Nosebleed – Scratching Circles On The Dancefloor

The last four years has seen British trio, Nosebleed establish and declare their voracious presence on the UK live scene; time which equally has seen their sound honed and reputation built, it all leading up to the moment they launch themselves at nationwide recognition. That time is now with the release of their debut album, Scratching Circles On The Dancefloor. It is a brief but relentless stomp of garage punk nurtured devilry allowing no time for a breath but giving a wealth of insatiable moments to breed instinctive lust for.

Thirteen virulent songs over twenty and a small handful of minutes, Scratching Circles On The Dancefloor flies from the speakers flinging song to song hooks like confetti and springing inventive twists like a mad professor. It is a rock ‘n’ roll dervish but with a devious control and scheme which sees feet, hips, and the imagination merciless to its manipulation.

Recorded live across one weekend alongside producer Andy Hawkins (Hawk Eyes, The Pigeon Detectives), Scratching Circles on the Dancefloor sets its intent with its first lungful of breaths. The initial guitar lure of opener I’m Okay wags an inviting finger before being quickly joined by hungry rhythms and the vocal mischief of guitarist Eliott Verity and bassist Ben Hannah. For fifty odd seconds the song rigorously hops around, Dicky Riddims’ beats setting the tone for the punk infested romp.

As the excellent start lays its last jab, its successor I’m Shaking is in the starting blocks, loco grooves teasing away as the track bursts into manic life. As rhythms pounce and hooks infest, the song sinks its mania into the imagination like a fusion of King salami and The Mobbs; teasing and fingering the psyche with its viral appetite and character. Superb does not quite cut its magnificence; a height of bliss eagerly backed by the addictive antics of Time And Time Again which quickly entangles the listener in its swinging grooves and excitable rhythms.

The voracious design of the album simply continues with the next pair of Wrong and Start Again. Not for the first or last time across the album, there is a whiff of seventies punk band The Cortinas especially in the first of these two with its sharp almost spiky hooks and instinctive catchiness while the second uncages a riot of bullish rock ‘n’ roll as punk as it is fifties scented honed into another irresistible and individual Nosebleed infestation.

As soon as the rhythmic rumble of Everybody breaks the momentary silence between songs, body and greed was sparked here; the track trapping an easy submission with its web of grooves and hooks let alone vocal incitement while Slow Down does the complete opposite as it had hips swinging and limbs flying with its dirt stained rock ‘n’ roll. Both tracks not only get under the skin but deep into the blood taking over spirit and soul simultaneously yet still get outshone by Scratching Circles. Like a puppeteer, the song dictated movement and energy; its Stones kissed heat and tenacious enterprise delicious spice in its creative irritancy and riveting manipulation.

Can’t Stay Here harasses like a child which will not take no for an answer to what it wants, the song bouncing around with its eyes firmly on the prize before Psycho grabs best track honours with its psychobilly hued rascality. Like the bad kid your mother warned you to stay away from, the track leads to wicked habits and salacious antics and boy does it reward for going astray.

A sixties garage rock hue lines the attitude soaked Kick Me When I’m Down next; swinging grooves and agitated rhythms gripping attention from its first touch, flames of melodic seduction from the guitar adding to its rich lure while I Can’t Tell You Anything creates a maze of hooks and grooves impossible to escape from, not that you will want to; an intent which is seeded in the album’s first note and only intensified thereon in.

It all comes to a close with What You Have Done, a ravenous collusion of grumbling filth lined bass, intrusive beats, and predacious riffs all linked by the band’s persistently anthemic vocals. It too has rockabilly/psychobilly infested fuel to its roar as well as a mouth-watering Misfits seeded glaze bringing the album to a close in majestic but certainly rampantly salacious style.

There are encounters which just inflame the individual instincts of us all, Scratching Circles On The Dancefloor is one for us, a release leading us to drooling ardour. We will not be alone as quite simply the album is a garage punk classic, indeed a rock ‘n’ roll masterclass from a band surely about to take national attention by the scruff of its neck.

