Walleater – Self Titled

walleater

The debut self-titled EP from UK band Walleater may not stop you in your tracks and demand immediate attention but there is an inescapable captivation to its presence which puts the shoegaze/alternative rock band firmly on the radar. Consisting of four reserved yet vibrantly enveloping melodic flights through immersive ambiences, the release potently presents a band rich in striking promise and worthy of anticipation for their near horizons.

Hailing from Leeds, the quartet of vocalist/guitarist Rob Dell, guitarist Alex Finney, bassist Liam Hemingway, and drummer Lyndarn Harrison, Walleater take the raw potential and sound of their previous two track demo, A Masking Aura, to stronger accomplished and atmospherically pungent heights. Recorded with producer Bob Cooper, their first EP provides a proposition which combines the essences of bands like Pavement and My Bloody Valentine with the lighter embraces of House Of Love and the darker metallic incitement of Static Plan. It results in a brooding encounter which can swing from lively enticement to imposing shadows with ease.

The release opens with Give In To Me, a track already unveiled last month to eager reactions. It is not hard to see why as the song coaxes Artworkinstant attention and appetite with its spicy electro resonance and guitar sculpted sonic lures from the very first second. It is a thick and consuming, senses frisking sound which sparks the imagination just as swiftly. Relaxing into a more temperate melody driven climate for the joining of the vocals from Dell, the song enchants before expelling further intensely passionate bursts of energy and guitar led rapaciousness with more than a sense of the Jesus and Mary Chain to it. It is an absorbing and unpredictable immersion with an open infectiousness which cannot be resisted by ears and passions.

The following Just A Boy strokes the ears in a more restrained coaxing from the start; the guitars a gentle sway and temptation skirted by equally toned down beats and the dark throaty tone of the bass. The stance is completed by the vocal shimmer of Dell, his tones magnetic in a delivery which harmoniously drones at times whilst seemingly holding angst coated disinterest. It is a riveting delivery which never loses its appeal and potency even within the squalling ambience which tempestuously chills the narrative and song. It is hard not to offer a suggestion of Deftones to the flavoursome sound of the track but as with all thoughts it is a mere spice to the evocative recipe.

Glow comes next, the track an enterprising instrumental exploration which smoulders and flares up with controlled but intensive emotion across its simultaneously harsh and mesmeric landscape. With flames of noise and progressive rock to its demanding and commanding maelstrom, the piece provides further evidence to the invention and expression of Walleater’s songwriting and sound.

The release is completed by What Do You Know?, a melodic breeze of a caress which almost glances over the senses until the stronger sinews within the rhythms of Harrison take hold of the reins ensuring the song imposes just that little bit more. It is a whisper compared to the louder calls of other songs on the release though none roar with full lungs it is fair to say, and impressively adds another colour to the band’s creativity and presence. At times the track also sparks thoughts of China Crisis with its slightly celestial elegance as it finishes off a fine debut enjoyably.

It is probably fair to say that Walleater is yet to discover their unique voice, which is not surprising this being their first invitation to the world, but already there is a potency and breath to their music which pushes them out into an attention asking spotlight which only brings expectations for impressive things ahead from and for the four piece.

The Walleater EP will be released digitally on April 21st through Bandcamp for £1.99 while physically the EP will be spread across two 7” with ‘Part One: Give In To Me / Just A Boy’ being released also on April 21st via Close To Home Records with ‘Part Two: Glow / What Do You Know?’ scheduled for later this year.

http://walleater.bandcamp.com/

https://www.facebook.com/walleaterbanduk?ref=ts&fref=ts

8.5/10

RingMaster 11/04/2014

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Passenger Peru- Self Titled

     Passenger Peru

    Startlingly immersive with the craft and ability to turn the listener into a castaway lost in an expansive seduction of suggestive pop majesty within a dreamy soundscape in its rawest breath, the debut album from Passenger Peru is an experience you cannot help licking your lips over before each and every encounter. It is a mouthwatering collection of warm and elegant persuasions bred in an exploration which is bold and bravely adventurous. The self-titled album is as mentioned pop in its rawest most potent form but with an inspiring scourge of creative devilry and melodic mesmerism twisted into a hypnotic and at times wonderfully demonic dance.

