Conjuring Noise: The Great Sabatini Interview

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Having inflamed like so many others, our passions with their blistering intensive and thrilling album Matterhorn, Canadian noise metallers The Great Sabatini returned earlier this year with an even greater mouthwatering proposition. Third album Dog Years is a masterful tempest exuding virulently destructive and invasive sonic devilry; an enthralling examination and manipulation of the senses. Not needing to be asked twice, we rifled questions at Sean from the band to discover the depths of The Great Sabatini, talking about origins, lyrical intimacy, musical magick and much more…

Hey Sean good to meet you and thanks for giving over some of your time to chat with us.

Tell us about the birth of The Great Sabatini and the time leading up to the uncaging of the band in 2007?

Hey, nice to meet you too. It’s our pleasure to talk a bit about our dumb selves. All of us came together when bands we were previously in collapsed. We all decided to start moving away from the kind of things each of us had been doing with past efforts, musically. It seemed to come together easily, naturally. We just kind of went with the flow.

How did the four Sabatini’s meet?

Rob and I have been playing music together since we were 15 or so. We’ve played in bands together since that time. We knew Joey from other bands around town, and even shared a jam room together years before we started playing together. We met Steve in Sudbury, 2004 at a really crappy weekend fest that both of our bands at the time were playing. We became fast friends, and the rest is history.

Did the band start out with a specific intent and is that still the same driving force now or has it evolved with your music?

I think the only intent really was to move away from our previous musical comfort zones. Rob and I were used to writing more technical metal things in standard tuning, so there was a focused effort to distance ourselves from that. We bought baritone guitars and started slowing things down naturally, due to the nature of the much lower tuning and feel of the instruments. You can’t be as busy sometimes when you’re playing in a lower register, so riffs start slowing down for clarity’s sake. In regards to intent, it’s the same as it was from day one; keep challenging ourselves to create music that subverts our own comfort zones as artists. It might not be a huge leap from record to record, but there is movement, and growth, with every new project we take on

You sound is a unique brew of noise, sludge, doom, progressive rock…and plenty more. How would you describe it to simplify things?

As a kind of inside joke, we refer to our sound as “swamp trench arithmetic”. Maybe it hints at a sludgy math-rock vibe… Usually I describe us as a sludge band, because for all the variety rolled into our songs, all of it is pretty grimy or sludge-based. The end result is sort of wrapped up in this sludgy package.

We discovered you through your second album Matterhorn, a startling and riveting treat to our ears. How would you say your music and 1964881_815898598424769_284230856_ncreativity has changed and evolved from your first days, through that great album and onto the just released Dog Years?

I think that, as songwriters, we focus on making things simpler; communicating ideas in a simpler way. Part of that is recognising our strengths, and reining them in. We want to include a myriad of ideas and influences into our sound but feed them through our creative process in a way that results in more a more cohesive end result. I suppose one might call it “nuance”… Not something that most folks associate with brutal, loud music, but I feel that there’s more and more depth and nuance to our songs as we go. Matterhorn was the first time I really felt like we’d accomplished a certain level of that in our music. The songs are relatively simple in structure and riffing, and seem straight forward production-wise, but there’s a subtle balance of feels and ideas stitched together throughout. I think Dog Years employs this much better. Taken at face value, it’s a loud, raw, angry record, but there’s a lot going on in the songs, in a way that isn’t like an overt genre mash-up kind of thing.

We feel the brilliant Dog Years, and it is, is less cruel and destructive than its predecessor but has a more intensive and precise examination of the psyche which makes it just as exhilarating and threatening. Is that something you would agree with?

I do agree. Matterhorn was about cruelty and violence and the harshness of life, ‘cos that’s what I felt when I heard the music we were writing. Dog Years, musically and lyrically, is kind of exploring the things that drove us to play music initially. It has some throwback moments with the punkier parts, and maybe it rocks out a little easier. I still feel like it’s a punishing, loud, angry record but maybe you picked up on the focus of the record. It’s hard to tell sometimes, as the creators of the music, how much of what we’re saying is obvious and how much is completely buried in the end result, but Dog Years is more of a look inside OUR heads and our history, to some extent.

Did you approach the writing and recording of your third album in any way differently to the previous release?

Well, we usually do a lot of writing together in the jam room but a few small bits were demoed separately and sent out via email to the guys, and then tweaked and moulded by each of us on our own time. The songs are totally malleable… they can change easily before we hit the studio. In the past, a lot of our material, especially the Matterhorn stuff, was played on the road a lot before it was recorded, so the songs adapted and changed a bit more, but almost all of the Dog Years material was written and then quickly recorded with less time to mutate. Maybe that gave it a bit more immediacy, or urgency.

