Sara Lowes – The Joy Of Waiting

Photo Credit Emily Dennison

Photo Credit Emily Dennison

There is no other way of saying it, the voice of Sara Lowes is sheer mesmerism, an inescapable siren drawing the listener into adventures which musically transfixes ears and imagination just as potently. Her new album The Joy Of Waiting, is complete evidence of the fact, basking in these bewitching elements and in turn immersing the listener in charming and imaginatively charmed embraces. The successor to her acclaimed debut Back To Creation of 2011, The Joy Of Waiting is a quite simply a soul mate for anyone with a taste of melodic and harmonic alchemy.

Based in Manchester and North East bred, Lowes is the keyboardist in The Earlies and has working with the likes of Daniel Johnston, King Creosote, Jens Lakeman, Jim Noir, Jesca Hoop, and Dawn Landes on her CV. Her music draws on a diverse maze of flavours and styles, classically bred arrangements entwining and invigorating essences from progressive rock to pop, jazz to seventies psychedelia, and more besides. First album Back To Creation, as mentioned drew potent praise and support which The Joy Of Waiting can only emulate and reap greater rewards upon itself. Inspired by J.B Priestley, with a track using his name as a title, and looking at “observations on our perplexing relationships with time”, the lady’s new full-length is a spell of beauty and evocative reflections, and quite breath-taking.

The album’s title track starts things off and immediately is flirting with gypsy folk like strings which swirl provocatively around ears and emotions, their colourful expression joined by just as picturesque keys and melodies. There is a baroque like scent to the piece of music too, an older drama which wraps around the more fiery and sultry climate which emerges as the song continues revealing its heated landscape. Eventually the song drifts away and within a swift taking of a breath, the album swings straight back as Most Things and a riveting pop contagion which is soon dancing with the compelling tones of Lowes its puppeteer. The track is a ridiculously infectious kiss, a quite magnificent encounter courting sixties beat pop vivacity as fizzy tendrils of carnival-esque keys sport a creativity which reminds of The Stranglers Dave Greenfield.

Lowes has a voice which is hard to compare to another, though on the first songs and a few others tracks, she bears a resemblance to Brighton singer songwriter Cate Ferris, the following new saralowes2single I Find You another blissful example. The song is a smoulder of thickly simmering melodies and enchanting harmonies over a great distortion kissed rhythmic tempting. Keys again bring psyche spinning enterprise to spice up the song’s enthralling canvas, whilst the ethereal radiance of voice and surrounding sweltering sounds merge like a mix of Solar Halos and The Capsules. It is pure creative majesty and has ears and appetite enslaved by the time it makes way for the courtly hug of JB Priestley. Lowes straight away has ears and pleasure cupped as orchestral spices back her sunny presence, the opening gentle lure a passage into a feistier but no less radiant stroll of warm jazz seeded pop catchiness. As across all songs, there is a tapestry of different flavours and styles colluding in their support of the vocals, each song as here, as unpredictable as it is immediately accessible and magnetic.

The intimate balladry of Bright Day smooches with the senses next, its refined texture and voice a warm glaze over ears, even if not quite igniting them as its predecessors do. That success, is sublimely achieved by Chapman Of Rimes, a seventies bloomed pop rock flight with celestial harmonies and bold hooks under a blaze of brass seduction, and even more so right after by the excellent With A Mirror. The opening lure of bass and keys with rolling rhythms is enough to seduce unbridled attention for the new song, helped all the more by the vocal hints which whisper within the sultry enticement and rays of brass bred sunshine which light up ears. Like being lost in your lover’s arms, the song strokes and infuses body and thoughts with a romancing croon of voice and sound. That alone would be enough to wax lyrical about the song but with unpredictable and superbly infused twists of ideation amidst wrong-footing turns, the song is a master-class in songwriting and aural theatre.

Given the hard task to follow such a triumph is Little Fishy, and it makes easy work of keeping enjoyment clasped. From a celestial yet intimate soundscape cast by wistful keys and harmonies, the song emerges as something akin to progressive rock and lounge/electro pop, weaving its own virulent aural carnival.