    Passenger Peru comes from the creative minds and passions of Justin Stivers (vocals, guitar, bass, synth, drums, drum machines) and Justin Gonzales (vocals, guitar, synth, piano, samples), the former one time bassist with The Antlers for their Hospice album. The seeds for the Brooklyn based project are said to have started four years ago when the two musicians met and evolved into the Stivers led band Pet Ghost Project. A year in preparation, Passenger Peru is mouthwatering sonic scenery composed into something unique from essences of garage rock and shoegaze, psychedelic, alternative rock and more. With plenty of peaks and very minimal lows, if any at all, the lo-fi, hi-quality flight is raucous spellbinding pop brought in its most primal and beauteous magnificence.

     The album immediately takes the listener to a scintillating pinnacle with its opening pair of songs, a height the album never passperucoverquite emulates again though it thrills consistently trying. First song Your Hunger emerges from a cinematic melodic swoon and following studio doodling launches one of the most exciting and impressively tempting starts to a song heard in a long time. Guitar and bass instantly secure the fullest attention as they virtually gnaw on the ears with the latter offering an almost carnivorous tone to its dark enticement. With mutually attractive rhythmic teasing alongside, the rapacious sound conjured by the pair continue to coax and lure in the strongest lustful reaction and hunger, a post punk essence bringing thoughts of Joy Division and Gang Of Four to mind prowling the imagination whilst framing the excellent mellow and soothing vocals. It is delicious mix with sinister spirals of cold sound amid glorious flames of melodic tenderness colliding and uniting for a quite stunning provocation. Complete with an irresistible repetitious gait to bass and rhythms alongside a quite saucy groove which also hardly veers from its prime intent, the song sets the highest plateau for the album to keep up.

    In the Absence of Snow steps up next to stroll that pedestal with ease, its opening acoustically sculpted guitar tantalising and the again snarling throaty bass tempting exceptionally addictive and successful in igniting even greater rapture in the imagination and emotions. Best described as the Jesus and Mary Chain meets House Of Love whilst the revelry of Ok Go! is at play, the bait laid down for the ears and emotions to partake in, is again virulently impossible to refuse or not find a greedy need for. Rock pop at its finest with a fiery solo and another spine of repetition kissed captivation, the track continues the album’s unassailable submission of the passions. With an impressive lyrical craft and insight also at work, which admittedly comes second best to the sound in attention taking over the first couple of plays, Passenger Peru at this point has already ignited an ardour which only a total car crash of a remaining body of songs could deflate.

    Pollen Season takes no time in showing no such disaster is on the cards though as mentioned before, the album never treads the same lofty levels again. To put that into context though the following tracks prey on and build their own benchmark which most bands would swap their grannies for, the third song on the release a beguiling proposition of organic beauty around once more a bass treat you can only enthuse over with a tendency to drool, and a percussive enterprise which does not steal focus but would leave a major whole with its absence. Seriously magnetic, the song departs the now raging appetite for the album for the epidemically engaging pop absorptions of Tiger Lilly and Heavy Drugs to take over. The first of the two has a swagger and melodic grin which teases and charms but an equally solicitous sonic and rhythmic bruising to its latter swing whilst the second is a sultry summer breeze of radiant melodies within an increasingly dark and unsettling premise.

     The second half of the album starts with Weak Numbers, again a track which ensnares thoughts and appreciation but marks a slightly less potent stretch for the album. The front five tracks leave the latter quintet in their shadow though once more in a context where Passenger Peru is on another realm with their artistry at the start of the album and a still immensely impressive level thereafter. A gentle and smouldering embrace, the song is a melancholic incitement with celestial elegance aligned to a tempestuous but contained emotive brawl. It is a transfixing companion immediately supported by the exotically imagined Memory Garden and the enthralling, intensive fascination of Health System, a song which merges heavy and light melodic and intimidating textures into a weave of emotion entangling beauty with XTC like alchemy.

     The new single from the album Dirt Nap comes next, emerging with a slight Celtic lilt to its sonic beckoning before a predominately acoustic caressing ensues with a sense of The Wonder Stuff to its snare. Initially thoughts were not over excited by the song but over time it works its way under the skin to seduce though personally not the right choice as the single to lure people into the outstanding album, a record holding back another major treat for its closing offering. Life and Death of a Band is a rowdy and antagonistic romp but equally a ridiculously endearing and alluring temptress from a maelstrom of invention and creative intrigue and a quite brilliant finale to a breath-taking slab of pop excellence.

