Flyying Colours – ROYGBIV EP

Flyying Colours_Reputation Radio/RingMaster Review

Like a favourite candy, the ROYGBIV EP from Australian shoegaze popsters Flyying Colours, is richly flavoursome, addictively captivating, and impossible not to treat oneself to another portion of. It is a delicious slice of aural contagion wrapped in inescapable melodic seduction, and one addiction it will always be ok to indulge in.

Hailing from Melbourne and formed in 2011, Flyying Colours cite My Bloody Valentine and Fleetwood Mac as influences to their own sonic explorations and with the former an immediate spicing and the latter becoming more apparent over listens, they make a healthy spicing to something individual to the band. Similarly the compelling beauty of a Lush and the psych pop seducing of House Of love also nudge comparisons yet there is a bolder, almost bruising texture to the Flyying Colours sound which adds stronger uniqueness to the creative theatre of songs and EP. 2013 saw the release of their self-titled debut EP, a full introduction to their attention grabbing, raw beauty clad sound which came after the first teaser of the single wavygravy. Its qualities and lures are now explored with new intensity and adventure through ROYGBIV, a success with the potential of awakening a really broad spotlight upon their presence.

Flyying Colours EP_Reputation Radio/RingMaster Review     Single songs and the EP as a whole, are as rich in aural colour as its title suggests, but an evolving kaleidoscope of sound rather than a structure of individually layered hues just lying against each other. It all has a changeable and transfixing quality which starts with I Don’t Want To Let You Down. A sonic jangle works on the senses initially with its bait quickly joined by the thick beats of drummer Andy Lloyd Russell. The persuasion of guitar expands the moment the two meet and collude in awakening imagination and appetite, a sonic smoulder with a lively underbelly casting its spell on ears as the equally magnetic vocals of guitarist Brodie J Brümmer caress. The song continues to stroll with warm intent, getting feisty at times especially in a vivacious chorus which sees second guitarist Gemma O’Connor add her siren-esque tones to the mix. The bass of Melanie Barbaro is arguably the most laid back thing on the increasingly fiery encounter, yet her strings only add thick seduction through their thickly magnetic shadows within the blaze of the song.

It is a potent and infection clad track quickly backed and surpassed by the voracious shimmer of Running Late. Guitars jangle and dance in ears, offering a feel of British eighties indie pop a la Orange Juice and Josef K, whilst both vocalists twin up their mellow tempting to stroke ears. There is an unmissable sparking between textures in the song, igniting the thick sonic haze of the encounter further and indeed a sway of bodies and movement of feet and emotions before it.

The increasingly impressive adventure and ascent of the release continues with Not Today, and straight away the song has ears and thoughts spellbound as an opening melodic mist is pierced by one invigorating and tantalising bassline. Its groove is matched by those of the guitars and also in the more low key post punk vocal delivery of Brümmer. That post punk essence is throughout the EP but especially here makes the most delicious lure, suggesting that if Joy Division had gone funky with their sound it would have been something akin to this hex of contagion. Spicy hooks and a rhythmic swagger relentlessly feed a quickly hungry appetite and impassioned lust for the incitement and it is no surprise the song is the lead invitation to the EP, and indeed a favourite across the band’s recent UK tour with Pinkshinyultrablast.

In The End emerges from the closing strains of the triumph, swiftly laying down its own virulent persuasion though reining in the dramatic urgency of its predecessor just a touch as it wraps ears in a thicker smooch. Like the last track though, it barely takes a minute before full involvement of the listener is enticed, the still tenacious energy of the song inescapable incitement to the body as feet tap rigorously and hips swerve to the flow of the proposal.

Final track Leaks almost bludgeons its way into view in comparison to other tracks, the muscular snarl of bass and matching jabbing beats a heavily boisterous lure courting a caustic yet bewitching sonic mesh of sound from the guitars, it all coloured again by the immersive vocals. It is a fiery end to the release, and another irresistible song showing, as each proposition within ROYGBIV, another twist to the sound and invention of the band.

