Joykill Collective – Battle Cry

Joykill Collective - Pic (1)_RingMaster Review

Emerging from an artistic commune in Northampton and a “dissatisfaction with the prevalent right wing politics and media”, alternative rock band Joykill Collective release debut single Battle Cry, a roar which emotionally and physically lives up to its title. It is not a particularly aggressive incitement on the ear but is certainly a melodically evocative and atmospherically commanding proposition with the same kind of uncompromising intensity, and one potent introduction to the band.

Initially intended as a solo design for vocalist/guitarist Leif, talented friends of the musician skilled in various mediums were soon drawn to the project and its idea. The embracing of local musicians, writers, poets, and filmmakers, many of whom lived and worked in the same commune and shared an angry voice against the devastating political situation that so many find themselves in, were subsequently a vibrant part of the emerging and impassioned project . Now ahead of and taken from their first EP Liberty Taker, which is due for release in December, Battle Cry has been unveiled and fair to say is already whipping up and potently engaging ears and thoughts with its climatic presence and breath.

A lone melancholic strum of guitar engages ears first, though within seconds rhythms, melodies, and the soft mesmeric tones of Leif are also flowing warmly over the senses. It is coaxing which never dissipates but becomes infused with a volatile atmosphere as rhythms and chords grow in dexterity and intensity whilst creative sonic flames enhance the melodic lure of the guitars. Thickening with every passing second, vocals becoming more agitated and imposing too, the track is increasingly a rich blaze of emotion and creative angst which only grows in size and power, again over every fascinating moment. Bands like Doves and Biffy Clyro sort of come to mind during the song but really it is a proposition which whilst not strikingly unique refuses to be clearly referenced to anyone else as it captivates.

It is only one song so probably too early to shout about the big potential and future of the band, we will reserve that opinion until the release of Liberty Taker, but with the band and associates currently exploring roads less travelled in Kazakhstan, China, and Morocco, they might find themselves coming back to a bit of a fuss over their very enjoyable first single.

The self-released Battle Cry is out Now!

Pete RingMaster 02/09/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

For more exploration of the independent check out http://www.zykotika.com/

United Highs – Talk About Us

United Highs band pic_RingMaster Review

Talk About Us, the new single from indie rock band United Highs, is as smooth and flavoursome as Cornish ice-cream, and just as easy to grow a keen appetite for. The band itself is also Cornwall bred with a sound which is not seemingly as worried about sculpting its own distinctive character yet as it is in providing a great time for band and listener. It is an intent successfully fulfilled by Talk About Us, one of those songs which just linger to please and entice long after physically has leaving the building.

Unighted highs - Talk About Us - Single artwork_RingMaster Review     United Highs is the creation of Falmouth hailing brothers Luke and Kristian Good, the sons of one of Cornwall’s most respected guitarists, the late Rod Good. Once they began experimenting with musical ideas and it became obvious that the guitar was “in the DNA” of Luke and vocalist Kristian had the flare for words, the pair and band’s musical journey was in motion. Drummer Ben Nankervis was brought into the creative fold after he came to the rescue of one of the band’s show at London’s Half Moon which was under threat due to illness. Soon recruited full-time, he was soon recording the United High’s debut album Over the Influence with the band at the legendary Sawmills Studios in Cornwall. The current line-up was completed when bassist/backing vocalist Ian Henderson joined the band, his CV at that point already including session work with Bad Company, a tour with Twisted Sister, and work with the likes of Steve Marriott and Larry Wallis as well as a host of former bands including Panik, The Love Affair, and Turbo.

Also recorded at Sawmills Studios, Talk About Us is the band’s new temptation and features the guest vocals of Abby Miles. Originally asked to provide backing vocals on the song after being heard singing at a party, Abby’s contribution is a far more potent aspect to the lively encounter than just that, her part evolving as the song grew as it was recorded to become a full union between guest and band.

The single quickly grips ears with heady beats and a dose of riffs not too far removed from the punkish air of early Sex Pistols offerings. The song soon blossoms a melodic and dramatic nature though, guitars casting a spicy web which the strong tones of Kristian and subsequently Abby harmonically explore with their swiftly riveting union.

