The Eastern Swell – Hand Rolled Halo

Having been spellbound by their debut album, there was a definite intrigue as to how its successor would rise to sit alongside if not above its captivating predecessor. Fair to say that Hand Rolled Halo took little time to unveil its own compelling beauty and mesmeric dexterity to answer the question; the album with its matching craft and imagination sitting firmly alongside the first as one essential electric folk/melodic rock adventure.

The Eastern Swell is an electric folk outfit from Edinburgh which emerged in 2014 and inspired a flood of acclaim loaded attention with their debut album, One Day, A Flood two years later. Released as now its successor, through their home city’s great independent label Stereogram Recordings, the album was a tapestry of poetic storytelling and melodic suggestiveness. Hand Rolled Halo offers more of the same yet is as unique in character and enterprise as you could wish for. Recorded and mixed by Pete Harvey at Pumpkinfield Studios and mastered by Reuben Taylor, the album just smokes and simmers on the senses as it seduces ears and imagination from start to finish, Hand Rolled Halo sharing a tempering but welcoming intimacy to any hot lascivious celebration and comforting warmth to every thought haunted, loneliness accompanying cold stark night.

Featuring guest craft from previously mentioned cellist/keyboardist Harvey and trumpeter Al Hamilton alongside the quartet of vocalist Lainie Urquhart, guitarist Chris Reeve, bassist Neil Collman, and drummer Andy Glover, Hand Rolled Halo instantly caresses ears with the melodic touch and intimation of Miles From Home. Intrigue wraps every note, the emerging melody almost sinister in its lure and so enthralling especially as the song slowly but assuredly adds new teases to its invitation. Eventually the smouldering flame of trumpet lights the new warmth coating song and the senses, Urquhart’s siren tones swift seduction as too the darker attitude and tone of Collman’s bass. Still drama soaks every note and movement within the excellent track, even in its livelier swing and twists, allowing the imagination to conjure alone as well as with the personal reflection of a track where the word captivation does no justice to its enthralling hold.

The band’s version of traditional folk song Blackwaterside follows, The Eastern Swell giving it their own gentle but openly imaginative and again beguiling interpretation as heated rock hues merge with the song’s classical heart before The Game brings its adventurous exploits to ears. As with all tracks, the web of individual strands transcends beyond that electric folk tagging they come under; this outstanding instrumental embracing slight but certain dark wave and post punk essences to its suggestion heavy canter to provide a feast for the imagination and senses.

Next up Down Again By Blackwaterside echoes the concept of the dark sad tale shared by the second track, this time though re-imagining the romantic outcome the protagonist in Blackwaterside was expecting rather than the deceit. Again the band treats us to a melodic temptation in voice and sound which chases away the dark a feat its successor, Spindrift, matches but with a shadow draped passage into almost gothic lit introspection. The track is pure charm and again dark intrigue, the band’s music alone as manipulative as it is a platform for the listener to create their own theatre; a richness every song offers up.

From one favourite moment to another as Zeitgeist bounds in with its boisterous waltz. For the main, Hand Rolled Halo has the body gently swaying but here it is urged into full animation as gypsy/jazz and swing irreverence infest the instinctively lively folk heart of the song. Throughout the album the dark strings of the cello transfix and the hot flumes of trumpet incite and here simply throw off any restraints to romp with the feverish appetites escaping the rest of the band.

Through firstly the increasingly infectious and flirtatious serenade of The Scene and lastly the instrumental hinting and pastoral refinement of Dreaming Of St. Jude, the quite magnificent Hand Rolled Halo concludes its temptation and seduction. We called its predecessor spellbinding and no other word truly fits The Eastern Swell’s new adventure either though instantly persuasive and only blossoming in every aspect with every listen, new layers of imagination perpetually unveiled, Hand Rolled Halo borders on alchemy.

