Andy Cooper – The Layered Effect

Like the fleet footed shuffle of a confidence fuelled, adrenaline powered boxer, the sounds of US rapper/producer Andy Cooper beguile, spar, and jab within his second album The Layered Effect and like the very best, it swings knock out punches to simply drool over.

A tapestry of old school rap and hip hop as funky and jazzy as it is lung bursting fresh, The Layered Effect is pure pleasure in the ears. It is a homage to the past equally embracing the experiences of Cooper through his part as one third of hip hop outfit Ugly Duckling but not so much a throwback as a new revitalising breath in its history, and the fact that at times it reminds us of nineties UK hip hop duo Honky is extra cream to greedily lap up. Lyrically Cooper also acclaims the core and original essences of the genres he plays with throughout his album, revelling on the fun conjured on the inside as much as the listener basks in it on the outside.

The Layered Effect opens up with Here Comes Another One. Featuring Dutch MC Blabbermouf, the track swiftly swings and flirts with tenacious beats and the vocal shuffle of Cooper, keys keeping up with their own suggestive dance. The rapid fire exploits of Blabbermouf are just as rousing once uncaged, the song’s subsequent vocal weave devilish in its lure and as irresistible in its enterprise as the magnetic alignment of brass and keys with all the track’s other enticing sounds..

The following interlude of Layers toys with the chorus of the opener before Get On That has attention jumping and body bouncing with its R&B meets Fat Boy Slim scented jazz ‘n’ hop funk. As busy and richly flavoured as it is greedily infectious, the song twists and turns like a controlled but lustful dervish, its rhythms alone are instinctive manipulation, a trait just as potent within successor The Perfect Definition. More predacious than its predecessor in beat and tone, the track is a virile invitation led by the verbal shuffle of Cooper wrapped in boisterous musical prowess.

Talking of virility, Do The Andy Puppet is sheer virulent contagion, a deceptively persuasive saunter spun from presumably The Allergies 2016 video for Rock Rock featuring Cooper and his material woven counterpart. It has the innocence of child entertainment and the machination of retail temptation but really it is one slice of sublime contagion putting a smile on the face and spirit.

Last Of A Dying Breed has ears and thoughts swaying with the essences of old school rap blessed in instinctive funk while Anything Goes with Canadian rapper Abdominal guesting, pounces on the appetite with rapacious relish and dark intrigue, the song another as shadowy as it is radiant. The vocal union of the two is animated captivation skilfully matched by the song’s less forward but no less engaging sounds.

Surely only a deceased heart can stop any body from twisting and rolling to the rhythmic pulse and jazz flumes of the superb Can’t Be Satisfied, the track a virus to hips and feet let alone the imagination, while B-Boy Blues spreads further diversity to the album with its steely breath and twang lined funk. Both hit the spot dead centre, each solely owning the listener for the expanse of their presence.

The sultry shindig of Sizzling Hot provides a sweltering festival of sound and enticement to which once more eager involvement is inescapable. Its heated swing slips into the interlude of Just One Of The JB’s, its declaration springing into the celebration of Rick Said So, a Beastie Boys toned roar riding the inspirations of rap’s spawning days from Rick Rubin forward.

The release ends with the summer energy of A New Dawn, a fascinating web of sound around a final spring of vocal enterprise and lyrical suggestion which simply draws ears and imagination into its folds. It is a spellbinding conclusion to one increasingly addictive encounter. Andy Cooper has been no stranger to attention and acclaim through his previous projects and debut solo album but maybe not as much as The Layered Effect could and should spark.

The Layered Effect is out now through Rocafort Records; available @ https://rocafortrecords.bandcamp.com/album/the-layered-effect

http://www.facebook.com/acooper75/    http://www.instagram.com/andycooper75/

Pete RingMaster 30/01/2018

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Psykokondriak – Gloomy Days

art_RingMasterReview

Offering anarchic imagination and musical unpredictability is French rockers Psykokondriak, a band, to use a term in their new album’s press release, which “is a sixheaded hydra, a rock ‘n roll and hip-hop chimera.” They are also an encounter which on the evidence of Gloomy Days leaves a grin on the face and spirit as its parade of deranged adventures posing as songs spring inescapable fun fuelled incitements.