There is something familiar to the song, different aspects hinting at an array of bands yet combining for an easy persuasion that, as suggested earlier, hangs around teasing and tempting thoughts and emotions, especially through the fiery chorus and outstanding blend of vocals which often come in waves to seduce ears.

Talk About Us is one of those songs which may not become a personal classic but we would suggest a proposition which will persistently put a smile on the face every time it steps forward, whilst United Highs is a band we should all go checkout a little closer, Abby Miles too after this.

Talk About Us is available now via the band’s Bandcamp page as a “pay what you like” download.

RingMaster 14/08/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Ded Rabbit – Scarlet Cardigan

Ded Rabbit_RingMaster Review

Continuing a very healthy tradition of outshining their previous release with something even more irresistible and creatively mouth-watering, Scotland based indie rockers Ded Rabbit uncage their new single Scarlet Cardigan. It is a song which merges wonderfully raw textures with intricately inventive hooks, contagious energy with rousing vocal drama, and uniting it all in another exhilarating bellow. Ded Rabbit is a band walking the precipice of national exposure, something very easy to say after Scarlet Cardigan.

Ded Rabbit consists of four Yorkshire brothers, Eugene, Fergus, Eoin, and Donal Gaine, who moved to the Highlands in the mid-nineties, subsequently heading to Edinburgh for their studies and the moment where, in their words, that they “began taking music more seriously.” Since then as Ded Rabbit, the foursome has released a trio of increasingly acclaimed EPs, all recorded at Rocket Science Studios (Texas, Belle And Sebastian, Dougie MacLean) and earned a potent live reputation with a presence taking in shows with the likes of The 1975 and Man Made, their own headlining gigs, and festival spots at Rough Beats, Liverpool Sound City, and T In The Park where they headlined the T Break stage this year. Drawing on inspirations from bands such as Led Zeppelin, The Beatles, Queens Of The Stone Age, Fugazi, Ian Dury and the Blockheads, Gang Of Four, Interpol, The Cribs, The Libertines and many more, the band’s EPs have been a just as magnetic affair, Wash Away and Wake Up In A Dream stirring up keen attention previously whilst the recently released Moving In Slow Motion has pushed even keener spotlights their way. As suggested earlier, their new release unleashes another rousing and masterful step forward in the sound and adventure of the band, Scarlet Cardigan which is the lead song from the last EP, setting a new dynamic marker.

The single instantly reveals a scuzzier air to the band’s sound, something explored more upon Moving In Slow Motion whilst also pushing the band’s cleaner melodic explorations. Vocals and hefty beats are the first union alongside slim but enticing guitar which in turn expands with melodic lures as the song itself blossoms into bolder incitement, a bulbous bass riff just whetting the appetite all on its own. The spicery of eighties new wave/post punk is at its strongest yet in the Ded Rabbit sound in Scarlet Cardigan but woven into something certainly with a whiff of Arctic Monkeys/The Cribs to it, but thrillingly original to the band. Raising crescendos of energy for its chorus and volatile calm for its agitated verse built passages, the track enthrals with unpredictability and breath-taking enterprise from start to finish.

Like a mix of Asylums, The Libertines, and The Woodentops, with at times essences of Josef K too, the free to download Scarlet Cardigan is another enslaving slice of indie rock ‘n’ roll from Ded Rabbit and another thick suggestion that the band ready to take the UK indie scene by storm.

Scarlet Cardigan is available now.

The Ringmaster Review 12/08/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Skellums – Clarion Call EP

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Like a union between Weezer and Arctic Monkeys but sticking a middle finger up at any expectations that thought might breed, UK band Skellums quickly stir up ears and a greedy appetite with their new EP Clarion Call. A festival of alternative and indie rock ‘n’ roll across four mischievously captivating songs, the what we are assuming debut release from the band, marks the Liverpool quartet out as one potential soaked and new exciting adventure.