I guess the studio and recording process is something always bringing new lessons and discoveries which can be used or avoided next time. Was there anything from Matterhorn which had that inspiration and any new things learned with Dog Years?

There’s always a learning curve. We’re always learning things and trying to apply them the next time around. I can’t think of any major things that happened with Matterhorn that wound up shaping Dog Years in an obvious way… we’ve always strived to make things sound more raw, natural or live-sounding on our records and Matterhorn was a nice step in that direction, but Dog Years, I feel, has a bit more of that raw thing going on.

How long was the new album in the making?

We started writing in earnest at the start of 2013. We spent a lot less time on the road that year and really just focused on writing. By December 2013 we were in the studio and by February of this year the record was mastered. It was a pretty quick turnover, for us.

Like a great many bands do you have to struggle and deal with obstacles of everyday life when it comes to creating and certainly recording a record?

Obstacles are always present. But we’ve been a band for almost 7 years and we deal with things together, in a focused manner, quite efficiently. Making records is something we’re always trying to get better at, but we’ve all been doing it for over ten years and our collective experience is constantly being employed to overcome any obstacle. Thankfully, we’re all really good friends, so we’re good at working together to accomplish our goals

There seems an intimacy at times to the lyrical side of your music which suggests inspirations often come from things close to home and personal experiences. Give us some idea of stories or situations to songs upon Dog Years.

Some of the songs relate to people or things in our personal history. Pitchfork Pete is about a guy Rob and I knew many years ago. Some of the songs deal with our rituals, our perception of our lives as romantic black-magick purveyors of the Almighty Riff. When the reality of being a penniless touring musician sets in, the thing that keeps us going is the magic. Music is total magic and we have fun projecting some kind of cartoonish self-importance onto the band. It’s much more fun to think of ourselves as traveling Riff-Warlocks spreading the unholy gospel of Satan through amplified guitar riffs than it is to see ourselves as the jaded, ageing heshers that we ACTUALLY are. We’re following our dreams. Dog Years is a glimpse into that world, we hope. Lyrically it’s all about that… the world we’ve created for ourselves, full of feral beasts, oracles, war-cries, Viking battle-lust and strange visions. But sometimes this kind of fantasy shit collides with the naked truth of our choices in life, and that’s where the “Dog Years” thing comes in. One day, maybe, we’ll be old men looking back on these times as our Dog Years, all that time we spent hammering away at our dreams.

487212_598817973466167_250606339_nHow does the creation of songs more often than not transpire in the band?

More often than not, Rob and I write riffs or ideas in our own time, and then, when we get together, the ideas are presented and everyone puts forth their own takes on the riffs and we arrange the structures together. There isn’t any one mastermind. Everyone’s fingerprints are on the end result.

Is there a particular moment or twist in Dog Years which gives you an extra inner tingle of pride or just satisfaction?

I think each of us probably has his own moment like that, but for me, Akela was one of those. I wasn’t thinking that would be on the record, but the guys heard my demo, and wanted it to be there. It’s a pretty naked thing, for me, to have a song like that on there. There isn’t any wall of noise to hide behind. I recorded that in my room at home and everyone agreed that to re-record it might ruin it. So, I feel pretty happy that Akela is on the final cut.

Tell us about the great ‘scary’ album cover.

We wanted the cover to reflect our childhood in some weird way. We were aiming for an image that looked borrowed, from another time, not from 2014. I made the puppet, and he represents a certain aspect of our collective personality. Rather than actually steal an old image that may have worked just as well, we opted to create this thing ourselves and hopefully imbue that aspect into it in a subtle way. Really, I want people to see it, react to it, and fill it in with whatever feeling they think is best.

The album has been released on the great Solar Flare Records. How did that come about and is it true that the equally brilliant Sofy Major has some inspirational input?

We met Sofy Major first in North America when they came here to make a record and tour a bit and then later when we played with them in France. Sofy Major/Solar Flare are the raddest dudes on the planet, so their interest in Dog Years is incredibly flattering. Those dudes have been through a lot and suffered it all with a smile on their faces so that alone is a huge inspiration to us. Their music is incredible… I don’t wanna butter them up too much, but getting to work within that particular family is a huge privilege.

What is the Montreal metal and rock scene like right now and specifically in regard to your style of creative mayhem?