The band’s sound is like a mix of Hollywood Undead, Beastie Boys, Toumaï, and Red Hot Chili Peppers; groove infested and as funky as a swingers party and all led by a voraciously infectious hip hop devilry. Formed in 2006, Psykokondriak went through numerous line-up changes before releasing debut EP Hôpital Psykotrip six years later. Mid-2014 saw the current line-up in place, MC’s Y.B. (aka Mc Body) and Braeckman (aka Mc BOY) linking up with guitarist Tristan Florin (aka Docteur Florkin), bassist Cédric Desneulin (aka le comte Eskarfesse), drummer Aurélien Desneulin (aka L’empereur Mark Oreill), and DJ Julien Delville (aka DJ Stam Iff). Following an appearance on the Christmas compilation album Walt the Fuck last year, Gloomy Days is the sextet’s biggest nudge on attention and result of the band expanding their sound, a release with numerous familiar aspects and fiercely enjoyable and unique exploits.

Introducing the Body Boys is the short entrance into the album, the vocalists announcing themselves and the forthcoming adventure as sturdy strikes of sound engage in ear pleasing coaxing as turntables sizzle. It leads straight into Psyko Waltz, Pt. 1, a continuation in sound and style of that initial invitation. The bass instantly sets out on a funk infested grooving as vocals bounce around, a lure entangled in sonic interplay as swinging beats entice a tempest of twists and raw energy. The track easily recruits ears and appetite for its somewhat recognisable sounds yet individual character of imagination which in turn only develops and expands as the track continues to grow. By its closing, the track is as heavy and invasive as a Korn meets (Hed)p.e. proposal and as enjoyable.

The Fine Art of Terror follows, thrusting hungry riffs and funk bred grooves through ears as vocal declaration and predacious attitude drive the energy and character of the excellent encounter. Again hips and feet are swiftly gripped by the creative and contagious drama escaping Psykokondriak, the band raging and swinging with matching dexterity before Workless Dance opens up its inescapable flirtation with wiry hooks and vocal revelry. In no time the track is a festival of lean grooves and thicker expulsions, at times carrying the scent of a Primer 55 or at other moments exploring something akin to 633 meets Crazy Town, every second leading to an unexpected turn.

A similar template provides the canvas for Monstros Incorporantes next; punk rock, metal, and hip hop colliding in a jungle of swiping beats, predacious bass and guitar grooves, and vocal infectiousness. Again familiar elements entangle fresh enterprise as the track grips ears and bodies before the brief cinematic instrumental interlude of Gunfight Helicopters sets up the raucously psychotic Think It Up. Like Flea and co losing their sanity as early Faith No More interferes, the deranged engagement jumps around like its feet are burning on hot creative coals, again the imagination as hooked as ears on Psykokondriak’s fun soaked bedlam.

The album’s best track comes next, Spookadelic Fever Mansion opening with much of the classic Alfred Hitchcock TV show intro before sauntering into an aural spook fest of swaying rhythms aligned to a low slung bassline. With its cartoonish swagger and the rapacious aggression which blossoms in certain moments, it plays like a Scooby Doo meets Beetlejuice soundtrack while lyrically snarling. The track is glorious; reason enough to take a look at Psykokondriak and quickly backed up by Hot Day Hotter Night and its funk stroll with moments of climactic eruption and anthemic vocal roars; it all simply impossible not to get thickly engaged in.