Hand Rolled Halo is available now via Stereogram Recordings @ https://stereogramrecordings.bandcamp.com/album/hand-rolled-halo

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Pete RingMaster 07/12/2018

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

12 Stone Toddler – Idiolalia

Whilst it is hard to believe wishes generally do come true we have to question that when a long time hope has just been realised with the release of a new album from one of the UK’s most unique and irresistible bands, 12 Stone Toddler.

The band created two of the last decade’s most essential albums for us in the 2007 released Does It Scare You? and its successor two years later, Scheming. They also uncaged a host of tracks which defined the inherent brilliance and unpredictability of their songwriting and sound including The Rabbit, a song which first had us deviously hooked on the band and has never escaped our personal playlist ever since. Though thickly wrapped in acclaim, the band never quite had the rich attention and recognition they deserved outside of their more local surroundings and subsequently seemed to step back into the shadows as its members explored other projects. It is a band though which we know has been the inspiration to a great many artists, all who will be rejoicing with us and fans at their return and a new album in Idiolalia which is 12 Stone Toddler craft and goodness at its most inimitable and mischievous.

With a new line-up seeing guitarist Helen Durden and drummer Robin O’Keefe alongside founder members and songwriters in keyboardist Ben Jones and bassist/vocalist Chris Otero, the Brighton hailing band has linked up with Freshly Squeezed Music for the release of Idiolalia. Immediately as its opener teases ears there is affirmation of what we already knew, the 12 Stone Toddler sound is impossible to pin down or make assumptions about. Musically the band embrace and indulge in strong flirtations with everything from and within rock, pop, and indie to swing, jazz, and more vaudevillian hued exploits; every emerging track individual in character and sound but united in the quartet’s one of a kind touch and imagination.

My Machine starts things up and once its mechanical workings are in order springs a swagger led stroll which needed mere seconds to get under the skin. With a steam punk like breath, the track continues to swing and sway on a manipulative rhythmic pulse, carnival-esque melodies escaping keys to spice guitar bred hooks as the familiar and potent tones of Otero provide a ringmaster like touch. It is an irresistible and irrepressible start to the album instantly setting down a rich marker in the second chapter of 12 Stone Toddler.

The following Give Me the Creeps is just as rousing and magnetic, building its own inescapable lure over a handful of seconds before casting an individual appraisal of life with melodic charm and fascination stirring enterprise. As with their music, the band has always conjured imagery and sparked the imagination with their lyrical prowess and as shown by the first two tracks alone they have lost none of that dexterity.

The animated surf swing of the outstanding Piranha just captivated and mastered inhibitions in hips and feet next while Mirrorball latches fifties seeded breeding to jazz nurtured devilment in its swingbeat flavoured gait for matching success. Add the insatiable rock ‘n’ roll of Just Enough Rope and the almost somnambulistic canter of Carried Away, a track which just blossoms by the listen with its melodic radiance creating something akin to Skylarking era XTC, and you have the kaleidoscopic nature and sound of 12 Stone Toddler in a beguiling nutshell and their ingenuity. The third of that foursome of treats is a wonderfully nagging proposal, its groove niggling away as keys squirt their melodic spicery across the fevered body infesting jive invading the passions.

Across the eager eventful waltz of Heavy Sleeper and the smouldering and increasingly heated melodic sunspot of Nice Surprise, ears are only pleasured by instinctive temptation. Both though still find themselves eclipsed by the following pair of Ride a Donkey and Runaway Train. Neither track was included in the promo sent our way but found to be joining the rest within the album and together providing another major highlight. The first teases with its air scything lures alongside Otero’s enticing vocals before the track’s swarthy landscape embroils country sighs with seaside town quaintness before its simply superb successor takes the listener on a journey of sound and voice escalating the intimation of its title note by syllable.