    Passenger Peru will be massive at some point with all the evidence resting and burning away in their debut, a journey as unique and awe inspiring as their name hints at.

http://www.passengerperuband.com/

http://passengerperu.bandcamp.com/

9/10

RingMaster 05/02/2014

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Slippertails – There’s A Disturbing Trend

 

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     US rock band Slippertails is a bit of a mystery you will find when looking for info on the creators of new album There’s A Disturbing Trend. Based in New Jersey and formed by its members in Bloomington, Indiana where they roomed together, the band is apparently a duo though the only name seemingly offered up is that of frontman Nick Casertano who recorded demos alone in his basement which would eventually become this album. Other than that it is pretty much left to the imagination to wonder what the band is about, but what is not a secret is the stirring addictive sound band and release persuades with. A merger of sludge bred tendencies within an alternative rock/garage punk narrative and steered by a hypnotic vocal drawl which at times embraces shoegaze mesmerism, Slippertails creates a presence which worms deep under the skin and into the psyche with irreverent contagion.

     The album is not a flawless affair if being critical but such its potency and potential it is hard not to be excited about the prospects and future creativity of the band whilst glossing over any small negatives. Varied in fuzz drenched sonic spice and caustic imagination which sears and scores the senses, There’s A Disturbing Trend has a nagging almost pestilential beauty which just empowers and improves over time and though a raw lo-fi proposition which maybe will grate on some, the nine track tempest of noise is a masterful slice of sonic alchemy. The immediate description of the band’s sound which comes to mind is Frank Black meets Everclear, the latter thanks to the vocal delivery and alternative rock/grunge tendencies of songs, with plenty of Melvins juices in the mix but that is only part of the story to be honest as the songs soon reveal.

     Opening with its first single Hip New Jerk, the album makes an energetic entrance with keen punchy rhythms puncturing the instantly compelling smog of scuzzy guitar. The vocals of Casertano soon seize control with a Frank Black like presence which infuses into the heavy garage punk sounds too. It is an irresistible lure of a starter with a very relaxed breath which fits in perfectly with the more boisterous and scowling aspects of the song. A great single and opener it makes an early strong plateau for the album to maintain which the following Failure matches with its different type of temptation. A slow almost stalking encounter for the ears, the track seduces and intimidates with equal efficiency, flames of guitar smouldering in the air whilst bass and rhythms scowl belligerently beneath them. Again there is a Frank Black like suasion which predominantly seems to guide the inspirations for the whole album but it is not so overpowering as to dismiss any of the uniqueness of Slippertails.

     Both Walk and Garden State Of Mind ignite the appetite into a hungrier state of eagerness; the first from a hypnotic drum coaxing evolving a garage punk tempting which latches on to the exceptional rhythmic bait whilst a sonic web of guitar toxicity and effect showered vocals play out their narratives. It is one of those songs which holds a virulence which the emotions unavoidably get infected by whilst its successor with another crawling sonic festering of an approach, wraps its fuzz sculpted arms acidically around the ears before serenading them with delicious vocal harmonies alongside the ever engaging core vocal causticity of Casertano. The pair only inflates the already buoyant pleasure spread by the album and though it at times takes time to fully recruit the passions There’s A Disturbing Trend by this point already has full command of thoughts and emotions.

   The following pair of Gold Tooth and I Will Peel You Open move into that Everclear side of things, the vocals very much reminding of Art Alexakis whilst the expressive emotive sonic casting is a close cousin to that created by the Oregon band. It is fair to say that both songs fall short of what comes before them, the second almost labouring in its persuasion, but still the two ultimately convince with a craft and infectiousness which can and does only enhance the presence of the album. Things are soon back on course though with the brilliant All Seeing Eye, a song which sounds like Jesus and Mary Chain in tandem with House Of Love as they seduce The Walker Brothers. It is a transfixing mesmerism which leaves imagination and senses lost in a fuzz drizzled evocation of an emotively crafted sunset.

     The brief punk surge of Altar Wine also has a sixties temperament to its aggressive outburst whilst closing song I Wanna Take Pills With You is a psyche addled piece of sultry enchantment, a shadowed soaked melodic psychedelic glow of danger and seduction. It is a slow burning conclusion which like the album just gets more potent and magnetically thrilling over time and plays. There’s A Disturbing Trend is a striking encounter which makes you work for its rapture but pays handsomely with some quite enchantingly abrasive treasures.

https://www.facebook.com/pages/Slippertails/487759917932606

8.5/10

RingMaster 14/01/2014

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the Greeting Committee – Island

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Hailing from the sultry streets of Newcastle, the Greeting Committee is one of those smouldering embraces which once laying their spellbinding caress over the ear leaves a lingering temptation which persistently invites and receives a return into the arms of the band’s exotic sound. Creating a web of psychedelic and indie seeded rock with Brit pop and sixties blues kissed seduction, the sextet return from the success of their first single Show Me The Lights Of Home at the closing weeks of last year, with debut EP Island released via Puzzle Push Records. Consisting of three magnetically compelling tracks, the release is a wake-up call and introduction to all newcomers and confirmation for existing fans of the potent promise and strength of this very exciting emerging band.

The title track opens things up with a dramatic brew of strings, keys, and atmospheric intensity which once securing full focus mellows out into a melodic breeze of impressive vocals and sonic imagination. It is a thick and intensive breath though which drives the song, one also unafraid to settle into less imposing textures and weight to allow the vocals and guitars to cast an infectious mesmeric weave. Imagine a merger of My Bloody Valentine, House Of Love, and The Verve and Island is the resulting alchemy and more. A brooding and increasingly seductive encounter the track is a beauteous evocation for the imagination and passions.

The following What’s It Like again takes a relatively gentle entrance into its resourceful body, its initial and following presence another filtrated through the essences of House Of Love with some Inspiral Carpets whilst infused with a delicious sixties Eastern sultriness and melodic warmth. Deceptively infectious and virulently compelling, the song is a persistent and welcome instigator of the passions, a rapturous engagement which is the strongest on the release and for personal tastes would have been the better lead track, though the fade out is an annoyance and seemingly suggesting the song is incomplete in this version.

The closing Borders & Patrols also ventures into an older climate of sound for inspiration, a whisper of The Doors washing teasingly over the harmonics and melodic intrigue conjured by the guitars. A celestial elegance from the keys accompanies the rich slowly roving bassline across the track to keep the persuasion unpredictable verging on mysterious whilst the excellent vocals and skilled guitar narrative brings a hue to the song which leaves a purposeful hunger in the appetite for band and release.

The Island EP is a masterful adventure which only disappoints in its contents being admittedly magnificent but only a trio of songs. the Greeting Committee breeds a greed which the release certainly suffices but also leaves short and impatiently wanting more by its lack of more tracks, but then it equally leaves anticipation for the next encounter an eager fire. This is a band destined to major things, just watch this space as the saying goes.

http://www.thegreetingcommittee.co.uk/

9/10

RingMaster 25/11/2013

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The Darlingtons – Who Says There’s No Beach In Doncaster EP

The Darlingtons Press Photo

Soaked in a melancholy which enthuse their hearts rather than casting them in darker oppressive shadows, the songs and sound of UK indie rock band The Darlingtons is an absorbing and magnetic wash of imagination and craft. The Taunton band has a presence and ability to reflect the darker shadows of ordinary life in a way which pulls no punches but still brings a breath of hope and consolatory comfort; most of all though it provides one pleasing and evocative encounter which plays like a new old friend and emotional co-conspirator.

With already their debut EP Decades Dance under their belt and the experience of having a label ‘behind’ them, the foursome of Kiran Roy, Daniel Young, Alex Bispham, and Chris Holmes now forge their own furrow and fight their own battles alone, and earning plenty of acclaim for their live performances and now their second EP through it. Who says there’s no beach on Doncaster? Is a collection of six live tracks bringing the band’s stage potency directly into the ears of the listener. It is a raw and unafraid to show warts and all encounter which declares the quality of songwriting and sound of The Darlingtons with unrestrained ease, and probably with such intensity to the emotive strength of the quartet, does so far better than any studio release might be able.

Opening song Bats is an immediate attention grabbing proposition, rhythms a bold enticement around which the guitars float andWho Says There's No Beach In Doncaster Front Cover flame with melodic enterprise. Everything takes a step back soon after arriving, apart from the continuing to jab rhythms and moody bass, to allow the excellent vocals to begin their narrative. It is compelling stuff which only intensifies as the guitars return their sonic embracing and vocal harmonies skirt the emotive vocal delivery. Though arguably not as tender in its touch, there is a feel of the House Of Love to the song which seduces as successfully as the every punchy rhythmic frame. It is a mesmeric lure and already a powerful declaration of the band in songwriting and live performance.