Flyying Colours is cast as shoegaze but their outstanding EP proves that there is much more to their voraciously bubbling shimmer of sound, plenty to appeal to fans of melodic and psychedelic rock as well as those of psych and lo-fi pop.

The ROYGBIV EP is available via Club ac30 in the UK @ http://store.clubac30.com/products/548073-flyying-colours-roygbiv-ep and in the US on Shelflife @ http://www.shelflife.com/catalogue/LIFE126.html now!

https://www.facebook.com/flyyingcolours   http://www.flyyingcolours.com/

RingMaster 18/05/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard on Reputation Radio @ http://www.reputationradio.net

 

 

The Cathode Ray – Infinite Variety

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The energy around the arrival of and anticipation for Infinite Variety, the second album from Scottish band The Cathode Ray, ensured that intrigue and enthusiasm of a great many was high going into the release. It is fair to say that the proposition not only lives up to hopes and expectations placed upon it but leaves them lightweight against its kaleidoscope of fun, sound, and adventure. What was not predicted here was the nostalgic impact it had on ears and thoughts, as well as memory, for our first time with the band. Musically it weaves in essences from the seventies and eighties into an invigorating modern tenacity but it was finding out the background to the members which inspired us to first trawl through cases of vinyl on a nostalgia trip to relive old favourites ashamedly neglected over time.

Formed in 2006, The Cathode Ray was initially a song-writing collaboration between Jeremy Thoms and ex-Josef K frontman and solo artist Paul Haig, a band and solo project straight away dug out for a reprise in the ears. A couple of well-received singles followed before Haig left the project in 2009. Taking it over Thom enlisted guitarist Steve Fraser once of Edinburgh post punk band the Scars, another enslaving proposition for our passions way back, and alongside him drummer David Mack and bassist Neil Baldwin to complete a new line-up, the latter bringing another search through boxes to relive the glories of the disgracefully under-rated Bluebells and post-punk group TV21. Once that was out of the system it was full-steam ahead with Infinite Variety, an album swiftly living up and more to anything its creators may have helped craft before.

The album’s landscape uses various decades of sound as its palette, twisting and shaping them into unique and colourful proposals with a lyrical exploration to match. Said to loosely be a concept album, Infinite Variety visually and aurally references the natural world whilst looking at emotions involved with the human condition. The songs are kind of bundled into three areas; ‘fear, paranoia, lust and betrayal’ spicing the first few songs before looks at ‘transformation, honesty and realisation’ and subsequently love in various light and dark forms flavour the tracks. Like in a kaleidoscope though, it all seems to disarrange and evolve with every twist of a track to provide an on-going and increasingly fascinating adventure.

10425081_1014104828616219_3923383927065033299_n   That diversity to songs is one of many potent aspects to the album and it all starts with the outstanding Backed Up. A simple rub of guitar and accompanying cowbell prods make first contact, soon joined by crisp beats and an expanding coaxing of melodic enticing. The expressive tones of Thoms join the widening incitement next, his entrance awakening bolder enterprise in the guitars, whilst riffs and hooks come with a great post-punk spicing. The reserved but lively melodic invention provides a sultry colouring which the dark bass tones wonderfully temper whilst vocally Thom drives it all with a voice which is like a mix of Pete Shelley and Ste McCabe to offer another rich texture within the potent album starter.

It is a strong beginning straight away eclipsed by the outstanding Resist, one of the most addictive slices of warped pop you will come across this year. Its hooks instantly get under the skin and into the psyche, swiftly followed by the vocals and the thick bass bait. The song’s infectiousness is simply virulent bringing a whiff of The Revillos to its power pop stomp, a passing scent not as strong as the Buzzcocks like catchiness which oozes from the following Nowhere At All. Again it is merely a spicing though, this time to a captivating stroll of imaginative percussion, imposing rhythms, and addictive enterprise, all soaked in inescapable contagion.