Scratching Circles On The Dancefloor is out now through TNS Records and available @ https://tnsrecords.bandcamp.com/album/scratching-circles-on-the-dancefloor

https://www.facebook.com/nosebleedband/

Pete RingMaster 11/04/2018

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Falls – One Hundred Percent Strong

FALLS Promo_RingMasterReview

We all have bands, and no doubt many, which almost with their first creative breath spark an instinctive and lustful affair between their sound and ears. For us UK noise poppers Falls is one such union, a riotous quartet which spins webs of invention so contagious that they make the common cold seem lazy. Back in 2014, the band had us hooked with their self-tagged gash pop/fuck rock via the Dirtbox EP. Now they have unleashed its successor, One Hundred Percent Strong; a bigger, bolder, and even more devilish affair to rapture over.

Formed in 2013, Falls has been a hungry and irresistible live presence from day one, tours and shows with the likes of Allusondrugs, Shikari Sound System, God Damn, Blacklisters, Press To MECO, and Black Peaks among their own headlining conquests. The Dirtbox EP equally sparked attention upon its release, eclipsed the next year by the band’s two track single Mastiff which saw a host of radio play and support from the likes of Huw Stephens, Zane Lowe, Steve Lamacq, Alex Baker, and Sophie K. Ahead of a co-headlining tour with I Cried Wolf and an appearance at ArcTanGent in August, Falls is now uncaging One Hundred Percent Strong, a four-track stomp sure to outshine its predecessors in acclaim to match the leap in sound and invention.

There is a more mature and accomplished feel to the songs with the band’s latest offering, but without defusing the loco imagination and quick fire twist and turns which have already marked out their sound and imagination. In fact those elements have been honed with an even keener creative devilment to keep ears and the imagination as busy as the song’s instinctive rock ‘n’ roll does the body. With everything combined, Falls’ music is like a mix up in a noise infested pop factory blending early XTC with Hawk Eyes as seepage from Melvins adds a thrilling contamination.

front cover one hundred percent _RingMasterReviewIt all starts with the kinetic shuffle of Get Well Soon; a track instantly accosting ears with throbbing bass grooves and rolling beats as the guitars of Martin Gallagher and Philip Kelsall perpetually cast wiry hooks and teasing riffs. That alone is enough to infest the psyche and lift the spirit, but add the rousing vocals of the band, with one of the three string pickers leading though no idea which, and you have instant emotional arousal. The track continues to swing and thump, even as its pop fuelled chorus dances provocatively on the imagination. It is simply glorious; we all find manna for the ears in certain songs and this is ours.

Though it is quickly matched by the even more tenacious and slight psychotic Shady Nasty. Again grooves and hooks are swift bait around the lively inviting beats of Steff Jones with the band’s vocals further harmonic and mischief making fun. There is also a volatility to the encounter, at times it almost intimidating ears with the resonating snarl of Ben Griffiths’ bassline a prominent enticement though it is just as compelling in the warmly flirtatious moments too.

SWARM comes next and lives up to its name as riffs crawl incessantly through ears, though there is no particular urgency to their incitement. Instead the song writhes around with steely grooves and off-kilter exploits within a web of punk hooks and noise rock sensibility. Ultimately, it is as funky as it is ferocious, as poppy as it is cantankerously inventive and pure alchemy for the senses and at this point our very greedy appetite for the release.

There is no relaxing of the twisted tempting and addictive ingenuity with closing track Death In Disco Shoes either, the track leaping around like a hyperactive sugar fuelled teenager not knowing whether to party hard or be creatively responsible and doing both with unbridled zeal.

It is an exhilarating end to one of the year’s major propositions so far and no doubt will remain so. Falls and One Hundred Percent Strong are noisy, raucous, and prone to addictive habits; the very best kind of rock ‘n’ roll.

