Beth Blade & The Beautiful Disasters – Bad Habit

Gaining an increasing reputation and support for their hard rock nurtured sound, South Wales hailing Beth Blade & The Beautiful Disasters raise the ante with the release of debut album Bad Habit. It offers a lively and tenacious roar, already drawing comparisons to artists such as Halestorm, Joan Jett, and Heart, which swiftly has the body and appetite eagerly involved in its instinctive rock ‘n’ roll.

From Cardiff, Beth Blade And The Beautiful Disasters have quickly recruited and built upon an eager and loyal local following since emerging. The time since has seen them stomping across the UK with their own tours and with the likes of Marco Mendoza (Thin Lizzy, Whitesnake, The Dead Daisies) as well as sharing stages with others such as Ricky Warwick and Damon Johnson of Black Star Riders. Recorded with Nick Brine (Thunder, The Darkness, Bruce Springsteen) at the legendary Rockfield studios and Leeders Vale, and mastered by Pete Maher (The Rolling Stones), the crowd funded Bad Habit is a hefty poke at bigger national attention with success an easy to assume expectation.

Opener Hell Yeah swiftly has ears grabbed, its opening lure of riffs accompanied by the moody tone of the bass; instinctive attention inviting by them well before the fiery flames springing from Chris Gould’s guitar ignite with classic rock spicing. As rhythm guitarist Beth Blade brings just as tasty riffs into play, her vocals command even greater focus while giving richer strength to the song. Like a mix of Suzi Quatro and Cherie Currie, she stands bold with a tenacity matched in the infectious sound hollering around her.

It is a great start quickly matched by the album’s title track; a slice of foot stomping, chest beating heavy rock led by the swinging beats of drummer Sam Brain. Its forceful attitude is epitomised by the brooding tone of Nicko Goodwin’s bass, its menace tempered skilfully by the wiry melodic tendrils of guitar similarly coming at ears with a touch of discontent. Its rousing qualities are swift incitement to physical and vocal participation before Beautiful Disease offers its own potent blend of catchiness and predacious threat. Muscle and melody unite across the menacing prowl of a song which shows the band as adept at creating more composed and moody proposals as they are at flying at the jugular in spirit rousing charges.

Down And Dirty lives up to its name next, its bluesy grooves tonic for hips as rhythms and riffs surround the increasingly impressing tones of Blade with their grungy antagonism while Poster Girl For Pain reveals another aspect to the Blade’s songwriting and the band’s sound with its power driven balladry and emotive intensity. It is a slowly burning encounter compared to the hungry exploits of its predecessors but a temptation becoming more potent and irresistible with every passing minute and listen.

The heart bred snarl of This Bitch Bites fuels both vocals and music, Blade a spiky treat within the track’s quarrelsome nature. Again attitude soaks every strain of sound and intent escaping the excellent song, its defiance and combative contagion equally lining successor Hell In High Heels though its blues rock inflamed body has a ‘lighter’ and more keenly catchy nature which might not impress as addictively as the antics of the previous track but leaves pleasure in another lofty place soon reinforced by the classic rock ‘n’ roll nurtured romp of If You’re Ready To Rock. Carrying no real surprises, the song lacks the spark of its companions for personal tastes yet easily keeps enjoyment and feet firmly involved.

The album is brought to an end by firstly the heated beauty of Angel With A Dirty Face, Blade sharing a croon as magnetic and captivating as her rebel rousing deliveries elsewhere, melodies simmering and boiling up with equal elegance, and lastly through the ballsy, swagger loaded rock ‘n’ roll of Legends Never Die. It encapsulates all the galvanic and creatively vociferous qualities of the Beth Blade and The Beautiful Disasters sound and indeed Bad Habit itself in its bones, leaving instincts aroused and a hunger for more leading fingers keenly back to the start button.

Beth Blade and The Beautiful Disasters might not be the most unique proposition around right now in sound but for a fiercely enjoyable and raucous holler easy to get off on, they set a mighty example.

Bad Habit is out now @ https://bethbladeandthebeautifuldisasters.com/store

https://bethbladeandthebeautifuldisasters.com    https://www.facebook.com/BBATBDofficial    https://twitter.com/BBATBDofficial

Pete RingMaster 23/05/2017

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Lawless Hearts – Creatures Of Habit

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Coming off a highly successful 2014 which saw the band play Austin’s renowned SXSW and undertake a praise earning European tour, Florida quintet Lawless Hearts look to make this year just as potent in their emergence with the release of debut EP Creatures Of Habit. Offering four songs which draw on some of the best essences of classic rock for a modern slice of rock ‘n’ roll, the release is an attention grabbing and thoroughly enjoyable introduction to the band.