The final trio of tracks leave no second of sound or pleasure void of bold adventure and imagination, Dig a Hole kicking off the home straight with its virulent manner and step before the senses romancing saunter of The Borrowing Song serenades with the theatre and unpredictability you can actually expect from a 12 Stone Toddler offering. The album closes with one half of the band’s current double-A sided single, Heaven Was Closed, the other part of that teaser opening up Idiolalia. It is a warm and sultry piece of pop rock which simply seduced by the play.

It has been a long wait for 12 Stone Toddler to stir back into life but an intermission in their creativity well worth enduring as they are back as inventive, compelling, and intoxicating as ever.

Idiolalia is out now via Freshly Squeezed across most major stores.

http://www.12stonetoddler.com/   https://www.facebook.com/12stonetoddler   https://twitter.com/12stonetoddler

Pete RingMaster 06/10/2018

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

TV Coma – Body Negativity

If you can imagine the results of Weezer and Swound! musically cavorting with Jan and Dean alongside Blur with a punk nurtured revelry you can get a whiff of the sound of TV Coma though not necessarily the individual mischief and enterprise rampaging through their debut EP, Body Negativity. It offers six tracks of unbridled fun and boisterous deeds amongst cleverly manipulative creative antics and is simply one of the most enjoyable exploits we have greedily indulged in this year.

Emerging from the songwriting revelry of brothers Leo and Max Troy, St Albans hailing TV Coma is a foursome by bassist Jamie Rider and drummer Robert Clark. They also seemingly embrace the punk DIY ethics of yesterday with their first release recorded in Max’s bedroom who then mixed the tracks himself before passing them over to Alan Douches (Ben Folds Five, Converge, Sufjan Stephens, Mastodon) to add his professional gleam to things. The result is an encounter which has an organic roar and an instinctive devilry and one which eagerly gets under the skin with unbridled fun in close quarter.

Have A Party kicks things off and rises up from an encroaching sonic lure with big scythes of guitar and matching rhythms. Everything is an intriguing tease leading to the first vocal rally cry before things settle again into a calm stroll and reflection. It in turn invites ears and listeners to its subsequent chant loaded bellow and a finale which the body, if not already bouncing, can no longer escape. Seriously contagious with a great rock muscularity and edge to it, the track is a glorious invitation into the waiting fiendish clutches of EP and band.

There is no escaping thrusting a Weezer likeness to the following Digital Girl, the LA band one of the major inspirations for the brothers. Even so, the track is ablaze with raw pop punk zeal as it is pop rock catchiness and swiftly inciting physical and vocal participation with its rousing holler before Trudy latches on to its infectious antics for its own particular weave of viral contagion. Something akin to Weezer meets We Are the Physics with Asylums in close attendance, the track just saunters along spilling grooves and hooks like confetti as rhythms cast their own manipulative incitement. Surf pop harmonies escalate the fun and listener’s involvement with a track which never leaves a moment void of creative rascality.

A sonic clamour announces next up Unemployable; a short but attention stalking roar of angst and noise around more of the hooks and enterprising taunts the band seem to instinctively breed. The track instantly and effortlessly leads into inhibition losing shenanigans, reactions even more escalated with Football Song, a Blur meets Television Personalities howl which could easily be adopted by the sport’s fans or haters.

Grow Up completes the line-up of plaintive ejaculations. From its initial vocal wail to the punk rock soaked blaze of sound, the track is a zealously waving finger at immaturity and irresponsible fun whilst creatively providing both.

With each track sparked by traits within modern life, Body Negativity is one spirit rousing adventure. It might not be the best thing you come across in 2018, though it very well could be too, but there will be few as memorable and even fewer as relentlessly enjoyable.

Body Negativity is out now and available @ https://tvcomamusic.bandcamp.com/releases

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Pete RingMaster 22/09/2018

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Death & The Penguin – Anomie

Four years ago contemplating and feasting on their introduction via the Accidents Happen EP, we readily declared it “one of the most exciting entrances in a long time”, further intimating that “Death and the Penguin is the next big and important thing within British rock music.”  Even with the release of the Eine Kleine Granatenmusik EP two years later that emergence turning into national attention has seemingly stalled. You can sense though a busy band they are not ones to rush things or just release something unless it is exactly at its prime. That is why their highly anticipated debut album, Anomie has brought intrigue and fears. Extended time can diminish the potency of even the finest things but certainly not in the case of the imagination and sound of the UK outfit.