Don’t Waste Your Words strides in next to bring an addictive lure of hip swinging rock ‘n’ roll. Feet and ears are an early submission, whilst the capture of the imagination is barely a drum stick swing away in the riveting temptation of the song. It is not alone in offering hooks and a presence which are indelible in thoughts and emotions even after the album’s departure, but it is probably the most intoxicating though matched straight away by the excellent Buck The Trend, a song with a healthy breath of Tom Verlaine and Television to it. Keys and guitar spin a gorgeous eighties web for the rhythmic and vocal prowess of the song to pull this way and that, a combination sculpting another major highlight in the album. There are times across Infinite Variety, like here, where thoughts wonder if the band may have missed the boat with their sound in the fact that The Cathode Ray would have surely been a big inspirational player in the eighties. Every time that suggestion raises its head though band and album almost in anticipation provides evidence to differ, like No Holds Barred which comes next, proving that they are definitely a perfect fit for the now. The song is a slower but similarly infectious offering with a held in check energy which still has body and emotions swaying feistily with its low key and thoroughly addictive swagger. Once more riffs and melodies combine to create a fresh twist and distinct romp of sound and invention in the album.

The brilliant Eureka Moment! is simply a montage of eighties goodness crafted into a transfixing and exotic jungle of imagination fuelled rhythms, Scars like sonic sweeps, and Bluebells bred melodies. It feels like a song dipping into its creators past exploits and those of others whilst equally drawing on new ingenuity. The John Foxx led version of Ultravox comes to mind as does The Creatures as the track seduces and incites but again they are just particular hues in an new enthralling and thrilling aural conjuring by the band.

This Force Of Nature brings its flowing melodic breeze next, female vocals seducing alongside the tones of Thoms, whilst Torn Apart explores an immersive and haunting cavern of sonic reflection which in many ways has seeds to the likes of House of Love and My Bloody Valentine. The absorbing and mesmeric encounter, as so many songs, keeps the album turning over in imagination and invention, as well as variety, before making way for the post punk croon of The Eyes Are The Window To The Soul. With a bassline which recalls early Cure and an Orange Juice like jangle to its chords, the song is bewitching and engagingly dramatic like a modern day Associates.

The album is closed by the elegant reflection of Saving Grace, a semi-acoustic ballad which simply whisks ears and thoughts off into hope soaked clouds under a smouldering exotic sun of melodic temptation. The song is spellbinding but also only telling half the story at this point. Around mid-way the calm is suddenly infused with ominous rhythms and sinister keys, nothing over imposing but certainly a brewing provocation which is soon ripe with surf rock tendrils of guitar and a tempestuous air. As if warning that good times still offer a stormy adventure, the track is irresistible manna for ears and imagination with seven minutes of sonic alchemy.

Infinite Variety is quite breath-taking, leaving thoughts basking and appetite hungry for much more. There have been many releases and bands recently creating real triumphs of nostalgia and new invention, but The Cathode Ray tops the lot.

Infinite Variety is available through Stereogram Recordings now on CD and download via http://www.stereogramrecordings.co.uk/audio/infinite-variety-the-cathode-ray-cddl/

https://www.facebook.com/thecathoderay

RingMaster 21/04/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard on Reputation Radio @ http://www.reputationradio.net

Tapes Runs Out – Friends/Flowers

 

Pic Lauren Marsh

Pic Lauren Marsh

A serenade for the ears and imagination, the new single from UK indie pop rockers Tape Runs Out suggests we have a rather fascinating and tantalising proposition on our hands with the Cambridge quintet. Obviously one song does not reveal all, or two in this case, but both offerings making up the band’s first release, Friends/ Flowers certainly spark an instantly keen interest and enjoyment of their opening persuasion.

