The Kut – Valley of Thorns

The Kut by Canz Rickman

There is no doubt that the recent release of new single Mind Games stirred up a fresh hunger in an already in place appetite for the eagerly anticipated debut album from The Kut, in us and a great many others. Truth is we had already been hooked on the band’s contagious punk grumble ’n’ roll through their previous EPs but the new track’s fresh adventure and imagination brought fresh intrigue and pleasure to devour. It ensured that Valley of Thorns was leapt upon with rude eagerness and the fuse to further pleasure lit.

The album brings live favourites, some of which already known from those previous encounters, and brand new creative provocations; a union providing one rousing and increasingly impressive, dare we say essential slab of rock ‘n’ roll. Within its striking body it roars and seduces, attacks and coaxes, all the time infesting and manipulating ears, body, and imagination in a way which reminds of punk rock in its seventies prime but is all modern fire and attitude.

The Kut is the alter-ego of multi-instrumentalist Princess Maha and live a sonically ferocious trio completed by the moodily infectious basslines of Stella Vie and the swinging beats of Diana Bartmann. With their reputation growing by the year since emerging in 2010, The Kut has exploded upon venues across the UK and Europe and earned rich praise playing festivals such as Download, Camden Rocks, Nice N Sleazy, Rebellion, Hard Rock Hell, Glastonbudget, and Strummercamp. Support and acclaim has been rife across the media, radio and written press alike, and last year saw the band become a finalist in the Rock category of the UK Songwriting Contest 2017 as well as being a current Semi-Finalist of the International Songwriting Competition. It has been a busy and successful time which the release of Valley of Thorns can not only escalate but nurture The Kut as a household name.

Produced by James LeRock Loughrey (Skindred, White Zombie, My Vitriol, Bjork, Def Leppard), Valley of Thorns kicks off with its lead single, Mind Games teasing the senses with its sonic mist before boldly strolling through ears with a Deftones meets Spinnerette like captivation. There is a haunting air and emotive depth to the song yet it has a virulent swing to its gait and rhythmic persuasion which has the body swaying and appetite greedy in no time. A track epitomising the seductive persuasion and nagging irritability in The Kut’s sound, it is pure mesmerism which has become stronger and more striking across multiple plays.

The album’s stirring start continues with the rebellious rock ‘n’ roll of Hollywood Rock N Roll, a virulent slice of anthemic temptation which had us bouncing and roaring in no time with its Babes In Toyland/ Spinnerette-esque stomp. The latter of the two is a band which often frequents thoughts across the album, its snarls and instinctive catchiness reminding of the band even in a sound which is pretty much distinct to The Kut.

The following No Trace swings in like a predatory temptress, grooves writhing around ears with an almost salacious touch as dark hues of bass growl and beats firmly strike. It is a scuzzy affair, the songs body a muggy grunge trespass contrasted by Princess Maha’s harmonic vocal caresses which offer their one lining of danger. It too has a haunted sigh to its croon which just enslaved attention before I Want You Maniac grips ears with initially a gorgeous low slung hook and subsequently its infection loaded swing. A tinge of L7 lines its tenacious enterprise, a whiff of Hole its encroaching shadows; the song a volatile sonically visceral encroachment just impossible to have too much of.

The blossoming diversity within The Kut’s sound is superbly shown in next up Love In The Rush Hour, the song a collusion of harmonic kisses and predacious intent. It strolls with the inherent swing which effortlessly springs from the band’s invention but aligned to a caustic glaze of guitar amid fuzz twisted riffs; an entangling of contrasts which is as compelling as Princess Maha’s vocal temptation who at times can be described as being like the UK Brody Dalle.

I Am Vain is dirty rock ‘n’ roll with attitude flowing from every pore but as naturally infectious as anything within the album; its punchy nature spawning its own unique hooks and skilled enterprise while the mellower climate of Alekhine’s Gun breeds a prowling volatility which erupts in sonic flames and vocal abrasions; its irritations and discontent erupting and spewing rancor before simmering down back into the song’s relative calm. Though neither track quite match the heights of those before them each leaves ears and appetite greedy for more whilst revealing new shades in The Kut’s adventure.

A calmer air is brought by X-Ray Eyes too though unsurprisingly it has an inbred growl which fuels bold rhythms and its suggestive character plus an increasingly addictive catchiness which has song and the body bouncing as the first contemplates and the second submits to its moody enslavement. Its success though is soon eclipsed by that of Bad Man. A multi-flavoured rock ‘n’ roll virulence, the track is like a boiling cauldron spiced by the punk juices of Bikini Kill, the dark rock ‘n’ roll of  Jess and the Ancients Ones, and the infectious agility of Sleater-Kinney; it all brewing up into another individual Kut intoxication.