Described as “off-kilter alternative rock from London”, Death & The Penguin has a sound which teases but never accepts real tagging. At times it is avant-garde in its nature, in others experimental alternative/indie rock akin to a blend of Young Knives and Baddies. In other moments it blazes with an At The Drive In like dissonance yet as proven across the twelve compelling tracks of Anomie it is only unique to the quartet of Tobias Smith (vocals/guitar), Andy Acred (bass/vocals/keys/electronics), Chris Olsen (guitar/vocals/keys), and Phil Gadsden (drums).

The fascinating radiance of Hospital Song opens things up the song a wistful embrace of melancholy and haunting beauty shared by keys and voice within a more inharmonious breeze. It is a startling start to the release, bold and brave but undoubtedly magnetic as it leads to the waiting hands of The Calving Shuffle. Simply sensational, the track has ears and appetite on board immediately with its rhythmic shuffle, guitars weaving their suggestive threads in turn as the darker pulse of the bass groans while its political scything gives extra edge to vocals and its tone, as too more post punk hued sonic scrapes and the gang arousals.

A major highlight of the album, it is quickly rivalled by the angular twists of Kill Saatchi where warm melodies and enticing harmonies wrap its more untamed dynamics. Addressing the insidiousness of adverts and subservience to them, the track firmly nudges the imagination as it coaxes the body with its mercurial presence before Space 1998 has both rocking. One of two tracks taken from that first EP, and it has to be said both thoroughly welcomed and deserving of their place with the new offerings, the song is a spatial serenade with flirtation in its melodic web and tenacious energy in its spiral of craft and enterprise. Having a vocal hook-line which is just irresistible only adds to its majesty.

Colour In Me is next, its initial shimmer punctured by the rhythmic dexterity of Gadsden is coaxing of the richest order and soon backed by just as magnetic tendrils of guitar and Smith’s always gripping vocals. For all its virulent contagiousness volatility simmers in its depths, rising up with restraint from time to time to bring a great contrasting grittiness to the track while Misha Lives presents its magnetism through a slow but catchy stroll amidst electronic teasing and atmospheric drama. The song is a collage of flavours but all merged without clear definition into its post rock/electro/pop croon.

The folk gentleness of Driftwood (God Loves a Bird of Prey) has thoughts slipping away on its evocatively elegant breath, an acoustic flight brought back to earth by the ever addictive roar of Strange Times. The second from Accidents Happen, the song just grips from its first rapacious moment. With post hardcore hinting discord erupting across its melodic cacophony and those previously mentioned Young Knives essences colouring its character, the track continues to be manna to our ears.

Just as potent though is the truly manipulative Abyssinia. Rhythmically and harmonically it lured subservience to its suggestive heart and prowess within moments, tightening its persuasive hold by the second and each creative turn as at its core a wonderfully dark nagging bassline drives and stirs all of the adventure.

The final trio of tracks ensure the lofty heights of the album never the dip, the first of the trio, Leatherface, setting a peak of its own as sonic threat and rhythmic predation colludes with instinctive catchiness and lyrical trespass of emotive scars. Being suggested as a future single, the track is glorious epitomising the individual alchemy of the band’s songwriting, imagination, and adventurous sound.

Was It Kindness? takes on the challenge of following such a gem with its own untethered imagination where keys and voice tempt and taunt throughout as an inner crescendo bubbles up and eases, eventually bursting into a relatively calm pasture of enterprise and not the rousing romp expected; a deceit which works a treat leaving the evocative ballad of Bones to enjoyably conclude one thrilling release.