Closing on the dark strains of Unherited Culture, a track reminding a little of nineties UK band Honky but exploring its own experimental and threatening shadows, Gloomy Days simply hits the spot for something fresh and exciting. Musically at times it is not the most unique yet every recognisable aspect is countered and surpassed by moments of imagination and craft masked as lunacy.  Whether Gloomy days will break Psykokondriak into new hungry spotlights time will tell but it will definitely recruit a horde of new fans with us to the fore.

Gloomy Days is out now across most online stores and streaming @ https://psykokondriak.bandcamp.com/album/gloomy-days

https://www.facebook.com/Psykokondriak

Pete RingMaster 01/09/2016

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Sonny Green – Grime Is Punk

Art_RingMasterReview

Grime Is Punk is the debut EP from Sonny Green, a young musical poet with a bite to his rap and honesty to his words. With grime bred sounds circling around him whilst carrying their own individual drama, it is a combination which just commands attention.

Aged 21, Green has made a potent introduction with his first EP, but it is just part of an emergence which began seven years ago when he was experimenting with music in his local Connexions youth centre on the Cluny Square estate in Southend. Casting lyrical challenges and insights exploring broad and personal social issues, he made When Words Fail Music Speaks, a 14-track mixtape selling over 10,000 copies which in turn secured Green a weekly residence at the renowned Dalston venue Passing Clouds. At 17, he “ditched his A-Levels and pitched up his tent outside St Paul’s Cathedral, to stand in solidarity with the Occupy movement, ensuring that the voice of his generation was not ignored,” that followed by a performance at The House of Commons where he shared the stage with Fatboy Slim as part of a concert organised in association with Last Night A DJ Saved My Life Charity.

Since then he has supported Asian Dub Foundation, who subsequently recruited him to join them live, played numerous shows across Europe and played support for the likes of Pete Doherty and Section Boyz among many. Released via Hostage Music, Grime Is Punk is the nudge on national attention with Green offering the potential that he could live up to the suggestion that he might become a “voice for the people, a person willing to stand up and speak about the issues surrounding them in the world they live in.”

His EP opens with Fuck Off, an uncompromising proposal in sound and word summed up by its title. Pulsating bass tones and surface splattering beats tempt ears first as fizzy keys bring their own portentous air. It is a low key yet potent canvas from which Green pounces on ears and imagination while inciting thoughts with his scything spits. The dark shadows of the sounds equally line his vocals and a varied delivery as much a highly agreeable essence as the imposing climate of the track.

New single Bars follows the great start, its air and nature immediately lighter but again open in its defiance rich attitude. The repetitive design of the sound surrounding the urban wordsmith, as in all songs, is an addictive nagging with extra spices of adventure to feast on alongside the enjoyable swing of Green’s vocals.

That catchiness is even more gripping in As Above So Below, its underlying almost mischievous melodic tempting colluding with the slim haunting of keys and a throbbing bassline which sizzles as it’s throatily entices. Musically, the track is almost cinematic and vocally a gripping incitement shaped by Green’s virulent delivery whilst its successor, Flashy, is a shimmering and snarling protagonist coming over like a raw mix of Honky and G.R.I.M.

Its compelling persuasion leads to closing track Hustle, a track which bounces on the ear and bringing feet to life as a sultry and exotic hue seduces through synths. The snap of beats is as biting as Green’s syllables and tone, the theatre of the bass just as compelling, and the lyrical shuffle a rousing spark for body and emotion.

It is hard to pick a best track though the closer is always there on the tongue. Fair to say from start to finish Grime Is Punk is a thoroughly enjoyable incitement for ears and thought;  a potent start recording wise from Sonny Green with bigger things easily foreseeable for and from him ahead.

