The Twindows – Valkyrie 2.0

For most, musical bliss can come in various shapes and styles; creative adventures which just connect with personal instincts and tastes. It is fair to say that for us it recently came all rolled up in one hungrily tempting proposal going by the names of The Twindows and their debut album Valkyrie 2.0.

Hailing out of Philadelphia, The Twindows breed a rapacious sound which infuses essences of everything from noise and indie rock to metal and grunge to a punk across the decades borne heart. It is a bold and boisterous web of temptation as virulently infectious as it is ferociously imaginative and led by a voice truly we could listen to all day long. Vocalist/guitarist Aster Grimm has one of the most devilishly tempting voices and just as magnetically matched by the creative antics of guitarist Kyle Anderson, bassist Caleb Banas, and drummer Oskar Daoud across Valkyrie 2.0. Together they have nurtured a release which teases, seduces, and arouses across eleven lust inducing slices of musical diablerie.

It begins with Like My Music; raw and salacious pop infested punk rock roaring from aggravation with Damned like hooks and rhythmic rapacity to the fore. Grimm blossoms in the centre, her tones stirring song and attention further as for one minute and three quarters the track provides the album with one irresistible start.

The following Mosquito / Thick Skin swings in on a blend of grunge nurtured rock ‘n’ roll upon a ska seeded bounce. Fiercer textures with metallic toning soon sizzle and sear around the tenacious attack of Grimm, the track’s noise punk instincts just as vocal before it passed thick attention and an already keen appetite over to Forgiven. Instantly it entangles ears in rhythmic espionage; boisterously coaxing beats and a glorious bass grumble getting under the skin as guitars weave a sonic web around Grimm’s similarly magnetic lures. Something akin to Throwing Muses embroiled in the punk ‘n’ roll of Spinnerette and in turn fused with devilment of Die So Fluid, the track is sheer captivation; one as seductive as it is predacious and all feral temptation.

Dig Tree comes next, the track a bewitching slice of punk pop initially, nostalgically recalling bands such as The Chefs and 4 Non Blondes. It floats across the senses but has a sonic causticity which just adds to the song’s bait again headed by Grimm’s engagingly manipulative presence. Whilst adding a new hue to the album broadening adventure, the song has feet and hips involved just as easily as rock ‘n’ roll instincts.

That variety of flavouring across the release is encouraged again by next up Ska Death (Ska Death Lounge Death Ska), an unstoppable incursion of ska/noise punk which had the body eagerly bobbing along before expelling a hellacious sonic gas of aural volatility, a tempest returning with greater dexterity after the song relaxed again into its lively bounce, and with bolder imagination as sax flames sear the riveting bedlam. Imagine Animal Alpha infused by the spirit of The Jellycats and the punk revelry of The Mo-Dettes and you come close to the song’s infectious alchemy.

The Twindows let their punk instincts run riot in Reversals next, the track an insatiable rock ‘n’ roll charge with noise bred vapours crossing a kaleidoscope of twists and turns while Pulp within a similar but even more corrosive landscape leaps around with kinetic intensity and agility. All the while though as rhythms dance, sonic spices and melodic adventure simmers and rise up to temper and challenge the tempestuous nature of the track.

The inescapably catchy punk ‘n’ roll of Instigator unerringly worms into the psyche within seconds straight after, the song like a mix of The Kut and Daisy Chainsaw but as everywhere uniquely Twindows; a trait just as potently shown by the grunge rock of The Industry. Admittedly, the song did not quite hit the spot as those tracks around it within Valkyrie 2.0 but only added to the fun before The Pixies endowed Sleepycore had us licking our lips once more. With its almost somnolent swing and Grimm’s vocal bewitchment, the outstanding track simply transfixed, even more so when it’s deceitful gait unveiled a furious if still controlled intent.

Bringing things to a close Wire Mother surrounds its energetic croon with abrasive psych and indie punk imagination, the song another as unpredictable in sound and imagination as it is irresistible in persuasion. It provides a provocative and rousing conclusion to an album which just lit the fires of personal tastes while offering something completely fresh to ponder, taste, and devour.

We have nothing more to add except go and have a nibble yourselves.

Valkyrie 2.0 is out now ad available @

Pete RingMaster 21/03/2018

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright


Mala Ruckus – People Mountain People Sea

Formed in Dalian, China, consisting of 5 musicians from 4 different countries and now residing in Prague, in the Czech Republic, Mala Ruckus and their seriously captivating sound is one of the music world’s best kept secrets. Maybe and hopefully that will not be the case for longer with the upcoming release of the band’s debut album, People Mountain People Sea. It is a showcase and rich introduction to the quintet’s multi-flavoured indie folk pop/rock, a collection of songs which get under the skin like a sensuous itch and has the body and emotions bouncing like the first days of summer.