There is very little we can tell you about the foursome of Roberts, Watson, Crichton, and Courtney, except that, according to their press release and all forms of info for them , Skellums began because “there was nothing else left to do” and that the band formed their own record label, Rent & Debt Records to bring forth their flavoursome endeavours. Creatively fragrant their songs certainly are too on the evidence of Clarion Call, musically and lyrically where the band weaves tales of the streets, lives, and experiences most can relate to in some moment or form.

Picture 14_RingMaster ReviewThe EP opens with the outstanding We Are One, a song bounding in on a flood of gripping riffs and rolling rhythms, all weighty and dramatic, before slipping in to a mellower but no less compelling energy for the entrance of the expression loaded vocals. As the narrative spills word by word, guitars relax into a spicy, almost ska bred gait aligned to a great throaty bassline and crisp beats. Band vocals erupt as the chorus bears down on the passions, their anthemic call matched by the infectious swing of the song at that moment and the great lead vocal delivery. The track just grows and incites further with every passing minute of its magnetic rock ‘n’ roll, ending on a blaze of a finale and creating a storming start to the EP.

The Avenue comes next, an initial shimmer of melodies eventually leading to another catchy stroll around a vocal and lyrical social play. Brass shed rays of melodic sun across the song throughout too, their warmth matched by again great variety to the vocals and the inventive shuffle of flirtatious hooks and sparkling grooves. As its predecessor, the song is a riveting seduction, showing more of the diversity already obvious in the sound and songwriting of the band, whilst spellbinding ears and imagination with a success emulated by the irresistible Monsters right after. As the song gets into its virulent stride, it should be admitted that the thought of ‘if The Monkees had been scousers this is the sound they would have held the world with’ surfaced, both they and Skellums sharing a seemingly instinctive pop ingenuity equipped with great underlying shadows.

Clarion Call is completed by the gentle but open swagger of Growing Old, another song flirting with a ska/reggae seeded canter wrapped in melodic enterprise and unpredictable revelry. Though not quite matching the success of the first three songs, it is a fascinating and thoroughly enjoyable end to the EP whilst providing more provocative and mesmeric lyrical theatre.

Over time we will all come to learn and know more about Skellums, though their music does all the talking needed right now, and even if they stay a mystery no one will really care if they keep coming up with the kind of creative fun rippling brilliantly within Clarion Call.

The Clarion Call EP is available from August 10th on Rent & Debt Records.

https://www.facebook.com/skellums    http://www.skellums.com

Upcoming Skellums shows:

Friday 21st August – Zanzibar, Liverpool

Saturday 29th August – Eric’s, Liverpool

Sunday 30th August – The Corner Flag, Sunderland

RingMaster 05/08/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

The Fuse – Alamein

the fuse_RingMaster Review

It is fair to say that the journey to the release of Alamein, and that of its creators The Fuse themselves, has been a platform of trials and issues to which many other bands would have probably thrown the towel in over long ago. Eight years on the UK rock scene has seen the band suffer member instability and changes, label collapses, and their manager struck down with cancer. The band’s new album in the thoughts of many was destined to never see the light of day, but with an attitude matching and title seemingly inspired by the Winston Churchill quote, ‘Before Alamein, we never had a victory. After Alamein, we never had a defeat’, the London band’s offering is ready to captivate grip ears.

Formed in 2006, The Fuse soon began enticing ears and interest for their alternative/indie rock sound, and within a year they was heading over to LA to record their debut album after Russ Regan, who discovered and signed Elton John, had heard their single Everybody Knows The Way and signed the band up. In the financial crisis of 2008 though, his Velocity Entertainment went bust leaving no release ready and the band returning to their home city. Back in England, The Fuse continued to lure attention and support with their shows, especially after playing one with Coldplay cover band Coldplace. This triggered more gigs around the UK and in 2010, a tour of Holland supporting Coldplace as well as the sharing of a stage with UB40 and numerous festival spots. More tours and shows in Europe were followed in 2012 by the band headlining the Pembrokeshire Fish Week Festival and Richmond World Music Festival, and the next year playing a couple of shows with Foreigner. Now the quartet of Alex Lato, Simon Bowker, Ed Thorne, and Simon James White have their first album on the launch pad, an fair to say, the Javier Weyler (ex-Stereophonics) produced album reveals a collection of songs which just grab the imagination.