The Grime Is Punk EP is released May 13th via Hostage Music on iTunes.

 https://www.facebook.com/Sonny-Green-aka-SGB-233648870029827   https://twitter.com/SonnyGreenUK

Pete RingMaster 09/05/2016

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

For more exploration of the independent and promotional services check out http://www.zykotika.com

dälek – Asphalt For Eden

Photo credit: Devine Images

Photo credit: Devine Images

Returning from their hiatus a few months back, dälek have confirmed their return with the release of their new album Asphalt For Eden, the successor to 2009 full-length Gutter Tactics. Released via Profound Lore, it also sees a new line-up bringing their imagination to the band’s renowned experimentation.  Revived by mastermind and producer MC Dälek (aka Will Brooks) last year, with the permission of ex-member and co-producer Oktopus, and with DJ rEk on turntables and co-producer Mike Manteca on samplers and effects alongside, dälek reveal the first result of their fresh union with an album which bewitches as it intrigues, provokes as it explores new dramatic adventures in the band’s sound and imagination.

Whether it is a new pinnacle in the band’s creative endeavours we will leave others to decide but certainly Asphalt For Eden ignites the imagination with its raw noise within ambient beauty and dark trip hop meets hip hop experimentation and provocation. It opens with the hypnotic Shattered, a persistent nagging of drone and sonic repetition hugging the lyrical prowess and delivery of MC Dälek. It is a haunting waltz of dissonant shadows and throbbing resonance; reminding a little of British hip hop band Honky, with MC Dälek prowling ears and thoughts with his stirring presence.

The sensational start continues with the also toxically atmospheric Guaranteed Struggle. Again the senses are immersed in inharmonious textures and sonic trespasses, rhythms roaming with a distracted gait as the vocals spread their evocative insight. The cacophonous air is as mesmeric as the swing and vocal enticement, becoming more invasively compelling and corrosive with each passing minute of the song’s droning beauty. It increasingly seeps deeper into the psyche, magnetic in its mystique laced discordance and ravenous in its oppressive envelopment of body and mind.

art_RingMasterReviewMasked Laughter (Nothing’s Left) is a lighter distraction; its elegant fuzzy harmonies blossoming into halos of sonic suggestion around effect cloaked vocals whilst Critical provides an industrial toned intrusion with a carnival-esque revelry and infectiousness to its melodic undercurrent. As with its predecessors, there is a busy creative machine working away within the muggy climate of the track, new revelations emerging with every listen and in turn a fresh wave of virulent contagiousness.

The rockier incitement of 6dB comes next with its haze of sonic instrumentation and raw ambience around a brewing rhythmic stroll. It is a plaything for the imagination before Control simmers and bubbles with its bracing celestial air and harsh romance of noise around MC Dälek’s ever alluring presence. Its spatial qualities are emulated in It Just Is, a closing slice of transfixing sonic and melodic discord aligned to a pulsating trespass of charm. Though it, and the track before, do not quite ignite the same strength of reaction as those before, both leave satisfaction full in their absorbing embrace.

The biggest pleasure comes in the repetitious and enjoyably monotonous drones of sound which shape tracks in a range of differing textures and ways. It provides a mesmeric and imposing romancing of the senses and imagination simultaneously acting as fuel to the creative fire of Asphalt For Eden and spicing to its rousing explorations. It is as if dälek has never been away.

Asphalt For Eden is out now via Profound Lore across most online stores.

https://www.facebook.com/dalekmusic    https://twitter.com/daleknwk

Pete RingMaster 28/04/2016

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

For more exploration of the independent and promotional services check out http://www.zykotika.com

Desert Storm – Omniscient

Photo by Matt Winyard.

Two years on from their acclaimed second album Horizontal Life, British heavy blues metallers Desert Storm unleash a new cauldron of ridiculously addictive temptation in the ravishing shape of Omniscient. Before listening to the new release we would have been ecstatic to announce that the album was an equal to its brilliant predecessor. But it is not; just like the last album was a fascinating and thrilling step forward from the band’s outstanding debut full-length Forked Tongue, the glorious Omniscient is a leap to new plateaus. Everything about the encounter is a gripping evolution of adventure and maturity; riffs are dirtier, grooves keener edged, and it has a contagion which borders on slavery, all without losing any of the blistering uniqueness and raw power which has always soaked Desert Storm’s sonic invention.