The following Ship At Sea has turmoil in its presence from the first note, keys offering an unsettled emotive suggestiveness whilst the drums prowl the song as if expecting dark clouds and trouble ahead. The rhythmic aspect of the band is a scintillating temptation throughout the release, constantly offering immense and dramatic textures and cages which thrust the song to the heart of imagination and emotions within its recipients. Within the song the still impressive vocals find themselves a little overrun by the intensity and rhythmic intent but not enough to defuse their effect and reflective potency whilst the guitars and bass conjure individual entrapments for the senses which are as irresistibly toxic as they are mouth-wateringly enterprising, especially the twang lilted bait laid down in the latter part of the riveting track. With a slight resemblance to Prince Edward Island and evocatively Scottish band Letters, the track leaves a lingering breath-taking impact in its wake.

Both Don’t Give Me Hope and For Some Else In Time keep the band’s hold on the passions secure, the first an insightful beckoning lyrically and musically around again rolling hypnotic rhythms which slowly builds its atmosphere and intensity into a climactic finale which never quite reaches the full blaze its hints at but certainly has the air smouldering brightly. Its successor equally burns with a resourceful but reserved suasion which leaves the appetite well catered for and want for more an open greed. Neither of the songs quite matches the might of the previous tracks but with elements which fully seduce and overall a presence that breeds satisfaction, the pair only enhances the experience of Who Says There’s No Beach In Doncaster?.

The opening to Everything is a surprising welcome, guitars prancing with a festive heart and dark bass romping within their eager caresses. It is not that the other tracks are manna to the pessimist but the shadows are noticeable by their absence at the start of the song and when it sparks its rhythmic and guitar spawned explosive fuel. The track then does step into that melancholic shade again which initially disappoints but only until the song merges both extremes into a vibrant and magnetic dance of sound and emotional expulsion. Though the song also falls just behind the outstanding start to the EP it provides another varied and flavoursome treat, rhythms and guitar strokes addictive, keys and vocals alluring.,

     Watch Yourself brings the release to a close in fine style, the song an infection loaded slice of indie pop with a heavy emotional body which a virulently anthemic chorus. It completes in Who Says There’s No Beach In Doncaster? an exciting and robust encounter from a band we are going to hear a lot of in coming years you suspect and one definitely that should be seen on stage.

http://www.wearethedarlingtons.co.uk

8/10

RingMaster 22/11/2013

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Nothing – Dig

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    Recently signed to Relapse Records, Philadelphia-based Nothing release new single Dig to celebrate the link up with the label who will release the band’s debut album Guilty Of Everything in 2014, as well as their current tour with Whirr. Combining a mesmeric and stirring mix of shoegaze, metal, and progressive invention, the single is an imagination capturing temptress walking the same seduction as found from Deftones and Palms but with a unique potently evocative sonic elegance of its own.

Nothing was formed in 2011 by Domenic Palermo, a musician who previously brought us hardcore/punk act Horror Show. His former band was held at stop when Palermo was imprisoned for a stabbing which saw him away for two years. Once released, he took time away from music before releasing a demo called Poshlost under the Nothing name. Then followed a union with Brandon Setta, who brought his craft for creating lush and rich evocative soundscapes to the intent and vision of Palermo. A 300 ltd edition 12” EP called Suns And Lovers followed on the Japanese boutique label Big Love Records, with the band donating its share of the proceeds to the label for a Tsunami Relief Charity. The release was then followed by a five track EP Downward Years To Come in November of last year which again caught the imagination of a great many.

Recorded with Jeff Zeigler at Uniform Recordings the single is a scintillating hook not only to itself but the forthcoming album, an inspiring playmate for thoughts and visions to immerse and wrap themselves within. Dig opens with a crisp but gentle blaze of guitar and resonating ambience which only needs the entrance of the outstanding vocals to secure total attention and plant a seed which brews to ardour by the song’s end. It is impossible not to think of Deftones during the track but it is doing the song an injustice such its individual fascination and melodic charisma burning magnetically from within the caustic yet equally alluring steely wrap. Vocally thoughts also drift to House Of Love whilst the song itself explores a skilfully fermented sunset framed by the outstanding rhythmic cage and spellbinding guitar guile and craft.

Dig is a must check out release though it should come with a warning as there is no doubt it will be the instigator of strong unrest as the wait for Guilty Of Everything and its joys seemingly promised by the single bears down on patience.

http://www.bandofnothing.com/

9/10

RingMaster 20/08/2013

 

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True Widow – Circumambulation

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One of the strongly anticipated albums to be unveiled this year, Circumambulation the new release from US band True Widow, is just a masterful alchemy of shadows and light filtered through equally enveloping sounds. Towering in intensity, seductive in beauty, and consuming in atmospheric toxicity, the eight track album leaves the listener exhausted, invigorated, and submerged in its and their own emotional depths for a full aural and mental exercise.

The third album from the band has a sound which defies labelling, though True Widow themselves term it stonedaze. The trio merge a stirring mix of drone, post-rock, and shoegaze but continue to add further unique additives as their creativity evolves. The new release breeds further the essences of the likes of My Bloody Valentine, Baroness, and Earth into their own distinct flavour but into the brew also incorporates the pop warmth of a House Of Love and delicious distortions of a Sonic Youth. It is an irresistible alchemy that takes the listener on a journey musically and emotionally, a mesmeric and at times gnarly trip that explores the textures and extremes of thoughts and experiences.

The Relapse Records release in many ways follows on in the same vein of previous albums True Widow (2008) and As High As circumambulation_1400The Highest Heavens And From The Center To The Circumference Of The Earth (2011), but there is also a sense that the trio from Dallas is refining their imagination from deeper depths within their rich invention. As soon as opening track Creeper emergences from a destructive ambience with a wiry guitar groove twisting around the ear soon joined by the plodding thick bass call and crisp rhythms, the drift into undiscovered sinister realms is an evolving fresh encounter. The track is a slow stalking evocation teasing and intimidating around that almost fifties like groove call whilst the vocals of guitarist Dan Philips and aside him bassist Nicole Estill, bring a hue and warmth to the melodic persuasion that the senses just revel in. As the drums of Timothy Starks drive and cage the portentous breath of the guitar alongside the tenebrific air of the song wrapped in sultry heat and devouring ominousness, the track lies as a riveting contagion that works on every pore, sense, and thought.

The following S:H:S has a tall order to live up to the might of its predecessor but as the distressed ambience slowly swarms around scuzz lined guitar teasing and rhythmic evocation the band again has its recipient falling into a rich and thick weave of tempered aural fire. It is not as dramatic as the first song but walks the same plateau of temptation and potency as it creatively explores its sonic narrative on the way towards the best track on the album.

From its first sizzle of guitar beckoning there is a sweltering heat to Four Teeth. The song accosts the senses whilst simultaneously guiding them into a rapture which is truly ignited when the wonderful tones of Estill take the vocal lead and kiss the ear with harmonic beauty against the resonating flumes of sonic vapour pouring from every guitar note. It is a scintillating steamy embrace with roughened skin to its molten touch that simply leaves you lost in a pop inspired stifling haze. Another song which impacts on every facet of the emotions and body, it is a perfect slice of finely crafted inspirational rock pop brilliance.

As the imposing Numb Hand with its slowly burning grunge tinged labour and the equalling lumbering but darker brooding Trollstigen declare their testing intent and hypnotic stances, the album just sinks deeper and firmer into the passions, the second of the pair a predacious crawl into the psyche with the vocals of Estill again a merciless temptress. It uses repetition and doom spawned ambience as ripe sonic fruit within its bait and towers as another caliginous pinnacle on Circumambulation.

From the more than decent instrumental I:M:O, the release closes with the sweltering climes of firstly HW:R, a track coasting through southern rock heat with a tropical surf rock coaxing and melodic elegance, and finally the consuming and dense Lungr. The song slips into the darkest corners of mind and heart but lights the way with a beacon of melodic majesty and reverberating sonic imagination that leaves the listener immersed in enthrallment.

Circumambulation is sensational and though it arguably lacks the hunger to go to the very darkest places it is one of the most rewarding and thrilling albums to enwomb the senses this year.

http://www.truewidow.com/

9/10

RingMaster 23/07/2013

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Friday Club – All I Wanna Do Is

friday club pic

One of those insatiable riots you know you have to climb on board with as it teases and taunts the ears, All I Wanna Do Is the new single from UK rockers Friday Club is an irresistible flame of invigorating unpolished fiery rock ‘n’ roll. It grabs you from the first second and exhausts your energy as it takes limbs and voice on a charge of sonic mischief and blues edged aural addiction. The Birmingham band has been earning some very potent reactions and support over recent months and with ease the single shows why.