Formed in 2013, Mala Ruckus first came to our attention two years later when they introduced themselves and debut EP Make the Monkey Watch to the site. It offered three lively and swiftly magnetic songs which in hindsight certainly hinted at the wider tapestry of sound now shaping People Mountain People Sea. Those tracks make up a quarter of the album and sound as fresh and exciting amongst their new companions as the first day heard. That is the key to the band’s sound, its ability to feel as refreshing as its first listen a hundred times later, that coupled to a bold imaginative and an instinctive aptitude to be virulently infectious no matter how it comes.

Fronted by the instantly magnetically distinctive voice of Canadian vocalist/guitarist Alex Montyro, Mala Ruckus swiftly get down to business with opener Run. Straight away the melody casting strings of Montyro and Ireland bred guitarist Caolon O’Neill Forde coax ears, the crisp beats of American born drummer Sean Rollins lurking and finally adding a skip to the already boisterous song. The keys of Francis Carlisle and the bass of fellow Brit Ian James add their smiling strolls to the swinging encounter thereafter, the song like a fusion of Jim Jiminee and Arctic Monkeys and quite irresistible.

In saying that it is still eclipsed by the following Hoverboards where straightaway the medieval spiced mandolin of O’Neill Forde has ears and imagination hooked. That melodic invitation sparks a boisterous stroll of indie rock pop, rhythms tenacious bait within the track’s energetically melodic shuffle. Montyro’s vocals again just hit the spot as unerringly as the sounds around him, especially the pulsating bassline, kinetic parade of hooks, and the harmonic glaze from across the band.

Trees, Fields is next, the song a calmer but no less catchy proposition with its bold rhythms within a folkier air equipped with a sighing temptation of strings. Like an Autumn sunset, the song is a fine blend of melancholy and warmth becoming increasingly vivacious by the minute before making way for the compelling croon of Words. With a country twang and a more reserved urgency compared to its predecessors, the song sways in ears, sharing another adventurous side to vocals and melodic enterprise whilst echoing the success of those around it.

The sampled opening of Sheets sets the oppressive tone of the world but one soon calmed and evolved by the emerging melodic canter of the track. As with the previous song, its energy and spirit brews by the second, every twist and turn, each vocal and musical touch escalating in creative drama and thickening emotion. There is a Coldplay like scent to the song by its close but in a good way as it stirs the passions up ready for successor East Hastings. From its own gentle and provocative entrance complete with a Latin seeded seduction, the track rises up with evocative drama for a creative helter skelter. Revolving with fervour and diversity, the track is immense; a slice of indie rock theatre as composed and fluid as it is boldly unpredictable and the best song winner.

It is persistently rivalled to be fair, from those before and following such as the jazz funk lined Nowhere Bound with its smoky tone, soulful brass, and hazy melodies,  and in turn Take It Away. The second is a frisky carnival; its Mediterranean swing and smiling melodies pure flirtation backed as teasingly by vocals and its friskier rock ‘n’ roll side. Reminding a little of UK band JacksonsWarehouse, as a few tracks do, the song has hips swinging and spirit bouncing with zeal for four delicious minutes.

New single Beast of our Babylon brings a more sombre breeze to the adventure but with no less captivation and pleasure involved. It is a folk nurtured ballad with melancholic strings and acoustic elegance round the emotive tones of Montyro which just thickens and captivates second by second, maybe missing the mischief of other encounters within the album but rich in creative beauty to spark just as much pleasure.

The following pair of Fire and Ghosts ignite their own dose of lusty acclaim, the first a prime snappy fusion of the band’s folk/indie rock recipe and quite beguiling while the second is the perfect crescendo of energy and spirit. Its build from an emotive kiss and melodic caress is simply sublime, rhythms a brewing tour de force driving the increasing tempo and rousing air looming upon the senses, and its arrival into a virulent rock ‘n’ roll escapade irresistible.

The album departs with Barmaid, a raw sepia hued slice of lively folk seduction which has feet tapping, hips swaying, and vocal chords humming in seconds. Its sorrowful sigh is just as warming as its harmonic tempting and rhythmic teasing providing the perfect way to drift off into the sunset of People Mountain People Sea.

All the promise of that first EP has been exploited within the album but taken to a level not anticipated back then. It is quite wonderful and the fact that the common words coming from those hearing it with us is “Damn this band is good” says it all.