The album is completed by Mario, a raw pop ‘n’ rock encounter as beguiling as it is aggressive. Throughout the album another band which at times comes to mind is seventies outfit The Photos through the pop hues open within The Kut’s sound. Here alone there are coincidental echoes in its infectious traits which only add to the fun.

Being already hooked by their earlier releases, we were always likely to head into Valley of Thorns with a favourable disposition but swiftly it outshone anticipation heights, the new songs alone suggesting The Kut is ready to grab attention from the biggest names in attitude soaked rock ‘n roll.

Valley of Thorns is released via Cargo Records / Criminal Records on 13th April in the UK and Europe and May 18th in the US.

Forthcoming Tour Dates

TBA April Album Launch Party, London

26.05 Strummercamp Festival, Oldham

27.05 Nice n Sleazy Festival, Morcambe

02.06 Camden Rocks Festival, London – 2pm The Monarch

30.06 Rat InFESTation 2, Facebar, Reading

06.07 Amplified Festival, Gloucestershire

07.07 The Cotswold Inn, Cheltenham

14.07 Wemstock Festival, Wem

22.07 Tramlines Fringe, The Royal Standard, Sheffield

2/3/4/5 August: Rebellion Festival, Blackpool

http://thekut.co.uk    http://facebook.com/thekut   http://twitter.com/thekutgirlsrock   http://instagram.com/thekutofficial

Pete RingMaster 04/04/2018

Suicidal Tendencies – World Gone Mad

 

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Many elements make up the success of legendary punk/thrashers Suicidal Tendencies, an array of qualities which has gripped and thrilled across three and a half decades and eleven previous studio albums. One potent trait is, within a sound which roars Suicidal Tendencies from its first breath, unpredictability; an essence which in varying degrees has made all of the band’s offerings memorable and easy to devour. New proposal World Gone Mad is no exception; a seriously rousing and thunderous affair of crossover ferocity inescapably Suicidal Tendencies which twists through new adventures while flirting with the imagination.

The successor to the well-received 13 of three years ago, World Gone Mad is a tempest of infectiously aggressive and creatively imaginative escapades equally drawing on the kind of punk fuelled exploits which marked out the band from its early days as one of metal and punks most vital propositions.  The new album also sees the band’s newest line-up in place with founder and vocalist Mike Muir and guitarist Dean Pleasants (ex-Infectious Grooves) linking up with guitarist Jeff Pogan, bassist Ra Diaz, and master drummer Dave Lombardo (Slayer, Phantomas, GripInc, Dead Cross). It is a unit which across the board has forged a new aspect to the Suicidal Tendencies personality without losing its prime character and appeal. Produced by Muir alongside Paul Northfield (Rush, Dream Theater, Queensrÿche, Ozzy Osbourne, Hole, Marilyn Manson) who also engineered and mixed the record, World Gone Mad snarls and stomps, providing an incitement as bruising and confrontational as it is a riotous funk grooved infestation of ears and body.

Latest single Clap Like Ozzy sets things off; its fuse and explosion prime Suicidal Tendencies. Lombardo’s catchy beats first catch ears, a grumbling bassline quickly adding to the thick coaxing as guitars send sonic scythes across the lure. Swiftly the song uncages a venomous yet ridiculously catchy assault, wiry grooves and rhythmic tenacity an anthemic roar of punk ‘n’ thrash virulence ridden by the unmistakable presence and tones of Muir. As hooks collude with the flirtatious antics of the bass, Pleasants winds trails of melodic lava around it all, his strings a heated siren within an already irresistible calling.

The New Degeneration takes over finding even more irritability in its tone and individual elements. Riffs and rhythms almost stalk the senses as Muir leads the defiance; group calls a great backing to his instigation. An undercurrent of animosity brews throughout the attack, eventually igniting as Lombardo flicks the switch to a full-out ravaging of ears with his magnetic swipes. Again the track is ‘typical’ Suicidal Tendencies but rippling with fresh twists and turns to leave satisfaction rich and full before Living For Life appears to eclipse its success. Unsurprisingly moments of Infectious Grooves like juiciness appear within World Gone Mad, the third track unapologetically embracing their funk metal swing for its initial flirtation before crashing ferociously upon the senses with its punk scented epidemic of ravenous riffs and on rushing rhythms again led by the twisted beat alchemy of Lombardo. The track is glorious everything you could wish from a Suicidal Tendencies encounter and more as it seduces and inspires body and spirit

suicidal_tendencies_-_world_gone_madSuicidal Tendencies - World Gone MadThe gentle melodic opening of Get Your Fight On! is a suggestive pull next which intrigues more than ignites the imagination but soon leads into the waiting rhythmic prowess of Lombardo and the sonic enterprise of Pleasants and Pogan. It too works its way from a relatively calm tempting to an incendiary blaze where it really grabs the appetite and passions as heavy metal flames unite with punk and thrash dexterity for an anthem which might not hold all the sparks of its predecessors but leaves only an eager want to delve into its cauldron all over again.