The band’s debut double A-side single is a beguiling tapestry of dream pop, electronic rock, shoegaze and numerous other spices and textures within their majestic flights. Tape Runs Out itself began as an electronic solo project of Liam Goodrum-Bell (vocals/guitar/samples), before expanding to a full-band and releasing the Covered In Tape EP in 2013. It was given a gentle release but seemingly a well-received one before things changed again and the current line-up came to be mid-2014. Consisting of Richard Barker (guitar), Hélène Dufour (bass), Yasmin Prebble (keyboard/melodica/glockenspiel), and Ellie Winter (hammered dulcimer/backing vocals) alongside Goodrum-Bell, Tapes Runs Out now make their most open and broadest official introduction with Friends/Flowers via Ear to Ear Records.

a0018462225_2     Friends is the first encounter and swiftly sparkles in ears with its elegant enticement of guitar and keys. Melodies seduce and blossom within a breath of the track’s entrance, soon accompanied by the excellent mellow vocals of Goodrum-Bell backed as vibrantly by the harmonies of Winter. The song is a summer stroll basking in wistful rays of sonic light and reflective emotions, a romancing hug of sound which flirts with whispers of bands like My Bloody Valentine and House Of Love whilst creating a jangle of modern imagination. It is mesmeric company; that is until it just stops and leaves body and emotions hanging. Actually it is a great end to an outstanding song but greed determines that there is not enough of its beauty to be fully satisfied.

Flowers is another matter, its four minutes plus a plentiful bounty to embrace and immerse within. It is a far more sober landscape explored though no less warm and intriguing. Wrapped in a psychedelic haze and an even richer melancholic ambience than its predecessor, the song floats and swirls around the senses and imagination like a wispy dream. Though not as instant as Friends on the ear, the song slips into the psyche and makes a lingering temptation whilst revealing far more about the songwriting and invention of Tape Runs Out compared to its impressive seduce and run companion.

Though Friends grabs the biggest plaudits, both songs provide a thoroughly engaging and enjoyable first real glimpse at Tape Runs Out, a band we can expect and already want to hear and see plenty more of ahead.

Friends/Flowers is available via Ear to Ear Records from March 30th @ http://eartoearrecords.co.uk/album/friends-flowers-single

https://www.facebook.com/taperunsout   http://www.taperunsout.co.uk

RingMaster 30/03/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard on Reputation Radio @ http://reputationradio.yooco.org/

 

Surf City – Jekyll Island

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There are times when it is easy to get lost in a realm of fantasy, moments in life and indeed music when physically and mentally you can escape the hum drum and explore new landscapes. One such escape is the sultry adventure of Jekyll Island, the new and third album from New Zealand psychgazers Surf City. Basking in a sultry surf rock seeded climate wrapped in the summery smile of shoegaze and the sonic beauty of psyche rock, the release is a mesmeric lure for ears and imagination.

The successor to their acclaimed album We Knew It Was Not Going To Be Like This of 2013, Jekyll Island is a fascinating flight of sound and emotion. Songs again come soaked in the warm magnetic fuzziness which the band is becoming renowned for but equally feel more precisely sculpted and resourcefully rounded propositions. It is open growth and evolution in the Surf City songwriting but an emerging potency which defuses none of the band’s already rich and tantalising qualities; basically a maturity of existing prowess exploring fresh and vivaciously new adventure. Simply songs and album offer pure pop presented in summery embraces of charm and beauty.

The album is also an imposing grower on ears and passions, its early touches engaging and magnetic but continual exposure leads to anything from lustful rapture to lingering seduction. The first track though is an immediate enslavement of ears and emotions on its first ever touch. From its opening exotic web of percussive and sonic enticement, Beat The Summer Heat has imagination and appetite hooked; especially as from that opening shuffle a rhythmic contagion unleashes irresistible bait. Jabbing with their own individual swing, beats forge an addictive lure at the heart of the track, taking ears and pleasure by the hand as guitars swarm over their enticement with vivid colours and a lively shimmer. Vocally too Davin Stoddard is a beacon of warmth and magnetism, riding the contagion with radiance. The track is glorious, almost alone worth the cost of your ticket for the album’s compelling ride.