Hailing from Jacksonville, Lawless Hearts takes inspirations from the likes of Bon Jovi, Guns N Roses, Led Zeppelin, Boston, and Foo Fighters into their energetic and melodically expressive sound but equally as their EP pleasures the ears, it is easy to suggest that maybe artists like Heart, Fleetwood Mac, and The Pretenders have made some impact on the band’s tastes too. Creatures Of Habit is not a proposition which blows you away or reeks of major originality, due to those influences maybe, but equally it does have a blaze of freshness and enterprise which ensures the band is not just one of the crowd.

Creatures_Large     The EP’s title track is the first song to touch ears and instantly wraps them in a sonic embrace which soon broadens into a potent stroll framed by pungent rhythms and coloured by a guitar bred melodic enticing. Things settle down with the full entry of Alex Marie’s magnetic vocals, her impressive voice swiftly a full engagement between ears and pleasure backed strongly by members of the band. The guitar of Michael Thomas also brings another rich ‘voice’ to the encounter, infusing the song with more imagination melodies around a flame soiling solo. As riffs from rhythm guitarist Justus Sutherland similarly entice and the dark throaty tones of Rob Joseph’s bass enthrals, the song blossoms into a flavoursome captivation.

The fiery air and textures of the first song continue to be explored by the following If I Have To which erupts with an immediate pop rock infectiousness. The crisp beats of drummer Corey Ahlquist hold court across the infectious encounter, driving things on in a vivacious stroll as vocals and guitars cast their individual tenacity and feisty charm. Like its predecessor, and the EP as a whole, it is hard to say you will hear anything startlingly new yet for enjoyable and refreshing rock sounds and imagination Lawless Hearts leaves no one wanting. The delivery of Alex Marie, as the sounds seems, to gain even greater heat in its passion too whilst the guitars once more dazzle in craft and adventure.

Oblivion is the source of that earlier mentioned hint of The Pretenders, the evocative hues around its verse especially reminiscent of the distinct flavour found in the UK/US band. A more restrained but no less impassioned proposition, the track provides a rock pop croon thick on emotion and full to the gills with transfixing vocals and harmonies.

It is final song Fallout which steals the show though, opening with a reflective balladry which evolves into a mighty rock ‘n’ roll stomp complete with rumbling rhythms, vocal roars, and melodic intoxication. The track is irresistible and alone reeks of the potential within Lawless Hearts which suggests this is a band really going places. The other tracks on the EP are no slouches in making similar hints, but the last proposition on the EP simply soars above their accomplished and enjoyable presences to majorly impress. Once more it is probably right to say no new templates are being set in place with the song but rock music does not often come much better or thrilling.

With their first album also appearing to be in the works for 2015, it is looking like being another big year for Lawless Hearts with Creatures Of Habit a rich and pleasing start for it and the suspected wakening of big spotlights upon the band.

Creatures of Habit is available from April 21st via Pavement Entertainment on most online stores.

http://www.lawlesshearts.com/   https://www.facebook.com/LawlessHeartsMusic

RingMaster 21/03/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard on Reputation Radio @ http://www.reputationradio.net

 

 

 

 

A.D.D. – Core

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It may be labelled as hard rock, but the roar of sound which escapes the craft and imagination of Chicago band A.D.D. is just as much metal and punk, and very often more so. It is a fiery and aggressive mix which makes the band’s second album Core, one of the most enjoyable slabs of voracious rock ‘n’ roll to be heard this year and most likely moving forward. It is a release which does not dramatically startle yet leaves ears and emotions seriously gripped and hungry. It is not an obvious classic encounter either yet can stand toe to toe with those which might be offered such label in creative tenacity and sheer pleasure. However you see and hear it though, Core is an encounter which does what all great rock albums do, leaves the listener breathless, adrenaline soaked, and highly excited.

Though still a young band A.D.D. (Analog Digital Disorder) are no strangers to attention and increasing acclaim. Their first album was been an eagerly devoured and purchased introduction on CD and download whilst live the quartet has only impressed and built a potent stature through shows with the likes of Korn, Chevelle, Halestorm, Sevendust, Alterbridge, and Buckcherry amongst many. Equally they have played and left events like Throttlefest, Summerfest, and WIIL Rockfest with success and praise soaking their wake. Now the band is ready to breach the broadest spotlights with Core, and such the impact on personal ears it is hard to see them losing any momentum in their ascent, indeed only accelerating it. Mixed by Tadpole (Disturbed, 3 Doors Down, Staind) and mastered by Grammy Award winner Trevor Sadler, the Pavement Entertainment released album hits the sweet spot straight away and never relinquishes its ultimate grip again.

I Regret sets things off in immense style, the track an instantly robust punch of rhythms and an aggressive snarl of riffs bound in spicy sonic tempting. There is grouchiness to its attitude, epitomised by the throaty growl of bass, and an instantly matching snarl to the voice and delivery of Matilda Moon (Margaret Young). Her vocals roar and soar with emotion and aggression across the song, simultaneously offering a warm and melodic vitriol which reminds of punk metallers Mongrel and their front lady Jessica Sierra, and indeed the song has a feel of their US compatriots but in openly individual ways. It is a mouth-watering opening to Core, melodies and harmonies as ripe and pungent as the more hostile elements of the outstanding encounter.

Print     The following Not My Way comes with a more even tempered but no less compelling presence. Moon and guitar embrace ears initially with expressive restraint before the track erupts with predatory riffs and heavy jabbing beats in a furious and highly flavoursome weave of sound. Part confrontation but more magnetic croon, the song captivates and tantalises with evolving adventure. The guitars of Dave Adams and Jeremy Sparta alone absorb an eager appetite but aligned to the pungent rhythms and Moon’s increasingly impressive tones, it is a mouth-watering trap for the imagination and passions.

Hear Me Now steps up next with muscles openly flexing in every swiping beat from Jason Delismon as aggression wraps every snarled syllable from Moon. Though it has a fuller melodic rock canvas to its thick bellow, there is still that metallic intensity and punkish roar at large, the track all the better for it, and something missing from Was My Life next. It should be noted not everyone will feel the same about the song, but for personal tastes it is one of two times where the album goes astray. Led by the vocals of Sparta, who right away we emphasize has an impressive voice and embraces the soft/hard rock balladry of the song with skill and inventive colour, the track simply breaks the flow and charge of the album with its soft hearted endeavour. It is a potent showing of another side to the band’s sound and songwriting but feels out of place in the surge of the release. It is a personal thing though and as the saying sort of goes, “it’s not them it’s me”.

Attention and emotions are flying and rigorously enthused again with the voracious Damn Thing, a rhythmic trap of a song with bracing and soaring melodies aligned to matching harmonies. Crossing a volatile landscape of ideation and aggressive sound, the guitars and Moon simply enthral across the song’s lively length. Their passion and invention helps build an anthemic incitement which is imposing and rewarding from start to finish whilst the closing snarl of the song just sends shivers and tingles down the spine, a reaction swiftly soothed by the melodic charm and warm caress of So The Pain. Vocally and lyrically emotive, and soaked in an angst lit aural embrace, the track blossoms a provocative web which brings whispers of one of the band’s influences, Heart, as well as more classic rock imagination through the guitars. The fade-out is disappointing but the song a fascinating and exciting encounter showing even more of the depths to A.D.D.

Nightmare is next and also explores a broader and calmer weave of melodic rock but comes littered with dramatic and inventive twists from guitars and vocals around a carnivorous spine of bass and drums, whilst its successor Nothing Left, sees the band turning back to the more recognisable hard and classic rock recipe but with a fiery and thrilling intent to its melody rich power ballad canvas. It also has a tempestuous air and agitated nature in riffs and rhythms which makes for an unpredictable and highly enjoyable proposal.

So Much is seeded from that classic bed of inspiration also but this time as with Was My Life, lies like a cuckoo in the cradle of the album despite also being a skilfully and impressively sculpted proposition. As the earlier song, others will devour it with greed and rightfully so, but for our tastes it finds barren ground and a want to dive into album closer Black to keep the exhilarating growl and tempest of Core in top gear. The closing song is a beast of a track, from vocals to riffs and rhythms to sonic toxicity, a predator of ears and emotions unafraid to add tangy spicily coated melodies and harmonies to its seduction. As it started, Core goes out on a pinnacle, finishing off nothing but lofty peaks to be honest, despite a couple of aberrations in our likes.

A.D.D. is a band poised to leap into the big time, if not with Core certainly sometime ahead, and with seriously thrilling albums like this already fuelling their rise, it would be stupid for anyone to wait.

Core is available now via Pavement Entertainment on CD @ http://official-a-d-d-store.myshopify.com/collections/frontpage/products/a-d-d-core-cd and digitally on most online stores.

A.D.D. has upcoming live shows at…

Fri. Mar. 27th – Mojoes – Joliet, IL – HEADLINE CD Release show

Sat. Apr. 4th – Crazy Coyote – Burlington, IA

Sat. Apr. 11th – Freakster’s Roadhouse – HEADLINE – Pontiac, IL

Thu. April 16th – Nevin’s – HEADLINE – Plainfield, IL

Fri. Apr. 24th – On the Rox w/ Wayland – Jacksonville, IL

Thu. May 7th – Mojoes w/ Black Stone Cherry – Joliet, IL

Sun. May 10th – High Noon Saloon w/ Y&T – Madison, WI

Sat. June 5th – Metal Grill – Milwaukee, WI

Fri. July 17th – Rockfest – Cadott, WI

https://www.facebook.com/Analog.Digital.Disorder

RingMaster 25/03/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard on Reputation Radio @ http://reputationradio.yooco.org/