt Bellamy and co breath coats the adventure but fair to say that again both songwriting and sound only use such influences as colour to their own designs.

The release ends with Hollow Skies, and if atmospheres and emotional intensity was thick before, they combine here for a smothering seduction fuelled further by the harmonic richness and craft of Lomax’s voice. Once more shadows line the noir lit theatre of the guitars and the emerging depths of the song, its body almost cavernous in feel with jabbing beats and darkly toned bass enterprise. Fair to say this time though it is the songwriting and the voice of Lomax which steals the show, even if unavoidably you have to also offer Muse as a close but certainly not quality defusing comparison to his presence.

The EP is as compelling as Peur is openly inventive, every track blossoming from the technical and inventive canvas the band members skilfully craft. They may still be looking for their truly distinct sound but more treats like Future Architects will see few complaining as Peur continues their impressive emergence and exploration.

The Future Architects EP is available now @ https://peurofficial.bandcamp.com/album/future-architects

http://www.peurofficial.com   https://www.facebook.com/PeurOfficial

RingMaster 04/06/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard on Reputation Radio @ http://www.reputationradio.net

Goldsmack – Wild Season

Goldsmack-Wild-Season-EP

To be honest it is proving hard to describe the Goldsmack sound; certainly it is a blaze of sultry pop equipped with a potent glaze of psychedelia. But equally it delves into dark rock ‘n’ roll and blues bred exploits whilst casting a theatre of intimate drama amidst an evolving landscape of aural roars and smouldering emotions. Maybe the closest hint is to say that the Italian trio create something akin to Nick Cave and the Velvet Underground uniting in the seduction of My Baby and MGMT, but then again maybe not. There is also a familiarity to their music which makes accessibility very easy but as revealed by the diverse collection of adventures within their new debut EP Wild Season, it is once caught by that invitation that the real adventure and thrill actually begins.

Goldsmack consists of vocalist Georgia Minelli, guitarist Davide Tebaldi, and bassist/keyboardist Luca Bagatti, three childhood friends brought up “in the single most beautiful and boring place on earth”. It was a small village in the gentle hills of northern Italy where the trio nurtured their musical prowess and imagination, amongst many things to while away the hours. Their sound plays like the home of dreams and isolation bred from a similar source of inspiration in their remote upbringing whilst the band name, again to quote from the press release, “…refers not as much to real gold, but rather to an alchemical sort of gold, a chimera, a potent drug…a prismatic, paradoxical thought that becomes circular and obsessive.

Good Morning Star tantalises first, a monotone sonic lure the thread to a web of electronic beats and guitar cast spirals of melodic enticing. A thick bass tempting swiftly adds to the potent bait, the mix carrying a post punk air reinforced by the also singularly expressive tones of Minelli, an essence of the Au Pairs coming to mind at this early point. At the heart of the persuasion a brewing infectiousness grows, wrapping the increasing celestial pop and vivacious radiance of the encounter. Contrasting it though are prowling shadows courtesy of the bass aligned to a sonic predation, extremes colluding to offer their part in the exploration within the EP of “the impossible triangle between Love, Money and Spiritual Enlightenment”.

The captivating start is swiftly surpassed by A Wild Wild Season, a fascinating dark rock stroll seeing Bagatti bring his full vocal participation to the narrative alongside Minelli. A spicy melody winds itself around another darkly lit bass coaxing, beats resonating in the background as Bagatti’s equally shadowed Cave-esque tones cast the beginning of the evocative narrative. The song continues to saunter, merging lighter scenery into the sinisterly aired landscape, whilst both Bagatti and Minelli duet and entwine their compelling deliveries to enthralling success. The seduction gains even greater momentum as a croon of orchestral like coaxing reveals their provocative textures in another riveting and mouth-watering triumph to the release.

A feisty ambience of blues and psyche rock smothers ears next as Rites Of Spring takes over, that My Baby reference a perfect clue to the sultry and fiery shuffle of the encounter. Minelli is as much ablaze as the guitars, their individual tempestuous energies and impassioned creativity uniting in a fire of persuasion though one kept in check a touch by the great wandering tenacity of the sobering bass. Once more ears are glued and imagination ignited; their appetites hungry for more and straight away fed by the similarly caustic delta blues pop/funk of Kids with Guns. Feet and emotions are quickly recruited to the swagger of the song, ears seduced by the impressive and sizzling enterprise of Tebaldi’s guitar resulting in one more increasingly enjoyable and incendiary escapade.

The closing Of Human Bondage is an enthralling oddity, a turbulent experience of dark drama and emotional torment coloured by insightful references and samples. These alone reinforce the imposing theatre and power of the track but are matched just as potently by the menacing shadow coursing its sound. Within it all a dark beauty is at work too, a calm and hope which only accentuates the track’s absorbing provocative heart.

It is a gripping end to a thrilling introduction to Goldsmack. Wild Season is an infestation of the psyche which continues to work away even after its sound has left the body; a golden slice of psychedelic darkness and shadowed pop whose recommendation comes as a roar.

Wild Season is available now @ https://itunes.apple.com/us/album/wild-season-ep/id988821494

http://goldsmackmusic.com/   https://www.facebook.com/pages/Goldsmack/804817556212518

RingMaster 20/05/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard on Reputation Radio @ http://www.reputationradio.net

 

Diamond Youth – Nothing Matters

dy Reputation Radio/RingMaster Review

It may be only thirty minutes in length but Nothing Matters, the debut album from US alternative rock band Diamond Youth, is jam packed with boisterously contagious songs to party hard and long to. It is a riot of fun seemingly bred on flavours inspired by the likes of Queens Of the Stone Age, Weezer, and Foo Fighters but with plenty of its own distinct characteristics and flavours to create something individual to Diamond Youth. For personal tastes the release is stronger and most tenacious in its first half but every offering within Nothing Matters is a compelling slice of pop rock equipped with feisty persuasion and a good strain of tenacious mischief.

Diamond Youth hails from Baltimore, emerging around 2010 with a line-up featuring members of Trapped Under Ice, Terror, and Down to Nothing; all sharing a common background of art, design, skateboarding, and of course music. Influences range from band such as Pixies, The Nerves, and unsurprisingly Queens Of The Stone Age, and it is fair to say that the quartet has increasingly lured attention through a host of EPs starting with DMND and Don’t Lose Your Cool in 2011. It is Orange in 2013 and Shake a year later, both as the new album released via Topshelf Records, which provided the spark to greater focus and acclaim enveloping the band, in turn sparking strong anticipation for the band’s debut full-length. It will leave no one disappointed and is destined to not only recruit another wave of eager spotlights and fans whilst simply creating a fun time for all.

Recorded with engineer Dave Warsop, the album starts with its title track, swiftly entrapping ears and appetite with stirring rhythms and spicy hooks encased in vocal and melodic revelry. Quickly, especially as the vocals impressively cast their tempting on proceedings, that QOTSA air is an open breeze bringing even greater catchy bait to the vibrant persuasion. It is the tangy hook though which brings the biggest smile in the emotions, that and the adventurous ideation lining the song from first note to last.

Nothing-Matters-Cover Reputation Radio/RingMaster Review     The excellent opening to Nothing Matters is quickly matched by Thought I Had It Right, another song with thick hooks and entrancing harmonic tempting. Slightly more restrained in energy compared to its predecessor, the song saunters and sways with a rich Muse like sultriness to sound and voice. Every syllable comes coated with a spice of angst whilst melodies like a fine wine just become more seductive and effective on the senses with very passing moment. There is also a volatile edge to the contagion posing as a track, its sonic presence flirting with causticity as it forcibly infests and ignites ears through to the imagination.

Spinning steps up next with an even more reserved nature though melodic and vocal passion in turn create a blistering roar courted by a snarl of a bassline. Fair to say that it might be the least feisty song on the release so far but it is the most tempestuous and fascinating, and subsequently quite irresistible as also the following Far Away from Earth. Rhythms straight away lay down an anthemic potency before quickly finding themselves skirted by a deliciously grizzled bassline and a brewing sonic mist of guitar. The mellow croon of vocals does bring a magnetic tempering but ultimately only seems to inflame the growl and rebellious attitude of the song as it erupts in a cauldron of pop infectiousness and rock ‘n’ roll predation. Crunchy and warmly smouldering simultaneously, it teases the psyche like Josh Homme toying with Muse as it creates yet another instant pinnacle upon the album.

A more summery swagger comes with Succulent next, a surf rock/ garage pop colouring the sweltering climate of the bewitching instrumental. Its heated charm and warm elegance are emulated in next up In the Clouds, a bubbling shimmer of sound and harmonies which takes the listener by the emotions and leads them on a dance of addictive devilry. Six tracks in and five of them are easily single potential, an instrumental having little chance of being chosen let’s be honest.

From Riptide onwards, band and album seems to explore a different avenue with a lessening of the agitated sonic invention and an increasing of more immersive melodies and warm radiance. Tracks as this compelling ballad still have a fire in their belly but such the alchemy of virulence in earlier songs they just miss, and it is just, casting the same persuasive spark. Nevertheless the song has ears engrossed and satisfaction full whilst the static kiss and melodic coaxing of No Control and the post punk like rhythmic lure of The Nothing, ensure only the keenest attention is given. The second of the two especially has thoughts and enjoyment lit before Deep Love explores some dark pop beauty. It has a feel of UK artist Rooster Cole to it, with its sombre ambience encased in an excitable adventure of sound. The track is superb, a match for anything before and without doubt also a song on its own sure to trigger greedy reactions.

The album closes with The Difference, itself a humidly aired release of emotional and musical drama, and a fine end to an increasingly impressing encounter. Diamond Youth has taken the qualities nurtured in previous releases to new thrilling and at times spellbinding heights. Whether you want an out and out romp to party with or something with a melodic embrace to sink into, Nothing Matters delivers one very enjoyable time.

Nothing Matters is available now via Topshelf Records @ http://www.topshelfrecords.com/products/545159-diamond-youth-nothing-matters or https://topshelfrecords.bandcamp.com/album/nothing-matters

https://www.facebook.com/dmndyouth   http://www.dmndyouth.com/

RingMaster 20/05/2015

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