1919 – Bloodline

This is a moment no one likes to contemplate let alone undertake, reviewing something from an artist and exceptional musician who has sadly just been untimely taken from music and the world. It also though gives fingers and thoughts a chance to pay homage especially when the subject of the piece is such a striking and rousing slice of creativity.

Bloodline is the new album from gothic/post punks 1919, a band formed at the tail of 1980 which proceeded to break the charts with a trio of singles, record one of the genre’s inspirational albums, and make appearances on the John Peel sessions twice before disbanding. Founding guitarist Mark Tighe

Mark Tighe RIP

began bringing the band back to life in 2014, its line-up sealed the following year with original drummer Mick Reed and bassist Karl Donner joining Tighe and vocalist Rio Goldhammer; the quartet subsequently releasing the ‘Madness Continues Sessions’ live album and in turn the self-released Death Note EP.

This past night of January 27th, Mark passed away; a deep loss for family, band, and fans but equally for music generally. His playing was distinctive, like a single individual colour in a vast palette of hues, able to create haunting melodies and moments as evocative and captivating as the incisive grooves and hooks from him which so freely and uniquely gripped body and imagination. The evidence is no more powerful and true than on Bloodline. He was also a wholly loved man to whom music was his life’s fuel and a true gentleman for all those who knew and met him.

Bloodline is a thrilling way to remember and enjoy Mark’s craft and potent presence; an album which grips physically and imaginatively from its first breath, increasingly winding appetite and lust around its creative fingers track by track. The foursome quite simply cements themselves as still one of the essential post punk incitements with it, almost as if they had never been away as a presence yet pushing themselves into new fresh realms of creative drama and aural adventure.

The album’s title track is first up, chugging riffs swiftly turning into wiry tendrils as percussion teases. Once the brooding bassline enters, things become eagerly catchy with the song blossoming into a PiL meets Leitmotiv like lure with Rio’s tones showing a certain Lydon-esque tinge to them. Feet and hips cannot avoid being involved as sultry melodies weave their temptation and a repetitious Killing Joke scented nagging growls in its belly.

Drama seeps from the electronic coaxing bringing next up This Vanity into view, its raw industrially kissed smoulder continuing to hug the senses as the bass unveils a gorgeous lure. Alongside, Mark’s guitar spins a spiral of melodic suggestion as Mick’s rhythms instinctively roll, a Gene Loves Jezebel like breeze soon floating over the provocative landscape to seep into every emotive crevice as vocals plaintively croon. Quickly absorbing the senses, the track makes way for the outstanding, rhythmically tenacious canter of Inquest. There is no escaping thinking of Jaz Coleman and co as Karl and Mick unite their flirtatiously anthemic designs but as throughout Bloodline, 1919 soon breed their own distinct character of sound and imagination. Magnetic harmonies and intoxicating melodies proceed to vine the ridiculously virulent encounter drawing the listener further into its creative theatre where just as riveting treats lay like its successor Retrograde. Like a puppeteer, it has the body bouncing while its spicy maze of melody is a sunspot of temptation contagiously matched by the snarling bass and hungrily leaping beats; Rio the ringmaster to its rousingly provocative and exhilarating waltz.

Even darker depths are drilled by the bass next in Legacy, its gnarly breath echoed in the caliginous air of the song though it too has a rampant catchiness which tempers and suits its shadowy presence. Imagine Bauhaus in league with Play Dead and the song can be visualised but still only a glimpse of its invasively compelling adventure, success matched by that of the wholly different presence of Zeitgeist. Again the first of the just mentioned pair of references is a prime clue to its tenebrific air and almost vampiric temptation, Rio carrying a Pete Murphy air to some of his persistently highly enjoyable, ever moving delivery. Mark’s imagination spins another labyrinth of melody and haunted sound too, evolving textures as radiant as they are emotively darksome to seduce and ensnare.

Through the galvanic punk rock of Disassociation and the intrigue soaked flirtation of Waiting For God ears are thrilled and the album’s variety stretched with the latter revolving its charms in ears and imagination like a temptress whilst wearing Theatre of Hate/ The Danse Society sourced inspiration as another alluring spice to its own spellbinding and tenacious revelry. Both tracks whip up body and spirit with sublime yet forceful ease, being quickly and as boldly matched in results by the slightly calmer and heavier fascination of Trespass. Maybe the most pop lined song on the album it just as openly shares raw shadows whilst boisterously serenading the listener, and as those before, it only sparks emotional and physical participation.

Bloodline closes with Life Is.., its tribal incitement of rhythms alone enough to incite allegiance, bewitchingly assisted by the fuzzy glow of melodies and variety coated vocals. Something akin to a fusion of Calling All Astronauts and Inca Babies but not, the wonderfully niggling song saunters and swings with increasing infection; an aural epidemic from which there is no escape as it brings one very fine release to a tremendous conclusion.

You cannot evade sadness listening to Bloodline but neither the joy sparked by its simply stunning presence.

Bloodline is out now through Westworld Recordings.

Video Dir. Carl Arnfield / ChalkmanVideo.com

https://www.facebook.com/1919official/

Pete RingMaster 06/03/2017

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

King Colobus – Self Titled EP

king-colobus-promo-shot_RingMasterReview

There are times when something just clicks with ears and imagination, instincts instantly seizing the day and directing responses with almost lustful energy. That is what happened to The RR when facing the self-titled debut EP from UK rockers King Colobus. From virtually its first breath on the opening listen, the four-track theatre of blues and alternative rock trespassed and seduced the imagination and passions. It is pure drama, creative adventure as bold and ballsy as it is imaginatively intricate and sinisterly persuasive.

With its seeds sown in 2013, King Colobus officially stepped forward two years later. Vocalist/guitarist Stewart MacPherson and bassist James Bailes had already collaborated on ideas and songs for a future project when independently they both relocated to Devon. There they linked up with Plymouth based guitarist Gavin Huck and drummer Simon Marsh, uniting as King Colobus.

There is no escaping inspirations found in the likes of Queens Of The Stone Age, Soundgarden, Johnny Cash, and Interpol in the band’s sound but equally they have a personality and character to their music and songwriting which is sure to intrigue fans of others like Japanese Fighting Fish, Damn Vandals, and Inca Babies. There is uniqueness to their sound though which is most vocal and suggests why the quartet has already earned a potent live reputation whilst taking in shows supporting artists such as Sea Sick Steve, Band Of Skulls, De Staat, and Crazy Arm.

king-colobus-cover-artwork_RingMasterReviewRe-released this past week, the first King Colobus EP is a majestic introduction to the band and needs mere seconds to grip attention and appetite through opener Get Up. From its initial dark minatory melody, its texture wiry and tone ominous yet pure enticement, the track bounds in with swinging rhythms and a growling bassline supported by just as primal riffs. MacPherson instantly engages and recruits already persuaded ears, the song itself bluesy in air but pure virulent rock ‘n’ roll with an underlying punk snarl. It is a controlled web though, teasing and taunting rather than assaulting and only increasing its grip as a shimmer of guitar around alluring vocals breaks the tenacious trespass before breaking into an even bolder compelling incitement.

It is a stunning start swiftly reinforced by the song King Colobus, it too opening with a juicy lure before uncaging its heavy blues rock saunter. Bass and vocals stand individual in tone but equal in temptation as beats jab with relish at the senses, the song’s flames waiting to erupt in a sizzling blaze before settling down again until further incendiary expulsions throughout its compelling body. Showing an array of flavours making up their sound, at times the track reminds thoughts of Josh Homme and co and indeed The Doors but again the result is individual to the foursome.

Tits and Teeth steals its fine share of the passions next, its dark vaudevillian devilry carrying an air of sadly demised circus punks The Shanklin Freak Show, further evidence of the host of spices in the King Colobus invention. The song as good as stalks its victim but relishing its creative invasion of ears and imagination with energy eager to consume its prey whilst, with virulent catchiness, recruiting their participation.

Final track Wait immediately reminds of nineties band Skyscraper, having their instinctive rock ‘n’ roll infectiousness and tenacity to command attention; invention and imagination blossoming in its success. Grooves and hooks tangle the senses as rhythms ground out an easily given submission to their insistent prowess, vocals leading it all with their own rousing presence.

It is a glorious end to a must hear release not only bringing King Colobus to wider attention for the first time but suggesting there is really something major brewing down on the south coast.

The King Colobus EP is out now through all stores.

http://www.kingcolobus.com/    https://www.facebook.com/kingcolobus/

Pete RingMaster 07/02/2017

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Autopsy Boys – Return of the acid casualty auto humans

AB_RingMasterReview

After tenaciously grabbing ears and imagination last year with their mischievous invention and punk bred sound through the singles No Ambition and Song For Debbera, electro punk miscreants Autopsy Boys are poised to release their eagerly awaited new album this month. We call the band electro punk but as their fans know and the upcoming Return of the acid casualty auto humans shows, the British quartet’s sound has more distinct styles and textures than a high street boutique. New wave, punk, horror punk, industrial rock, metal…the list goes on to the flavours making up an album which has the creative devilry and mischief of a Saw movie and the relentless hungry adventure of a computer game.

Formed in 2011 by vocalist/keyboardist Lee Brunskjill and bassist Gary Hargreaves, who had already been making music together from 2006, the Leeds hailing Autopsy Boys stepped into the light when the founding pair were asked to open local hard-core punk and heavy metal all day event Beefstock IV. Recruiting friends for the supposedly one off moment, the band simply continued to play and create, with guitarist Alan Laird and drummer Sam Shelton (who recently left to be replaced by Billy James Mitchell) subsequently linking up with Brunskjill and Hargreaves. The following time also saw the earlier post punk inspired sounds of writers and band move into a hardcore punk arena of sound whilst still infusing the healthy revelry of synthesizers and samples into their horror movie/gaming inspired themes.

Singles like Rich Kids Playground/ Negative 8 and Crushing On Cynthia sparked increasing attention the band’s way as too debut album Def Elements in 2012. For all their successes though and that found by both No Ambition and Song For Debbera, the twenty one hefty Return of the acid casualty auto humans is looking like being a whole new ball game for attention and reputation. From start to finish, the album is a maelstrom of diversely flavoured and feverishly explosive tracks sure to ignite the buds of anyone with a taste for electronic, punkish, and bruising confrontational incitements.

Artwork by White Dolemite

Artwork by White Dolemite

Curated by Canadian actress/film director Debbie Rochon, Return of the acid casualty auto humans has attention quickly gripped; The acid test featuring Johnny Violent providing a brief intro with dark threatening shadows to its portentous coaxing on the way to turning into the rousing exploits of 27.8.89. With Blag Dahlia, who we are assuming is indeed the front-man of mighty punk band the Dwarves, the second song opens with an infectious electro rock tempting around steely riffs and firmly landed beats. Becoming more imposing as atmospheric keys collude with dark rhythms but never breaking its catchy intent, the Hadouken! scented song has appetite keen and ready for the fiercer proposition that is Just dance with me. Punkishly irritable and atmospherically sinister, the track quickly badgers and stirs up the senses with a hardcore seeded stomp carrying just a whiff of The Dickies to it.

As strong and heftily pleasing as the album is so far, I’m gonna kill myself lays down a certain pinnacle next. From Hargreaves‘ grievously throaty bassline to the intimidating fusion of vocals and belligerent riffs, it has body and emotions thickly involved in its punk rock challenge and lyrical adventure. Psych rock keys simply add to the raw and vibrant fun as the track reveals just some of the array of flavours fuelling the album.

The band’s early post punk style is still an element which has its say at times and Summers over makes riveting use of those textures with its nagging bassline and steely presence before erupting in a senses scorching crescendo. Like Artery on acid, the song is increasingly captivating just as the old school punk blessed Breakfast at retro Betty’s boutique which gets even more antagonistically incendiary as guest Al Skull adds to the contrasting vocal and sonic trespasses.

Through the power pop/grunge rock coloured STRAWBS! and Song for Debbera, the album demands attention, the first of the two uncaging virulent rock ‘n’ roll with the pugnacious nature of a street brawl. Its successor, with Rochon providing another great entrance to a song, is a contagious electro pop canter with an eighties new wave spattering of noise and bait hinting at bands like The Normal and Inca Babies. Both tracks keep pleasure full, though they soon get eclipsed by the muggy intensity and predacious character of  the excellent Lotti will conduct the same experiment on several different humans and in turn the similarly raucous and bracing Denton ward honey trap. Both tracks are simply shots of punk adrenaline giving the appetite more to be greedy over.

The chase scene provides a dance-punk /r&b infused distraction next; featuring Junior Bear and Debbie Rochon, the song is a lively eighties toned stroll which again enjoyably takes album and sound in another pleasing direction if without quite stirring up the instincts as powerfully as We’re gonna need more bodybags. Visceral in tone and punk ‘n’ roll predation, the song’s blending of metal, hardcore, and electro punk voracity has the body bouncing and energies exhausted by its close leaving Agoraphobia to exploit all with its own frantically bruising and anthemically inflamed incitement. There are numerous pinnacles to the heady landscape of the album, this an unmissable one immediately followed by another in the glorious Level 7: Compulsive. Basking in the involvement of Leeds duo Petrol Bastard, the track goes for the jugular from its first breath; weaving every strain of punk into its own hellacious addiction for ears as its punk irritability and addictiveness provides the canvas for the grin inducing vocal prowess and devilment of band and guest.

The album is at its fullest height now, the past trio of treats matched by the psychotic drama of Every good sitcom gets cancelled after the pilot where Brunskjill seems to have been stuffed down a drain pipe to present his narrative whilst around him a tempest of rock ‘n’ roll boils over as an even more deranged than normal Cardiacs like kaleidoscope of insanity flirts with the imagination.

Lusty reactions continue to be stirred by the Rochon introduced Bubblegum where the guest vocals of Rebecca Lindley especially light up ears within more robustly tenacious endeavour. There is equally no relaxing of appetite and eagerness for Cigarette burns which follows with Al Skull again on board. Though carrying a feel of Peter and The Test Tube Babies and The Adicts to its raw punk storm, keys and the Autopsy Boys ingenuity only twists it inside out to forge another fresh infestation of the senses before the electro punk pop stroll of Every little thing has hips and emotions swinging.

The gentler but no less attitude loaded electronic proposal of Disco for psychopaths steps up next, its creative wares leading to nothing less than unbridled satisfaction. It is a success quickly matched by Town full of microdots and its hungry torrent of hardcore belligerence and rhythmic animosity with Al Skull back again to add to its ravenous snarl, and indeed the melodically acoustic and rabidly frenetic stalker that is Totally obsessed with you which brings the album to a devilishly magnetic close.

With so many tracks there was the fear even as a long-time fan and player of the band’s songs on our podcasts, that Return of the acid casualty auto humans would be a collection of undoubted triumphs but also a few fine but inescapable fillers. From start to finish though, there is no weak link or a song seemingly thrown in to make up the numbers. The album’s strong start just gets bigger, bolder, and more irresistible song by song with, of course particular moments which really ignite personal tastes along the way.

So come the end of the month, we suggest you go treat yourself to an album certain to ride high on many end of year best of lists. Did we mention that the album is to be released by the band as a free download too, with a CD and vinyl release at a later date; as their music might suggest, the band must be mad!

Return of the acid casualty auto humans is released 30th April as a free download via  https://autopsyboys.bandcamp.com/

http://www.autopsyboys.com   https://www.facebook.com/autopsyboys/   https://twitter.com/autopsyboys

Pete RingMaster 04/04/2016

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

For more exploration of the independent and promotional services check out http://www.zykotika.com/

The Seduction of Noise: Twenty punk/alternative releases which ignited The RingMaster Review in 2015.

In another year of creative drama, sonic adventure, and melodic mastery across the broad sphere of sound, The RingMaster Review selects those EPs/albums covered by the site which most turned ears and imagination lustful.

TSPSI_RingMaster Review

The St Pierre Snake Invasion – A Hundred Years A Day
https://ringmasterreviewintroduces.wordpress.com/2015/11/04/the-st-pierre-snake-invasion-a-hundred-years-a-day/

Oh! Gunquit – Eat Yuppies and Dance
https://ringmasterreviewintroduces.wordpress.com/2015/05/02/oh-gunquit-eat-yuppies-and-dance/

Zedi Forder – Self Titled EP
https://ringmasterreviewintroduces.wordpress.com/2015/09/03/zedi-forder-self-titled-ep/

Mr. Strange – The Bible of Electric Pornography
https://ringmasterreviewintroduces.wordpress.com/2015/11/05/mr-strange-the-bible-of-electric-pornography/

Mr. Strange EP album cover _RingMaster Review

Billy Momo – Drunktalk
https://ringmasterreviewintroduces.wordpress.com/2015/02/02/billy-momo-drunktalk-album/

Black – Blind Faith
https://ringmasterreviewintroduces.wordpress.com/2015/06/01/black-blind-faith/

Los Bengala – Festivos Incluso
https://ringmasterreviewintroduces.wordpress.com/2015/08/25/los-bengala-festivos-incluso/

The Dropper’s Neck – Nineteen|Sixteen
https://ringmasterreviewintroduces.wordpress.com/2015/07/10/the-droppers-neck-nineteensixteen/

The Dropper's neck Cover Artwork_RingMaster Review

The Slow Readers Club – Cavalcade
https://ringmasterreviewintroduces.wordpress.com/2015/04/14/the-slow-readers-club-cavalcade/

Los and the Deadlines – Perfect Holiday EP
https://ringmasterreviewintroduces.wordpress.com/2015/07/13/los-and-the-deadlines-perfect-holiday-ep/

Le Butcherettes – A Raw Youth
https://ringmasterreviewintroduces.wordpress.com/2015/09/18/le-butcherettes-a-raw-youth/

Le Butcherettes A Raw Youth Cover_RingMaster Review

Asylums – Wet Dream Fanzine EP
https://ringmasterreviewintroduces.wordpress.com/2015/02/23/asylums-wet-dream-fanzine-ep/

Inca Babies – The Stereo Plan
https://ringmasterreviewintroduces.wordpress.com/2015/03/11/inca-babies-the-stereo-plan/

The Barnum Meserve – Self Titled
https://ringmasterreviewintroduces.wordpress.com/2015/04/06/the-barnum-meserve-self-titled/

Deepshade – Everything Popular Is Wrong
https://ringmasterreviewintroduces.wordpress.com/2015/09/24/deepshade-everything-popular-is-wrong/
Deepshade Cover Artwork_RingMaster Review

Kobadelta – Open Visions
https://ringmasterreviewintroduces.wordpress.com/2015/04/27/kobadelta-open-visions/

Dirt Box Disco – Only in it For the Money
https://ringmasterreviewintroduces.wordpress.com/2015/04/16/dirt-box-disco-only-in-it-for-the-money/

The Migrant – Flood
https://ringmasterreviewintroduces.wordpress.com/2016/01/08/the-migrant-flood/

Dick Venom & the Terrortones – SnakeOil for Snakes
https://ringmasterreviewintroduces.wordpress.com/2015/11/09/dick-venom-the-terrortones-snakeoil-for-snakes/

cover_RingMaster Review

Practical Lovers – Agony
https://ringmasterreviewintroduces.wordpress.com/2015/11/28/practical-lovers-agony/

The RingMaster Review 01/01/2016

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

For more exploration of the independent and promotional services check out http://www.zykotika.com/

Hackmonocut – The Sum Of My Parts

hackmonocut_RingMaster Review

A sultry swampland of immersive melancholy, noir kissed beauty, and bewitching almost sinister drama, The Sum Of My Parts is one of the major surprises that always spring up in a year. To fans of Austrian musician Hackmonocut, album and sound is probably an evolution to an already recognised alchemy from the artist but to newcomers, as us, the release is a spellbinding and mouth-watering surprise from the shadows, one of the essential adventures of 2015.

Hackmonocut emerged in 2012, spending months writing and creating his distinctive yet at times enjoyably familiar tapestry of sound and shadow bred emotion. Debut album, In The Land Of Basement Hobby Rooms, was released in 2013 and swiftly lured potent attention and praise which its single Virgin Suicide Bomber sparked to stronger effect. Whilst making the video for the track, Hackmonocut formed a live band whilst studio recordings as with the new album, remained a predominantly solo project. Now it is the darker presence and incitement of The Sum Of My Parts to seduce fiercer spotlights, which such its soulful power and haunting seduction it surely will.

The album opens with We Better Look Away and a scuzzy wash of riffs and tangy guitar tempting around dulled but concussive rhythms. Quickly there is a psych rock spicing oozing from the raw air, especially once the vocals of Hackmonocut begin pouring narrative and melancholy. The song equally has a punkish snarl to its reserved but invitingly swinging stroll, Doors meets sixties garage rock orchestrated by The Jazz Butcher a simple but potent description to the character and magnetic hues of the excellent start to the album.

Things turned much darker with Now which from its first breath slowly invades and blossoms in ears and imagination with its sorrowful elegance and imposing theatre. Gentle but rich hooks and melodies emerge and sparkle in the dark corners of the track whilst the dirtier fuzz lined play of the guitars entwines with emerging drama cast by the strings and ukulele of Mr. Woolph, who also play in the live band, across the absorbing landscape. There is a definite Echo and The Bunnymen air to the song also, one also embracing Nick Cave essences, both flavours which return in varying degrees across the album but only colours to something with its own identity and voice.

cover_RingMaster Review     The excellent Used Love rips the air next, a garage punk seeded snarl of a song growling round the ever riveting tones of Hackmonocut. This time a sense of artists like Inca Babies and Pete Wylie come to mind as the track twists and turns on a spiral of sound, energy, and invention. It is like a hex on the imagination, just as irresistible as the following Dead Born Sister. The new single, released the same day as the album, is noir cast seduction which glows with beauty and a tormented soul as it captivate ears and thoughts with its sublime craft and inescapable and tenaciously dark hug. Once more Nick Cave is an easy comparison, as also that of The Mission, but once more the man creates a unique croon painting a lingering sound and picture which breeds only addiction fuelled reactions.

The Ripper (Gimme Back My Love) follows with a similar tone to its dark smouldering of emotion and gothic hues. Blessed with the contrasting warm harmonies of Ella against the grainy tones of Hackmonocut, the song flickers and glows like a fire in the night, guitar and bass the eventful sparking in the shadow of the tribal rhythms additionally lit by flames of voices. Strings again add richer drama and potency to just one more peak in the increasingly impressing release.

Through the mesmeric dolor of Scarlet and the distorted scuzziness of Leech, the album continues to enthral, the first enslaving with its fascinating heartbreak through word and sound and the second with a harsher climate of blues and psych rock accompanied by mellow but flirtatious piano. Both, without quite matching those before them, grip attention and appetite before Love Letter slips into Doors meets Helldorado lamentation and soon after, to close up the album, Days Of Roses takes the listener on a flight of sweltering balladry and lost souls. Both simply transfix but the final track is pure dark seduction with grit in its attitude and tempestuousness in its air.

The Sum Of My Parts has an intimacy to it as potent as the resonating sounds shaping its body but also carries broader reflections across songs which, as the album itself, only grow and involve the listener more with every listen. This is a must for all dark rock ‘n’ roll and gothic rock fans, for those with a taste of any of the references mentioned, and really a treat for anyone which loves great dark music.

The Sum Of My Parts is available from August 14th.

Ringmaster 14/08/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Inca Babies – The Stereo Plan

INTREPID FOX oct[1] copy

From the days when the devil thrust his evil designs into music, dark rock ‘n’ roll has been a persistent and endearing temptation. From the leather clad hip and vocal lures of Sweet Gene Vincent to the modern psychotic seductions of Dedwardians, it is a delicious trespass of ears and imagination that continues to evolve rich adventurous psyche twisting pastures. The likes of The Doors, The Cramps, The Birthday Party, Bone Orchard, The 69 Eyes, Eighties Matchbox B-Line Disaster, The Dropper’s Neck to name a few, have continued to expose the senses to new ravenous depths of sinister sonic exploration over the decades. One band which from their emergence in 1982 has also sculpted a perpetual warped seduction is Inca Babies. Their almost serpentine invention and dark musical incitements have continued to inspire and invigorate, even during the near on twenty years they were absent from the music scene, but since returning in 2007 you can only suggest that the UK trio must have shaken hands on a new deal with Lucifer as they have risen to truly become one of the leading lights and template setting protagonists of British rock ‘n’ roll.

The evidence is already boldly apparent in their two albums since reforming, the acclaimed Death Message Blues and Deep Dark Blue of 2010 and 2012 respectively. Both releases ignited an already ravenous gothic rock scene and duly deserved all ardour given but each in many ways was just an immense but leading appetiser for the glory of The Stereo Plan. Released towards the end of 2014, the band’s seventh studio album is a masterpiece of the dark aural arts. The third instalment of their death blues trilogy, its fourteen-track proposal twists and turns through the primal essences of post punk, surf, garage punk, trash blues, and every other dark flavour available, but bred in the imagination of Inca Babies transforms into a recipe of ingenious alchemy. It is a transfixing and slightly menacing proposition which has everything from feet to the passions ablaze.

Listening to The Stereo Plan is almost like immersing in a greatest hits collection of songs, every encounter of such irresistible and impressive invention and contagion that there is no time to take a breath and reflect until the final note of the release drifts away. It all starts with the album’s title track and its opening tangy lure of surf bred toxicity. It is an instant inescapable invitation for ears and imagination, the percussive shuffle which soon adds its bait only increasing an enticement which deepens again with the thick bass prowls of Vince Hunt. Continuing to bind ears in his guitar’s delicious spicery too, Harry Stafford pounces with his vocal and lyrical dance, as everything in the song colludes to create satanic rock ‘n’ roll majesty, especially as rhythms grow in intensity and devilment with the vocals to arouse an even lustier persuasion.

How to follow such a magnificent start would have many bands in a cold sweat but not Inca Babies as they match its majesty with a just as compelling incitement going by the name of Scatter. Stereo Plan Front 1The swinging beats of drummer Rob Haynes recruits eager attention right away, swiftly adding appetite as riffs and bass grooves unite with his anthemic beats and the incoming catchy vocal delivery. Into its stride the song expels a punk causticity around its driving rhythmic spine, the fingers of Stafford continuing to dance over the strings of his guitar to create a web of sonic addiction. The aforementioned Dewardians comes to mind as the song bounces with venomous mischief and also Eighteen Nightmares At the Lux with its scuzzy textures.

The salty smoulder of Damnation comes next, an Orson Family like countrified shimmer fuelling the temptation of guitar and rolling beats. As the opening pair of songs, psychobilly bred rapacity coats the song but also here a more garage punk tenacity emerges and grows to an even more potent persuasion in the following River To the Centre of the World. A haunting slice of upbeat balladry with a chorus which simply infests the senses, the track is dark poetic manna for ears and imagination. It also continues the mouth-watering diverse landscape of the album, each song a blossoming of individual and unique gothic theatre bred in sinistrous ideation.

The Cajun cast spell of Stand Down Lucifer keeps listener and album in lustful realms next, its sinuous shimmer and invention a creeping and inescapable seduction whilst Feast With Panthers strolls in with stalking rhythms and demonic hooks within again a fine and alluring vocal proposal. Like Th’ Legendary Shack Shakers meets The Screaming Blue Messiahs, the latter a band easy to offer varying degrees of comparison to across the album, the track swings it frame and flirtation with mischief in its eyes and a wicked lick on its melodic lips. The Stereo Plan began on a lofty pinnacle and this pair again sublimely ensures that there is no slip from such heady heights.

   Last Flight Out of Saigon with its pulsating bassline and acidic sonic veining croons suggestively in ears next, its minimalistic yet cavernous presence a mesmeric hex before the garage pop feistiness of Absolute Leader of the World leaps at the senses. Holding a great raw seventies/eighties punk essence to its contagion, the song is a sweetly caustic roar of blues rock which re-ignites body and energies after the resourceful ‘rest’ found in its predecessor.

Returning to the insidious charms which festered wonderfully in the early songs, Devilfish Anarchy stalks and romps with that gothic blues meets psychobilly predation and devilry. Beats and basslines are the instigator to lust fuelled whiplash as vocals and melodic toxins work away on thoughts and emotion. It is an exhausting pleasure whose rigorous nature is swiftly tempered and contrasted by the funereal stance and classical elegance of Still Mountain, a bewitching ballad wrapped in imposing and provocative shadows.

A dirtier yet restrained heavy rock pushes the walls of Damn Our Hides next, its persuasion not as instant as elsewhere, though swiftly a captivating companion for ears, but slowly burning away behind the scenes and repeatedly nudging thoughts after the event, as so many other songs on the album. Its enduring temptation is another striking aspect of The Stereo Plan, each twist of its design able to return at leisure and with potency, just as the heated jazziness of Ghost Ship. The track is ablaze with sultry trumpet flames, filthy basslines, and delirious sonic enterprise combining for a fiery musical sunset on an apocalyptic landscape.

The album is finished off by the excellent psyche/ surf rock stomp of Blacktop Speedway and finally the garage rock serenade of Late Night Frankie Brittle, a croon which simply grows in weight, intensity, and sonic rabidity with volcanic imagination. The pair makes a thrilling end to one irresistible encounter.

Admittedly having a soft spot for the type of sounds Inca Babies revel in went in their favour, but also it brings more demands but once again the Manchester trio stand tall over them as they again help lead British rock ‘n’ roll into new and exciting explorations.

The Stereo Plan is available now via Black Lagoon Records

http://www.incababies.co.uk/   https://www.facebook.com/incababies/

RingMaster 11/03/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard on Reputation Radio @ http://reputationradio.yooco.org/

Inca Babies: Deep Dark Blue

Inca Babies

    Deep Dark Blue is easily one of the best albums of 2012 and one of our favourites, a release which shows that the creativity of Inca Babies just gets richer and more delicious. The thirteen track album is a sensational treat which teases and ignite the passions with all the expected shadows conjured by the band brewed in a sweltering vat of new imagination and mesmeric enterprise.

Since its beginnings in 1982, the Manchester band has brought a distinct and hypnotic presence to rock n roll with their punk spine combining trash rock, surf punk, garage blues. The early days brought great acclaim and popularity, the band playing four John Peel Show sessions over the years, frequently topping indie charts, and playing tours and dates across Europe, not to forget releasing four acclaimed albums and numerous equally received singles. The time also saw the band struggle with holding onto drummers and singers to remain alongside guitarist Harry Stafford and bassist Bill Marten. This eventually led to the demise of the band in the late eighties, Inca Babies running out of suitable options. The release of the Best Of… compilation album Plutonium in 2006, ignited great interest on the band again and it reformed the following year with Gold Blade drummer Rob Haynes joining Stafford  who took on vocals too, and Marten. As gigs followed inside and beyond the UK, the band began working on their first original album since reforming but sadly midway through Marten passed away and everything was put on hold as the band came to terms with the devastating loss. Eventually in tribute to and to keep his legacy alive the band, with friend and former A Witness bass player Vince Hunt coming into the setup, completed the album Death Message Blues which was released late 2010.johnn

Released on their own Black Lagoon Records, their sixth studio album is quite possibly their best work yet, the maturity and DDB album coverexperiences of the band leading to songs which just lay organically on the heart as if born from your own personal passion. Rightly or wrongly we have always thought of Inca Babies as the UK version of The Birthday Party, not necessarily in sound but in journeying through the darkest of shadows and using them as a wrapping to their unique vision. Deep Dark Blue again gives plenty of evidence for us to remain casting that ‘shadow’ over them whilst continuing to mark the band as something which is one of a kind.

The album opens with is their first single for twenty five years, My Sick Suburb. Opening on simple beats and a grouchy bass the track is an instant bluesy attraction especially with the jangly guitar and vocals of Stafford soon adding their presence. It is an uncluttered track with a sure swagger which ticks all the boxes, and though the choice of single from the album would have been different for us you can see why it was chosen and not argue with its open effectiveness.

From a strong start the album just gets better and better. The following But Not This Time is a fiery stomp of sonic guitar rubs and what in no time becomes an addictive element of the whole release, that heavily prowling and throaty bass invention. Throughout many of the songs the Cramps like breath which lacquers the sound is irresistible with this song and the next up title track the first such pleasures. This track is a smouldering stroll through a heated atmosphere with caging rhythms and sizzling guitar sonics which place the senses on edge and set the heart alight. It is a twisted blues piece of grandeur with an acidic twang and viral infection to its gait.

It is so tempting to wax lyrical about every track on the album but will resist and just mention personal highlights amongst only nonstop irrepressible and contagious slices of delight. Firstly there is the twin scintillation of the gallows themed Following Jorges and the psyche elegant Bikini Quicksand, both with a similar yet different heat to their coruscate air. Tracks like Tower Of Babel and Monologues Of Madness also trigger all the passions possible but all are exceeded by two songs, Endgame Check Out Club and Sven Hassel v Billy The Kid. The first of the pair is a track which plays like a psychobilly Johnny Cash track spiced with The Screaming Blue Messiahs, its infectious groove and scorching solo a welcome sonic branding which any one would be proud to bear. The second is just brilliance in action, everything about the song an ‘orgasmic’ addiction. Punk guitars graze the ear whilst sharing time with vocal and bass lures just impossible to resist, their combined mischief sheer genius. Easily one of the best songs heard this year its mix of bruising storms and magnetic simplicity is quite masterful and a true triumph.

As declared earlier every track on Deep Dark Blue is outstanding, making for an album which should stand to the fore of any best of lists and the heart of all who engage its magnificent company.

www.incababies.co.uk

RingMaster 07/12/2012

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