The album’s title track is another which takes its time to convince to the same level as the opening tracks, showing itself a slow burner which by the fifth or sixth lessons is one of the moments of the album which lingers the longest. A perpetual prowl which ignites onto a consuming fire of sound and aggression, the song has a touch of Insane Clown Posse to its most intense fire and Red Hot Chili Peppers to its relentless groove but as expected roars with nothing other than the voice of its creators.

The excellent Happy Never After fingers lustful reactions next, its gait also a prowling incitement crossed with sonic tendrils and pushed by steely riffs courting militant beats. Muir is the ringmaster to its determined intent and nature, whipping up the heart and imagination of track and listener alike as the rest of the band spins a riveting and increasingly addictive web.

From one major highlight to another as One Finger Salute stands bold and aggressive with punk rock insatiability and thrash driven intensity straight after to create a deliciously imposing and hungry proposal. Diaz’s bass is a treat of a bestial lure, its resonating flirtation aligned to the jumping beats of Lombardo, both enslaving attention soon bound in the sonic potency of the guitars.

Straight after Damage Control is a threatening infestation of wonderfully toxic and gripping grooves as rhythms again take on a preying animalistic potency whilst Muir and riffs stir with their punk ‘n’ roll cattiness. The outstanding track keeps the album’s pinnacle point going in feverish style, bass and drums especially irresistible though all parts of the incitement leaves a new hunger installed in ears and appetite for the release.

The sonic metal tapestry of The Struggle Is Real equally sparks a zeal for song and album, its punk call and rhythmic swagger a captivating irritant on peace and clam while successor Still Dying To Live sees the quintet embarking on a smouldering melodic venture equipped with alluring throaty bass tempting and psych rock shimmers around the warm coaxing of a kaleidoscope of magnetic hooks and surprises. At over seven minutes, the track is a masterfully invasive seduction romancing ears and imagination and a compelling finale to World Gone Mad capped by the stripped down magnificence of This World and its evolution and continuation of the closing track of the same name upon 13.

The track is a fine end epitomising the growth and riveting blossoming of sound and imagination between the two albums seeing World Gone Mad a powerful and thrilling new turn in the band’s history.  Whether it will be considered the band’s best release will down to the individual but without doubt the album is destined to be right there as a true favourite.

World Gone Mad is out now across most online stores through Suicidal Records.

http://www.suicidaltendencies.eu/   https://www.facebook.com/suicidaltendencies   https://twitter.com/OFFICIALSTIG

Pete RingMaster 15/11/2106

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Skinny Girl Diet – Heavy Flow

SGD_RingMasterReview

Raw and defiant, unashamedly honest and forthright, British trio Skinny Girl Diet have a sound and heart bred attitude which refuses to pull its punches or tow the party line lyrically or musically. It is a combination which roars with anger and informs with uncompromising zeal and now fuels a debut album which just demands attention. Heavy Flow is a punk infused slab of grunge confrontation as lo-fi and rapacious as it is often melodically engaging and masterfully seductive; an incitement for ear and thought which perpetually hits the spot.

Consisting of sisters Delilah and Ursula Holliday, vocals/guitar and drums respectively, and their bassist cousin Amelia Cutler, London hailing Skinny Girl Diet has increasingly been talked about and covered over past years with Heavy Flow according to the band “a body of 6 years of work”, adding “it’s basically us as a band in its entirety.”

From it’s in the face cover featuring the ladies clad in white dresses inflamed by the natural showing of periods, Heavy Flow invades the senses with assertive pride and confrontation. Its songs are emotionally intensive flying in the face of suppressive attitudes towards women and numerous other injustices shaping the world.  It is a roar of frustration and uncaged ire which stirs up air and emotions from its first breath.

Opener Comedown Intro is a sonic entanglement of solemn nicely caustic guitar alongside an alignment of a pulsating bassline and crisp beats courted by enticing harmonies. Its relatively brief coaxing leads the ears towards the awaiting antagonism of Yeti, the band’s recent single. With a tinge of The Distillers meets Babes In Toyland to it, the track rumbles and grumbles on the ear while encasing it in sonic toxicity and vocal dispute as feverish twists add to the rousing melee.

cover_RingMasterReviewIt is an outstanding full start matched by the musically more even tempered Okay. Instantly catchy with its low key but virulent stroll, the song soon brews up a tempestuous climate around the increasingly engaging tones of Delilah, further switching and embracing the contrasts across its forceful endeavour. As its predecessor and those to come, the track is a lyrical poke which makes you stand back and think even as the imagination is eagerly accosted and beguiled by its twists and turns.