The quiet reflection of For The Seasons calms things down next, the captivation a haunting ballad with a 10CC breeze to its air, before Cutting Room Floor slips into ears and simply radiates elegance and beauty whilst adding further fascinating diversity and invention to The Joy Of Waiting. The song is a gorgeous soar of melodic enterprise setting up the listener enthusiastically for the final pair of songs which are seemingly placed in different order on the physical and digital copy of the album.

The Clock Plays It’s Game provides a melancholic temptation which blossoms with the dark and light suggestiveness of strings against the just as potent call of Lowes’ voice and classically dramatic keys. Maybe not as immediately impacting as other songs, it is a lingering kiss increasing its stature with every listen, whilst Horizons is a track which just lifts emotions and spirit with sublime craft and open relish. Its swirl of hooks and melodies is a gala of folk pop smiles and sixties pop merry making and quite sensational. Whether the last song on the album or not, we suggest you make it that anyway as you leave its company with a song in the heart and melodic manna in the ears, a remedy sure to cure all ills and chase away dark shadows, much like The Joy Of Waiting as a whole really.

The Joy Of Waiting is available now via Railings Records, digitally @ https://itunes.apple.com/gb/album/the-joy-of-waiting/id963782296 and physically @ http://www.saralowes.co.uk/

https://www.facebook.com/SaraLowesMusic

RingMaster 25/02/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard on Reputation Radio @ http://www.thereputationlabel.today

 

LongFallBoots – Wait For The Echo

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Though not exactly psychotic or schizophrenic, Wait For The Echo, the debut album from UK scuzzers LongFallBoots, definitely has a certain deranged edge and tenacity to its sound and character which makes it one of the most fascinating and enjoyable releases to hit 2015 so far. Brewing up a sound from a maelstrom of noise and punk to stoner and psych rock, and that barely covers it all, the Warwickshire band create a fuzzy sonic smog which almost visually ripples with ideas and imagination within its caustic surface. That again is only half the picture as rhythmically, the album is one of the heaviest predatory treats you are likely to come up against in rock music this year. It all makes for an intriguing and thoroughly exciting proposition from a band which manages to actually offer something new.

LongFallBoots is the creation of friends Alex Caithness (KOSS, Cincinnati Bow Tie) and Ben Holdstock (Paralus, Cincinnati Bow Tie), and came about by accident when the rest of the line-up in the pair’s other band failed to turn up for a rehearsal. That moment in time was filled by the duo writing first EP It Was Duke and the birth of LongFallBoots. Since its release in August 2012, the band has released a further six EPs, the first five in a 12 month period whilst the last, Good At Television was written after the new album and recorded before its completion to ‘keep busy’ as the band managed the logistics of scheduling in and recording the full-length with the numerous guests which feature on Wait For The Echo. The album was written by and primarily recorded by Caithness and Ben Holdstock, though with extended contribution from live bassist Chris Childs, who has since left the band, and vocalist Amy Smith, who has subsequently replaced Childs on bass and additional vocals, and recorded the Good At Television EP with the band. Further guests on the album include Andi Chamberlain (Eagles Born Vultures), Claudio Aníbal (Ash Is A Robot), and Marc Shinner (Those Loathsome Fishmen/Devi Ever) amongst many. LongFallBoots like to work fast when it comes to writing and creating songs, a frenetic approach to their recordings which again applies to the album yet does not in any way corrupt the quality and energy of the release, in fact it probably goes some way to make it as intensively dynamic and gripping as it is.

That strength is immediately on show as opener Transmission stirs up ears and senses; the opening scuzz of guitar and slapping rhythms a raw and feisty coaxing catching the imagination with ease, especially as it broadens with rich melodies and mellow vocals. It is a potent mix which from an early strong position becomes a much more instinctive persuasion as the band’s vocals a2819673812_2fiercely roar and bellow from behind the more relaxed delivery of guest Jonathan Martin. The track continues to grip tighter as beats get more agitated in tandem with the general manner of the song, the returning sway of Martin’s gentle caresses seeming to gain extra impetus from this for the magnetic ‘chorus’.