CD_CBwallet_The Fuse_12_06_2015_RingMaster ReviewAlamein opens with the outstanding Black Lion, a song tantalising with almost tribal enticing from its first breath and a cascade of harmonic vocal roars, which in turn sparks a seductive stroll of meaty rhythms and tangy grooves. The song is soon strolling with a swagger and mischievous enterprise, drums and bass a prowling shadow against the bright temptation of the guitars and quickly alluring vocals. The full result is a contagious and increasingly compelling romp inventively setting the album off on a major high and setting a lofty bar for the following Misfit to match. It is a test quickly passed as an electro shimmer of an entrance evolves into a dark Stan Ridgway like pop canter, the track proceeding to flirt with spicy hooks and sparkling melodies over another tenaciously rhythmic adventure. Its colourful mix of sound is matched by a great variety of vocals across the band too, their unions a festival of creative revelry around a lively reflective narrative.

Oxygen steps up next, treating ears to a post punk bass line and matching ambience before the vocals, with melodies in tow, awaken a ray of energy and warmth. As in the first pair of songs, imagination is soon adding little twists of sound and character to the engaging and increasingly emotionally inflamed proposition. Feet and appetite are simply bewitched by the track and indeed Sleuth which shares its resourceful vivacity next. Inside once more contrasts unite, the snarl of the bass and punch of drums tempering but more so complimenting the bubbling keys and vocal vibrancy, it all bound in fiery guitar endeavour. It is a fresh breath of drama and aural heat which is continued through the mellower White Shark and the elegant croon of Rainbows. Neither song quite spark personals tastes as strikingly as their predecessors to be honest, but each, and especially the increasingly rousing latter, grows into a potent and provocative blossom of sound and persuasion.

A twangy tone of guitar quickly makes 3AM an inviting proposal, the song growing with every passing chord into a magnetic blaze, still cored by that great initial bait and increasingly breeding a catchiness which lingers long after its boisterous departure. There are many tracks which wear single on their temptation, this certainly amongst them as too Paint This Town which actually has already had that position and unsurprisingly drawn a great many newcomers to The Fuse. Bounding in on a Blondie-esque dance of melodic flirting, the song swiftly builds its own distinct, infection soaked incitement for body and emotions. Its body of hooks and pop leaded tenacity has the musical shine of bands like Super Happy Fun Club and at times The Killers, whilst providing another pinnacle for Alamein.

The album closes with firstly the emotive and melodic smouldering of Phantom, a song which suggests that Coldplay is certainly amongst the band’s inspirations, and lastly In This World. The final song opens with a Lennon-esque tone to vocals and piano, subsequently growing into another of the slow burning persuasions on the release which builds into a richly satisfying theatre of sound and emotion which finds a potent resemblance to Queen like adventure.

Both songs offer an enjoyable end to a highly pleasing album and long last, proper introduction for the world to The Fuse. There is no doubting their journey to now has been worthwhile and creatively well spent, Alamein emerging as a very rosy addition to the melodic/indie rock discography of 2015.

http://www.thefuse.london/    https://www.facebook.com/thefusemusic/

RingMaster 05/08/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

 

Young States – Down To You EP

Young States_RingMaster Review

If their debut EP Down To You is an indication of things to come, UK rockers Young States is a band a great many will be paying close attention to over coming years. Young in presence and age, two members barely 18, the Norwich hailing quartet make their striking introduction with four songs sculpted in alternative and indie rock; encounters which are lean on flab and strong on passion, as well as accomplished craft. It is not yet a scene stretching proposal or something to set the pulse racing out of control, but both music and EP are propositions to get ears and appetite eagerly on board and anticipating an inevitable potent progress of the band.