In some ways such the excellence of Accidents Happen, the quality and adventure within Anomie is not a surprise but everything about the album is bigger, bolder, and so much more irresistibly unpredictable…Another of the year’s truly essential explorations for us.

Anomie is out now and available @ https://datpmusic.bandcamp.com/

 

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Pete RingMaster 15/08/2018

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

The Spitfires – Year Zero

Through their first two albums, it is fair to say that The Spitfires have established themselves as one of the UK’s most enticing emerging bands. Both variously acclaimed releases lured potent attention to the band’s weave of punk, dub, and ska spiced rock, a sound growing by the record to embrace plenty more flavouring and now a fresh captivation within new encounter Year Zero. Their third full-length is the Watford quartet at their most imaginative, bold, and accomplished yet; a release which fuses energetic revelry and melodic enticement with lyrical sharpness.

From our first encounter with debut album Response in 2015, we like most have been unable to avoid offering up comparisons to the early exploits of The Jam, that continuing with its successor A Thousand Times the following year. Again there are times Year Zero embraces that open inspiration as well as essences for us which remind of bands such as Purple Hearts and The Cortinas. They are hues though which add colour to The Spitfires’ increasing individuality which is in rich bloom across the latest inescapable lure of an album.

Remains The Same opens up the release, its initial keyboard tempting thick intimation leading to the track’s spirited heart and web of hooks and lures. Punk and ska entangle as the song bounces along with varying urgency, the lead vocal prowess of guitarist Billy Sullivan for company with his potent tones as ably and infectiously backed by those of bassist Sam Long. The fresh addition of trombone adds to the adventure, its flames adding to the rousing roar inciting ears and attention in swift order.

The outstanding start continues with Front Line, bass and guitars immediately casting their contagious enterprise over ears as the crisp beats of Matt Johnson land and the keys of George Moorhouse flirt. Long’s bass pulsates with an earthy lilt within the virulence as Sullivan’s vocals once again easily entice. As with its predecessor, there is familiarity and catchiness to the song which grabs body and appetite but coming with an individuality which in turn switches on the imagination.

Next up Over And Over Again just as quickly and skilfully has the body bouncing and listener participation enrolled, its indie meets a Madness-esque scent joyous incitement becoming bigger, bolder, and more involving by the second. Contagion comes in various designs and strengths, the track pretty much one unstoppable infestation of energy and creative invention as too in its own unique style is Something Worth Fighting For. Swinging along on with a reggae nurtured gait as currents of dub bred enticement shimmer, the track effortlessly got under the skin in moments only increasing its hold as vocal, melodic virulence, and the band’s united craft colluded.

Further into the album you go greater adventure rewards, the following By My Side an enthralling piano led ballad with the guest vocals of Emily Capell pure radiance within the song’s own creative glow while Move On is a compelling dub lined brew of magnetism akin to Ruts and The Redskins meets Dub Pistols.

There is no avoiding giving a strong hint of next up Sick Of Hanging Around by comparing it to Paul Weller and co but again though it is a track which foremost is The Spitfires alone; the spicy blasts of trombone and the suggestive caress of keys a big part in ensuring its individual character in sound and imagination is forefront. As strong as its presence and the enjoyment felt is, the track is quickly and firmly eclipsed by The New Age. A boisterous punk and indie pop bred stroll with a power pop lining and dub ska underbelly, the outstanding track is glorious a call to feet, energy, and to arms.

The final pair of the album’s title track and Dreamland completes the release; the first unveiling a Ruts DC like saunter enveloping the senses like a celestial sunspot and its successor with the same infectious seduction in many ways echoing its title, a luminous melodic trespass on the state of society today.

More impressive and addictive by the listen, Year Zero is the coming of age of The Spitfires’ song writing and sound but with still plenty more to offer and explore in its evolution ahead. The world might be spiralling out of control but it is inspiring some striking reactions as this.

Year Zero is out now through Hatch Records; available @ https://thespitfires.tmstor.es/and most online stores.

