Feral Kizzy – Slick Little Girl

Phote by Luke Fisher

Phote by Luke Fisher

The debut album from Californian dark poppers Feral Kizzy is simply an aural playground, a landscape of musical roundabouts spinning through modern tenacity and invention and creative swings whooshing across eighties new wave and jangle pop. Slick Little Girl is soaked in originality and nostalgia, a mix providing a riveting and thrilling treat ultimately cast as something unique to the Long Beach quintet; and something very easy to get addicted to.

Formed in 2010, Feral Kizzy consists of five musicians uniting a rich variety of inspirations in the band’s sound. References have been made to Patti Smith, Concrete Blonde, the Yeah Yeah Yeahs, and The Cure, though the one band which comes to the fore more than most, whether an influence or not, is eighties US band Pylon, especially their first album Gyrate. As suggested all spices and essences are evolved into something new but there is certainly a potent and enjoyable similarity in textures, sound, and unpredictable invention. With some guest contributions from bassist Hannah Smith Keller and Hannah Blumenfeld (Jail Weddings, White Murder) on violin and cello, the five piece of vocalist Kizzy Kirk, keyboardist/vocalist Brenda Carsey, guitarist Johnny Lim, drummer Mike Meza, and bassist Kevin Gonzalez perpetually explore their and the listener’s imaginations within Slick Little Girl, and fair to say they leave major pleasure in their wake.

Opener Lapdog Apparition needs little time to lure ears and appetite with its potent charms, a thumping initial beat casting the first hook swiftly assisted by a jangle of guitar and the saucy shimmer of keys. Quickly into a magnetic stride the song swings along with sharp twists, subsequently slipping into a more fluid and mellower enticement then just as easily coming out of it and starting the cycle again. A tinge of the Au Pairs flirts with thoughts as it continues to dangle bait and enterprise through ears, though it is the delicious B-52s like detour which seals a lustful deal with emotions through its Rock Lobster like tease.

Feral-Kizzy-Slick-Little-Girl-Cover__RingMasterReview   The track is creatively irresistible, a major flirtation matched by the band’s new video/single Community Service. A throbbing Cure like bassline sets things in motions, whispers of guitar lining the entrance of vocals with Kirk alone an enthralling invitation and in union with Carsey, inescapable tempting. The song proceeds to spin a web of tantalising vocals and hooks as its rhythms offer a shadowed prowl against the more celestial flight of the keys. It is captivating stuff, an inventive weave of textures and melodic infection, with the description of Xmal Deutschland meets Throwing Muses and indeed Pylon a canny hint.

The Way We Are has a fine line in guitar jangle and spicy melodic imagination backed by another addictive dark rhythmic baiting from Meza and Gonzalez, whilst vocally a Debbie Harry like whisper clings to the expressive roar of Kirk. Matching the invention and lures, Carsey breeds a pungent waltz of persuasion with fingers on keys too, it all colluding in a busy and thick dance of jangle pop before making way for the melodic caress of Sally and the Emcee. A gentle saunter equipped with rawer, incisive edges, the song is a provocative croon which thickens with every passing chord and beat until filling air and ear like dense melodic smoke. It persistently smothers the senses and seeps into the psyche, seducing with increasing effect over every play.

With a similarly sculpted canvas Lament comes next quickly breeding its own distinct character with a bluesy tang and citric adventure of spatial keys. The track is mesmeric but with a fire in its belly leading to a feisty rock tenacity driven by masterful riffs and hooks from Lim. Again sounds from earlier decades entwine with a modern invention and freshness, culturing something as much psyche pop as it is punk rock. From one album pinnacle to another with the scuzzier Life Associates which straight away is a more forceful and rugged proposition through the snarl of bass and guitar alone. Again there is a punkish element to the song’s roar and a sultry kiss to the melodic endeavour on offer, something like Siouxsie and the Banshees merged with Martha and The Muffins a strong reference, though as across the release, songs come with Feral Kizzy originality which argues against any comparisons as much as it sparks them.

More blues bred twangs grip the guitar enterprise in Not My Mind, the spicy coaxing quickly engulfed in the melodic poetry of keys and attention grabbing vocals. Though it does not quite light the same rich fire in ears and thoughts as its predecessors, the track reveals yet another side and depth to the songwriting and invention of the band, its body a volcanic fusion of sounds and textures which never erupts but is a constantly imposing and gripping incitement unafraid to unleash the heat of its heart.

The Dinosaur flirts and sways with sixties garage pop captivation and indie rock mischief next, flirting with body and thoughts from start to finish and never relinquishing its tight vivacious hold until passing the listener over to the just as ingeniously compelling tempting of The Skin Is Thick. A darker but no less boldly imaginative encounter, the song winds around ears like a lithe temptress, constantly stirring up shadows and deep rooted instincts through heavy seductive tones of bass and enchanted keys spilled drama. With vocals also on a resourceful intent to enthral and enslave, the song makes an impressive and exciting warm-up act for the closing show stopper What Are You Doing? All the lures and creative theatre of its predecessor is taken to a new level, every second of the song a controlled but rich blaze of skilled and impassioned endeavour. It is an epic bellow from the imagination and creative depths of the band only enhanced further by the sensational presence of Kirk and the intense incitement of the orchestral coloured strings, their spicy lure bringing echoes of Sex Gang Children back in the day.

Feral Kizzy is superb at uniting slim and often repetitive textures with thick tapestries of ingeniously woven enterprise, the last song epitomising that craft and success which flows across the whole of Slick Little Girl. The album is a thrilling adventure; one bred across the years in many ways but solely of the now, and Feral Kizzy a band surely looking at big things ahead.

Slick Little Girl is available from June 26th on LP/CD/Tape/Digital via eliterecords @ http://www.eliterecords.de/#!webshop/cst1

http://www.facebook.com/feralkizzy   http://www.feralkizzy.com

RingMaster 25/06/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard on Reputation Radio @ http://www.reputationradio.net

 

Yukon Blonde – On Blonde

Yukon Blonde_Reputation Radio/RingMaster Review

There is a melodic humidity to On Blonde, the new album from Canadian indie rockers Yukon Blonde, a sultry and almost sticky feel and ambience embracing and seducing the senses song by song. Already renowned for their seamlessly crafted and contagious pop songs, the Vancouver band went into experimentation mode for their latest endeavour, weaving in textures and sounds bred within psychedelic, digital, and synthetic adventure. It was a move bringing bolder and more fascinating character to music and release whilst breeding an even greater virulence for their maybe unexpectedly purest pop encounter yet.

It is easy to expect infectious proposals from a Yukon Blonde release but the quartet of Graham Jones, Jeffrey Innes, Brandon Scott, and James Younger have found a new epidemic of persuasion and catchiness despite venturing into the ‘unknown’ with On Blonde. Frontman Innes has said about the album, “We were more ambitious writing On Blonde so it’s sort of ironic that in experimenting we created a more accessible record than ever before.” Easy to slip into and embrace, the Colin Stewart (Black Mountain, Dan Mangan, Sleepy Sun) produced, Tony Hoffer (M83, Beck, Foster the People, Air, Depeche Mode) mixed album simply backs up his words, starting straight away with opener Confused.

The first song instantly swamps ears with a buzzing electro tempting, the potent coaxing quickly joined by spicy guitar and crunchy rhythms. It is soon a stroll of magnetic melodic and vocal tenacity, eighties and spatial breezes a lively simmering within the vibrant body and energy of the song. Down below though there is an underlying rumble in the heart of the encounter, a stirring dark intent which gives real depth and intrigue to the refreshing pop romp. There is a bit of Weezer to the song, a bit of Super Happy Fun Club too, but it emerges as something distinct to Yukon Blonde just like Make U Mine which follows. Its body moves with a funky gait within a mellower more reserved energy, vocals and harmonies floating around ears as they forcibly flirt with the imagination alongside musical echoes of bands like Heaven 17 and Röyksopp.

Variety is a swift essence of On Blonde too, the first pair of tracks coming with individual characters but not as openly as the outstanding Como which follows them. Its acoustic lead soon lures the appetite into a summery canter of endearing melodies and vivacious vocals, all tempered by another great shadow wrapped bassline. A tinge of China Crisis teases throughout but equally a whisper of The Beach Boys floats with the tantalising harmonies as guitars dance with sparkling adventure and revelry within the hazy romance of a song.

yb-onblonde-Reputation Radio/RingMaster Review     I Wanna Be Your Man slips into a fuzzier and grittier landscape, one seemingly blossomed from a Bolan-esque seeding. It saunters around which attitude and confidence, every resonating bassy lure and sonic sizzle carrying a glint in their mischievous eye whilst unpredictable and tantalising twists and turns merge with the warm fluid flow of the bewitching proposition. In no time it has seduced and enslaved ears and emotions, an inescapable success and potency cultured just as powerfully by the similarly mouth-watering Saturday Night straight after. The song pounds ears with relentless rhythmic incitement around which eventful vocals and an elegant embrace of melodies rigorously serenade. Every second comes with a flirtation of sound and ideation but also that unpredictable essence which again as much as the fresh investigations of sound infused right across the album, is the spark to new adventure and ingenuity in the Yukon Blonde persuasion.

A sixties hued, folkish ballad in the shape of Hannah steps forward next; its harmonic charm an easy snare for ears. Once it has full focus it unveils bulbous bass tones and evocative drizzles of melodic expression to tighten its hold, though whilst again pushing the diversity of the album, it never manages to come up to the persuasive levels of its predecessors, something the admittedly enthralling Your Broke The Law also cannot quite emulate. In context though both songs are like a lover’s romance with the listener, never leaving them less than enamoured whilst allowing the likes of Starvation to steal more of the limelight which it does with consummate craft. Carrying a Depeche Mode/Daniel Miller like dark croon to its intoxicating enveloping of body and thoughts, the track swings and sways with irresistible and addictive ingenuity, never startling with its temptation but smouldering away for the same long-term effect.

From one triumph to another as the indie rock sculpted Favourite People bounces around with varied guitar jangles and contented bass grumbling within another rosy veil of keys. Just as the energetic musical creativity of the track, the vocals have an animated and frisky intent to their presence and enjoyment, and though once more it is a song which you can only really compare to Yukon Blonde themselves, there is a small urge to suggest the likes of XTC and Talk Talk as hints.

The release ends with the electro rock stomp of Jezebel, a sultry temptress of a song adding a final rich twist and spark in one masterful slab of aural gold. On Blonde is seriously compelling, a whole diverse summer in one spellbinding embrace. Yukon Blonde do not light a blazing fire in the belly and heart with the album but it is the hottest, spiciest warm glow felt from a release in a long time.

On Blonde is available now via Dine Alone Records / Caroline UK digitally and on CD/Vinyl through most online stores.

http://www.yukonblonde.com/   https://www.facebook.com/yukonblonde

RingMaster 18/06/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard on Reputation Radio @ http://www.reputationradio.net

 

Abraxas – Totem

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Creating a melodic kaleidoscope of flavours and styles described as Protodancepop, French quartet Abraxas has also provided one of the year’s surprises in the shape of the vibrantly flirtatious Totem. The band’s first EP is a fascinating web of new wave, indie pop, progressive rock…well the list goes on. It is an adventure; a dance of sound and imagination which is as potently familiar as it is strikingly unique. Simply it is a new best friend in the making.

The Paris based foursome of Tino Gelli, Jonas Landman, Solal Toumayan, and Léon Vidal are four childhood friends who in the words of their bio, “learnt to play and to create a whole musical universe together.” Inspirations come from the likes of Pink Floyd, King Crimson, Metronomy, Late Of The Pier, and Connan Mockasin; essences openly audible as many other spices from numerous decades, but woven into something unpredictable, impossible to pin down, and distinct to Abraxas. Four years after forming, the band released debut album Warthog in 2011, an attention grabbing offering which along with a potent live presence, pushed the band into keener spotlights nationally creeping outwards. Taking a year to work on and create Totem, Abraxas now stand ready to stir up wider awareness and a new following of eager appetites, with one fresh recruit right here.

The release opens with Deep Down in the Middle of Shanghai and an instantly coaxing electronic shuffle. It is a welcome of minimal substance but rich appeal luring the listener into a funk kissed stroll and quickly tantalising voices. Providing a rich and impressing element across the whole EP, the vocals are pure captivation with a delivery which is harmonic and sandy, warm and devilishly mischievous at the same time. Keys and guitars just as inventively back up their infectiousness, every twist and turn exploring new styles and imaginative exploits. As mentioned the EP has a certain familiarity to it, shown right away by the first track, but its tapestry is something difficult to reference and to find any lack of originality in. Like Tom Tom Club meets Goldfrapp with a touch of Thompson Twins, but not, the song is a seductive siren of pop and evolving textures making a compelling start to the revelry of Totem.

images     The following Guatemala is of a similar template, spinning an even sultrier climate and Latin cloaked enterprise for its vivacious quickstep of energy and sound. Shimmering keys and the shadowy taunt of the bass make a great contrast and collusion of light and dark whilst a slightly older emerging air reacts perfectly with the flames of guitar. Maybe just lacking the irresistible spark of its predecessor, the song keeps things bubbling over pleasingly before making way for the more intimate saunter of Democratie. As irresistible to feet and body swerves as it is melodically elegant on ears, the track floats over the senses leaving stubborn hooks throughout courtesy of dark bass hues and the ever mesmeric qualities of the vocals. There is a Muse quality to certain moments of the song and a Propaganda feel to the sparkling pop endeavour simmering tenaciously within its evocative breeze of a persuasion, everything uniting in one bewitching proposal.

The glorious Kayak comes next, a song entwining shoegaze and psych rock temptations with a wealth of additional intriguing styles, many just brief slithers within the croon of the song. Its background is as busy as it’s more prominent scenery, a shamanic enticing working potently away through voice and beats as keys, guitars, and harmonies cast their riveting narratives. The song is again a spellbinding offering to match the last but maybe outshone just a touch by the closing devilment that is Death of Poussyflex. Returning to a more dance-floor seeded intent, the closer is an energetic striding of indie and synth pop but again with a maze of enticing variety and textures. Jazzy, funky, and persistently draped in a psychedelic seducing, the track explores almost as much creative terrain as an A-Z of modern art, leaving the album on a high and more importantly the listener hungry for more.

Totem is a treat from the blue and Abraxas a melodic provocateur of the endearing kind; time to get your adventure and dancing shoes on.

Totem is available through most stores.

https://www.facebook.com/abraxasofficial

RingMaster 07/06/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard on Reputation Radio @ http://www.reputationradio.net

 

The Landed – She

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Whether the summer will be a blaze of sun or a flood of rain time will tell over the coming weeks but undoubtedly it will be a feel good moment in time thanks to singles like She from UK indie band The Landed. A melodic romance for the senses and catchy enticing for the body, the song is a lively bubbling of pop rock unafraid to weave in some blues sultriness and melodic guitar jangle amongst its captivating spicing.

The Landed hails from Colchester, two brothers and two friends who since uniting musically and initially playing covers, has persistently developed and honed their songwriting and sound. It was also a beginning allowing the quartet of Paul and David Hale, Dan Currie, and Paul Jannece to learn their stage craft, exploring what made great songs tick and audiences come alive then infusing it into their own emerging imagination and music. Last year saw the release of their self-titled debut EP, a collection of six songs quickly luring attention and acclaim from fans as well as the likes of Tom Robinson at 6 Music and Huw Stephens at Radio 1. Now it is She beginning to stir up eager spotlights upon The Landed, a song which for us is undoubtedly the band’s most vibrant and mouth-watering offering yet.

She coverFrom its first breath the song is a lively incitement of guitar jangle and warm melodic temptation, and only increasing its coaxing as the excellent vocals and a moodier but still radiant bassline enters the revelry. Crisp beats provide the heartbeat of the song, the bass the drive, and both come wrapped in the creative and adventurous colour of harmonies and guitar. Within its flowing dance of sound and energy there is also a healthy unpredictability at play in the track, showing itself more openly in certain places more than in others but constantly lurking within the smiling character of the song’s anthemic stroll and endeavour.

She is a sparkling and mesmeric seducing of pop/indie rock from a band with the knack of shifting feet as heartily as they ignite ears and imagination. The Landed have certainly grown-up since their early creative days, and indeed since their first EP to give the coming weeks a definite ray of sunshine.

She is out now
Upcoming live dates:

6th June – University of Essex
28th June – Colchester Free Festival

http://www.thelanded.com/   https://www.facebook.com/thelanded

RingMaster 02/06/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard on Reputation Radio @ http://www.reputationradio.net

 

Black – Blind Faith

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Like for so many others, Wonderful Life is a mainstay of not only all-time favourite albums but also our weekly listening pleasure at The RingMaster Review. Its creator Black, the musical non de plume of Colin Vearncombe, has continued to incite ears and the passions since that triumph’s release in 1987, through over ten studio albums under the Black moniker and the musician/songwriter’s his own name alone, yet still that album steals the show of our personal pleasures. Now though it has a rival in the shape of the magnetic seduction of Blind Faith, Vearncombe’s first release of new songs in six years. It is a melodic smoulder and emotional caress of thirteen diverse and captivating propositions which potently reminds us that their composer is still one of Britain’s most imaginative and persistently compelling songwriters and artists.

Blind Faith was co-written with long-time friend and musical sparring partner Calum MacColl, the son of Peggy Seeger and Ewan MacColl and brother of the wonderful Kirsty. Recruiting a host of talented musicians to help its recording, and with Calum Malcolm (The Blue Nile/Prefab Sprout) producing, Vearncombe brings all his emotively description skills to bear from the opening seconds of first track The Love Show. A sombre yet joyful acoustic melody hits ears first, swiftly courted by a kiss of strings and in turn the ever distinct voice of Vearncombe. In no time the track is a blossoming breeze of melodic enterprise, recalling the early days of Black whilst conjuring a new evocative croon in sound and texture. The melancholy of the song is gorgeous yet its atmosphere is simultaneously the complete opposite of that, warmth and tantalising lightness providing one endearing kiss on the senses.

BF-Front-Cover     The sensational start is continued by the vibrant saunter of Don’t Call Me Honey, a mix of country and folk revelry colluding in a catchy escapade swiftly in control of imagination and appetite. The swinging beats of drummer Liam Bradley are aligned to the slightly darker but no less energetic tones of bass from Simon Edwards, their combined magnetic spine the keenest lure in the dance of the song. The proposition’s riveting call is matched by the distinctly different Good Liar, a slow stroll of vocal reflection embraced by guitar bred melodies courtesy of MacColl and a mesmeric wash of keys cast by Mikey Rowe. Ears almost float in the croon of the song before being taken on a wonderful dramatic ride in Sleep Together. This treat has a melody rich hook which is like a fine wine on the creative menu of the song and just as potent on the senses as the real thing, additionally bewitching them in the eventful mesmerism already fuelling the captivation.

Womanly Panther has the same kind of theatre to it, this time in the shape of a siren-esque sixties flame. The imagination swiftly runs with the song’s suggestiveness as vocal harmonies are hugged by ever expressive strings. Thoughts conjure images of cosmopolitan temptresses on the French Riviera, a vision only encouraged by the tones and words of Vearncombe. It is another pinnacle in the increasingly thrilling Blind Faith and yet another unique proposal in its diversity, as indeed is Who You Are with its gentle embrace. Once more a whisper of nostalgia engages ears as the song’s chorus unveils a melody and vocal lure reminiscent of early Black enticements. Around this though there is a sultry climate which is almost surf rock like in a hazy complexion which has ears and emotions spellbound.

The following Sunflower is a slightly longer to ignite smoulder but from its first breath keys and Vearncombe’s tones cup ears in potent reflection before slipping away and being replaced by the just as emotively tenacious Not The Man. As it broadens its embrace, a more lively energy flows through the track’s sound and presence, and in turn the listener setting them up perfectly for the country rock spiced and new single Ashes Of Angels. Though another slimline song in textures, there is never a lack of thick melodic ingenuity and creative adventure to any Black song within Blind Faith, and equipped with a virulent contagion of vocal and musical hooks, the song sets itself up as just one more irresistible triumph.

The smoky emotion and tone of Stone Soup holds attention firmly next whilst the eloquent orchestral grace and provocative hues of When It’s Over has ears and thoughts bound with its contrast of soaring keys and strings against a grumbling bassline. Both though are over shadowed by the closing pair of Beautiful and Parade, the first, of course, living up to its title with a shimmering reflection of voice and guitar whilst the second unveils a celestial weave of melodies aligned to matching vocal prowess, the vocals of Vearncombe ever the strongest persuasive lure. It is a sensational close to an exceptional release which definitely flirts with the description classic.

Listening to Blind Faith brings back some of the same emotions felt listening to Wonderful Life way back in time and ever since, and that realising tingle of something special having just seduced ears and more. Colin Vearncombe’s first album is still the unrivalled Black album for us but Blind Faith is right there by its side as an essential proposition for all melodic rock/pop fans.

Blind Faith is available now via Nero Schwarz Limited @ http://www.colinvearncombe.com/music/blind-faith/

http://www.colinvearncombe.com   https://www.facebook.com/blackakacolinvearncombe

RingMaster 01/06/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard on Reputation Radio @ http://www.reputationradio.net

 

 

Fight Like Apes – Self Titled

Fight Like Apes Cover _Reputation Radio/RingMaster Review

It has been as good as five years since the release of their second album, though there was a rather satisfying EP in between, so it is fair to say that anticipation for Fight Like Apes’ new encounter across the board has been bursting with hungry excitement. It is a wait now relentlessly rewarded by each of the twelve songs making up the self-titled proposition, offerings taking ears and imagination on a unique and rebellious exploit of indie pop devilry. It really only takes one listen to establish the album as a favourite and barely a couple more to suggest it is going to cast as one of the major triumphs of 2015.

Hailing from Dublin and formed in 2006, Fight Like Apes and their synth pop/alternative rock sound has been luring in keen and potent attention ever since the release of the EPs How Am I Supposed to Kill You When You Have All the Guns? and David Carradine Is a Bounty Hunter Whose Robotic Arm Hates Your Crotch in 2007. The following year saw them nominated for two awards at the 2008 Meteor Irish Music Awards, and it has only been a continuing torrent of support and acclaim since, though equally there have been moments to challenge as with any band. Debut album Fight Like Apes and the Mystery of the Golden Medallion that same year poked a keener, broader spotlight, attention emulated and pushed to new heights by second full-length The Body of Christ and the Legs of Tina Turner in 2010. Their sound and songwriting had already found uniqueness in presence and character which has consistently evolved from release to release, song to song at times, and it is again prevalent upon the new offering. The time between albums two and three saw the band dropped by their record label but they decided to go down the crowd funding route with quick success. This meant that it has been a length wait for their new epic of fun but as hinted at by the Whigfield Sextape EP last year; the band’s return has only brought new seductive and vivaciously eccentric pleasures.

Unleashed through Alcopop! Records, the album quickly has ears and imagination immersed in its pop alchemy through I Am Not a Merry Man. A quaint electronic coaxing jabbed by firm beats initially the song is soon sauntering along with a melodic swagger and lusty bassline, and lit up further by the ever bewitching vocals of Mary-Kate “MayKay” Geraghty. Moments of feistier endeavour also clad the constantly alluring stroll, the song an inescapable flirtation for ears and thoughts with the flowing keys and backing vocals of Jamie “Pockets” Fox just as magnetic as the pulsating rhythms and prime melodic roar of MayKay.

The following Crouching Bees from a single crisp rhythmic rap is soon engulfing ears in an elegant weave of melodies carrying a slight Altered Images air and once more badgered by thickly tempting rhythms. Vocally MayKay again is as potent in casting a mellow seduction or an impassioned raucousness, her heightened delivery a fiery incitement to the calmer waters of the keys, though they too at times provide an off kilter element of their own. The infection of sound and imagination of the album is already enslaving the psyche two songs in and only increases its bait through Pop Itch and The Schillaci Sequence. The first of the pair is a more ‘regular’ canter of indie pop design, though as it is Fight Like Apes there is plenty of sparkling vocal adventure and sonic twists whilst the second sways over the senses with melodic eloquence. It too initially seems a more reserved example of the band’s invention and creative exploration but with an agitated rhythmic shuffle and Devo-esque electro psychosis it soon puts expectations straight.

Fight Like Apes _Reputation Radio/RingMaster Review Both songs keep enjoyment keen and appetite greedy, though everything is soon eclipsed by the brilliant Didya. Easily our favourite proposition on the album, maybe from the band full stop, the song ambles in on a melodic hook which is Weezer like. That alone has lips licked but it is once Pockets takes the vocal lead with a punkish anxiety to his tone that things erupt into genius. The throaty bass and wilder tempered beats are belligerent whilst the voice of MayKay similarly has a challenging edge to it, the blend a spellbinding incitement though it is the vocal bedlam which follows that has these ears and passions are enslaved. It is like a warped mix of The Dancing Did and The Ting Tings, pure creative mania and manna, setting up the listener for a blaze of a finale.

Numbnuts calms things down a touch next, its persuasive croon persistently littered with stirring vocal snaps and musical twists on the way to creating an increasingly fiery climax whilst its successor Pretty Keen on Centrefolds has ears captivated with an eighties synth pop bubbling that nudges thoughts of Blancmange and Soft Cell. Of course things are never that simple, punchy and at times bedlamic beats adding a drama to match that of the vocals whilst keys whip up a contagious tempting for the dance-floor.

Like a mix of Morningwood and Yeah Yeah Yeahs but all Fight Like Apes, The Hunk and The Funplace sculpts another major pinnacle for the album. Rhythmically anthemic and imposing, melodically spicy and slightly nostalgic, the song easily has ears engrossed but it is the roaring chorus which takes a great song to the plateau of brilliance. It is pop at its most dynamic, provocative, and irresistible.

There is no let-up of the thrills and creative spills as firstly I Don’t Want to Have to Mate with You swirls around ears and leads expectations on a merry dance. It is a lively breeze of fascinating textures and rousing calm providing a spellbinding theatre of sound and voice, emulated in its own way by Baywatch Nights with its even slower smoulder, though again there is a snarl to vocal moments, spicy intrigue to keys, and dark shadows to surrounding scenery. Both tracks make riveting listening, a norm across the album to be fair and continued in the excellent Maevis Beacon: Annihilation, a song with more than a whisper of Young Marble Giants to it especially in its opening minute or so. All tracks make a quick and thick first impression but some reveal even more to their depths and beauty over time with this a prime example.

The mesmeric seducing of Carousel brings the release to an emotive and reflective close, and a dramatic one as epic rhythms and brooding melodies rise as the song progresses. Folkish theatre and heavy tribal rhythms break free too in the scintillating end to a sensational encounter. It may have been a while in the making and coming but Fight Like Apes has spent that time crafting their most vigorously inventive and exciting sound yet. This is a must have for all experimental and rousing pop enthusiasts, actually just every pop fan out there.

Fight Like Apes is available via Alcopop! Records from 18th May @ https://itunes.apple.com/us/album/fight-like-apes/id981566460

https://www.facebook.com/fightlikeapes

RingMaster 08/05/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard on Reputation Radio @ http://www.reputationradio.net

Gentian – NightLight

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Never be afraid to give a twelve year old an acoustic guitar because you might just be breeding magic. That is what happened with UK band Gentian, from the moment one of its members held the instrument, seeds were sown and creative blooms nurtured, with haunting and elegantly enchanting songs like NightLight their new single emerging. There is much more to the tale than that one instant in time of course but from Devon musician Jingle picking up the guitar and proceeding to devour its and her potential, the UK music scene been on course to meet one strikingly promising and mesmeric proposition in the shape of Gentian.

The creativity within Gentian is two pronged though, and has been from an early age. Once Jingle had mastered the song books at her disposal, she and sister D.D., who has already been singing along, began writing their own unique songs. The years have seen this develop with D.D. , who is also an author, writing the songs and creating the melodies whilst Jingle arranges and plays all the instruments. 2012 saw the pair emerge into the spotlight as Gentian and in little time their music was receiving support from James Santer at BBC Radio Devon on his Introducing show. Recently the duo released the In The Dark EP, a debut three track melodic tempting recorded with Andy Rugg (Coldplay, Beyonce, Jay-Z) at Resident Studios in London. The release is an embrace of evocative and tantalising beauty with new single NightLight its mesmeric pinnacle.

From the first kiss of dark strings, the song has ears and imagination enthralled, its melancholic seducing an inescapable and picturesque caress of gothic shadows and radiant charm. The alluring enterprise cast by the creative skills of Jingle is as spellbinding as it is emotionally provocative whilst the soothing but equally vibrant voice of D.D., backed by the bewitching harmonies of the pair, takes ears and thoughts on a celestial flight through the darker climate of the song. There is also a virulent infectiousness washing through the encounter, colluding with less open moments of almost sinister persuasion, a potency which by the track’s end had us thinking that if a British TV company did their own version of American Horror Story, this would be the prefect theme tune.

Though having being impressed by the EP, it was NightLight which actually blew us away, and it continues to do so as a single. Something a great and increasing many are finding too.

Nightlight and the In The Dark EP are out now.

http://www.gentiantunes.com/     https://www.facebook.com/GentianGentian1

RingMaster 03/05/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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