Earning strong acclaim with their live shows which has seen them in their short time as a band playing This Feeling and supporting the likes of Chase & Status, Labrinth, and Black Tambourines, Friday Club added extra fuel to their seemingly instant rise when putting up the live demo of the track Fall Down Kids, the song breeding more ardour their way, as did the putting up online the lead track from this single (the ‘unclean’ version named All I Wanna Do Is Fuck) , its appearance grabbing over a thousand listens within its first week. Recorded live the new single is set to accelerate things again, it has all the weaponry and temptation required it just needs ears.

All I Wanna Do Is instantly sears the ear with a sonic lance of guitar coaxing soon backed by rhythmic hustling from drums and540877_432364740174910_15284868_n bass and an expansion to the acidic melodic guitar wash. Settling into a slightly less urgent gait as the strong vocals add their expressive touch, the song is a blaze of compelling and contagious persuasion with climactic infection soaked choruses which ensure that if the listener is not already stomping in league with the aural bait they cannot resist any longer. I have to be honest and say the omission of the word ‘Fuck’ in the chorus is a mistake or certainly should have been replaced by something as the sudden pause/pull up does feel like a blip in what is an outstanding song. Nevertheless it is a thrilling bad boy of a track which with its slight Jesus and Mary Chain jaunt and scuzzy House of Love like melodic drive makes for a riveting and passion inciting encounter.

The accompanying Tropical is a wonderfully raw and again fire emblazoned sonic  wash, its surf rock like sirenesque lure a delicious heat over the raucous dirt covered rock ‘n’ roll floor of the song. With undemanding but firmly gripping rhythms and sizzling guitar grazes, as well as a great caustic snarl to the vocals, the song is an aurally mischievous brawl which like its co-conspirator steals the passions.

For rock music with a devilish swagger to its attitude and impossibly virulent call to its raw honest body, All I Wanna Do Is has all the ingredients of a classic and the band all the imagination and passion to become a real inventive force.

https://www.facebook.com/FridayClubBand

8.5/10

RingMaster 22/06/2013

 

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The Lost Souls Club: High Noon EP

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    UK rock band The Lost Souls Club has earned a strong reputation and acclaim for their commanding shadowed rock n roll but as yet has not ignited the awareness they deserve. Whether their new EP High Noon will be the trigger only time will tell but it will not be for the want of quality and compelling invention. The release is a fiery and bruising encounter which offers no pretence nor makes demands but provides fuel for a raging fire of pleasure for its impressive offerings.

The Southampton quartet of Jon Tufnell, Simon Jackson, James Freemantle, and Jon Lamont, merge heated essences of varied rock flavours from alternative and psychedelic to melodic and indie with extra spicery from shoegaze and garage rock. Formed in 2010 the band takes influences from the likes of Led Zeppelin, The Jesus And Mary Chain, Placebo, Nick Cave and The Bad Seeds, and Black Rebel Motorcycle Club, to name a few, into their own distinct recipe of scuzzy rock n roll. Musically the band carry heavy whispers of the aforementioned bands so at any point a reference easily springs to mind but it sculpts it into an inspiring and raw gift of its own.

The release opens with the irresistible Romeo, a track which immediately feels like an old returning friend in new and inspirational The LSC - High Noon EP coverclothing. The initial rich guitar lure is soon joined by ripe rampant beats and expressive earnest vocals, the combination as the bass offers its darkened menace, a compelling and inciting intensity upon the ear. The prime riff persists with its addictive resonating grip to fire up the passions the longer its feeds on their hunger and once the track breaks in to a punk rock storm of coarse energy and insidious seduction, the track needs persuade no longer to the calibre of its impressive presence.

The following Kiss Away The Sun caresses with a blistered enveloping ambience, its wrap veined by raucous guitar provocation and again emotive vocals which tell their own unique tale. The bass and drums bring a sinewy frame to the song and its dreamy if intimidating atmosphere, the union leaving a mesmeric invitation which is hard to refuse. A mix of The Jesus And Mary Chain, House Of Love, and The Mouth Of Ghosts with the raw edges of Birdland, the track induces another belt of rapture with its diverse and equally delicious enterprise and monochrome light.