The scuzzy touch of next up Lazy Eye is impressively tempered by vocal harmonies which manage to snarl and seduce simultaneously while Eyes That Paralyse is an invasive rock ‘n’ roll grievance deceptively and cantankerously anthemic. The first of the two unites the rasping prowess and causticity of guitar with a kinder caress of vocal and melodic provocation, the second the raw emotion of voice and sound to an abrasive smoulder, both further igniting ears and an already lively appetite for the release.

Already noticeable is the imaginative structure and enterprise of the band’s songs within their ever scathing provocations, next up Bored the most bold yet with its wandering bass twang and sonic espionage around the primal beats of Ursula and Delilah’s standoffish vocal trespass. The song is a riveting tapestry of multi-flavoured adventure, as punk as it is grunge and noise rock seeded as it taps into another exciting aspect to the band’s songwriting and imagination before the corrosive punk ‘n’ roll of Wolf Pack just preys on the senses.

Another pinnacle within the loft heights of Heavy Flow is forged by the acerbically grooved and voiced Silver Spoons, the track a fuzz ball of emotionally trenchant, sonically bracing discord which just sparks within ears. Its unpolished beauty is contrasted by the warm clarity bringing successor Fix Me into view, its mellow calm breeding a Breeders toned predation subsequently bringing stronger turbulence to the song’s captivating atmosphere.

Through the venomously contumacious Pretty Song and the punk familiarity of DMT, Skinny Girl Diet reinforce their command of ears and a hunger for more, the second of the two arguably the album’s least unique track with its Hole/L7 like swing but as addictive as anything involved in the success of Heavy Flow.

The biting shimmer and growl of Forget equally stirs the passions with a far more inventive design soon taken further within the stormy majesty of Wasted Smile, a track which baits the senses with melodic and emotive elegance and within the flicker of a twist unleashes a blaze of sonic and rhythmic raging upon them.  It is a superb end to the album with Comedown Outro providing a melodically raw epilogue which only urges a need to press play all over again.

Heavy Flow impresses on first listen but truly grows and inspires with further investigations. It might not be declared the best album of 2016, though it just might too with a great many, but Skinny Girl Diet has provided one of the more important propositions to be embraced.

Heavy Flow is released November 4th; self-released in the UK and through HHBTM Records in the US.

https://www.facebook.com/skinnygirldiet/   http://skinnygirldietband.tumblr.com/   https://twitter.com/skinnygirldiett/

Pete RingMaster 03/11/2016

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Hands Off Gretel – Burn the Beauty Queen

HOG_RingMasterReview

Checking out the ear exciting single One Eyed Girl a few short weeks back, our closing line was “Roll on Burn The Beauty Queen”. That is the title of the debut album from UK grrl punksters Hands Off Gretel, and just a handful of days ago it was unveiled to quench hopes and anticipation for its potential riding on the back of its lead single. Burn the Beauty Queen is glorious, a feast of grunge fuelled punk ‘n’ roll snarling and barracking like a fusion of Die So Fluid, Spinnerette, and The Raincoats. It is an infestation of ears and psyche skilfully weaving recognisable flavours into its own distinctively imaginative exploits and more than fulfilling the promise offered by its first single.

Emerging from an early musical partnership between vocalist/guitarist Lauren Tate and guitarist Sean McAvinue and following the demise of the former’s Lauren Tate Band, Hands Off Gretel quickly started to draw attention with Tate’s ‘frustration songs’ as creative fuel. Late 2015 saw Sam Hobbins invited to play bass and drums on the South Yorkshire band’s album, subsequently become the permanent Hands Off Gretel drummer to join Tate and McAvinue, newest member bassist Joe Scotcher completing the current line-up.

In a year already seeing Hands Off Gretel release the single My Size as well as One Eyed Girl and play Whitby Goth Weekend, Camden Rocks Festival, Rebellion, Kaya Festival, and Isle of Wight Festival, Burn the Beauty Queen is the pinnacle and needs barely two minutes of opener Queen Universe to confirm the fact. Teasing, almost taunting with a lone riff initially, bait swiftly accompanied by the potent tones of Tate, the song is soon a cauldron of imposing rhythms, cantankerous riffs, and spiky hooks with bitchy harmonies adding their great snarl. It is a stunning start quickly reminding of those earlier references yet just as powerfully showing its own character of sound and invention as it stomps over senses and into the passions.