The 2nd Technic offers an instant increased snarl with its riffs and air, employing a post punk chilling around incendiary bursts of noise rock intensity. That alone is a compelling mix but with little flirtations of melodies and harmonic vocal mumbling, the song becomes an irresistible creative raging whose masterful heights are matched by the following False Flag immediately after. It rolls in on a contagious rhythmic enticing, a nibbling guitar adding to the exciting lure. Vocal squalls and tempestuous urgency break through soon after, not quite brawling but certainly bringing greater intimidation and thrilling rapacity to the encounter. Already thoughts of Melvins come to the fore but only as a scent of the raucous creativity being expelled by LongFallBoots.

Thoughts are thrown a curve ball in some ways by Thousand Hands, its fuzz pop breeding a warm and intriguing embrace, especially with the angelic tones of Amy Smith adding to the rosy colour of the song. Of course it is again only part of the picture as the surface of the sounds are woven with bracing fuzziness whilst throughout there is a veining of acidic heavy rock enterprise. The song is pure magnetism but does not quite light the appetite as those just before it, or the next up Loaded Question. Punk infused, the track is a thumping roar in ears with a warped mentality and design to its addictive presence and textures. There is a slight touch of The Zico Chain to it and at times Torche, and for just over a minute it provides another enslaving highlight of the album.

Both the groove bound Displacer with its rhythmic dance and the doomy prowl of Noctavia bring further diversity to the album and new adventure to ears, each in their individual persuasions worming under the skin and deep into the psyche before the riveting and infectious devilment of The Cruel Institution steals their thunder with its sonic winery and sinuous invention. It does not take long to become a firm favourite within Wait For The Echo, though the sultry twang and spicy croon of A Peculiar Hell gives food for thought before the bedlamic By Design hits with its Converge-esque vocal attitude and continually shifting landscape. At times it is a brawl on the senses and in other moments a sweet seduction; a post-hardcore like fury which as all songs is ultimately hard to pin down.

The Sham basks in a heavy rock predation as a Mastodon intensity mixes with a Kyuss like melodic blazing driven again by caustically delivered vocals. It is a slow burner compared to other tracks but has ears and appetite enthralled whilst Simultaneous Man simply has each turning somersaults of pleasure with its voracious and uncompromising punk raging equipped with a deliciously throaty bassline and sinister sonic endeavour.

A final piece of expectations defeating excellence comes with the closing An Apology, the band again slipping into mellower waters with charming melodies and the siren-esque voice of Smith; anticipation is already expecting special things ahead with her voice now a regular feature of the band. The final incitement cannot leave without a trespass of the senses though, guitars and hoarse roars adding to the increasing intensity and inflamed climate of the song as it brings the album to an impressive close.

   Wait For An Echo incites and delights in equal measure. It is an album for all fans of heavy and noise bred rock music to explore a healthy new adventure with, and whilst LongFallBoots is still a secret to a great many right now, the new release could change that privacy as it ignites more and more ears and emotions. And if it falls short, let’s be honest there will probably be another tasty EP or two right around the corner reinforcing its fine temptation and fighting the cause.

Wait For The Echo is available digitally and on CD now via http://longfallboots.bandcamp.com

https://www.facebook.com/LongFallBoots

RingMaster 24/02/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard on Reputation Radio @ http://www.thereputationlabel.today

The Permanent Smilers – One Real Big Identity Crisis

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One Real Big Identity Crisis, the new album from UK band The Permanent Smilers, is a release with no apparent direction or framework to its intent and enterprise; a release which basically lives up to its title but boy is it a slab of irresistible fun. Through thirteen songs, band and album take on a torrent of different styles and nostalgic flavours which really should not work alongside each other as coherently as they do, and all come with a humour and mischief which adds to rather than overrides the adventure of the individual characters. It is slightly deranged but not chaotic and thoroughly unpredictable yet not messy considering the vast sounds employed from song to song. Most of all though it is simply a compelling proposition which comes from left-field, keeps its heart there, and leaves the most enjoyable experience in its wake.