Shoot Me Down bristles with menace and confrontation, the fuzzy guitar resonance and devouring bass evocation a charred encounter which is in no rush to claim its victory. Though brief the track commands attention and soaks the senses with a brooding and ravenous intent whilst musically the equally grave emotive wash lights a Nine Inch Nails/Queen Of The Stone Age smouldering in its sententious heart. Lyrically song and EP is themed by conflict between opposites within oneself and like the music creates evocative and seducing connections to the listener.

The release is completed by We Are All Gonna Die Anyway and I Know I Spoke Too Soon, the first another energised romp for the senses, its familiar tone and devices refusing to reveal their sources but vibrant with recognisable irresistibility. It is a punchy anthemic slab of feistiness which contrasts and introduces perfectly the closing simmering glories of I Know I Spoke Too Soon. Mellow and emotively magnetic the track is a psyched melodic dream which pervades the ear and beyond with elegance and flames of passion which sear at the touch.

High Noon is an excellent release which deserves to set the band on the path to the widest recognition. If it will time will of course reveal but The Lost Souls Club can hardly do much more to sway the listener.

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8/10

RingMaster 13/03/2013

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Goodbye, Labrador – A Thousand Times Before

If you are looking for a stirring and heated soundtrack for your summer days than A Thousand Times Before from Goodbye, Labrador is easily one of the best candidates. The six track EP is a stunning voice for hazy days and heated emotions with its dreamy and infectious immersive sounds the perfect backdrop to emotive and passionate endeavours.

     Goodbye, Labrador formed in 2008 and finds its members based in Barcelona, Brooklyn, and Prague. 2010 saw their self titled debut EP pull in enthused attention as the members came together for shows in Portugal supporting Ölga and its recording. Now the quartet of Martin Pípal (guitar, vocals), Phil Gold (guitar, percussion, vocals), Gonçalo Hipolito Martins (bass, vocals), and J. M. Silverman (drums, percussion), return with their second release through Dead Fisherman Records to once more place their masterful touch upon the senses. As with their first EP the band upon A Thousand Times Before create dream state borne sounds steeped in eighties post punk invention and nineties art rock imagination. Recorded with Eduardo Ricciardi at Golden Pony Studio in Lisbon, the release is a delicious palette of melodic imagination and emotional caresses brought with stirring energies and sleepy calm.

     Goodbye, Labrador open up the EP with the golden toned Intrepid. The first notable thing is the striking bass sounds of Martins and their captivating presence as they explore and expand the shadowed corners of the light bursting from each and every song. Alongside the beguiling guitar play they create a balance which steers the majestic flow of the songs deeper and with stronger contagion aided by the wonderful duality of the vocal attack. The male and females voices sweep the lyrics through the ear on whispers and rays of warmth for the fullest pleasure and it is hard to think of another band recently able to find the consistent heights in this vocal craft as Goodbye, Labrador do. As mentioned the band find influences in the heights of the eighties and as the EP plays the likes of House Of Love and Felt easily slip in to view as comparisons.

Sirens takes over next and easily emerges as the best song on the release. It immediately lures full attention as the bass paves the way with its heart exciting tones whilst the song is soon lighting up the atmosphere with imagination and spiralling melodic enterprise. There is a great discordant feel to the track too especially through the explosive guitar manipulations and energy which reminds again of Felt but also others like The Passage and Birdland with its rawer surface. With a fiery climax to crumble before, the song is simply outstanding and alone ensures the band is one to always keep an eager eye on.

The likes of Falling Away and Embrace The Stranger continue the growing affection inside with their well crafted sounds and shapes. The first of the pair is an easy to consume continuation with dwells on the plateau built from the starter whilst the second with a slight Pixies air to its bewitching presence ventures into further cascades of sonic beauty and incendiary discord lined aural explosions. All of this drama and stirring wonder comes within that dreamy magnetism, the expertise of the band to merge both so fluidly and contagiously deeply impressive.

The excellent Silence Of Me and the emotive Memoir complete the line-up of excellence just as enjoyably as what came before. As the former of the two weaves its startling melodic prowess one realises the band is finding the levels of melodic infection in their emotive hooks as those which made the likes of Echo & The Bunnymen and Wah! so essential.

If there is one slight criticism for the release it is the similarity across the surface of songs which makes it easy without retaining an element of focus to find the songs merging. Of course given firmer attention the songs without fail unveil a wealth of diversity and invention which is undeniable. A Thousand Times Before is a gem of a release which makes one hope Goodbye, Labrador get together often and bring much more of their outstanding creativity and sounds to our ears.

RingMaster 05/08/2012

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