Where many similarly styled bands seem like servants to the riff, in that it predominantly consumes their songwriting, Desert Storm enslave that feature of their sound and twist it into a web of just as forceful and potent grooved and melodic exploration. As proven by their previous album it means each track has a distinct character and creative emprise of its own, and in Omniscient all songs come from an even broader canvas of imagination and craft. Since forming in 2007, the Oxford quintet has challenged and lit ears right through to the passions with their persistently gripping releases. Equally they have earned a formidable reputation for their live presence through shows and tours with the likes of Karma To Burn, Nashville Pussy, Peter Pan Speedrock, Honky (ft. members of Down/Melvins/Butthole Surfers), Orange Goblin, Red Fang, and American Head Charge, not forgetting igniting festivals like The Bulldog Bash, The Desertfest, Brisfest, and Roadkill. Their stature and reputation already goes before them but now with Omniscient global recognition and spotlight has to be on the cards.

The band’s fans are sure to break into a broad smile as opener Outlander instantly collides with ears through excited rhythms and imposing riffs. As spicy grooves swiftly join the revelry it is prime Desert Storm psych blues flavouring, intent on seducing senses and imagination with concussive beats and intoxicating sonic temptation. Already there is a sense of new adventure though, OMNISCIENT_FCbackground melodies and atmospheres adding their suggestiveness as vocalist Matt Ryan roars. His voice is as bracing and gruffly coated as ever but also seemingly carried on a new clarity and variety. As expected it is impossible to escape the lures of guitarists Chris White and Ryan Cole or their weave of sinew driven riffs and toxic grooving, every note spilling temptation and virulence to match the similarly seductive dark throated tones of Chris Benoist’s bass and the anthemic heavy footed swipes of drummer Elliot Cole. It is an enthralling and incendiary start to the album, body and emotions already aflame from its creative bait and blues spirit.

The following more predatory Queen Reefer is just as irresistible. The source of the band’s new video, it is a ruggedly charming temptress with bulging beats and acidic invention. Far heavier and threatening compared to its more devilish predecessor, it casts a darker more volatile demonic air in its breath around a corrosive touch. In saying that though, the song is still irresistibly catchy and commanding, and with a mesmeric slip into a gentle embrace of expressive melodies and low key drama cast by guitars and bass at one point, mouth-wateringly adventurous.

Horizon continues to spread thick almost doomy textures of intensity and emotion next, drums creating a clash of percussive disorientation which only adds to the power of Elliot’s swings and the tangy blues grooving binding song and senses. It is just one part of the track’s scenery though as halfway it explodes into an explosive rhythmic tango which in turn seems to incite greater energy and venom to flush through the brawl of vocals and sonic enterprise. The track never quite ignites into the fury you suspect it might but is the better for it, the relative restraint adding to the dramatic tension of the song, a scintillating theatre which again turns Sway of The Tides into a battlefield of hostility and contagion, and Home into a folk ballad of sheer beauty. The first of the pair comes with flared nostrils and a rhythmic blood lust as heavy metal and stoner-esque blues rock clash in ears. The song is breath-taking, especially when it switches to a folkish pasture of cleaner vocals and a simple but expressive melody midway. It only impresses more as the scene and sounds start building back up to another fire of intensive emotion and searing grooves. Its successor is even more tantalising and enslaving. Voice and guitar again align to create a mesmeric smoulder of blues folk and southern tinged melodic rock which simply delights. Whereas the last album had the transfixing unexpected melodic delights of Gaia, Omniscient has this absorbing treat to wrong-foot, surprise, and thrill.