There is no chance of such a powerful bordering on psychotic beginning being followed by an antic-climax either as One Eyed Girl follows to confirm its position of one of the best songs heard this year. Grumbling in ears from its opening bassline, the track is soon aggressively challenging and seducing as Tate’s catchy yet confrontational tones align to the nagging and addictive exploits of McAvinue’s hooks and riffs as rhythms swing with venom. Again there is no escaping a Brody Dalle essence to vocals and indeed the sound but the song bounces around on its own unique terms to feed an already keen appetite for what is on offer.

art_RingMasterReviewBad Egg is next, coaxing ears with a singular hook wearing an early Adam and The Ants scent before things open up with wiry melodies and predacious beats as McAvinue’s guitar spins a web of tangy melodic intrigue. Less ferocious and imposing than its predecessors, the track is dangerously bewitching, leaving a lingering imprint before Teethin’ strolls in like a gunslinger, one hiding its bite behind catchy endeavours but perpetually gnawing away with post and old school punk invention. Its exceptional persuasion is followed by that of Little Man, a haunting ballad-esque canter seemingly as much inspired by the darker explorations of Siouxsie and The Banshees as bands like Hole and 4 Non Blondes, and quite irresistible.

From its dark shadows, Hands Off Gretel go for the jugular with the punk infested and simply brilliant Always Right. It is a rousingly irritable assault, like Bikini Kill meets Au Pairs and also fiercely addictive as its virulent enterprise and piecing hooks take hold before Under The Bed bares its cranky attitude and nature with creative zeal.

Through the barbarous Oh Shit with its predatory bassline and scything riffs and the raging fire of World Against She, Hands Off Gretel prove that even their least unique offerings simply ring true with ears and emotions and set the band well apart from the field whilst tracks like Eating Simon with its Three Imaginary Boys like Cure hooks and enslaving rhythmic rumbling offer evidence that the quartet just might be one of the bands helping steer British rock to new glories ahead.

Then we have Plasters, a superb and slightly deranged piece of imagination which drawls discord, musically and emotionally, whilst casting another highly addictive web of beats and sonic hooks. The song brings seventies punk, eighties new wave, and nineties grunge into the raw and twenty first century invention of Hands Off Gretel for something quite striking.

The dark amble and warning of Push The Girl and the climactic theatre of Awfully Miserable bring Burn the Beauty Queen to a powerful close; the first sublime creative drama in the ear and its successor, from an engrossing low key unleashing, a tempest of scything beats and grumpy basslines littered with electric grooves and spiky hooks as crescendos rise and fall.

It is a great end to one of the year’s most impressive and seriously pleasurable releases of 2016. Hands Off Gretel bring a fresh excitement to music, Burn the Beauty Queen the biggest thrill.

Burn the Beauty Queen is out now and available @ http://www.handsoffgretel.co.uk/_p/prd15/4533789831/product/burn-the-beauty-queen-album

http://www.handsoffgretel.co.uk/   https://www.facebook.com/handsoffgretel/

Pete RingMaster 21/09/2016

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Healthy Junkies – Box of Chaos

HJ_RingMaster Review

It was September 2013 when we last had Healthy Junkies igniting ears with a release; that being their impressive second album The Lost Refuge. One of our parting lines then was that the UK had “come of age and you only sense they will get better.” It was partly right as the London quartet has only gone from strength to strength on the live scene and now with third album Box of Chaos. Their coming of age back then though might have been a touch premature for the riveting and dynamic fourteen track punk ‘n’ roll stomp from the band firmly outshines its acclaimed predecessor.

Emerging from a meeting between founders, guitarist Phil Honey-Jones and Paris hailing vocalist Nina Courson at the venue Punk in Soho in 2009 and their creative bonding over mutual loves and influences, melodic punks Healthy Junkies took little time to start leaving their stamp on the UK punk and rock scene. Making their live debut at an all-day punk festival in Brighton in 2010, the band has become a rousing roar around the UK moving into Europe and one of London’s most exciting and prominent live attractions with their self-hosted monthly night at The Unicorn in Camden a regular treat. Debut album Sick Note awoke a broader attention on the band when released, a success forcibly backed up by The Lost Refuge. Throughout the time line-up changes have only seemed to refuel the band at various times too, the latest coming since the recording of Box of Chaos with bassist Ivan Baragone replacing the departed Dave Renegade alongside Courson, Honey Jones, and drummer Tony Alda.

HJ(1)_RingMaster ReviewWhilst The Lost Refuge was a rousing tempest in ears from the first roar, Box of Chaos takes its time to build and entice even greater greedier reactions. Certainly its first play and touch is a potent lure but each listen reveals greater depths and imagination at the heart of the release which only adds to its strength and drama. There is also seemingly richer old school punk and rock ‘n’ roll hues this time around, essences no doubt bred from inspirations to Honey-Jones and Courson such as Sonic Youth, Hole, Sex Pistols, Bauhaus, Siouxsie and the Banshees, Iggy and the Stooges, and David Bowie. One band which our thoughts most leaned to as a reference across the new album though is Penetration; a similarly evocative nature and tone to the great County Durham band spicing the band’s adventurous sound from the off with both Nice n Sleazy and its successor Never Want It Again. The opener emerges on a sonic shimmer with waiting riffs quickly stirring into predatory life as ears continue to be enveloped in that initial mist. Rhythms are soon just as pressing as Coulson’s magnetic voice seduces, her tones a smouldering caress within the rising fiery heat of the song. It is an increasingly virulent protagonist grabbing swift involvement of the listener, setting them up for more riotous stroll of Never Want It Again. It is a tenacious canter though superbly twisted with ska/like asides as rhythms and vocals flirtatiously swing with mischievous intent within the otherwise busy attitude loaded rock ‘n’ roll of the song.

Danny Trash keeps the potent start to the album in top gear, its catchy canter and haunted atmosphere soon enslaving hips and imagination respectively. As expected and already shown, Health Junkies produce choruses and anthemic moments which are inescapable; voice and body soon on board with a track which is a maze of evocative sounds, pungent emotion, and creatively boisterous exploits.

The following Hypocrite is the opposite but just as glorious, its punk rock fury offering one minute fifteen seconds of cantankerous rock ‘n’ roll with raw riffs and repetitious brawling spawned from delicious old school incitement before I Don’t Give a Damn springs with a similar aggressive heart into ears. It is soon casting another prowling proposal with addictive hooks and gripping rhythms; both swift slavery as the guitars weave a melodically provocative narrative for thoughts to get wound up in as successfully as the body is lost to the anthemic prowess of the encounter.

The more hard rock meets punk ‘n’ roll tempting of Je Suis Free is an inviting and again contagious defiance next whilst Watch Out has a blues rock lining to its infection loaded, roister fuelled smoulder. Both tracks lead the listener into energetic and galvanic ways before Rebellion, with presumably Honey-Jones standing toe to toe with Courson in duet, stirring up another urge to take a stand and lose inhibitions in voice and deed. The track is Healthy Junkies at their rock ‘n’ roll best, direct, lyrically potent, yet igniting the want to fling the body around.

The confrontational rock pop enticement of Just a Fool steps up next, it too quickly sparking total involvement before the outstanding creative theatre of Runaway Devil infests ears and psyche. There is no escaping a Siouxsie and the Banshees air to the song, keys running their melodic fingers over the senses as Courson’s ethereal tones enchant seductively around the darker touch of rhythms. In short time the track is soon a fiercely bubbling and intimidating tempting, reminding of fellow Londoners The Duel, but still with that early coaxing a rich lure.

There are numerous peaks in the landscape of the album, that one pinnacle almost matched by the dirtier rock ‘n’ roll of Hustle Street straight after and indeed the twin tempting of the melodically mesmeric Captive with its dub shimmer and the robust swagger of Don’t Give Up where scything beats, bass rumbling, and scuzzy riffery crowd around the ever alluring tones of Courson. Reggae seeded turns and again dub spiced inventiveness only increases its grip on ears and appetite, Ruts DC like imagination leaving satisfaction bulging.

Closing with D7, another spellbinding mix of evocative calms, atmospheric haunting, and vocal seducing in a case of antagonistically anthemic rebel-rousing, Box of Chaos is a thrilling blaze for the ears and manna for the spirit from a band looking at their most successful and surely acclaimed loaded year yet.

Box of Chaos is released February via STP Records.

http://www.healthyjunkies.co.uk   https://www.facebook.com/healthyjunkiesband/   https://twitter.com/HealthyJunkies

9/10

Pete RingMaster 01/02/2016

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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The Kut – Rock Paper Scissors

The Kut Promo

More captivating with every listen, Rock Paper Scissors is one of those encounters which make a bigger impact in four songs than many bands can in a handful of song loaded releases. The new EP from UK rockers The Kut; it is a ferocious yet alluring mix of grunge, alternative rock, and punk. Each of the tracks offers something different to those before it without departing from the core heart of the band’s sound. It is pop, punk, grunge all at once, but predominantly it is anthemic rock ‘n’ roll to rage and romp with.

Taking inspirations from bands such as Deftones, L7, Hole, Incubus, Placebo, Nirvana, and Faith No More, the London trio whipped up keen attention with their first EP Make Up last year whilst singles and songs like No Trace, Mario, Closure, and Doesn’t Matter Anyway have bred keen support and appetites for their emergence in fans and media alike. Now is the turn of the more dramatically imposing yet virulently contagious James LeRock Loughrey (Skindred,White Zombie, My Vitriol, Page & Plant, Bjork, Def Leppard) produced songs of Rock Paper Scissors to make their persuasions, and there seems little will stop them awakening an even hungrier spotlight upon the band.