Surf City - Jekyll Island   There is no major drift in quality and temptation as the following Spec City takes over, it a song with a bubbling electro underbelly and a radiating surface of melodic and harmonic splendour. The song is a courtship of the senses, a My Bloody Valentine like caress making an unrelenting seduction as a Yo La Tengo like vibrancy brings livelier action to the romance. It is a tempting swiftly backed and taken into new explorations by Jekyll Island and the Psycosphere and in turn Hollow Veins. The first of the two is a fascinating mix of eighties new wave bred pop and nineties inspired psychedelic enterprise, but also littered with post punk hooks and a Happy Monday’s like devilry. The song is pure mesmerism and perfectly contrasted and complimented in tone by the darker rockier revelry of its successor. It romps through ears like a meeting of The Horrors and House Of Love engaged in a vintage surf rock revival, its touch and breath raw yet overwhelmingly seductive.

The guitars of Stoddard and Jamie Kennedy weave an infectious web of fuzz induced rock pop next in One Too Many Things, its twang offering a country whisper whilst its catchy tenacity has a Brit pop lilt to its tempting, whilst its successor What They Need expands the already potent variety within the album again. It opens with a droning tang of a sound you might expect from the band’s part of the world, a scuzz lined whiny lure which persists invitingly around the additional minimalistic yet weighty hug of sound filling its persuasion.

That constant tweaking of flavours has Leave Your Worries unveiling an anthemic infectiousness which plays like a the offspring of a union between The Mighty Lemon Drop, The Lightning Seeds, and Kitchens of Distinction, but as in all songs it emerges as unique to Surf City.

The delicious heavy bass seducing and just as enticing beats offered by Mike Ellis and Andy Frost at its start makes Indian Summer straight after, irresistible all on their own but infused with the melodic lustre of the guitars and the resonating touch of Stoddard’s vocals, it only proceeds to steal attention and the passions further. It is a charmer from start to finish, one carrying the right amount of mischief and excitement but an incitement which ultimately places the listener in a fulfilling and richly satisfying calm. That is a description suiting the whole of Jekyll Island to be honest, and especially the gorgeous pop of Thumbs Up which romps with ears and emotions next. Whether it is possible to ever write the perfect song is debateable but it is possible to come close and this is certainly a serious contender. Melodies reek of innocence yet are inflammatory on the ear whilst harmonies and rhythms simply engage in lustful and infection breeding temptation.

The album is brought to a just as thrilling end by firstly the more sober, in comparison to its predecessor, but raucously energetic dance of The End and lastly through the meditative glamour and brilliance of Jesus Elvis Coca Cola. Sixties kissed and soaked in aural sunshine, the track is a majestic sea of expressive harmonies and poetic melodies soaked in a wash of psychedelic humidity.

It is a transfixing end to an increasingly mouth-watering encounter. There is a great familiarity to Jekyll Island but only as a rich spice in the unique ambience and masterful imagination of Surf City. Psyche/shoegaze pop has rarely sounded better.

Jekyll Island is available via Fire Records now and digitally, on CD, and on black vinyl @ https://surfcitymusic.bandcamp.com/track/hollow-veins

https://www.facebook.com/killsurfcity

RingMaster 25/03/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard on Reputation Radio @ http://reputationradio.yooco.org/

 

Desert Ships – Skyliner

Desert Ships press image 2014

Four mesmeric flights flooded with celestial hauntings and shoegaze fascination, the Skyliner EP from UK band Desert Ships is as both band and release names suggest, an expansive and sultrily aired adventure. A release which is cinematic in its touch on the imagination and warmly sensuous in its lure on the senses, Skyliner shimmers and radiates like a mix of The Horrors, House Of Love, and Brian Jonestown Massacre with just a tinge of Inspiral Carpets for spicy measure. To be honest that is still a loose description of the psychedelic fuelled exploration found within the release but a good starting point for something distinct to Desert Ships.

Formed in 2012, the London trio of Mikey (vocals/guitar), Daniel (bass/vocals), and Claude (drums/vocals) swiftly sparked attention and acclaim with the release of their debut album that same year. The Mark Gardener (ex- Ride) produced Doll Skin Flag soon drew regular comparisons to the likes of Brian Jonestown Massacre, The Flaming Lips, Tame Impala, and occasionally the film scores of John Barry. Its success was backed by the band’s equally praised live presence which saw them tour with bands such as The Prodigy, Band of Skulls, The Rifles, and Babyshambles as well as play numerous festivals over the past couple of years. Reuniting with Gardener again in the studio, Desert Ships now unveil their new EP, a release taking its predecessor as a launch pad for broader and more expressive aurally visual experiences.

The release opens with its epic title track, a seven minute plus excursion into magnetic harmonies, sonic exploration, and fuzzy show gaze seducing. From its first breath there is a fresh and smouldering temptation at work, guitar coaxing Desert Ships-Skyliner-artwork -Final-HRthe lead into a weave of vocal harmonies and expression from across the band. That in turn is cradled by a tapestry of keys bred elegance and enterprise. The song emerges as a gentle maelstrom of gripping ideation and aural fascination, the vocals as varied and riveting as the spatial grooves and rhythmic shuffle courting their narrative whilst every immersive note is an exotic kiss upon the senses. Like soaring through a refreshingly muggy landscape, the track is enthralling leaving body and emotions submerged in blissful exploration.

The slightly slimmer length of Shell Shock is no less eventful next, embracing ears with a synth pop spiced temptation straight away. Laying down an eighties flavoured yet modern canvas of melodic hues, bands like China Crisis, Modern English, and The Flaming Lips coming to mind, the track croons with cosmic lustre and psychedelic colour. Again the imagination is sparked by and emotions immersed in an ethereal tapestry of sound and voice, the song the perfect pop proposition. It is a description which almost applies to the following Heart Beats and it’s more grounded but no less transfixing splendour too, though the magnetic offering does not quite have the infectious glow and compelling grandeur of its predecessor. All the same the feistier track is a masterfully and enticingly grooved invitation which is hard to resist as it reveals further shades and turns in the band’s creativity.

Skyliner is concluded by another epic holding of ears with its longest and relentlessly suggestive track, Ausgang. Somewhere between cheerfully funereal and livelily meditative, the persistent breeze of sonic and melodic enticing is a vibrantly repetitive affair which probably outstays its welcome but still provides an instrumental soundscape to create imaginative tales within. Though the EP is not one of two halves, like the previous track the closer lacks something of the first pair of songs but has plenty to entice and feed an already keen appetite for release and band.

Desert Ships has provided a treat of an encounter which is at its stunning best at the start and whilst slipping a level of persuasion or two in its latter part, perpetually leaves expectations and anticipation of big things from and for the band ahead rife. Ultimately Skyliner is a gorgeous flight which more than deserves a full investigation.

The Skyliner EP is available now @ http://desertships.bandcamp.com/

http://www.desertships.com

RingMaster 11/11/2014

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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Keys – Ring The Changes

KEYS-Ring-The-Changes-Cover-WEB

Not to be confused with the Bury St Edmunds unit holding the same name and who we covered previously on the site for their Innocuous Beats EP, the Wales hailing Keys is a psychedelic pop/garage rock band who have just released their tantalising new album Ring The Changes. Exploring and crafting unique songs from American influences such as Stooges, Violent Femmes, Velvets, Sly Stone, and Jonathan Richman, the album is a captivating encounter which either ignites a fire in the passions or has them simmering eagerly from the first of its twelve endeavours through to the last.

The successor to their acclaimed album Bitten by Wolves of 2011, which itself followed the well-received debut Fire Inside two years earlier, Ring the Changes sees the Cardiff band equipped with a new approach and drummer to expand and flourish again in the lo-fi exploration which marked their previous releases. Recorded over one weekend on 8 track tape with Pixy Jones from El Goodo, the new album is a swarm of melodic and seductive songs fuelled with unfussy enterprise and transfixing infectious beauty.

Handclaps make the first invitation to the album as opener Shake It Up starts things off. The minimalistic coaxing is swiftly joined by the potent voice of Matthew Evans, his delivery expressive and holding smouldering warmth to match the emerging sounds around him. The firm beats of Dave Newington and the dark enticing lure of James Bell’s bass add to the growing lure and drama of the song, a creative narrative coated in a feverish blues spice from the guitars of Gwion Rowlands and Evans. They also instigate a mischievous teasing across the song, it twisting through numerous styles and inspirations whilst sneaking in the fully British spice of David Essex’s Rock On.