There is little we can tell you about the band itself, though The Permanent Smilers is fronted by Richard Lemongrower who was the songwriter behind Norwich band The Lemongrowers, a band releasing two albums on Noisebox at some point in time. Produced with Jonny Cole and mixed by David Pye, One Real Big Identity Crisis takes little time in lighting ears and imagination, though it opens with maybe its weakest song. That is a little misleading as it takes a song to get a handle, or try to, on the release anyway but certainly Identity Crisis did not really grip attention as much as elsewhere and left thoughts with a slight wondering of what have we got ourselves into. Strongly swung rhythms and similarly intensive riffs clasp ears within the first breath of the song, their bait a jabbing lure against the unpolished yet engaging tones of Richard. It is an easily flowing and energetic slice of rock ‘n’ roll with the bass of Jonny Cole pungent bait at the centre of the stomp. Truthfully there is little wrong with the song but it lacks a spark in its presence which evades the reaction it probably deserves and is easy to imagine being found with others.

The good if unsure start is soon a thing of the past as Uh-Oh takes over with its festive folk swagger and emerging carnival like devilment. Sporting a splash of Tankus The Henge to its relaxed but vibrant stroll, the song is a constant swing of melodic hips as it moves towards an unexpected and mouth-watering slip into a Dukes of Stratosphear like ethereal psychedelic charm and climate, returning back into festive mood soon after as if it had just emerged from a dip in the sea. The song is fascinating and bewitching, and just the first of numerous adventures into different landscapes, as shown next by the punk pop devilry of You Know Where To Go. Bred from seventies power pop and carrying a mix of The Flys and The Lurkers to its hookery, the song just hits the sweet spot with its insatiable energy and mischief, before making way for the more relaxed melodic embrace of Elastic. The keys and guitars of Richard weave another enthralling web of sound here, this time with a sniff of sixties pop to it which is punctuated by the crisp beats of drummer Pete Fraser and dark bass lures of Cole. By its close, the song somehow becomes a thumping anthem without losing any of its melodic and gentle elegance, a potent feat for any song to offer.

Both Just No Good and It Doesn’t Work Anymore keep album and ears bouncing with energy and pleasure, the first using a garage rock spicing again teased by a sixties almost Doors like toxicity, whilst the second again spawning from the same kind of seeding brings a rawer punk grouchiness with its presence. Each has feet and emotions joining their rigorous coaxing before Ghosts allows a breather for the body if not the imagination with its Simon and Garfunkel meets Burt Bacharach like embrace. The brass persuasion of Dave Land seductively flames over similarly captivating keys and vocal caresses through the song but as always there is a scent of devilment to the song with thoughts wondering at times if they should be enjoying this as much as they are. There is no escaping its thick charm though.

The next pair of songs brings a rich sense of XTC to their enterprise and persuasion, Rebel broadening that over time with a seventies kissed soar of progressive fuelled psyche rock whilst its successor, Voodoo has the stamp of Andy Partridge to its flirtatious pop and virulent enterprise. The pair leaves nostalgia glazed lips licked and, through the latter especially, ears basking in psyche pop of the most delicious kind complete with jazzy brass and funk spirited unpredictability.

You Know When To Go dives straight back into punk infused rock ‘n’ roll for its brief but sparkling instrumental before Unforseen manages to conjure an encounter which recalls the quirky indie pop of The Monochrome Set and the plainer but no less tasty essence of Tom Robinson. The song alternatively stomps and swirls around ears, every passing hook and melody it conjures an intriguing and quaint yet voracious tease before it moves off into the distance allowing the outstanding See Through You to make its lingering mark. Acoustically shaped with an avalanche of panzer gun delivered rhythms, the song initially is a smouldering and majestic sway of sound. It subsequently explodes though into a tempest of energy and revelry which only lifts a great song to a heady plateau. Imagine the volatile energy of De Staat at their most devilish with the epidemic hunger of eighties punk/power pop and you get a sense of the glorious treat.

One Real Big Identity Crisis closes with the acoustic lullaby of Sleepyhead, the album ending as it started with a track which does not catch the ardour triggered elsewhere but certainly graces ears with tantalising propositions. This album is one unexpected and seriously enjoyable adventure; not breaking down boundaries or venturing into the unknown but never providing a moment when you are not surprised or wrapped up in its refreshing simplicity woven by skill and invention. There is only time left to lick lips all over again as we close off and dive straight back into The Permanent Smilers’ irresistible arms, something we suggest you do too upon release.

One Real Big Identity Crisis is released in April via IRL Records with new single Identity Crisis out in March.

http://www.thepermanentsmilers.com/   https://www.facebook.com/pages/The-Permanent-Smilers/1539697962929725

RingMaster 23/02/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard from http://www.thereputationlabel.today

Symmetry – The Cure

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Consisting of two anthems which simply lift ears and emotions in big, bold barrages of pop contagion, the new single from US progressive pop and rock band Symmetry is one of those rousing encounters which continually makes an invigorating impact. The Cure is a thumping bellow of melodic enterprise and impassioned energy which more than confirms why such the high praise wrapped around the band after the release of their debut album last year.

The Los Angeles band formed in early 2013, with the line-up of Michael Campbell (vocals), Jared Hara (guitar), Will Weiner (bass) and Max D’Anda (drums) described by the band itself as “the dream team.” Creatively everything clicked with their union it is fair to say and it was not long before the band was writing and working on their first album. Recorded with producer James Paul Wisner (Dashboard Confessional, Paramore, Underoath), Frozen in Time swiftly drew acclaim and potent attention at home and in the UK. Its success was followed by their song When Will It End winning Best Rock Song at the Hollywood Music and Media Awards. 2014 also saw the band touring the U.K. with Room 94 on the Live Nation No Strings Attached tour and towards its end working on a new release with producer James Paul Wisner.

The Cure kicks off 2015 in fine style for the band, and takes little time, after a rich coaxing of guitar swiftly joined by the potent tones of Campbell, to energise feet and appetite with jabbing 10805718_302954463234216_8072463695621893542_nbeats, stirring riffs, and lofty vocal harmonies. There is an instant familiarity to the song but nothing particularly definable as the track continues to ebb and flow in energy whilst increasingly seducing ears and imagination with its melodic flames and ripe rhythmic tempting.

As suggested the song is a thick anthem of a proposition but slightly reserved in that aspect in relation to the accompanying Hey. Vocals straight away are roaring with alluring harmonies as riffs niggle and electronic colours flirt with the listener. The song is not as rampant as its predecessor, having more of a rein on its energies yet manages to soar higher and with more climactic intensity to provide a different but just as dramatic and thrilling proposition.

Both songs show the accomplished skills and adventurous imagination of the band with the potential of even greater triumphs ahead of them an open suggestiveness. As much as the band name does not leap out, Symmetry’s sound certainly does and will surely find increasingly greedy attention ahead through The Cure and whatever follows.

The Cure is released on February 23rd via iTunes.

Symmetry are back touring the U.K., Ireland and Poland as support for Room 94 on their Dirty Dancing Tour, with dates…

28 Feb : 02 Academy, Oxford / 1 Mar : Thekla, Bristol

3 Mar : Old Fire Station, Bournemouth / 4 Mar : Rescue Rooms, Nottingham

5 Mar : ABC2, Glasgow / 6 Mar : 02 Academy, Newcastle

7 Mar : 02 Academy, Sheffield / 9 Mar : 02 Academy, Liverpool

10 Mar : Academy 3, Manchester / 12 Mar : 02 Academy, Birmingham

13 Mar : 02 Academy, Islington / 14 Mar : Academy 2, Dublin

15 Mar : Oh Yeah Centre, Belfast

http://symmetryband.com/

RingMaster 22/02/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard from http://www.thereputationlabel.today

The Sherlocks – Escapade

The Sherlocks

Bursting with bulging rhythms and just as rigorously captivating sonic invention, new single Escapade reveals exactly what Sheffield has been shouting about for quite a while; that The Sherlocks is one rather exciting band.