Upcoming Live Dates:

Fri 05 Oct – Southend, Chinnerys

Sat 06 Oct – Norwich, Arts Centre

Fri 02 Nov – Dover, Booking Hall

Sat 03 Nov – Brighton, Patterns

Fri 09 Nov – Leamington Spa, Zephyr Lounge

Sat 10 Nov – London, Islington Assembly Hall

Thu 15 Nov – Birmingham, Hare & Hounds

Fri 16 Nov – Glasgow, Broadcast

Sat 17 Nov – Edinburgh, Mash House

Fri 23 Nov – Bristol, Fiddlers

Sat 24 Nov – Exeter, Cavern

Thu 29 Nov – Newcastle, Cluny

Fri 30 Nov – Carlisle, Old Fire Station

Fri 07 Dec – Leeds, Hi Fi Club

Sat 08 Dec – Northampton, Roadmender

http://www.thespitfires.org/   https://www.facebook.com/TheSpitfiresUk/   https://twitter.com/thespitfiresuk

Pete RingMaster 02/08/2018

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Boomin – Now That’s What I Call…Boomin

Tagged as “Simply the greatest live party band on the planet!” UK pop rockers Boomin prove why they can be considered so with new album Now That’s What I Call…Boomin. The band’s renowned fun and mischief surges through its title alone but equally it is a name which sums up the release as a whole.  Containing sixteen tracks pulling from 35 artists, it is the ultimate collection of covers squeezed and moulded into medleys, mash ups and simply straight renditions all recreated and twisted in the unique Boomin way. With many songs we instinctively did not like in their original form there was no real expectation of being enthused about the release but in the hands of the little tinkers we simply felt nothing less than rich enjoyment at their and the album’s antics.

Consisting of guitarist/ vocalist Adam Langmead, bassist/vocalist Rory O’Grady, and drummer/vocalist Edd Langmead, Wigan hailing Boomin emerged in 2006. Since then the band has won numerous band competitions, shared stages with the likes of The Script, Scouting For Girls, McFly, Ultrabeat, Basshunter, and Ndubs among many more, and seen their debut album, Original Junkie reach reached No 22 in the iTunes Rock Chart and No.121 in the Album Charts. It was a potent introduction to the band’s pop infused rock and the instinctive fun which now floods Now That’s What I Call…Boomin.

Opener Thuglife sees a medley of tracks from Beyoncé, Christine Aguilera, Dr Dre, and Coolio in the grasp of Boomin, the track setting the tone, character, and revelry of things to come. Each portion flows into the next, the trio rather than re-inventing songs fingering them with their own devilry to stamp their own imprint on them.

Because of that inherent dislike of certain songs, some tracks certainly got under the skin more than others but all left a smile on the face especially tracks like Smells Like Billie Jean, a glorious mash up of the Nirvana and Michael Jackson classics. There is a vein of unpredictability to the song even with their extremely well-known sources which teases, as good as grins at the listener as song and band romps.

Other moments joining it on the front line of captivation include an impertinent take on Pulp’s Common PPL, a rousing stomp with Sum 42’s Fat Lip, and a bluesy hard rock lilted roar with Come Together from The Beatles. Alongside, the shameless fusion of Björk’s It’s Oh So Quiet and Sinatra’s New York, New York is pure incitement for vocal chords and energetic revelry from band and listener alike, but as suggested the whole album gives plenty for body, imagination, and energy to dive into, the irrepressible King Of The Swingers testament to that.

We will leave you to discover the rest of the album and your particular favourite moments to run riot with and you will more than once whether drunk or sober.

So Boomin the ultimate party band? Well Now That’s What I Call…Boomin offers little to deter such a statement, in fact nothing at all.