Artwork- The Kut RPS   Immediately opener I Want You Maniac treats ears to a scuzzy riff matched by punchy rhythms and an inviting vocal confrontation from guitarist Maha. Just as swiftly there is a sense of a more aggressive, angry even, feel to the tone and music of the track which is supported and realised in broader visceral fashion across the rest of the EP. The infectious qualities which marked the previous release are just as prevalent too, hooks and anthemic vocals a virulent persuasion against the fuzz lined enterprise of Maha’s guitar and the thumping beats of Violet Cannibal aligned to the predatory lures of Alison Wood’s bass. As mentioned the track has a new aggressive and raw belligerence in sound which without doubt benefits band and release. The song hunts the senses like a mix of L7 and Distillers but with the punk toxicity of early Damned and the catchiness of The Ramones to its potency.

   Alekhine’s Gun steps up next and has a mellower more relaxed touch to its opening, though again there is menace in the rhythmic framing and atmosphere shadows surrounding the excellent vocals and infectious melodic tempting. The rage which seems to fuel the EP erupts in abrasing vocal bellows throughout the encounter but persistently it manages to return to a less volatile and equally compelling state, subsequently offering great unpredictability and adventure throughout.

The best tracks on the EP complete Rock Paper Scissors, the first coming with the rock/punk pop excellence of I Don’t Need Therapy. Brewing essences of bands like Spinnerette and Valentiine into its own distinct landscape of dirty rock ‘n’ roll, the song strolls boldly with simple but voracious riffs speared by gripping hooks whilst the bassline running through all is sheer grouchiness. The track has an inescapable familiarity to it but that only adds to the rich flavouring offered and enjoyed.

The closing Bad Man emerges as the favourite, everything about it preying on ears from scything rhythms to caustic riffery. Even its melodic passages have a sultry yet sinister occult/psyche rock colouring which would not be out of place in a Jess and the Ancient Ones or Blood Ceremony offering. The track is outstanding; the pinnacle of The Kut’s invention for personal tastes and a fine way to leave the listener with a long and lingering excited impression of the release.

Listening to Rock Paper Scissors it is still easy to feel there is plenty more to come from the threesome, in songwriting and sound as well as invention, to truly set the band aside from the rest and give the UK a band to rival the statures of bands like Hole and L7. Right now The Kut provide a thoroughly enjoyable and impressive proposal which goes just down a treat.

The Rock Paper Scissors EP is available now via Criminal Records digitally and on CD at https://thekut.bandcamp.com/album/rock-paper-scissors

Upcoming live dates for The Kut…

2nd May: Hell Fire Club, Redhill, Surrey

Saturday 16th May: Elektrowerkz, Angel, London

Saturday 24th May: Mainstage, Glastonbudget, Leicester

Saturday 23rd – 24th May: Strummercamp Festival, Manchester

Saturday 30th May: The Harvest Home, Haughton Regis, Bedford

http://www.thekut.co.uk/   https://www.facebook.com/thekutgirlsrock

RingMaster 15/04/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard on Reputation Radio @ http://www.reputationradio.net

 

 

New Model Army – Between Wine and Blood

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New Model Army has never been slow in impressing and stirring up thoughts and passions since forming back in 1980 with their uncompromising and inventive sound, lyrical confrontation, and inspiring stage presence but it is fair to say that the Bradford band hit a new pinnacle with last year’s Between Dog and Wolf album. It showed as if fans needed reminding, that the band has become more impressive and essential with age, the rigorously acclaimed release being rewarded with being the UK band’s fastest selling offering and charting top 30 in UK and Germany. Now the band unleash the similarly outstanding and eventful 2 CD encounter Between Wine and Blood. Made up of six brand new songs on one disc and eleven live cuts of tracks from the previous album on a second, it is an invigorating continuation of the riveting creative plateau set out upon Between Dog and Wolf.

Following the potent release of the last album, NMA set out on the Between Dog and Wolf Tour to equal praise and success. Part two of the tour was scheduled for the spring of 2014 but due to drummer Michael Dean being diagnosed with blood clots in his leg and advised not to play shows, the tour was postponed until this autumn. The break enabled the band to hit the studio and to record 6 brand new songs for the mini studio album accompanying the live CD. The songs are bred from and continue the weighty impressive presence of Between Dog and Wolf, pushing and exploring further its creatively imposing and thrilling emprise. The tracks make for a compelling and enthralling companion to the live portion of the release. Recorded from the first part of the aforementioned tour at venues in London, Nottingham, Cambridge, Cologne, and Amsterdam, the CD sublimely reinforces and the power and impressive stature of the last full-length and the band live, easily capturing the raw and emotive energy which marks their songs and stage presence. Combined the two sides of the proposition makes for one of this year’s most enjoyable and striking incitements from a band as mentioned earlier just get better and better.

The new tracks start off with According To You and needs little time to consume ears in a slow yet heavy and throaty embrace of bass and guitar. It swiftly slips into a pungent stroll of predacious riffs and sonic enticement from the guitars of Justin Sullivan and Marshall Gill, whilst vocally Sullivan imposes himself with the distinctively confrontational yet expressive calm which has always marked his delivery. The grouchy tone of Ceri Monger’s bass brings another breath of drama to the prowl of the track whilst its flowing chorus is unafraid to dabble in rock pop without defusing the intensity and weight of the impressive opener. It is a stirring encounter, but emerging in hindsight as just the tasty appetiser for greater things to come starting straight away with Angry Planet.

The second track has barely time to coax the imagination before raw riffs incite a rampant stroll of anthemic beats from Dean, which in turn are caressed by a gentle but vocal melody and the ever riveting lure of the bass. Exploratory electronic breezes from Dean White enhance the dramatic evocation cast by the song for a stunning challenge where lyrics and vocals work on thoughts as magnetically as rhythms enslave limbs and the inventive sonic weave steals the imagination. Sure to be a crowd favourite ahead, the song builds and boils into a climactic finale driven by the discontent and unrest theming its narrative, ultimately cementing itself as a show and album stopper.

Guessing is equally anthemic in its individual stomp, beats and riffs an irresistible incitement over which melodies and sonic designs twist with flirtatious hues as vocals and the increasingly impressive bass endeavour of Monger, nestle 46f67d33-e5e6-4afa-b8eb-68050a268a25perfectly between the song’s antagonistic rhythmic drive and seducing creative enticement. Another to chalk up as a classic NMA proposition, the song is rivalled by the bewitching Happy To Be Here. An emotive folk embrace wraps ears as a sultry melodic temptation and ambience provides a mesmeric colour to the vocal draw of Sullivan and a courting acoustic beauty. An energetic bounce to the track just as rapidly emerges but is never allowed fully off its leash, the band instead simply breeding it into an infectious swing driving the provocative and intimate adventure.

The new material is completed by firstly the stunning Devil’s Bargain, again a tribal seeded bait opening up the track as keys build a haunting yet engaging atmosphere. It is an instant trap in which feet are unable to stay motionless as the body subsequently succumbs to the baiting. Thoughts and emotions are not far behind in their submission either, keys and vocals leading the resourceful and radiant temptation. As all the songs, there is a potent unpredictability and intrigue to every twist and shift of ideation in the track but skilfully explored with seamless ingenuity and passion. The closing Sunrise, the band’s new single, is a punk folk treat if it can be tagged as anything, which simply oozes irresistible melodies and spellbinding harmonies across a sinew sculpted spine. To be honest it is not the standout song on the release but still an easy choice to lead people into the album.

The live side of Between Wine and Blood just as tightly and swiftly grips passions and appetite, from the fist pumping thrills of the opening Stormclouds through to the closing contagion of Horsemen, band and CD steal total interest in ears and attention. The opening track sets the tone, pulling the listener into the middle of the tempestuous glory of song and occasion, skin almost tingling as ears are immersed in the passion and energy of the night it was recorded.

With every track a roar of intensity and passion delivered with the craft and snarl which has always been NMA, there is no point in the album where you wish to be anywhere else but certainly tracks like March In September with its fiery provocation, the impossibly addictive and brilliant Did You Make It Safe?, and especially the voraciously transfixing I Need More Time take the biggest plaudits. They are rivalled by the excitingly hostile shuffle of Between Dog and Wolf, a classic track and imperious live version in anyone’s book. As said though every song is a transport right into the heat of their recording and the evidence that there cannot be many finer bands live than New Model Army right now.

Mixed by Joe Barresi (QOTSA, Soundgarden, Tool and Hole), Between Wine and Blood is a must for fans and all with a yearning for impassioned and powerfully inventive rock ‘n’ roll, whether from the studio or stage. NMA also have a voice which never shirks taking on the world’s injustices and social wrongs and that as shown by this outstanding release, is just as masterfully engrossing.

Between Wine and Blood is available now on the band’s own Attack Attack label in various packages @ http://shop.newmodelarmy.org/ and https://itunes.apple.com/gb/album/between-wine-and-blood/id907118636

Check out New Model Army’s current tour dates and more @ http://newmodelarmy.org/

RingMaster 02/10/2014

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard from

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