Not that the album has a moment where it does not do all those things in varying degrees anyway, as proven by the boozy swagger of House of Salvation which stomps in next. The track with its bar room like blues grooving and abrasing riffery reminds of N Ireland band Triggerman in some ways, especially in the melodic toxicity veining the devilment and the magnetic flame of a groove which has the appetite licking its lips and body swerving in subservience. The excellent temptation is matched straight away by the funk nudged stroll of Night Bus Blues. Making the perfect soundtrack to those times after a show where the cold flirts as you wait for the over-due conveyance to take you home and that is only part of the recognisable drama, the track proves humour is never a missing ingredient in the recipes Desert Storm conjures. Obviously it is not lacking addictive sounds either, an adjective which perfectly fits both Bandwagon and Blue Snake Moan which follow.

The first revels in a seventies blues rock seeding, spawning its sonic tempting from a psychedelic scent as fresh as it is familiar. The song provides yet another shade of colour and striking originality to the album, Omniscient easily the bands most excitingly and enjoyably diverse and expansive offering yet. The second of the two bristles and bellows with the heavy rock ‘n’ roll sound that the band has always bred its imagination through. Again though, it is widely spiced and commandingly robust with an array of rock bred flavours inviting feet and soul to roll with its rigorous devilry.

The album closes with Collapse of The Bison Lung, a summing up of things in a way as ripe grooves and intimidating riffs collude with rampant rhythms and snarling basslines to bind attention and light fires in the passions. A masterful end to a mighty release it reinforces and confirms what Omniscient suggests and we declare, that Desert Storm should be mentioned in the same breath as bands like Black Tusk, Red Fang, The Sword, and yes maybe even Mastodon.

Omniscient is released worldwide via Blindsight Records on January 26th.

Following the album’s release Desert Storm will be going on a short European tour:

Fri 6th Feb – Antwerp Music City, Antwerp BE w/ Atomic Vulture

Sat 7th Feb – Rock Cafe Jinx, Zaandam, NL w/ Millstone

Sun 8th Feb – Bassy Club, Berlin, DE w/ Samsara Blues Experiment

http://www.desertstormband.com/

RingMaster 22/01/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard from

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The Van Burens – Presidential Lovefest

TVB

Mischief and good music is always a healthily attractive mix and that is exactly what you get with Presidential Lovefest, the second EP from US indie/reggae funksters The Van Burens. The nine tracks it holds captures the imagination and feet from start to finish; the six full tracks and trio of equally magnetic samples which split the earlier songs on the release creating an intriguing web and compelling party to get wrapped up in. The release is fun with a giant F but also an expertly sculpted and devilishly presented slice of slavery.

Formed in 2008 and taking their name from the eighth President of the United States, The Van Burens has built up an eager following for their vivacious and energetic sound. They have a presence which toys with theirs and the listener’s imagination, their songs certainly on the new EP eager to ride unpredictability with contagious adventure. Presidential Lovefest is the successor to the 2010 Eager EP, the former’s success and appeal helping the Boston band to go on to tour the US. Drummer/singer Matt Spitz speaking about their new release said “Presidential Lovefest captures both our fun live set and our meticulous studio sound; it’s a dance record you can hear a thousand times and always find something new”. It is impossible to disagree as even after numerous tangos with its pleasing body, new temptations and depths reveal their seduction ensuring the release just gets better over time.

Taking an irreverent theme of American history to its humorous premises, Presidential Lovefest opens with the introductory scenery of TVB coverMiss Lola Overture, a forty second lead into the following Tricky Dick. It is here where the release really wakes up, rhythms and a blaze of brass heralding the funk driven stomp ahead. The track immediately stomps with a rhythmic swagger courted by a great dark bass tone provided by Emmett Knox whilst alongside them the vocals dance with revelry and a welcoming enticement. With the guitars of Greg Smith and Greg Spitz teaming up with the keys of Jeff King to weave a melodic web which simply seduces emotions and appetite, the song continues its rampant persuasion bursting continuously with the trumpeting calls of Leenie Doran beside the equally magnetic flames of trombonist Pete Fanelli and saxophonist Joel Edinberg.