The One Hundred Percent Strong EP is out now via Venn Records digitally and on 7” vinyl @ https://www.vennrecords.com/shop/music/fallsvinyl/

https://www.facebook.com/fallsband   http://www.fallsband.co.uk

Pete RingMaster 13/05/2016

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

For more exploration of the independent and promotional services check out http://www.zykotika.com

Audio Poets – Make a Scene

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Such the almost scattergun diversity escaping Make a Scene there are times you wonder how it works with such coherent unity but it does and what is on offer is one gloriously rousing and dynamically imagination incitement for ears and emotions. The new album from US rockers Audio Poets, it is a thumping merger of pop punk, alternative rock, and unbridled rock ‘n’ roll, to try and slim it down, which leaves an increasingly greedy appetite breathless for more.

Formed in Dallas as 2014 made its goodbyes, Audio Poets quickly hit the live scene the following year, playing their first show in Buffalo with Rookie of the Year. Debut EP Colours had its successful release the following month before the quartet spent the spring of 2015 recording Make A Scene. The latter months of the year saw the album uncaged and the band relocate to Los Angeles, as well as hungrily hitting the live scene across the US. The UK and Mainland Europe are now in their live sights for 2016, the band ready to pounce on the already eager reactions to the galvanic sounds and the quickly impressing adventure of Make a Scene.

Recorded with producer Geoff Rockwell (Forever The Sickest Kids, Memphis May Fire, Crown The Empire), the band’s album swiftly hits a rousing plateau with opener The Anthem. A scuzz lined guitar makes the first invitation with its sultry hues, the lead vocals of guitarist Chris Durio quickly adding their punch to the attitude loaded proposal. As the track develops there is no escaping the potent and enjoyable Rage Against The Machine essence to the track, it coming bound in just as appealing stoner-esque grooves from the fiery guitar enterprise of Bru Whitley and Durio who create a magnetic web around the increasingly defiance loaded narrative and vocal tones.

It is a riveting and contagious start to the release but soon overshadowed by the outstanding Wake Up. Straight away that variety in sound and imagination is arousing ears and thoughts, the second song bounding around with pop punk energy and revelry whilst casting an aggressive CIV like snarl and melodic tempting. There is a touch of UK band Hawk Eyes to the romping escapade too, enslaving hooks aligned to rowdy but controlled dynamics colluding excitedly with the darker inviting prowess of bassist Mike Knight and the sinew swung beats of drummer Landon Jett.

Next up Not My Time is a triumph to match the last, this time the band exploring a My Chemical Romance meets Fall Out Boy like theatre of invention and creative mischief. Feet and hips are soon seriously involved with the more restrained, compared to its predecessors, yet feistily swinging canter of the spellbinding song and its unpredictable invention. There is a serious urge to dive right back into the track after its conclusion, though that is soon diverted by the punchy roar of Burn and after that, the album’s Marilyn Mansion scented title track. For the first, Durio mixes his strong clean tones with more rap bred vocal jabbing, though this time The Kennedy Soundtrack is a closer hint to the adventure of sound and voice on offer. As the song evolves between standing toe to toe with grouchy agitation and seducing with poetic melodic infectiousness, a touch of Lost Prophets slips into the captivation, that one more arguably familiar colour which, as within every song, simply helps flavour something openly unique. Next up Make A Scene flirts with and barges across ears with a virulence of craft and sound which again has the body and emotions subservient; electronic and industrial ingredients as powerfully persuasive as the punk infused rock ‘n’ roll at its heart.

Fiery interlude Space is more the doorway into a new turn to the album than a break, its cosmic air a progressively textured tempting for the imagination before Revolution stands tall and defiant in attitude and sound. Featuring Jay Miller of Texan band Drudge, the song is a brooding maelstrom of imposing rock ‘n ‘roll spiced with melodic hardcore imagination and an array of intriguing sonic colours and styles. It easily holds attention and enjoyment tight and leaves satisfaction full though it is maybe not as inventively bold and tenacious as earlier songs, a success found by the equally weighty emotive and tempestuous embrace of Wounded Eyes. Mixing a rich blend of varied metal infused rock flavours, the track is again an encounter fulfilling all wants and hopes if without quite breaching the same plateau the album set in place early on.