Montreal is always a hotbed of awesome music. In recent years, more of the sludge, doom, noise-rock and stoner rock stuff has been surfacing, which is nice, but I feel like everyone here is reacting to their surroundings, in a nice way… nobody is trying to sound like anyone else, I feel. Everyone that I know kind of does his or her own thing and tries to blaze their own trail. Sometimes it’s hard to be heard among all the amazing bands and artists, but we have our niche.

What comes next for The Great Sabatini across the rest of 2014?

We’re just about to get home from the first stretch of touring. We’ll probably do a few small things this summer but in the fall we head out again to do some touring in the U.S and then get ready to hit Europe in the spring of 2015.

Once again big thanks for sitting down with us; any final words for us to contemplate?

Thank you for your interest and support. Final words? Ummmmmmmmmmmmm……

And lastly give us an idea of the biggest inspirations on you musically and individually.

Take your basic 80’s/90’s generation stuff, all the grunge, punk, metal and hardcore, and throw our dad’s old Beatles, Zeppelin, Sabbath, and King Crimson records in there too. We’re all just disciples of this great tome of Rock. Finding a nice balance is the hardest part when starting a band, but ALL of that stuff is in our music, and album covers, lyrics etc. You could get real specific and say things like Melvins, Today Is The Day, Helmet, Jesus Lizard, Napalm Death, King Crimson, or what have you, but there’s just too huge a range of stuff influencing us to make for an easy answer.

http://www.thegreatsabatini.com

Read our review of Dog Years @ https://ringmasterreviewintroduces.wordpress.com/2014/06/02/the-great-sabatini-dog-years/

Pete RingMaster

The RingMaster Review 21/06/2014

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Wild Throne – Blood Maker

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Photo Credit:
Ryan Russell

    There are times when an introduction to a band smacks you dead centre in the face and stops you in your tracks, one fine example being the debut EP from US band Wild Throne, only they additionally rip open your torso with great scything riffs and gnaw your insides with rhythms carrying more voracity than a rabid predator. The three track onslaught is much more than mere aggression though, lethal melodies and impossibly captivating sonic imagination just as greedily at work as the release provides an early major statement for 2014. Blood Maker is a dramatic entrance from a band destiny will have a lot of time for you suspect on the evidence of their impressive tempest.

     Though the debut release from Wild Throne, the band have since 2009 already been crafting and honing their striking blend of progressive rock and melodic metal under original name Dog Shredder. With a couple vinyl EPs and numerous tours and shows with the likes of Dysrhythmia, Melt Banana, Kylesa, Marnie Stern, Helmet, and Black Cobra under their belt, the trio of Josh Holland (guitar/vocals), Noah Burns (drums) and Jeff Johnson (bass) have evolved into Wild Throne and announced this new chapter in riveting style. Recorded with producer Ross Robinson (At The Drive In, Machine Head, The Cure) after the band completed a US tour with Red Fang and Helms Alee, the EP declares the Bellingham, WA trio as not only a proposition to watch very closely but one to devour hungrily right now.

    The Brutal Panda Records released EP smuggles all of its ready to erupt creative armoury into the imagination through the BloodMaker_1600opening rhythmic intrigue of The Wrecking Ball Unchained, the coaxing dramatic beats of Burns, soon aided by the expressive potent vocals of Holland, hypnotically distracting the senses. It is a transfixing start which belies the lying in wait tempest which soon has its moment and bursts through the ears in a torrential storm of invention and passion. Riffs and rhythms stalk and incite with determination and skill whilst the bass of Johnson adds a throatiness which only further seduces but it is the fiery inventive sonic flames and twists Holland also unleashes alongside his stirring vocals which cement the captivation. It is a powerful almost tempestuous engagement with plenty to justify the comparisons to bands such as The Mars Volta, Helms Alee, and These Arms Are Snakes, Wild Throne has drawn, but also in many ways we would add Manic Street Preachers in their early days, Black Tusk, and Muse for various aspects and essences which expel their bait throughout the tremendous track.

     Ebbing and flowing like a tidal wave of energy and emotion, the opening majesty is soon equalled in presence and depth by Shadow Deserts, a track with an acidic call from its first breath aligned to another pulsating bass growl and rhythmic agitation. Like its predecessor, the song’s start is the perfect set up and doorway into the immediately following tsunami of passion and intensity. The celestial, bordering ethereal, ambience and vocals add another avenue to explore within the rage whilst the earnest vocal squalls and compelling punk fury of the track skirted by further melodic imagination and classic metal exploration, simply enslaves an already feistily hungry appetite for band and EP.

    From the exhausting and searing heat of the second song, the title track takes over and instantly opens a fiercer acrid vat of sonic exploration and senses searing enterprise. More At The Drive In than Mars Volta with a toxin of psychedelic vitriol to the expansive and unbridled fire of guitar and vocals, the track is a breath-taking plunge into rapacious creative rabidity and exhaustive passion. The song smothers and permeates every synapse and cell with an irresistible contagion and alone brings an intense spotlight upon the band, which the other songs of course only inflame.

    Blood Maker will not be the first time that Wild Throne leaves people opened mouthed you can be quite sure of that, but it makes a very important and exhilarating base to explode further from.

http://www.wildthrone.com/

10/10

RingMaster 06/03/2014

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Plug – Back On The Skull

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With more hip grinding grooves than a dozen pole dancing establishments, and certainly heavier boned treats, Back On The Skull the debut album from Texan noise rockers Plug enslaves and dances with the passions in exhausting and riveting style. With jackhammer rhythms powering ridiculously addictive grooves and equally seductive riffs, the eleven track juggernaut creates a loud and virulently compelling storm which is far too easy to greedily devour to surely be safe for any of us.

Formed in 2010 and consisting of ex and current members of Mammoth Grinder, Iron Age, Bitter End, FEED, and The Mites, Plug merges a voracious mix of noise and hard rock with metallic sinews and punk antagonism whilst stoner and psychedelic enticements add their  seduction. It is an exhaustive and breath-taking brew which simply ignites the imagination and passion. Imagine a tonic being made up from the essences of Unsane, Melvins, Torche, Red Fang, and Helmet whilst Dead Kennedys pees in the pot and you get a reasonably close dose to what Plug has to offer. It is a sound which is not exactly unique but neither is it without a distinctive flavour and intrigue of its very own, Back On The Skull working and playing hard from the moment it touches the ears and rewarding with a torrent of mouth-watering intensity and noisy drama clad adventure.

The San Antonio quintet of vocalist Tyler Lutz, guitarists Scott Corbin and Zach Brin, drummer Raul Vela IV, and Chris Ulsh of Mammoth Grinder, Power Trip, Hatred Surge, and The Impalers who provides the bass guitar for the album (Reed Deangelis the band’s current bassist), immediately chomp on the ears with opener Babysmile. Riffs and rhythms are almost grinning as they launch their muscular persuasion; a mischief soaking their thumping lure which evolves into a full swagger as the track extends its temptation with a rousing stroll through infection soaked grooving aligned to rhythmic taunting. The vocals of Lutz match the call of the music and with all aspects making an anthemic union, there is an irresistible recruitment of total attention and submission from its recipient.

     Meanwhile… is more than eager to back-up the immense start, its own wanton romp swinging brazenly between rhythmic coverlegs as grooves and riffs again cast a spell of noise bred contagion for a minute and a half before evolving into the title track. Bringing a heavier weighted energy and intent, the third song stalks its victim with a leaden prowl wrapped in scuzz lilted melodies and harmonically scorched vocals. There is an element of The Pixies and more so Melvins to the smouldering intensive bait on show but again it only flavours a magnetic sonic causticity distinct to Plug.

A potent bass coaxing opens up next track Rainbow To Hell, the song continuing the arguably subtle shifts in character through the early tracks on the album but equally increasing that variety with its sludge coated predation of the imagination. A slower burner than its predecessors, the immersive encounter employs further detailed yet restrained twists and turns in its invention within a patient consumption. It does not quite match those early heights either but easily reinforces the appetite ready for the likes of the following cover of Discharge’s State Violence, State Control. Bringing a greater carnivorous breath through the guitars to the song to replace the more violent aggression of the original, it is a satisfying provocation though it pales against the bands own tempting.

     Pigbomb and Cadence steal their hefty portion of the acclaim next, the first rife with intensive rabidity and discord lined scuzziness as well as another groove and collection of hooks to drool over whilst the second is a sultry psychedelic/stoner flight through a heated climate of melodic exploration. Though another not to make a quick suasion, it is an absorbing drift through evocative textures and new intrigue from the release. Their allurement is soon pushed aside by the outstanding Hideous Rex, a ravenous track which does not rush its attack but unrelentingly nags with dark rapacious riffs and a hefty atmosphere which feels like it is licking its bulging lips as it smothers the senses.

A great cover of the Fang track The Money Will Roll Right In steps up next, its sonic grazing speared by another addiction forging groove and great squalling vocals, before the rampancy of Mexican Death Hammer unleashes its claim for best track with a torrent of bruising riffs and crippling rhythms spiced with a sonic web of discord leaning crafted invention. It is a glorious incitement for the passions and does indeed steal top honours from a flood of exceptional encounters.

The release is completed by the epic Sphere 3, a nine minute dronathon of menacing intensity and invasive sonic toxicity washed over by spellbinding vocal harmonies. It is a meditative danger which seduces from first doom seeping note to its last corrosive breath, and though for personal tastes probably a couple of minutes too long to hold attention tightly nearing its end, the track is a dark beauty of an evocation to end a scintillating release.

Available as a buy now name your price release at their Bandcamp profile, Back On The Skull is an epidemically riveting and thrilling encounter which thrusts Plug right up there with the likes of Torche, Kylesa, Buzzov*en, Orange Goblin and the like. This is an album all riff hankerers must add to their sonic landscapes.

http://plug.bandcamp.com/album/back-on-the-skull

https://www.facebook.com/PLUGLIVES

9/10

RingMaster 13/12/2013

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Whores – Clean EP

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It is generally agreed that the Ruiner EP of 2011 was one exceptional introduction to its creators, a release which thrust US intensive noise rockers Whores straight into the centre of eager attention and marked them out as a band with the promise and armoury to become a possible tour-de-force to come. Their new release, the Clean EP not only confirms those early suspicions and expectations but in many ways blows its impressive predecessor out of the water whilst still declaring there is still plenty more to come from within the Atlanta trio. It is an unrelenting juggernaut of power and invention, a brute before which the passions soon fall to gleefully bask in the merciless ravaging triumph it unleashes.

Formed in 2010 Whores took little time in igniting the energies and hunger of fans locally with their rapacious heavyweight blend of aural provocation which plays like a voracious mix of Helmet, Jesus Lizard, Melvins, and UK band The St Pierre Snake Invasion. Their Brutal Panda Records released debut soon placed the band before worldwide awareness, its ferocious no hold barred invention an undoubted gripping entrance. With acclaim and success breeding around the band for that release and their live performances which has found the band alongside the likes of Torche, Kylesa, The Atlas Moth, Royal Thunder and many more, Whores now unleash their sophomore attack and quite simply the Ryan Boesch (Melvins, Helmet, Tomahawk, Fu Manchu) recorded Clean is the band taking another major step forward.

Again unleashed via Brutal Panda, the EP immediately stands snarling at the ears with the guitar opening of Baby Bird. The riffs of 1006024_605198922834746_308244883_nChristian Lembach are a cantankerous rub soon joined by the earthy bass growl of Jake Shultz, its throaty prowl instantly irresistible alongside the swinging thumping rhythmic assault of Travis Owen. It is a potent combination which takes on another guise and toxicity when Lembach restrains his fingers to let his vocals impressively swagger across the now primarily rhythm cast crowding of the senses. The track is an evolving, exhilarating contagious brawl of punk predation and riff clad incitement which feeds the senses as well as the already brewed hunger to the fullest enterprising meal of nose rock.

The immense start is continued through Last Looks, another track with a carnal breath to its bass and sonic endeavour and an antagonistic ingenuity to its invention. Vocals and guitar provide a rapacious presence which crawls over and permeates the psyche with intimidation, though it withholds any violent intent to make a seductive caustic embrace rather than a vicious assault upon the senses. Like its predecessor there is a rampant imagination to the track and a craft which elevates every lure and idea to another potent depth whilst its infectiousness defies any refusal from thoughts and passions.

      I Am Not A Goal-Oriented Person from its first seconds is a stalking temptation, the bass a cantankerous reptile coring the tempest whilst the sonic web of guitar and aligned riff rabidity oppresses the ear with a deliciously magnetic sonic squall of adventure and senses ravishing toxicity. Without quite matching the previous tracks, the song still easily feeds the awoken keen appetite for Clean which its successor, Cougars, Not Kittens equally matches and inspires a little more greed from. Verging on psychotic in its early sonic breath and exhaustingly expressive vocals, the track unfolds a groove which winds pleasingly around the ears before the heavy tempestuous doomy aspect of its heart takes the brief and impacting slab of muscle to a pungently intensive conclusion.

Next up Blue Blood lumbers through the ear with a sludge rock texture to its virulent bait, a heady full on weight which across the leviathan of a song steps aside for rivetingly addictive restrained garage punk spawned teases and lures where vocals and slowly chugging riffs play over an awaiting rhythmic confrontation. It is a masterful animalistic hunt sculpted with invention and epidemically enthralling mastery, a mix of Queens Of The Stone Age and Mclusky honed into an imaginative sonic scourge.

     I Am An Amateur At Everything completes the EP with a fire of sonic infiltration and rhythmic badgering, both aspects driven brilliantly by the ever compelling vocals and equally dramatic and corrosive bass marauding. It is a song which manages to be immediately addictive and also a smouldering slow burning entrapment of the passions to thrillingly close out an outstanding and aggressively intoxicating feast of noise. Skewering the passions with every barb on every hook offered whilst ensuring that anticipation for future releases from Whores will be impatient and rabid, Clean is one of the highlights of the year and another declaration of just how major Whores is destined to be.

https://www.facebook.com/pages/Whores/108004672554176

9.5/10

RingMaster 28/10/2013

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Lifescreen – The Lock Up Sessions

Fancy some good enthused melodic rock with big sounds and eager riffs then look no further than the new EP from UK rockers Lifescreen. Returning with their second EP The Lock Up Sessions, the Leeds trio give proof that rock music in the UK is vibrant, thrilling, and more than able to match their counterparts anywhere in the world.

Since forming in 2007 the Yorkshire trio of vocalist and guitarist Mark Burrows, bassist and backing vocalist Chris Unwin, and drummer Andy Richards have not only been one of the leading forces in their local scene but also gradually made waves further afar with their compulsive sounds, something which the new EP should energise decidedly. Formed from the ashes of Nerve Engine the band has gigged extensively over the years and through this and their releases in the debut EP Extended Play in 2007 and their two albums Deprogramming and Connexions in 2008 and 2010 respectively, have garnered strong praise in the media and a determined following from an ever growing swarm of fans to their sounds. The bands heady mix of melodic grunge tinged rock and heavier thumping riffs and rhythms demand attention without forcing it down the throat, their easily accessible and addictive tones hard to deny. April of this year saw the release of the single ‘Opting Out’ which saw another step in the bands development and a more rounded sound which the new release takes even further to unveil a fuller and inexcusably eager and impressive quartet of songs. 

Lifescreen list their prime influences as the likes of Alice In Chains, King’s X, Helmet, and Deftones and especially with the first of those four it is apparent on many of their songs quite clearly but the band uses these to foster their own sound rather than simply borrowing elements. Opening song ‘Sparks’ is a perfect example. It carries a defined Alice In Chains feel but is given a more vibrant and uplifting energy, as strong riffs from guitar and bass alike sway in front of the ear driven by the controlled drums of Richards. Though there is a strong grunge tone it gives a QOTSA feel as well especially with the dual vocal harmonies and as a personal preference the band really feels complete when they use that rather than a single voice, no disrespect to the fine tones of Burrows but he and Unwin together feel like they are closes of the circle of the band, making the sound complete.

Second song ‘Better’ comes in a similar in style to the opener but has a darker feel recalling the band Gruntruck to mind. The chunky controlled riffs against caressing melodies and smooth harmonies is a treat and though subdued in pace compared to the first track its intensity is higher and deeper.  These two songs immediately prove to any newcomers that this band can write engaging but instinctively powerful songs, and deliver them with the acutest skill.

The second half of the EP gets its heavier and more forceful boots on to show the other more aggressive side of Lifescreen, though they can never be accused of being light at any point. ‘Cyclic’ pulsates with choppy and incisive riffs and seams of mesmeric melodies. As the song progressives the riffs turn more waspish to infiltrate even deeper and hook the senses fully. This is the best track so far though soon to be shaded by the brilliant ‘PRNTRPNK’. This song whips up a frenzy with mischievous intent and devilish riffs to excite and thrill. The incessant grind is hypnotic, clasping tightly as the guitar of Burrows lights up the ear whilst the bass of Unwin throbs belligerently.

The Lock Up Sessions is an excellent release to not only ignite the senses and quicken up the pulse rate but also to firmly put a band already noted for being an extremely fine rock band up amongst the big boys, and a place well deserved. Lifescreen might still be an unknown to you but do yourselves a favour and go check out this impressive and wonderful EP, and it is a free download so no excuses.

http://lifescreen.bandcamp.com/album/the-lockup-sessions-2011

RingMaster 12/12/2011

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