The UK rockers is bred from family and friendship, emerging in 2010 after brothers Josh and Andy Davidson, guitar and bass respectively, moved in next to the grandparents of vocalist/guitarist Kiaran Crook and his drummer brother Brandon. The quartet were soon bonding over football and music, uniting over favourite artists such as Arctic Monkeys, The Beatles, Libertines, Oasis, and The Jam. This led to jamming sessions where they discovered, explored, and honed their sound, and subsequently gave birth to The Sherlocks. Since then the quartet has played over 500 gigs, sharing stages with the likes of The Enemy, Simple Minds, Scouting For Girls, Reverend and The Makers, The Buzzcocks, Twisted Wheel, Tom Hingley, and Steve Cradock thesherlocksescapadeartworkalong the way, and in 2013 released debut EP First Bite Of The Apple.

The well-received EP, as their following top 100 single Live For The Moment, set down a marker in sound and adventure which Escapade now runs with in fine anthemic style. From the first spicy breath of guitar, the song has ears and emotions leaping to attention, especially once potently jabbing beats and a flush of riffs add to the initial coaxing. The lure of the song then just gets stronger and more virulent as a gripping hook emerges from the start and swiftly binds imagination and emotions in its wine of a temptation. The strong vocals also add appealing expression and energy to the song, never imposing but just helping increase the catchiness of the track.

A great throaty bassline flirts across the song too, but it is the overall contagion of the encounter and its inventive dance which most enthrals and has feet and voice seriously involved in the creative commotion. Ground-breaking the song is not but certainly it is invigorating revelry of the irresistible kind and a reason alone to keep The Sherlocks under a tight spotlight.

Escapade is available now @ https://itunes.apple.com/gb/album/escapade-single/id952378243

The Sherlocks are touring the UK with remaining dates at…

20/02/15 Soundcontrol MANCHESTER

27/02/15 The Cookie LEICESTER

28/02/15 Talk Tea Rooms BIRMINGHAM

05/03/15 The Picture House HUDDERSFIELD

07/03/15 The Joiners SOUTHAMPTON

21/03/15 The Lemon Factory SWANSEA

10/04/15 Buskers DUNDEE

11/04/15 Stereo GLASGOW

18/04/15 Plug SHEFFIELD

25/04/15 Corner Flag SUNDERLAND

01/05/15 The Maze NOTTINGHAM

02/05/15 Club Academy MANCHESTER

16/05/15 Studio 2 LIVERPOOL

20/06/15 The Leadmill SHEFFIELD

http://thesherlocksmusic.co.uk/

RingMaster 17/02/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

 

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard from http://www.thereputationlabel.today

The New Southern Electrikk – Brown Eyes

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Listening to the trio of songs making up The New Southern Electrikk debut single, is like being immersed in a kaleidoscope of sound, each song offering a different light and colourful adventure to another. The release is an unpredictable proposition and a bewitching one, revealing why a vibrant buzz around the UK band from fans and media alike but equally suggesting we have barely scratched the surface of their depths and creative imagination. It would be wrong to say the single blew our fuses but once romanced and seduced by Brown Eyes and company, it is impossible not to have a healthy intrigue and appetite towards The New Southern Electrikk sound.

With the likes of Goldblade’s John Robb, the single released on his Louder Than War Records, The Lemonhead’s Evan Dando, and Suede’s Bernard Butler amongst fans caught by the band’s melodic spell, The New Southern Electrikk have ears and imagination engaged almost from the first melody stroking ears from within Brown Eyes. It is single guitar bred flirtation with just a percussive whisper alongside but a coaxing soon broadening into a sixties melodic melodrama of emotion and smouldering elegance. The song was inspired by a dark moment in the life of keyboardist Rikki Turner fourteen years ago when a woman he loved left his life as The Shirelles’ Baby It’s You was playing in the background. The former Paris Angel musician wrote the song’sPicture 110 lyric and melody soon after and there is no escaping a sixties girl group like charm in the music of the track or the soulful angst of that moment in time in the captivating delivery of vocalist Monica Ward. The melancholic basslines of Steven Tajti only add to the shadows, their melancholy courting the lean but potent melodic colours cast by guitarist Zack Davies. Evocative within a sultry climate, the gentle but imposing croon of the song with its Shangri-las like finale gets right under the skin, not necessarily setting a fire but working away over time as hooks and vocal moments persistently return in thought and memory.

The following landscape of The Theme to the New Southern Electrikk immediately ventures into new realms, keys weaving a psychedelic ambience around Krautrock scenery. It is only part of the soundscape though as a post punk seeded bassline swings its morose invention around crisp and uncluttered rhythms from drummer Jim Correy. Similarly a Morricone-esque tang simmers within the melodic wine of the again slightly sixties pop coloured instrumental too, it all aligning for a tantalising and compelling flight for ears and imagination to bask in and explore time and time again.

Completed by a mesmeric version of The Gun Club’s Mother of Earth, The New Southern Electrikk’s first single is rich magnetism. There is something for everyone within its spicy creativity and the minimalistic textures which offer new shapes and persuasions with each song on offer. Expect to hear a lot more of this fascinating band in future.

Brown Eyes is available now via Louder Than War Records @ https://itunes.apple.com/gb/album/brown-eyes-single/id960367750

https://www.facebook.com/pages/The-New-Southern-Electrikk/1566182530283214

RingMaster 16/02/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard from http://www.thereputationlabel.today

 

Milton Star – Salvation/Storyville

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Always partial to music which is as cinematic as it is sonically expressive, and especially keen on dark and sultry aural adventures which embrace emotive shadows as eagerly as they do melodic intrigue, the debut single from Scottish band Milton Star has come as a bit of a treat. Consisting of the songs Salvation and Storyville, the double A-sided encounter is a gothic romance for the ears and imagination. The two tracks cast evocative landscapes of smouldering emotion and heavy atmospheric colour uniting indie and dark country in one enjoyable and darkly feverish encounter.

Milton Star is the duo of Alan Wyllie and Graeme Currie, two songwriters/musicians whose history together goes back to the early days of post punk and across numerous projects, most notably the Thursdays who were signed to Fast Records. Getting back together in 2010 after both had been absent from the music scene for a few years, Wyllie and Currie now in a converted church in Fife, create and record their songs with a sound which have drawn the description, “think Velvet Underground meets vintage Glen Campbell via Rick Rubin collaborating on the next David Lynch movie or sound-tracking the latest HBO crime drama…” It is a hint in the right direction but as Salvation alone shows, there is plenty more within the band’s broad soundscapes and intimate canvases.

The track is a dark croon seemingly bred on a dark folk mix of Nick Cave and Mark Lanegan aligned to the visual drama of Helldorado and a whisper of the raw danger in a Tombstone Three. It Picture 3opens on an instantly gripping stroll of heavy beats which is swiftly joined by the sultry flames of guitar and great dark throated yet melancholically elegant vocals. There is an immediate theatre to the song, especially when voice and guitar add their provocative textures to the portentous heavy bassline and the crisp swings of the drums. The track is glorious and increasingly spicy as the two musicians weave in tangy grooves and emotive melodies which often come in a great ‘yawn’ of sound. With additional fifties rock ‘n’ roll stroking its gothic poetry, the song leaves thoughts lost in a soulful landscape of adventure and ears basking in syrupy sonic goodness.

Its companion Storyville similarly offers an intensive climate of shadows, this time the first breath coming around a grizzled bassline which instantly enslaves attention as the atmospheric lure of the track expands its coaxing. Slightly lighter than its predecessor but no less imposing with its bordering on caliginous emotions and aural colour, the song shimmers and smoulders with raw radiance and evocative expression, it all across that unrelenting bass spine. Not quite matching Salvation but certainly as enthralling and exciting, the song completes an impressive first excursion into the dark climactic majesty of Milton Star’s sound.

The single is sure to spark strong anticipation in a great many for more; future Milton Star adventures which if they are as dramatic and thrilling as this will be devoured greedily and noisily.

Salvation/Storyville is available from 12th January via Stereogram Recordings @ https://stereogramrecordings.bandcamp.com

http://www.miltonstarmusic.net/

RingMaster 12/01/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard from

http://www.thereputationlabel.today