It is a fun and pleasing beginning to the album swiftly surpassed by Hard Habit to Crack. A mesmeric and lively slice of heated pop which plays with ears and imagination like a union between Beach Boys meets House Of Love, the song is a surf kissed breeze suitable for beach and home with its radiant melodic sunshine. As the first song, it is also happy to stir up a shade of intensity and tenacity that never erupts but brings a great raw but understated breath to the tempered blaze. Its success is supported by the similarly flavoured sixties pop of Bad Girls. Melodies croon as potently as the mellow vocals throughout the breezy and catchy evocation, Jan and Dean meets Jonathan Richman a clue to the engaging presence of the track.

Both the bluesy pop romp of See My Baby and the fire glazed lo-fi lure of Wade in the Water keep attention and appetite rigorously keen, even though neither quite matches the previous trio of songs. The soulful sultriness of the second of the two provides an especially provocative intrigue and enticement before The Beautiful Sound of a Heartbreak unveils its humid climate and emotive caress. It is an enthralling melodically scenic flight of Walker Brothers-esque passionate harmonies and My Bloody Valentine sonic sedation, and quite bewitching.

Machine Elves is a slow burner compared to other tracks upon the release, its seventies soulful shuffle inviting and pleasing yet lacking something indefinable which the previous songs basked in. Nevertheless it is a superbly accomplished and skilled proposition for feet and thoughts to embrace before the outstanding shimmering grace and elegance of Slightly Ahead of the Curve seduces the emotions. Again it is a slower persuasion but emerges as another pinnacle of the thrilling encounter. It is also another where we suggest there is as much a British inspiration as from the other side of the pond, this time elements of Kinks flirting with thoughts as the song explores and expands its sweltering landscape and emotional atmosphere.

The album comes to a close through the mighty inventive persuasion of Ghost, a song as minimal and poetically enticing as they come with vocals and guitar offering a tender coaxing around a pulsating firm rhythmic spine. Prone to expulsions of feisty energy and deeply hooking invention, it is another stunner before lastly Go to Get My She To get Her with its blues funk shuffle brings it all to a fine end, its mischievous title earning a new persona in the course of the song.

Ring The Changes is a gem of a release which from making an impressive initial declaration evolves and breeds firmer lustful ardour for its inflamed imagination and potent sounds. Keys have grown to another plateau through their release, one which surely deserves and will find a matching spotlight.

Ring The Changes is available now via See Monkey Do Monkey Recordings digitally and on 12″ Double Vinyl @ http://seemonkeydomonkey.com/products/keys-ring-the-changes

http://keysofficial.com/

RingMaster 07/10/2014

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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The Pineapple Thief – Magnolia

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     Magnolia is a melodic serenade, an album which across its immersive seduction is equally unafraid to roar and show a creative and sonic muscle. The new full-length form UK rock band The Pineapple Thief, it is an absorbing proposition, maybe not one to set the passions ablaze but certainly an encounter gripping ears and imagination in a riveting embrace.

The Pineapple Thief began in 1999, formed by vocalist/guitarist Bruce Soord as initially an ‘experimental bedroom project’. It has proceeded to be an attention grabbing band earning acclaim and success across its thought inspiring journey and releases, Magnolia their tenth album. The successor to the acclaimed Someone Here Is Missing and All The Wars of 2010 and 2012 respectively, the new release feels like the offspring of all the influences and essences of the band’s previous exploits; dreamy, progressive textures and enterprise combining to evolve into new bracing pop infused rock adventures. As mentioned, the Kscope released album might not ignite a lustful ardour but with ease it makes for one of the most vivaciously captivating propositions this year, managing to really bring the band’s renowned live power and intensity into a release for arguably the first time.