Young States was formed towards the closing of 2014, its members meeting whilst on courses at Access To Music in Norwich. The foursome of guitarists Libby Irons and Amy Jeffery, vocalist/bassist Georgia Leeder, and drummer Molly Draba-Mann subsequently united musically, drawing on a love for and the inspiration of bands like Brand New, Arcane Roots, and Mallory Knox to spark and enrich their own quickly brewing ideas and sound. In no time they were writing their debut release, the striking Down To You EP, which with all things going in their favour, should soon begin sparking the seeds to national attention.

YS down to you EP_RingMaster Review     The release opens with the rousing No More, a song which from a gentle guitar and bass caress bursts into vibrant life with crisp beats keenly poking steely riffs and flavoursome hooks. The vocals, and indeed bass lure, of Leeder quickly adds further invitation to the tenacious blend of rock ‘n’ roll rich with potent whiffs of punk and melodic rock. As enticing as the sound and vocals are, so too is the invention of the songwriting, twists into different textures and the fluid mixing up of energy just imagination shaped resourcefulness. It is the vocal delivery, with Irons adding her rich backing too, which leads the show though in all aspects band and song leaves ears and appetite firmly gripped.

The following Feedback is just as dynamic and quickly persuasive, hooks and melodic tang a flavoursome weave to set things off and an evocative cradle for the subsequent presence of Leeder’s voice. Rippling with enterprise and impassioned attitude, the song reminds of fellow Brits Leopards, especially with its controlled but open creative snarl and generally imposing rhythmic framing. Like all four tracks, it is not littered with big surprises yet there is freshness to it and the Young States invention which sparkles with thick promise and a suggestion of bigger things to come.

Stay takes over next and instantly seduces with a seductively anthemic rolling of beats from Draba-Mann, they leading to and continuing through a sky of melodic beckoning which in turn welcomes ever alluring vocals. Choppy riffs and tendrils of sonic craft wrap and slip between the still persistently virulent rhythms and delivery of Leeder, her bass spreading its darker tones once the rest of the band is busy creating their mesmeric persuasion. Once more the foursome creates passages of melodic elegance and reflection amidst more volatile scenery, and once more the band leaves rich satisfaction in their wake.

The release is brought to a melancholic close through Passing Time, voice and guitar the first evocative kiss on the senses, their second aligned to resonating bass tones and a scuzzier air cast by Irons and Jeffery. The track holds attention firm the first time round but grows into the peak of Down To You over constant listening, its emotionally tempestuous and musically dramatic heart a brewing, highly persuasive theatre of raw energy and skilful craft.

The best song on the EP, it not only completes a highly enjoyable first look at Young States, but in many ways sets the tone for their next and subsequent steps. Distinct originality and unpredictability is still an open hint in their sound but growing nicely as evidenced by Passing Time alone. It is down to them how bold and tenacious they grow but also you by treating yourself to their first nudge on the British rock scene.

The Down To You EP is available from August 7th @ http://youngstates.co.uk/

https://www.facebook.com/youngstatesband

RingMaster 04/08/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

 

WhiteMoor – Pause and Effect

Promo Picture 4_RingMaster Review

Good words are seemingly only heard when people talk about UK indie band WhiteMoor, and having our introduction to them through their new album Pause and Effect, it is easy to see and hear why. The bands third full-length consists of eleven highly accomplished and creatively sculpted songs which are not always instantly striking but work away with a persistently enticing air and lingering tempting. So many of them come with hooks which just get under the skin, often unknowingly, and even if without such potent tempting, the band’s tracks make the most endearing companions.

Derby based WhiteMoor began in 2010, formed by guitarist Barrington Mole who quickly linked up with vocalist Benny Ryan. With the band’s line-up completed by bassist Luke Inglis, drummer Tom Scribbins, and keyboardist Louise Tomlinson by 2012, the quintet soon sparked fan attention with early singles and a self-titled debut album. A stirring of radio and media attention was not far behind either, especially as the following year in 2013, the band unveiled second album Horizons with again a host of well-received singles before and after only reinforcing their emergence on the British rock scene. Pause and Effect now feels like the key to awakening the broadest national awareness. From start to finish it is a heftily enthralling and lively proposition which just gets stronger and more persuasive with every listen.