It is a flaming bait to set the EP off in irresistible style, an entrance after the atmospherically wrapped bye bye with its ‘FoxMulder’/child sample, which is backed potently by the more restrained Hey Everybody. The song is a sultry breeze of smouldering brass and clinging melodies, band vocals and harmonies similarly gentle in their caresses. The track does not inflame as dramatically as the previous song but instead provides a persistent embrace which envelops and soaks the senses for a just as compelling capture.

A continuation of the previous sample comes with hello before Reagan raises its rhythmic knees and keen melodies for a vibrant wind of reggae fuelled enterprise. The beats of Matt Spitz pulsate and rap around the ears, alone triggering a festival in the feet whilst the mesmeric vocal sweeps which span across the punchy canter of the song manipulate the passions. Not for the first or last time, song and band inspire comparisons to the adventurous and inventive mischief of nineties band Honky, as well as offering essences of Fun Lovin’ Criminals. The song is a blaze of charm and inventive vitality, again the brass flumes emotively colouring the expressive canvas provided by guitars and keys framed by the ever tantalising rhythms. With flumes of scuzz kissed sonics and the guest trumpet insurgences of Sam Dechenne, the song steals passions and memory alike.

Lee Harvey emerges from a sinister atmosphere, a sampled public warning stepping from a noir haze right before a jazz/funk bred guitar teasing wraps its lures around the body. Again that Honky reference is at play, experimental hip hop elements swerving their inviting hips from within the fullness of the funk fuelled dance. There is a very familiar toxin to the track but it only accentuates the mystery and seduction, rogue keys and percussive exploits adding further sparks for the imagination to devour as greedily as the ears. Making its way to a climax of fifties swing and rock ‘n’ roll, the track is an irresistible treat to lose inhibitions and breath to.

The smokey air of This Town wafts gently over ears next, its shadowed emergence bringing a reggae built climate of condensed brass heat and stroking guitar evocation. Trumpet and vocal guesting from Doran as in the final song adds to the thick coaxing of the song, melodies and vocals swarming tenderly over the inventive nature of the guitars and rhythms. It is an engrossing, slightly more serious suasion than other tracks, flirtation raising another flush of warm ardour for the EP before the infectious closing of LBJ, it an experiment of intrusive melodies and invigorating imagination.

Presidential Lovefest is a delicious and boisterous encounter, one to lose your reserve and inhibitions to whilst The Van Burens climb your list of favourites with each and every tempting note.

The Presidential Lovefest EP is available as buy now name your price download @ http://thevanburens.bandcamp.com/album/presidential-lovefest

http://www.vanburenmusic.com

8.5/10

RingMaster 21/04/2014

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard from

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Senser – To The Capsules

Senser_promo2013_lores

It is always hard not to have an extra buzz to the anticipation of a new Senser release and the unleashing of their fifth studio album To The Capsules is no exception. Following the Biting Rhymes EP, an interim covers release between albums, the new ten track tempest from UK’s crossover legends shows the band at its most eclectic yet. Experience and maturity has certainly not diluted their want and intent to stretch their boundaries and on the evidence of the new release Senser have openly taken their consistently adventurous confrontational enterprise and inventive provocation to new levels. The debate is still going on in thoughts as to whether the album is their finest moment to date but certainly with a compelling expanse of imagination within a sumptuous storm of metal, hip hop, and electronica to simplify it all alongside the as expected political and social lyrical confrontation from the sextet, To The Capsules is a bright blaze in a fiery musical year.

Fan -funded through a highly successful Pledgemusic campaign and released via Imprint Music, the self-produced album takes the strong base established on the band’s comeback record How To Do Battle of 2009, and expands it into an intensive, incendiary, and satisfaction filling encounter. With a live presence which has accelerated into one of most exciting and inspiring over the past couple of years, Senser stir things up to another tempestuous height with To The Capsules, a record returning the band to the fore of genre merging invention and antagonistic ingenuity.