Now That’s What I Call…Boomin is available now @ https://boominmerch.bigcartel.com/

https://www.boominband.co.uk/   https://www.facebook.com/boominband/

Pete RingMaster 27/07/2018

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Nine Dart Finish – The Misadventures of…

Nine Dart Finish is a British outfit drawing on the wide influences of the likes of Weezer, Supergrass, Queen, and Ian Dury for their pop fuelled rock ‘n’ roll; The Misadventures of… is their debut album which unapologetically has the body bouncing as fun floods every pour of its magnetic enterprise. The trio from Birmingham has already lured potent attention from fans and media alike with a handful of singles especially potent; appetites for their boisterous sound which their first album can only multiply.

Consisting of former Coffeeshop member in lead vocalist/bassist Daz Yardley, guitarist/vocalist Christopher Mobbs, and drummer Andy Proudman, Nine Dart Finish first drew ears with debut EP Fall To Pieces late 2015. Since then their hook loaded pop ‘n’ rock has grown and become more creatively mischievous by the song. The Misadventures of… brings all the enticing dynamics and lusty grooves of the band’s sound as well as those devilish hooks the threesome seems to instinctively conjure together in one rousing enjoyable place.

Bringing the lively antics of recent singles, highlights of that first EP and new tracks together in one captivating union, The Misadventures of… roars into view with the outstanding The Cut of Your Jib. The track is wild rock ‘n’ roll, almost feral in its energy as riffs and rhythms harry ears just as eager vocals blaze. As the album continues it is easy to see why certain tracks were chosen and potent as singles and teases for the full-length but for personal tastes it is tracks like the raucous rock bred opener which trapped the keenest attention and passions. With a touch of Queens of the Stone Age to its contagious tempest, the track is a garage rock lined clamour getting the album off to a magnificent start.

The following Fall to Pieces is a far calmer proposition as a melodic jangle colludes with vocal harmonies before the track settles into its warm catchy swing. There is no preventing the quick shuffle of feet to its stroll, keys adding to its summery scent as vocals and melodies entangle before In the City uncages its own rock ‘n’ roll flame. Within its slightly rawer attack, hooks tease and tempt as riffs nag, Proudman’s beats striking with relish as they drive the infectious escapade.

Recent single Kicking & Screaming is next, a song which blossomed by the listen as its organic rumble aligns to melodic enticement. The former gives the otherwise gentle seduction a volatility which imposes without truly erupting, a combination gripping ears within a grunge pop like proposal while Charlie Bonkers offers up a melody woven slice of Brit Pop nurtured enterprise. It is fair to say that the song did not impact as potently as those around it on our tastes yet as honest to admit it had the hips swinging and vocal chords playing without any trouble.

You Don’t Bother Me similarly did not quite grab as strongly as many of its companions with its sixties hued pop but again involvement in its enticement was unavoidable as with the blues kissed rock of Falling for You. Both tracks epitomises the band’s knack at weaving varied and seriously catchy adventures though each is swiftly overshadowed by the album’s finest moment consisting of its final three songs.

From its initial melodic caresses Fabio’s Overture blossoms into a truly mesmeric slice of pop rock, emotive strands in voice and sound entangling another lure of virulent catchiness as inescapable whether the song is ablaze or simply smouldering. Its thick enticement leads into the rousing devilry of You’re so Cool. As again pop floods its bold rock ‘n’ roll, the track nags and taunts attention with relish. With something of UK duo The Sea about it, the track is superb rivalling the opener for best song honours though they are equally matched by the tenacious stomp of album closer London. There is a certain mod like hue to the song which only adds to its outstanding character and roar.

Though as mentioned there are some tracks which undoubtedly eclipsed others for us, The Misadventures of… is one thoroughly enjoyable involvement from start to finish. Nine Dart Finish have a sound with open growth in every new song so expect many more lustily fun times ahead as well as right now with their new offering.

The Misadventures of… is out now through iTunes and other stores.

http://ninedartfinish.co.uk/   https://www.facebook.com/NDFmusic/   https://twitter.com/ndfmusic

Pete RingMaster 17/07/2018

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright