Greyhaven – State Of Mind

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Finding an inventive and commanding middle ground between the raw intensity of metal and the anthemic infectiousness of alternative rock with a firm dash of post hardcore involved, British quintet Greyhaven recently uncaged their new EP State Of Mind. It is an encounter which roars and serenades ears and imagination in equal measure; bullying and seducing the senses with seven explosive and imposingly compelling proposals.

London based, Greyhaven formed early 2015 and soon earned a potent reputation for a live presence which has seen the band play alongside the likes of Create To Inspire, Idols Of Apathy, Vera Grace, and The Afterparty. Their first year also the release of debut EP The Flood, a well-received introduction which solidly set the band out as one to watch. State Of Mind suggests much more as it reveals Greyhaven taking new strides in songwriting and sound with riveting results.

Recorded with Dan Kerr (Shields, Create To Inspire, Despite my Deepest Fear), State Of Mind is a tempest of anthemic intensity and sound aligned to mellower moments of melodic intimacy. From opening suggestive instrumental Sinners a sense of creative and emotive drama blossoms in ears, the track growing in predacious shadows and poetic charm before it eventually drifts into the waiting jaws and rousing tempestuousness of Hexes. As guitarists Alex Hills and Jim White weave a tapestry of descriptive riffs and melodic tendrils in tandem with similarly potent keys, the raw throated growl of bassist Edd Kerton explodes to be subsequently replaced by the impressive clean and emotive tones of vocalist Sam Paterson. Tapestry is the best word for the song, so many elements across the band bred with imagination and interwoven in a proposal which never stops revealing new essences and shades of tone in every listen.

greyhaven_cover_artworkCopyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyrightIt is a craft and prowess which applies to all songs within the release to be fair, the following Darkest Hour swift confirmation as a great growling bassline from Kerton and the merciless swings of drummer Connor Tate link up with the harmonious delivery of Paterson and the emotive melodies which embrace ears. A fiery solo only adds to the imposing yet captivating drama shaping the song, again each minute a cauldron of enterprise breeding new adventures with every encounter.

There are familiar elements to the Greyhaven sound which suggest inspirations from the likes of Architects and Alexisonfire, and maybe are most openly apparent within the excellent On & On, though they are spices quickly engulfed in the band’s own eager imagination. The source of the band’s new video, the track leaps around and burns like a sonic fire, the guitars licking at the senses with melodic heat as rhythms crackle at the core amidst vocally coloured flames.

From one powerful persuasion to another as the highly infectious Our Stand steps forward next, its proposal bruising and magnetic as Paterson shines within another storm of metallic predation and emotionally inflamed contagion as savage as it is rousing as it is pop lined infectious. That lighter air also frequents successor Brother, though again Greyhaven infuse it into a creative and musical ferocity which almost venomously snarls. The song adds another shade to the sound and songwriting of the band, its catchiness an inescapable lure perfectly courted by a barbarous intent headed by Kerton’s toxically grouchy growls.

Closed by a thoroughly enjoyable acoustic version of The Flood, the title track of that first EP, State Of Mind proves and further suggests that Greyhaven is heading towards becoming a potent part of the British heavy rock scene. Already they have provided two releases no one should ignore.

State Of Mind is out now via Outsider Records across most online stores.

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Pete RingMaster 08/09/2016

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Idols Of Apathy – Life Lessons

Idols Of Apathy Promo Shot_RingMaster Review

Truly standing out in the vast horde of metal bands with a hellacious bully of a sound seems to get harder and harder with every passing year and diversely brutal release. Originality is a premium numerous touch upon, often impressively, and few rarely blossom to something which really does stand alone and become the inspirer rather than the inspired. British extreme /tech metallers Idols Of Apathy fall into the former with their sound, but equally strongly impress with their five track tempest of fury and raw ingenuity, the Life Lessons EP. The release is a volatile and skilfully invasive proposition which never leaves a moment dulled by a lack of imagination and passion, qualities woven in with recognisable hues to suggest that influences breed as much of the band’s invention as their own explorations. At the same time though, the highly enjoyable Life Lessons leaves ears and appetite fiercely attentive as a rich fuel of potential hints of even bigger and individually bolder things ahead as Idols Of Apathy evolve.

Idols Of Apathy Cover Artwork_RingMaster Review   Bursting from the Essex landscape in 2013, Idols Of Apathy were soon stirring up a potent local fan base, spreading further afield once they swiftly released debut single Deceiver. Its success was backed by first EP Unheard Words, which was recorded by Dan Keer. Picking up strong national and media recognition, it was the spark to the band sharing stages, to continuing acclaim, alongside the likes of Climates, Canvas, Lock & Key, Shields, Sworn In, Continents, Create to Inspire, Carcer City, and Falling With Style amongst many more. It is easy to see similar and bigger responses to the release and persuasion of Life Lessons coming up, and though it might not roar from that plateau of major originality it powerfully gives the already strong reputation of the band a new shot in the arm.

The release opens with Bipolar, a song inspired by vocalist Jack Dervish’s own condition and living up to its title in sound and character from its first evocative breath. In no time the inviting coaxing is an anger driven and heart spawned tearing of the senses, with a sound seemingly drawing on the savage intensity and hues of a Slipknot, Devil Driver, or As I Lay Dying. The lethal swings of drummer Stuart Roche resonate like masonry through ears and bone whilst the raw vocal invasion of Dervish, backed as strongly by guitarist Dean Chignell especially with his eventful clean tones, abrase and entice simultaneously. It is the web of invasive grooves and technical imagination from Chignell and fellow guitarists Tom Johnston and Joe Gregory that majorly helps turn a very decent track become a striking offering, their entwining enterprise helping the EP get off to an immense and impressive start.

The great creative irritability and hostile dynamics of the first song continues in the following Addiction, its trespass an insatiable incursion into the senses but bolder in its embrace of provocative ambiences and ‘mellower’ textures led again by clean vocals. The song itself jerks around at times like it has creative Saint Vitus Dance, twisting and lurching from idea to carnivorous intent with seamless and eventful prowess. The bass of Elliott Black is a predator in the mix, his lines and lures bestial, and though not always as open in the mix as in the first song are always there tempering or inciting the calmer and fiercer moments.

Once A Cheat / Always comes next, smothering ears in an atmospheric angst around similarly driven vocals before spilling its own animus of sound and emotion. The scything strokes of one guitar collude with a net of off-kilter sonic from another as the track blossoms a turbulence which merges moments of rich catchiness with winds of blustery causticity; the technical craft and ideation of the band from all angles ensuring predictability is an unused issue.

The scent of Whitechapel meets Revocation of the track merges with the rancorous intensity of the following Backstabber too, lining the melodic expression lighting up a track which maybe does not make the same initial impact as earlier propositions within Life Lessons but comes into its thrilling own over time and listens. It is an increasingly virulent tapestry of crippling rhythms and spiky guitar intrusiveness bursting with resourceful vitality and physical tenacity from across the board before leaving Lessons Learnt to bring the EP to an imposing like-minded and pleasing close. As well as essences which savage as old friends, there is an element of similarity between songs in certain areas but always saved from dominating things by the turbulent adventure the band builds each track upon. Whereas its predecessor’s assault was sonic and lyrical venom, the final track feels like it is an understanding incitement, melodic and harmonic essences a hug around the shoulder giving a reassurance echoing the words shared, though it still snarls and bites like a rabid beast too.

Idols Of Apathy is a band destined to more and greater attention, a suggestion hard to resist making on the evidence of the excellent Life Lessons, and if they can find that real element of originality too, the real potential of big things ahead.

The Life Lessons EP is available from December 4th.

https://www.facebook.com/IdolsOfApathy   https://twitter.com/idolsofapathy

Pete RingMaster 04/12/2015

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Idols of Apathy – Unheard Words

IOA Promo

Unleashing a sonic cyclone of unwavering hostility and technical victimisation, Unheard Words the debut EP from UK metallers Idols of Apathy is one formidable and gripping slab of creative savagery. As striking as it is vicious, the release explains with ease why there is a healthily buzz brewing around the band. It is not without aspects which prevents it making an even more major impact but with a raging potential and openly impressive craft to its sound and textures, it is easy to raise excited anticipation of big things for the band ahead.

Hailing from Essex and uncaged in 2013, Idols Of Apathy probably could not have made a more attention grabbing assault on the senses to start off their consumption of the country’s senses than with Unheard Words. Five tracks across a fifteen minutes furnace of sound and aggression, the release is a short bludgeoning shock to the system but one which does leaving a lingering impression and hunger in thoughts and appetite. It certainly takes work to explore and reveal the intricacies and superb skilled invention at play, its thick surface similarity to an arguably formula attack of songs already having fallen short in the opinion of some others, but dive into the eye of the storm and that is where songs and Idols of Apathy excel and surprise.

The EP starts off with brief instrumental Rebirth, a piece which enthrals from its first seconds with a melancholic ambience and melodic wistfulness, soon graced further by a harmonic haunting. It seduces senses and imagination before Artworkthe staggered djent charm and tenacity of the guitars within viciously stabbing rhythms ravage the air. That initial mesmeric beauty still persists though as it settles seamlessly into the portentous tempest stirring ruggedly around it. That intimidating suggestion is swiftly realised with Death Row. The corrosive vocal roar of Jack Paul Dervish explodes in ears first, matched by the ferocious backing tones of Dean Chignell whose guitar, alongside those of Tom Johnson and Joe Gregory, collide in an ear splitting maelstrom of intensive and technical voracity. As much as the track seemingly is intent on annihilation of the senses, there is a swagger and a budding nest of grooves poised and hinting in the belly of the fury. It swiftly makes for an intriguing and riveting encounter, to which the returning melodic call from the instrumental adds a rich emotive hue . It is a stunning track which continues to reveal new corners and depths within its bestial rage; every breath and twist a punch and treat for ears but within a frame of less than three and a half minutes there is no time for excess and showing off, not that you ever feel the band has the urge to go into that kind of indulgence.

The dramatic and impressive encounter is backed up by the just as imposing The Devil’s Clock Tower. That earlier comment about similar touches of songs is evident here as the rhythmic and guitar enterprise bleeds into what came before without close attention, even with the evocative sonic coaxing in their midst. As it grows and digs deeper into its intensive heart though, the guitars sculpt an individual web of temptation whilst the bass of Elliot Black in league with the ear drum puncturing beats of drummer George, brutalise and seduce in equal measure as the vocals again provide a caustic challenge to sink teeth into. As all songs, it is not just about the maliciousness though, the atmospheric fire and melodic colour drenching the track being as provocative and imaginative as its inhospitable drive and passion.

The release is concluded by firstly Ventriloquist, a track which filters its predatory animosity through a maze of scything riffs and mouth-watering ideation. The rhythms refuse to have a veil of course, their crippling designs and hard fisted rabidity resourcefully vengeful and as irresistible as the sonic binding and aggravated riffery working away on the passions. It is a fine torturous confrontation which is matched by the closing Deceiver, which as the previous song comes from distant scenery but this time simply takes the senses in its teeth and musically and vocally flails and tears their security to shreds. It is a devastating onslaught with strangely a touch of Mudvayne to it initially before the track unleashes another creative blend of metalcore and technical metal to engross and violate ears. It is a powerful and viciously engaging protagonist bringing the EP to a potent end.

Unheard Words is a commanding and impressive debut which leaves thoughts in no doubt to the promise and quality of Idols of Apathy. For sure it has that to be honest minor issue of tracks sharing certain aspects of their identities and it is fair to say that their sound just now fails to really stand out against the best similarly styled, aggression clad bands pushing the genre. Idols of Apathy though easily stand in the company of most of that crop with all the potential to find their lone voice in the future with you imagine even more impressive endeavours.

The Unheard Words EP is available now as a free download @ http://idolsofapathy.bandcamp.com/

https://www.facebook.com/IdolsOfApathy

8.5/10

RingMaster 25/07/2014

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