Big bulging magnetic rhythms open up the release, the initial pulsating lure of Devoid an immediate seizure of ears and thoughts. Senser-To-The-Capsules-cover-hi-resSoon after the guitar of Nick Michaelson is sending scars of searing sonic temptation across the rhythmic slavery, the merger only accelerating the hunger already brewing from the album’s entrance. Taking a stand of classic metal seeded enterprise alongside the still compelling rhythms, vocalist Heitham Al-Sayed unleashes his distinctive and passionate narrative delivery. It is prime Senser at this point but with a growl and predation which is as fresh a bait as ever laid down by the band. The album features guest vocalist iMMa across its length, the excellent vocalist having toured with the band since founding member Kerstin Haigh stepped down last year, and even as support on the song through the chorus raises the temptation and sultriness wrapping the metal bred intensity. As the predatory bass stalking of James Barrett and the outstanding drum exploits of Johnny Morgan, as well as the desk twisting skills of Andrew Clinton (aka DJ Awe) conjure greater shadows and traps for the listener to be enthralled by, the track is an immense and memorable lure into To The Capsules.

The following Time Travel Scratch drips intrigue and simmering seduction from its opening sample and coaxing, the DJ craft of Clinton stalked by the bestial bass sound conjured by Barrett immersed in a psychedelic funk kissed weave of imaginative persuasion. The track at times reminds of nineties UK rap group Honky, its grooves and senses mesmerising rhythms a similar toxicity wrapped in a soul and jazz funk fusion. The invigorating dance makes way for another lofty peak for the release. Witch Village with more than a whispered element of the weight and might of debut album Stacked Up to it, courts groove metal vengefulness and classic rock melodic enterprise for a result which is an aggressive and fearsome blaze of aural exploration and lyrical incitement.

The brilliant Wounded Spectre continues the torrent of diversity already rampaging across the album, its hardcore/punk rabidity linked to an alternative metal invention. Riffs are a carnivorous instigator of the passions whilst the sonic noise rock like stabs from Michaelson fall like shards of aural manna around the vocal vociferousness provided by Al-Sayed and iMMa. It keeps the album at its highest plateau, and is soon backed by the scintillating Break The Order, the track two and a half minutes of thrash ‘n’ punk fury. Take a pinch of Motorhead, The Grumpynators, Fuckshovel, and maybe a little Five Finger Death Punch and you have another piece of Senser alchemy to bask within.

The sultry sirenesque beckoning of iMMa within Alpha Omega and its sweet Eastern bred toxicity only increases as the track unveils intensive sinews and spite and melodies as virulently tempting as any release this year, whilst its successor Liquidity is a beguiling fluid heat of rap vocals, scratching squeals, and a psychedelic wash with a flavour of Dizraeli and the Small Gods to it. Neither track triggers the intensity of passion as their predecessors but both leave appetite greedy and satisfaction full to continue the raging pleasure.

Echelon features Kerstin Haigh on vocals alongside Al-Sayed and is another which just fails to reach earlier heights but for unpredictable and exhausting adventure is on the frontline, the track a bruising and uncompromising scorching fire of metal and hard rock rapaciousness. In its distinct character Chemtrails which has UK hip hop artists Junior Disprol and Manage guesting on its offering, also has a hunger which toys with rabidity within its electronic swamp and brass irresistibility. It is a challenging swarm of aural fascination, a glorious investigation which adds another startling aspect to the album whilst setting up the closing seven minute epic, Let There Be War. Despite the track epitomising all the strengths and invention of Senser it is a little disappointing, lacking that essential spark though like the other songs which slip below the album’s fullest heights, it is more down to the quality surrounding them on the album than any major shortcomings within its skilled and provocative walls.

      Nevertheless To The Capsules is a thrilling and richly exciting release and Senser back as one of the most innovative and boundary worrying bands in British rock, metal, rap….well within any genre they wish to employ.

http://www.senser.co.uk/

9/10

RingMaster 25/11/2013

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