By those already aware of the band, Pause and Effect is said to find the band exploring a heavier guitar driven sound with darker tones around the contagious hooks, fiery melodies, and mesmeric harmonies the band is already renowned for. Opener Hollywood certainly backs that claim up in potent style, the song from a gentle and evocative breeze of guitar and keys brewing up into a stomping cascade of energy and rhythmic enticement. The guitars continue to wrap the thick beats with their own new intensity and rigour, squeezing out infectious hooks and fiery enterprise with ease. With the mellower but no less feisty vocals of Ryan, backed strongly by those of Mole and Tomlinson, a great contrast to the sturdier and more voracious air of the music, the song grows and increasingly seduces with passion and creative tenacity.

Pause and Effect - Front Cover_RingMaster Review   The great start is matched by A Cage for the Animals next, it too a swift potent lure from its first breath though this time with a more aggressive touch before slipping into an expressive and melodically driven canter. It reveals a grungier essence with its increasing incitement on ears and body, but also a character which has glimpses of bands like Manic Street Preachers and Feeder to it. Though as the first song, and many others, there is something indefinably familiar to certain aspects of the song, it never feeds expectations, only refreshing itself and ears with every magnetic turn.

Both Dark Sparks and Be the Last keep things bubbling nicely, the first surrounding a pulsating bassline with shimmering keys, emotively hued vocals, and a sparking and immersive caresses of guitar. It too has a snarl and intensity to it, though restraining them into a more melancholic but still lively stroll. The keys of Tomlinson are compelling, at times almost Devo-esque in their imagination and touch, and as the album, the song evolves into a major tempting over time. Its successor slips into ears with an electro pop like coaxing, the keys again providing something to intrigue and wrong-foot whilst the rest of the band craft a more concentrated drama of their own. Once more ears feel they know the song as it unveils its charms but thoughts find no reason why and the appetite cares little as it devours another engrossing proposal.

The emotive smoulder of Codes comes next, the song revealing a whiff of Brit pop to its vocally shapely and melodically skilled body. Though it does not fire up personal tastes as successfully as those before it, the song only shows more of the depth and impressive songwriting of the band before the similarly less commanding Ghosts satisfies without igniting that extra spark. There is no escaping the individual and united craft weaving its clean and musically poetic enticement though, or that in its predecessor She Makes Me Fly, a seductive kiss on ears with plenty of twists and invention to keep the imagination glued.

All get simply outshone by the irresistible God Help the Queen though. It opens with an Echo and The Bunnymen hued lure of keys and a rich melodic hook, its rhythms also carrying the darker shadows of the Liverpool band before exposing body and emotions to a tantalising and rousing chorus. The song is just glorious, with the opening clutch of songs a major peak in the album’s landscape, and alone a good enough reason to go explore Pause and Effect.

The pair of Only Human and Masquerade provide good reasons too, the first an emotive melodic hug you only want to sink deeper into and the second a flame of fuzzy key bred atmospherics, caustic guitar tones, and magnetic vocals and harmonies, all tempered by another juicy dark bassline. Every song shows another fresh glimpse to the prowess and inventive depth of the band’s sound and imagination, the latter of this two revealing the band can turn their hand to more aggressive textures with ease.

Concluded by Until Tomorrow, a strong and masterful slice of melancholic balladry, Pause and Effect is a rich and constantly rewarding release. Certainly some songs for personal tastes lack the spark of others and thus the success, but each only grip and fascinate with, as the album itself, increasing potency over every listen. If WhiteMoor is new to you, than their new album is worth plenty of your intrigue and attention whilst for existing fans Pause and Effect shows the band in yet another creative light; looks like everyone is a winner.

Pause and Effect is available now via Sound-Hub Records on CD through http://www.whitemoor.co.uk/ and digitally @ https://goo.gl/goikuZ or http://goo.gl/p6oVQv

https://www.facebook.com/WhiteMoor

RingMaster 26/07/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard on Reputation Radio @ http://www.reputationradio.net