To keep abreast of the release date of People Mountain People Sea and gig news check out

Pete RingMaster 01/12/2017

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Indigo Sixteen – Bring on the Rain

Not having previously come across their previous trio of singles, their new track Bring on the Rain is our long overdue introduction to Indigo Sixteen. It is a compelling jangle of indie/punk devilry from a band looking ready to step into the long line of unique and compelling Scottish propositions of decades past.

Creating a sound which by design or chance embraces the essences of classic bands like Scars and Josef K as well as British outfits like The Libertines and Skellums, Edinburgh hailing Indigo Sixteen emerged in 2013. Leaning on inspirations ranging from Kasabian, The Smiths, and Joy Division to The Jam, Daft Punk, Kraftwerk, and Nirvana, Indigo Sixteen previously released the singles Decide (2014), And What? (2014/15), and Come and Go (2016). Now it is Bring on the Rain ready to stir greater attention the way of the quartet and as it plays in the ears it is hard to imagine it not rousing up a host of new fans.

The vocals of guitarist Stephen Mallin pull the song into view, the equally alluring creative clamour of fellow guitarist Matt McPherson adding its melodic jangle to his and the rhythmic shuffle of drummer Callum Davidson and bassist Andrew Stears. Carrying an energetic and virulent swing to its gait and spirited tenacity to its character and enterprise, the song reveals its punk and indie sides with zeal, merging them into a proposition maybe not yet truly distinct but as gripping and exciting as you could wish for.

Those earlier suggested flavours swiftly come to mind in the song to add to its appeal and a quickly bred anticipation for the next band’s next steps.

Bring on the Rain is out now.

Pete RingMaster 21/11/2017

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

The LaFontaines – Common Problem

It is fair to say that the debut album from Scottish rock band The LaFontaines was an adventure of imagination and diversity which in varying degrees captivated from start to finish. Released two years back, Class was a magnet to acclaim and a new rush of eager fans but we can tell you now it was just the appetiser to a big, bolder, and more creatively eclectic triumph in the shape of its successor, Common Problem.

As maturity has grown in their songwriting and imagination loaded sound so has a darker attitude and reflective snarl upon the world and its issues. It is a tone which lines every note and word but seems to only accentuate every imaginative twist and turn going to make one striking and increasingly addictive release. Its predecessor saw Motherwell hailing The LaFontaines break the UK Top 100 and Scottish Top 10 as well as top the UK Indie Breakers chart. As mentioned, it was a potent lure for attention, receiving over three million plays on Spotify alone, but easy to feel just the appetiser to bigger success with Common Problem.

Recorded with producer Joe Cross (The Courteeners), the album immediately invade ears with sound and lyrical bite as Explosion looms over the senses. The snarl lined attack of rapper/vocalist Kerr Okan is direct and magnetic, and swiftly matched in the brooding drama of the sounds around him. The song is soon a web of intrigue and suggestion, a tempestuous aural clamour which devours as it seduces the senses. It takes no prisoners yet is a seductive invitation which fascinates at every turn with that new invention and growth in ideation at already work.

The following Too Late makes a calmer start, electronic lures aligned with Okan’s spits as it slowly but firmly entices. The melodic vocals of bassist John Gerard perfectly court and contrast the attack of the frontman, his bass and the guitar of Darren McCaughey casting their increasingly antagonistic enterprise around a rhythmic trespass cast by drummer Jamie Keenan. As the first, it is pure temptation taking the imagination to dark corners with relish and insight before Common Problem pulls them into its warmer melodic stroll with its title track. A recent single, the song flows like a sun kissed river with more intimidating undercurrents lurking through the vocal prowess and words of Okan, a combination forging one virulently infectious proposal which soon infests body and spirit.

Next up, Torture has a crystalline like shine to its melodic sheen, various facets reflecting emotion and thoughts in its harmonic embrace with Gerard’s tones a warm caress alongside the honesty bold contemplation of Okan. As with its predecessor, it is impossible not to be swept up in its creative arms, to immerse in its atmospheric depths and McCaughey’s electronic web before the harsher rock ‘n’ roll of Hang Fire grips. With flirtatious hooks and irritable rhythms, the track instantly stirs up attitude and pleasure; the two pronged vocal temptation with Gerard especially striking, irresistible. There is creative theatre in every breath and sound of the track but all born in an instinctive aggression and emotive fire which aims at and hits its target dead centre.

Through the smouldering but lively heat and angst of Goldmine and the rousing rock ‘n’ roll of Armour the hold on ears and imagination is only tightened, the first a consumption of sound and enterprise which haunts long after its fiercely pleasing presence and the second a slice of alternative cored rock which prowls and almost menaces as electronic and melodic spicing explore its rapacious climate. Both tracks push the band’s creative boundaries and the already lofty heights of the album though they are still eclipsed by the vivacious and lively antics of Atlas. Magnetic from the off, addictive soon after, the track is a kaleidoscope of sound and adventure which becomes more contagious and seductive melody by melody, twist by twist.