Do You Feel It (Now) brings a feistier and in some ways creatively livelier proposal with its tapestry of styles soon after, vocals and sounds from every corner of the band helping draw physical participation before closer Make It Through, escorts ears into a broader electronic landscape that sees the album go out on a potent high.

For personal tastes the album produces its richest and most ingenious mastery across the first five or so tracks, exploring more emotively shadowed and intensive depths to matching success thereafter, and from start to finish Make a Scene is one irresistible and rousing temptation from a band surely heading towards major attention.

Make a Scene is out now through most online stores.

https://www.facebook.com/audiopoetsmusic   https://twitter.com/audiopoetsmusic

Pete RingMaster 07/02/2016

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

For more exploration of the independent and promotional services check out http://www.zykotika.com/

Hawk Eyes – Everything is Fine

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Debut album Ideal set the seeds for a lustful appetite which the following That’s What This Is not only cemented but took to new feverish heights; so anticipation for us and their fans for new album Everything is Fine was not exactly calm. Every want and expectation demanded of UK rockers Hawk Eyes it has to be said is swiftly met by the bands second full-length but it is only half of the story. On their breath-taking new encounter, the band explores new instinctively primal and raw depths within a greater and furiously fevered invention. Everything is Fine is rock ‘n’ roll at its most rugged and voracious, but also offered in its greatest imaginatively virulent form.

The heart and persuasion of the Leeds band began in the guise of Chickenhawk, a proposition similarly making a potent impression through their live presence and the album Modern Bodies of 2010. It was from the name change to Hawk Eyes though, that the unit tapped into a broader and richer vein of attention and personal creative exploration with a similarly expanding and creatively rebellious sound. The first album under the new guise, Ideals set a bigger roar within the British rock scene which That’s What This Is pushed even further but now having had Everything is Fine raging through ears into the passions, it is easy to say they were just hearty appetisers for a much bigger inventive meal.

The writing of the PledgeMusic funded Everything Is Fine began in 2012, songs emerging within and round the band’s constant hunger to tour and play shows, which included supported the likes of System of A Down at arena shows and playing the biggest music festivals across Europe, as well as SXSW over in the States. Even writers block for vocalist and guitarist Paul Astick could not derail the oncoming creative storm driving the new album, the man solving his problem by absconding to a hole at Spurn Point in Yorkshire on a really bleak evening with the outcome an oppressively dark and wonderfully ravenous title track.

The album though starts off with the inescapable lure of The Trap, a song making a gentle and slightly melancholic entrance with an air and dark stringed caress to match. Its first minute is a 4ca338c20ba067f7ab9f5dd77375627a0tantalising coaxing for ears and imagination before parting its veils for the pungent and anthemic rhythmic lure of drummer John Mackenzie aligned to the just as compelling throaty bassline offered by Ryan Clark. The outstanding vocals of the band are soon crooning and lifting the energy of the song, never letting it off its leash but prowling the senses and emotions with riveting expression and expertise. There is a breath of Dioramic and Pigeon Lake to the track, a harmonic and shadow wrapped breeze which only lifts the passions further as the opener crowds excitingly around the listener leading them towards a superb hook loaded vocal and almost combative climax.

The exceptional start is backed feistily by the sonic agitation of The Ambassador, a song grasping a dirtier hardcore laced vocal and rhythmic confrontation to its melodically clothed and tenaciously muscular breast. Hooks tease and riffs abrase from Robert Stephens and Astick, as vocals eye ball the listener with their boisterous tones and narrative. It is a blend ensuring body and emotions continue to be tightly clasped ready for the exceptional call of Die Trying. Soon offering punk vivacity to its heavier metal seeded tempest, the track equally finds an alternative rock contagion which offers shades of bands like Baddies in its unique creative brawl. It is a thumping encounter bringing further spices to its magnetic turbulence, a grungy essence as intriguing and gripping as the sinew driven aspects of the masterful persuasion.

