Cold Snap – World War 3

CLDS - 2015 Promo Pic - 600x400

It roars, it bellows, and it rages with all the spite found in a pit of venomous snakes, but most of all World War 3 provides a seriously mouth-watering treat to open up 2015’s metal offerings in blistering style. The explosive confrontation of Croatian band Cold Snap, the album is an imagination sparking tempest of groove metal infused with a very healthy dose of nu-metal and various other spicy strains of extreme provocations. It comes with slithers of familiar and recognisable moments and sounds which only add to the drama and pleasure found in its maelstrom of inventive and adventurous enterprise. If you are looking for your first bold purchase of 2015, then World War 3 is a major contender which will not disappoint.

Coming out of Varazdin, Cold Snap formed in 2003 and was quickly into their stride with increasingly impressing live shows which subsequently saw them play with the likes of Disturbed, Suicide Silence, Pro-Pain, Dead By April, Ektomorf and Unearth as well as playing festivals such as Metal Camp, Metal Fest, and Wacken Open Air. There has also been well-received releases increasingly pushing the band’s presence into broader attention, debut EP Mea Culpa of 3005 the forerunner of their albums Empty Promises and Perfection of 2008 and 2010 respectively. Following the departure of guitarist Vlado Soldatek last October, the foursome of vocalist Jan Kerekes, guitarist Leo Friscic, bassist Zoran Ernoic, and drummer Denis Roskaric has driven on with the release of the Tue Madsen produced World War 3 through Eclipse Records. It is an attention grabber from start to finish with the weaponry and ingenuity to awaken the attention and passions of metal fans around the world.

From the first breath of Straight to Hell, song and band are rampaging through ears and brewing up a keen appetite for what is on offer. Rhythms barge and riffs snarl over the senses, only stepping back slightly as the impressive vocals of Kerekes vent with narrative and eventful ferocity. Guitars and drums are soon back to throwing their muscles around though as the song flirts with essences of Mudvayne and Slipknot embroiled with those of American Head Charge. It is a formidable and addictively flavoursome mix given originality by the unpredictable invention and enterprise of Cold Snap. Raging and accusing as it opens up the album’s premise of looking at the ‘end of days’ we live in through every form of our lives, the song is a tremendous start swiftly emulated by the psyche revelry of Carnival. Exploring a (Hed) PE like fusion of groove and punk rap, the song smoulders with intimidating character, expelling furies of waspish grooves and sonic predation. It is a stunning encounter, stalking ears and thoughts with compelling craft and threatening intensity under the rhythmic slavery of Ernoic and Roskaric.

Friscic’s guitar is equally imposing and sonically inflammatory but even more skilled and adventurous within the following Rise Again and its Disturbed meets One Minute Silence stampede CLDS - 9038 cover - 1500of sound and enterprise. As in most songs, every passage and indeed moment comes with a subsequent twist in the flow and imagination of the incitement, here a sultry and tangy croon of guitar the respite in the tempestuous majesty of the aural protest.

The brief and warped rabidity of Unleash Me comes next to intrigue and excite as it leads the listener into the destructive heart of Monster, the unveiling of the danger portentously suggested in the first of the pair. The second track sways and challenges like a heady mix of Skindred, Devildriver, and Limp Bizkit, filtering their strengths into another uniquely gripping and seriously contagious storm of aggression and sound. Every second and aspect of the song ravages and seduces ears; stirring up even greedier appetite for the album, though that is something which applies to every track it is fair to say.

The much calmer atmosphere and thick provocative depths of Dead Guardian continues the diverse nature of the album, its sublime dark caress a gentle coaxing which increases in intensity and anger as the song proceeds to release its controlled but bile loaded roar. It relaxes again but only to start the compelling process all over again. With Kerekes increasingly impressive and extending the variety and adventure of his vocals, the track is a brew of enthralling emotions and antagonism leaving ears and thoughts engrossed and easy prey for the sensational brawl of Doomsday. Opening in a similar vein to how the previous song crooned the senses, it is soon a boiling vat of emotional hostility and raging sounds but psychotic enough to fluidly drop into deranged calm before a great bedlamic mix of various caustic styles. Another major highlight of the album it is matched by the might of Silent Killer, but only after the bewitching cyber haunting of instrumental Freedom has its moment to prey on the psyche and challenge the imagination. Silent Killer opens with riveting guitar bait before launching a Mudvayne seeded challenge vocally and sonically which in turn courts a rhythmic threat and anthemic tenacity spiced with Korn colouring. Again it has to be stated that for all the comparisons what emerges is something fresh, adventurous, and virulently infectious.

The final trio of songs all add to the increasingly impressive stature of the album, Court is Corrupted stepping up first with its venomously pungent bluster and creative rabidity. It is a growling provocateur, intent on enslaving the listener with bruising and vicious craft, something it definitely has no problem succeeding with. Chameleon seizes its chance next to rage across senses already softened elsewhere on the album. Juggling rhythms and rancorous vocals under a mesmeric sonic climate, it is soon throwing off its shackles to stomp belligerently and contagiously whilst establishing another pinnacle in the mountainous range of songs.

The closing My Emptiness unveils a final new twist in the album, its Palms whispered peace the calm before the storm of Machine Head hostility tempered by melodic metal tenacity. The song continues to shift and evolve across its eight minutes leaving ears blissful and thoughts captivated.

Wrapped in just as impressive artwork, World War 3 is a real treat from a band looking ready to stand boldly and confidently in the biggest spotlight of global metal.

World War 3 is available now via Eclipse Records @ http://www.eclipserecords.biz/brands/Cold-Snap.html

http://www.cold-snap.com/

RingMaster 13/01/2015

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Anti Clone – Hands Sewn Together

anti clone

If you thought nu-metal was a redundant flavour then hold on to your floral panties boys and girls because it is not only alive and viciously kicking but it has been twisted into a whole new glorious personality by UK geniuses Anti Clone. Genius is just what the Lincolnshire quintet is for not only has the band reaped the most flavoursome and essential essences of the genre and fused them with a healthy dose of varied other spices, they have bred those inspirations and accompanying familiarities into a fresh and new dawning. It is not the forging of a brand new ground-breaking exploit but without doubt the beginnings of a template destined to spark a fire in others.

Formed in 2011, the Boston band like so many went through a tempestuous time line-up wise before the two sets of brothers in Peter (lead vocals) and Drew Moore (drums/ programming) alongside Conor (guitar) and Liam Richardson (guitar) alongside Fraser Burch (bass) came together. The band from there were soon earning a powerful reputation for their live performances and sound locally which was emulated as Anti Clone spread their musical fury across the UK starting with a tour alongside Eridium last year. Since then the band has graced stages with the likes of American Head Charge, Sworn Amongst, ESO, Maplerun, Evil Scarecrow, and Bloodshot Dawn. Following the success of debut single 1984, the band’s Matt Hyde (Machine Head, Trivium, Fightstar, As I Lay Dying and Slipknot) produced Hands Sewn Together gets its national release and it is hard to see the British metal scene being the same ever again.

It only takes the first few moments of opener Take This Pill to turn attention and imagination on their heads and lay down bait which sets the seeds to a lingering ardour soaked reaction. Coarsely surfaced riffs size up ears first; their CDHSTSACtouch a rough rub before scythes of sonic enticement sears the senses through the guitars. With controlled yet punchy rhythms punctuating the initial lure to equally appealing success, Peter unveils his outstanding vocal expression, his deliver subsequently shown to be as inventive and varied as the sounds around him. The track continues to twist and flirt with the imagination and passions, elements of Korn making strong hints though maybe more so the song plays like a mix of Mudvayne and Fuckshovel with a rich dose of Drowning Pool incitement. That too is only a spice as Anti Clone proceeds to sculpt an antagonistic seduction which oozes originality and mouth-watering invention.

The simply outstanding start alone would be enough to wax lyrical about the promise of the band, but that potential is shown to be far more than just a future possibility by the following Here Comes The Flood. As different in character as it is similar in its creative alchemy, the second song completes the persuasion that release and band is something special. Charging from the blocks like Usain Bolt caught short, muscles and attitude bulging with every beat and note, the track is a carnivorous tempest of sinew driven temptation coursing with a (Hed) PE like anger and contagion. It is a riveting swipe at the senses which only intensifies its might and coaxing with an insatiable torrent of rhythms from Drew which in turn inspires guitars, bass, and vocals to collide in a breath-taking brawl of ingenuity. To be quite honest if there has been a better track unleashed this year it will have been something really sensational.

The furious drama of the track is equalled by that of 1984 though it comes as a more reserved proposition. The slow courting of vocals and drums stabs skirted by the excellent dark throat of the bass is another irresistible lure from the band. Behind it a seeping breath of portentous atmosphere is released but it is also a slow brew which hints and taunts before the guitars begin to stretch their presence and narrative with melodic enticing amidst a similar rising of passionate energy vocally. Eventually taking big strides rhythmically with potent hues of guitar enterprise on board, the song swells with an American Head Charge seeded adventure before repeating its magnetic sequence but with a fuller weight and evocative dexterity. Glorious in its harmonious reflection and raw in its impassioned protest, the track is a masterful.

The following System, which also features John Knight of Synaptik, makes a more controlled entrance like its predecessor but this time within an openly voracious frame of sound and intent. There is an intimidation to the track from its first breath though which ignites a sudden twist as the song escapes its compelling rein to surge with inventive nostril flaring into a riveting stomp of crusading rhythms and sonic tenacity. As all tracks it is also as unpredictable as they come, playing like an aural jigsaw which is unafraid to let its moves make rude and clunky interruptions to enhance further an already thrilling beast.

The EP ends with its most hostile offering, vocals and grooves from the first syllable and note a raw abrasion which develops its own infection soaked enticing. The Usurper is a brute of an encounter, a hostile and uncompromising protagonist which deceptively loads up with hooks and squealing grooves to seduce as it gnaws on the senses. Again it is another facet to the sound and presence of Anti Clone, no two songs on the EP sharing a whisper of ideation and undeniably none as ferocious and unrelentingly invasive as the closer.

Hands Sewn Together is pure joy, an encounter which leaves the majority of releases this year standing in its shadow whilst as declared earlier making for a standard setting proposition. Even though Anti Clone has only just started redesigning and warping British metal, it is impossible not to get truly excited about the band.

The Hands Sewn Together EP is available now @ http://www.anticlonehq.com/

www.AntiCloneHQ.com

10/10

RingMaster 25/08/2014

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Collisions: Believe In This EP

Just when we thought Irish band iBurn had already wrapped up our EP of the year choice even this early in the year, there comes along UK electro metallers Collisions to challenge and make us just think about our choice. Feeling like a bookie who has already paid out on Manchester City winning the English Premiership title a couple of  months back, the Brighton quartet has shown that nothing is ever clear cut.

Collisions has unleashed a pulsating mesmeric release that shows UK metal is just as vibrant as any where let alone as that of its Irish counterparts. Consisting of five tracks that exhilarate and incite the senses, Believe In This is a feisty cross breed of metal, electro, punk, and drum n bass that eagerly pulls one to their feet and drills them in the way of having infectious fun. The sounds that burst from the EP are tight, energetic, insatiable, and an infection that one just wants to go deeper and linger.

Formed in 2010 the band took no time in making a mark on their local scene which considering the perpetual health and competition in the Brighton area is a CV marker all on its own. Their impressive sharing of stages with the likes of Senser and Floors & Walls led them through an ever growing attention to headlining their own sold out show at The Hydrant and recently a European tour supporting (Hed)pe. It is hard to imagine anything other than a triumphant explosion of attention coming their way once Believe In This is released on May 7th, and maybe exploding onto the UK underground metal scene the least they can expect.

The moment the opening Middle Eastern electro vocal chants swarm around the ear on the opening title track the anticipation of something special is rife. A beckoning riff and electro teasing draws one into big meaty riffs and an irresistible energised punk attack. Immediate thoughts are Max Raptor meets Breed 77 and as the song explores and tantalises the senses that  feeling is imprinted further with touches of Dub War added to a special flavouring that is all Collisions. The song rampages with great vocals from Olly Simmons over moody distorted riffs that rile up the emotions and rhythms that drive with an excitable but controlled enthusiasm.

If this was the only good song on the release compliance is still a given but the band simply slams their quality home with an even better track in Fire Fire. The track is glorious, a feast of dance rhythms, ragga metal, and punk that leaves one breathless and deeply eager to dive right into it again. There is a definite Skindred stamp to it with essences of Billy Talent and Pendulum for extra spicery. From the tight controlling beats of Will Chapman and the brooding bass of Richard Speaight to the blood boiling riffs and melodic intrusions of guitarist Andy Trewin, the song blisters the ear and sends the senses into blissful spasms. Once more the vocals of Simmons  lead the charge magnificently ably backed up by the rest of the band in great group choruses and shouts.

Two down and great heights reached so there has to be a lull or drop in intensity right? Not at all just a change in sound showing the strong diversity the band brings to their music. Chasing Forms begins with an emotive rap metal vocal opening through an atmospheric slow enveloping of the ear, with electro elements to the forth the song then makes its full presence known with intense riffs and sturdy rhythms that expand to include intelligent melodic invention. Again the Pendulum feel flows through the song bringing an inventive form to the Kennedy Soundtrack like restrained slower moments.

Push and  Once Weary Eyes (remix) complete this stunning release. The first of the two is an electro/trance metal lined track that lies somewhere between Pendulum, Silent Descent and Ourfamous Dead. It is a powerful animal that burns itself into the senses with scorched melodies, unfettered rhythms and riffs that strike with a fully intensified metal heart.  The closing song Once Weary Eyes rounds things off perfectly with its drum n bass/metal sounds that wraps around the ear and beyond with a hungry intent.

Believe In This is immense and the finest declaration that Collisions are a band about to brew up a storm and a fresh breath for UK metal.

https://www.facebook.com/CollisionsUk

RingMaster 24/04/2012

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