Raw and angry, What Do I Know makes an equally mighty impact with its ferocious punk ‘n’ roll. The union of grumpy bass and intrusive beats with Okan’s uncompromising intent is alone an inescapable draw but add the sonic fire of the guitars and the snarling vocal presence of Gerard and a major highlight is forged which next up Total Control cannot quite match though it certainly keeps things burning brightly with its own fusion of melodic suggestion and voracious heavy rock. Every song is a web of invention and sonic enterprise dosed with an array of flavours; its own an unpredictable maze with all avenues leading to unbridled pleasure before Release The Hounds springs its own powerful and voracious fire for a glorious invasion of the senses.

The album is brought to a close by the nagging exploits of Asleep, a track which has the listener feeing like it is prey to its predatory instincts and creative hunger. With a rhythmic jungle and sonic maelstrom, the track is stunning, Okan leading its hungry tango with lyrical gusto as every member and instrument within the band colludes in one beast of a temptation ultimately talking best track honours.

As potent and exciting as Class was, it has been blown away by Common Problem; as too most releases venturing out this year. The LaFontaines have grabbed one of the reins guiding the British rock scene with their new essential and unique proposal yet you just feel they have only scratched the surface of their imagination and craft to raise the anticipation for their nest move tenfold.

Common Problem is out now via Wolf At Your Door Records, available @

The LaFontaines UK Headline Tour:

13th November 2017 – Lending Room, Leeds

14th November 2017 – Clwb Ifor Bach, Cardiff

15th November 2017 – Sound Control, Manchester

16th November 2017 – MK11, Milton Keynes

18th November 2017 – Barrowlands, Glasgow

19th November 2017 – Northumbria Institute 2, Newcastle

20th November 2017 – O2 Academy 3, Birmingham

21st November 2017 – Boston Music Room, London

22nd November 2017 – Leadmill, Sheffield

23rd November 2017 – Rock City, Nottingham

Pete RingMaster 31/10/2017

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

The Jade Assembly – Got My Star

It has been pretty easy to breed a keen and energetic appetite for the sound of UK band The Jade Assembly over the past couple years due to their imagination grabbing singles; a temptation which has gone hand in hand with a rising reputation and acclaim. In a crowded market place for alternative and indie rock bands, it is hard to standout and consistently but a success the Manchester outfit has easily grabbed and accelerated. New single Got My Star can only push things on again, the track a tenacious and rousing slice of rock ‘n’ roll from a band simply commanding attention.

Embracing inspirations from the likes of The Stones, The Who, and Oasis, the Bolton hailing quartet has earned a strong reputation for writing tracks which roar with heart as they infest body and spirit; traits shaping previous plaudit grabbing singles such as One Last Time and Nothing Changes. Got My Star is more of the same goodness but undoubtedly a new flavour in the band’s maturing sound and creative imagination too.

Got My Star instantly has feet tapping as the rhythmic pulse of drummer Andy Watson colludes with the pulsating bass stroll cast by Danny Hayes. It is rich bait across which the spicy tendrils of Gareth Smedley’s guitar lay and which only grows as the striking tones of singer John Foster stroll in. There is a snarl in his delivery, a tenacious energy and power which further ignites an already highly persuasive encounter. With fiery textures from the guitar, imposingly infectious rhythms, and the vocal magnetism of Foster, the song simply sparks in the ears making a strong claim for the best song from The Jade Assembly yet with its imagination and web of addictive hooks.

Released on vinyl as well as digitally, the single offers up a B-side too in the shape of Save One For Me. It is a slice of semi-acoustic, emotionally fuelled balladry with its own lively canter and creative drama. Its organic air and touch simply captivates, the song feeling live as if the band were there by your side as it shines another light on the band’s instinctive ability to write and create heart bred songs very easy to connect with.

In a time when the UK music scene is blessed with some remarkable and seriously exciting propositions, The Jade Assembly once again reinforce their position as one of them with a single which has the body dancing and spirit bouncing like a puppeteer.

Got My Star is released on November 6th.

Pete RingMaster 27/10/2017

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

The Tranquil – Get Up/ Live For The Weekend

Formed in 2004, Scottish outfit is still a relatively unknown proposition south of the border. Even so they have nurtured and claimed a perpetually growing and intensely loyal fan base over past years from within the West of Scotland music scene, recognition which their new single could tease much further afield to reinforce a growing reputation already on the rise through their shows around the country.