There is strong variety to the flavours of the song and even greater diversity to the album, as straight away shown by the raucous heavy rock stomp of Permission with its progressively honed melodies and the catchy warm stroll of The Ballad Of Michael McGlue. The first roars like a mix of Queens Of The Stone Age and Therapy? whilst the second looks at another more indie/alternative rock canvas coloured with funky beats and melodically inflamed evocative hues. Both captivate with ease, though the sudden stop of the latter and the immediate charge of the following More Than A Million soon has album and listener hitting greater exhaustive energies. The wonderfully toxic snarl of the bass and accompanying acidic grooves chain the passions instantly, whilst the continually impressive vocals of Astick along with the unpredictable nature of song and individual creativity within the band, enthrals as they lure body and voice into the swing and anthem of the track.

Terribly Quelled shows its aggressive proclivity next, snarling with resourceful and inviting belligerence attached to punk fuelled anthemic suasion before Night Music absorbs a Faith No More like climate as it provides another fascinating and increasingly addictive inducement complete with roaming rhythms, mesmeric vocals, and sonic blazes. Both songs leave emotions high though are soon in the shadow of the outstanding I Never Lose and the album’s scintillating title track. The first of the pair twists and flirts with an agitated new wave bloomed enterprise reminding of the likes of We Are The Physics. This is aligned to an unbridled stalking of heavy rock ‘n’ roll rabidity for striking success, whilst the latter is a tempestuous consumption of ears with a post punk and discord lit bluster of predatory imagination and sonic causticity. It is also, from within its corrosive smother, one seriously infectious proposal brilliantly closing with a thrilling parade of enterprise which hints of very early Adam and The Ants.

Everything Is Fine is brought to an engrossing end by firstly, the controlled yet ferocious avalanche of rhythmic intimidation and sonic examination that is Enemies, and lastly the seven minute plus TFF. The final song does not quite match up to all that went before it, yet leaves the listener engulfed in a tapestry of melodic and dramatically multi-flavoured adventure, which shows just how exceptional other songs are to outshine it.

In many ways Hawk Eyes had a head start thanks to the already hungry appetite for their sounds already bred by the band previously but Everything Is Fine surpasses all hopes and greedy demands with quick and masterful majesty. Start those best of year lists right now and put Hawk Eyes right at the top.

Everything Is Fine is available from February 9th through Red Vole @ https://itunes.apple.com/gb/album/everything-is-fine/id962728478

Check out Hawk Eyes on tour@

Thurs Feb 12, Maguire’s Pizza Bar, Liverpool

Fri Feb 13, Barfly, London

Sat Feb 14, The Joiners, Southampton

Mon Feb 16, Louisiana, Bristol

Tues Feb 17, Bodega, Nottingham

Weds Feb 18, Sound Control, Manchester

Thurs Feb 19, The Cluny, Newcastle

Fri Feb 20, Nice N Sleasy, Glasgow

Sat Feb 21, Brudenell Social Club, Leeds

http://www.hawkeyesmusic.com

RingMaster 09/02/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard from http://www.thereputationlabel.today

 

Canaya – Sealed Within The Walls

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    Like being caught between the eyes with a sledgehammer and then brought back to consciousness with a voraciously brutal seduction, the Sealed Within The Walls EP from British metallers Canaya is a real beast of a proposition. It is a merciless and compelling slab of ferocious confrontation infused with a riveting and absorbing wealth of inspiring riffs and potent grooves, a towering heavy weighted triumph from one of the UK’s most impressive if still ‘undiscovered’ metal bands.

     Featuring ex-members of Tangaroa, Executive Distraction Tasks, Hot Prophecy and Nerve Engine, Canaya was formed in 2010 and soon drew acclaim and eager attention with debut EP Alignment Of Dying Planets that same year. Live the Leeds quartet of vocalist Simon Wright, guitarist/vocalist Owen Wilson, bassist/vocalist Chris Wilson, and drummer Andy Richards have also wasted audiences, performances amongst a great many including Damnation Festival, Brew Records, Big Spaceship, Brainwash, and British Wildlife and with bands such as Narrows, Keelhaul, Knut, Coliseum, Humanfly, Melt Banana, Hawk Eyes, Brontide, and Lavotchkin, all increasing and reinforcing the powerful emergence of the band. The video of the single Dios Muerto found heavy viewing and support on YouTube, leading to the attention of Ginger from The Wildhearts who invited Wright to provide guest vocals on his album Mutation. The Hyde & Seek released Sealed Within The Walls is the next thunderous incitement from Canaya and possibly the trigger to the widest recognition, it is hard to imagine any other outcome.

     Opening track Levitating Casket, the new single from the release, instantly storms the ears and senses with a concentrated 1797464_581774275248163_604048507_nand intensive barrage of punches from the drums and broad sonic swipes of guitar. Each has a fearsome weight and intent in their power which the bass only empowers with its imposing predacious intensity. It is a striking start which spreads into a sonic causticity with animosity drenched vocal squalls from Wright supported by the two Wilsons. Continually twisting its attack with grooves and hooks flailing the senses amidst the infernal rampage of riffs and energy, the track is a tempestuous and mouthwatering onslaught, and as contagious as it is disturbingly venomous, the song soon has attention and imagination sealed within its corrosive embrace, both eager to fall deeper into the roaring invention and malevolence.

     The unpredictability and imagination of the first song is replicated by next up Award Winning Bastard, a distinct character with more sonic voracity than its predecessor but equally as captivating and incendiary upon the senses. You almost feel synapses and emotions withering within the tracks scorching sonic persuasion and rhythmic pummelling, but with another irresistible distraction from the band’s adventure and ingenuity only instinctive hunger prevails under the avalanche of sound. For something so vicious and brutal it is hard to believe the contagion of the songs is so virulent but it is and just as impressively repeated in the following Monarch Of Sin. Standing tall and muscular from its first seconds of rhythmic provocation and corruptive riffery, the song takes a less forceful approach in comparison to previous tracks but is just as dramatic in its enticement. A smouldering melodically fuelled acidic casting is aligned to a cleaner vocal delivery, the union almost Killing Joke like at times, and sandwiched between a heavily weighted predatory stalking brought by the bruising intensity and ravenous metal ferocity. The song is a savage and ruinous yet bewitching encounter, a temptation elevated by the Converge like fury of group vocals at the song’s finale; it and track a glorious tempest.

    Committed rages next and features John Sutcliffe from Humanfly within its scintillating exploits. From the first rapacious swagger and torrent of guitar invention the track secures greedy attention which it’s subsequent rampant riffing and transfixing rhythmic antagonism, not forgetting brawling vocal combination. The song swings and lurches from one explosive and thrilling point to another, infection and toxic animosity unrelentingly igniting it’s too brief but outstanding presence. The best track on the release, amongst only major triumphs, the song gives a big test for the closing Audio Porn to live up to. Raw and abrasive within an evocative melodic crafted enterprise, the song easily rises to the challenge providing release and listener with another individually startling expanse of inventive vehemence and exhausting adventure. It is a mighty intrusive end to a severe and masterful incitement for ears and passions. Influences for the band are cited as bands such as Black Sabbath, Metallica, Pantera, Mastodon, and Gojira , a list you suspect the name Canaya will eventually be added to as an inspiration for others. They and Sealed Within The Walls are right now collisions you simply need to stand in front of to bend and bask within.

www.facebook.com/canayauk

www.canaya.bandcamp.com

9/10

Ringmaster 15/02/2014

 Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard from

http://www.audioburger.com

Hawk Eyes – That’s What This Is

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Following up their last year’s acclaimed album Ideas, UK disorientators Hawk Eyes smack the listener right between the eyes with new EP That’s What This Is. Consisting of four tracks which in many ways take off from where their predecessors left off, the release is a carnivorous tempest of voracious invention and rapacious imagination which sculpts it all into an irresistible blaze of hunger driven energy and merciless confrontation. It is a mighty EP that lends forcibly the notion that the Leeds quartet is one of the UK’s dramatically promising and securely entrenched rock bands.

Originally called Chickenhawk until a couple of years ago, the band took little time to make an impression and inspire thoughts of being a potent force in waiting for the UK scene. Debut album Modern Bodies of 2010 churned up good attention and responses as did their live performances whilst Ideas with a new band name and shift in sound drew the strongest suggestion of the might and promise of Hawk Eyes. Written at the tail end of last year, as were many of the tracks to be found on their forthcoming new album, the PledgeMusic funded That’s What This Is provides a bruising storm of greedy riffs, bone snapping rhythms, and sinew clad rabidity which leaves the lungs low on breath and body caving in from exhaustion.

The opening title track wakes up the senses immediately with crisply swung beats and taunting rubs of guitar before settling into an 1098024_516515751751798_1760845154_nenergetic ride of driving bass riff and punchy rhythms coated in sonic intrigue and punk fuelled vocals. It is a striking encounter which only gets stronger and more potent as it unleashes a blend of punk ‘n’ roll and melodic metal which simply cages the passions into a maelstrom of pleasure and urgent participation. As it rampages the track reminds of the likes of One Minute Silence, Therapy?, and the other similarly musically clad emerging band leading UK heavy sounds, Fuckshovel. It is an outstanding and ridiculously anthemic infection setting the release off at the strongest pinnacle and though as mentioned it feels like a continuation of the previous album it openly brings a maturity and imagination which is a few leaps on.

The tall order to back up such an immense start is given to the kinder touch of Never Never, Just Not Now, a song that leads with less barbed catchy hooks and softer persuading melodies compared to the more savage attack of the previous song, though that is not to say it lacks a bite and the provocation which demands full emotional attention and limbs to cast their energised shadows in unison. With muscular rhythms framing sonic flames of craft and enthrallment and a melodic wash which takes in sound and vocals whilst still providing an acidic taste which intimidates and caresses, the song majestically rises to the challenge set without quite gripping the lip of the level. It does show the wealth and depth of sound and imagination within Hawk Eyes, an invention which does not over play or push anything beyond its use to songs but brings everything into a purposeful intent to provide the sturdiest captivating rock ‘n’ roll, in this case in a body that gives the likes of the Foo Fighters a run for their money.

Cheap has an alternative rock offering to again bring diversity to the release, though yet again the rugged passions of the band make their stirring mark with bestial riffs and cantankerous grooves more than eager to chew on the senses for the smouldering melodies to subsequently soothe. With a raw underbelly and a brawling attitude at its core the song is another jaw smacking treat which with its companions only make the anticipation for the impending album impatient, that lack of want to wait further cemented by closing song More Than A Million. Snarling up the senses in another tirade of ravenous predatory riffs and wickedly entwining grooves alongside a stalking of drums and bass animosity from its premier breath, the track entraps the listener in a web of ravenous sonic mayhem fortified by a rhythmic lashing and scarring guitar brutality, their reins held in the hold of the excellent melodic and passion bred vocals.

It is a thunderous conclusion to an invigorating release which keeps the band on course to head, alongside a few others admittedly, the world invasion of British hard balling rock. Hawk Eyes have their vision firmly set on your passions and That’s What This Is certainly gets the deed done.

www.hawkeyesmusic.com

9/10

RingMaster 19/08/2013

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard from

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