As soon as the jangling touch of opener Simple As That hits ears, band and album are in control of attention with the swiftly following vocals of Soord even more coaxing through their mellow tone. It is a gentle caress initially, Soord’s guitar as gentle as his voice before the dramatically impacting and thrilling eruption which follows turns the track on its head. It is a glorious and contagious expulsion of riffs and crisp rhythms released by Soord and Dan Osborne respectively, an intensive flame of energy and emotion with the vocals a mesmeric lure. It is hard to avoid suggesting a Muse comparison, but with the richly enticing bait of Jon Sykes’ bass adding to the subsequently sultry and pleasingly imposing stance of the track, there is a uniqueness which belongs to The Pineapple Thief. Anthemic and gripping, it is an impressive start to the album matched immediately by Alone at Sea. Entering on a bubbly hug of keys from Steve Kitch, the song flirts with ears and thoughts through suggestive melodies and the vocal prowess of Soord. The track proceeds to weave and entwine around the senses with a provocative weave of melodies and harmonies, a shoegaze breath at times kissing the narrative, but also stirring them up with sinew sculpted flames of heavier rock endeavour. As with many tracks there is a familiarity to the fascinating canvas but only adding to the infectious bait and addictive enticement.

Neither Don’t Tell Me nor the title track quite touches the plateaus of the first pair but both cast engaging and impressively compelling persuasions. The first is an emotive shuffle of rhythms and acoustic chords under a warm yet cloudy TPT Magnolia cover artexpanse of keys. This is coloured with a riveting orchestral expression which as across the album is arranged by Andrew Skeet, and a rawer incitement of guitar, whilst the second of the pair soars through another sky of orchestral beauty into an emotive climate of smouldering passion and bewitching elegance. As said they do not quite match their predecessors, but forcibly leave appetite and feelings greedy for more with their enthralling enterprise and skilled composition.

The slow Coldplay like balladry of Seasons Past is a tantalising flame of vocals and provocative melodies which seduces thoughts if not emotions to the same success, already personal greed for the more forceful elements of the album steering reactions, as also found by Coming Home. Despite that though, there is no escaping the incendiary beauty and orchestrated radiance of the strings in both tracks and the dramatic intensity and adventure of the second of the two. Vocally too there is no defence from the potent lure of Soord’s voice and the supporting harmonies of Sykes, their individual and united contributions as poetically inciting as the sounds around them.

The tenacious twang of guitar, matched by a similar bass riff, through the heart of The One You Left to Die instantly grips ears and appetite, the track going on to bind an immersive web of intrigue and melodic intimacy around its thrilling spine. It is a hypnotic flight of invention which sets up the senses for the rowdy roar of Breathe perfectly. That mighty expulsion setting the song off though it is soon awash with crystalline melodies and floating vocals before merging its peace into the original rugged and explosive bellow of sound and energy. The track is like a blend of House of Love, Doves, and Feeder, and another pinnacle of the album.

The stringed and emotionally shadowed From Me comes next, its dark charm engrossing before making way for the outstanding Sense of Fear. Guitars lay an irresistible web of jagged riffs to capture the imagination before aligning them with jabbing beats and a climactic embrace of keys and fiery melodies. It is only a moment in the shifting scenery of the song though, a slow provocative vocal caress aided by glances of keys bringing a dulled yet tantalising breath before a sturdy stride of intensive sonic flames and rhythmic bait have their potent say. It is a scintillating encounter which brings the stage presence of the band closer to the comfort of the home.

Magnolia closes with first up the graceful flight of A Loneliness and lastly the bordering on sinister noir wrapped elegance of Bond. The former is a strong and satisfying offering but between the previous track and the cinematic brilliance of the final song it is unable to leap out of their shadow and soon forgotten against the magnificent weighty body and emotional colouring of its successor. Both songs ensure the album ends on a high though, The Pineapple Thief never relinquishing its hold on ears and imagination across its aural and creative fascination, emerging as quite simply a must investigate proposal.

Magnolia is available now via Kscope @ https://www.burningshed.com/store/kscope/collection/284/

http://www.pineapplethief.com

16/09/2014

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