It is fair to say that Get Up/ Live For The Weekend did not instantly grab us, though certainly enjoyment was the reaction to its two prong invitation, yet it and especially Get Up kept nagging away in the memory, drawing ears back and sparking increasing appetite for its proposal listen by listen.

Hailing from the small town of Bellshill, a few miles out from Glasgow, The Tranquil consists of vocalist Campbell Findlay, guitarist Martin Murphy, bassist Chris Ingram, and drummer Jason Hastings; the quartet creating an infectious and emotive indie rock sound as evidenced by their latest offering.

Get Up instantly tempts with a pulsating bassline, its earthy tone aligned to a more volatile guitar melody. Its fiery texture is in turn joined by the lively tones of Findlay, their union still courted by the great bass throb and the swinging beats of Hastings. Swiftly infectious and open in individual craft, the track continues to entice and increasingly so, its instinctive hooks and catchy vitality working away in song and thoughts even once departing ears.

Live For The Weekend does not quite have the same energy or catchiness yet its initial lure of guitar makes for a captivating invitation. As its emotive heart and reflection develops, the song relaxes into a reserved gait which does defuse its potency a touch though it is ignited again for a tenacious chorus. Fair to say, overall the song lacks the spark of its companion and the ability to get under the skin but still reinforces the sense of imagination and craft which has bred two highly enjoyable encounters.

As their double A-sided release plays it is easy to expect The Tranquil to make inroads into national attention ahead, certainly if they can nurture the individuality which Live For The Weekend and especially Get Up suggests.

Get Up/ Live For The Weekend is out now.

Pete RingMaster 27/10/2017

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Lost Without Cause – Revival

Karly Edge Photography

It has been a while since outfit Lost Without Cause had ears and appetite grabbed with mini album Take Back Everything, six years in fact, but now they are back with a brand new release and a sound which has matured and blossomed into one powerful statement. The Revival EP is an encounter which if it does not get you first time around will on its second sweep through ears. Each of its four songs comes blessed with melodic enterprise and instinctive infectiousness, traits admittedly just as open in its predecessor, but bred with a new confidence of imagination and craft which alone commands attention.

Hailing from the South East of England, Lost Without Cause consists of vocalist/bassist Simon Marks, drummer JamesJJ’ Jaggers, and newest member in guitarist Tony Stead. Formed in 2004, the band swiftly stoked eager fans and attention with their pop infused alternative rock sound. 2011 saw Take Back Everything stir up a whole new ball game of recognition with its lead single, Trigger and accompanying video, being heavily featured on Kerrang TV and supported on national and online radio shows. Live the band has shared stages with the likes of Bastille, Kids In Glass Houses, Fozzy, Don Broco, Lower Than Atlantis, Sacred Mother Tongue, My Passion, The Crave, Koopa, Fei Comodo, None The Less, Saving Aimee and many more. Revival in some ways reflects the ‘return ‘of the band and what is sure to be a regenerated rise in their reputation and presence within the British music scene.

Breathe starts things off and the track instantly has attention hooked as the dark grumble of Marks’ bass lines up alongside his strong expression carrying vocals. JJ‘s beats in turn hit with relish before it is all wrapped in the melodic enterprise of Stead.  Instantly appetising and swiftly infectious, the song proceeds to stroll with wild nostrils and flirtatious hooks, its melodic jangle a teasing lure in the jungle of more exacting rhythms. It is fair to say that previous song Trigger has been the marker for Lost Without Cause up to this point but no longer as Breathe steals its thunder.

The following Depleted brings a Green Day-esque feel to its rousing canter, a hue soon immersed in the band’s own character of sound and invention. Great vocal harmonies and support to Marks across the band light up an already earthily anthemic incitement; swinging rhythms and spicy grooves all adding to the riotous yet skilfully controlled encounter.

Teardrops and Cigarettes in contrast is a mellow aired, warm seduction playing like a blend of China Crisis and Placebo with a further spice of Jimmy Eat World involved. Its gentle but lively sway has hips quickly involved, the sultry strains of the guitar courting the imagination as swiftly though it is the vocal unity again and the song’s adventurously imaginative landscape which seals the deal, not forgetting one glorious finale of emotion and power.

The EP finishes with Another End, a slice of rock pop which might not quite match up to those before it for personal tastes but only adds to the overall pleasure with its catchy rock ‘n’ roll and sonic dexterity.

Listening to Revival, it is easy to feel that Lost Without Cause’s time to make an indelible mark is imminent, if not with their fiercely flavoursome new EP with whatever comes next.

Revival is out now across most online stores.

Pete RingMaster 10/10/2017

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright