Gnarwolf – II

Photo credit: Scott W. Coleman

Not to be confused with the equally fine British hardcore band Gnarwolves, Gnarwolf is a primal roar from Texas whose snarl is also hardcore bred and demandingly distinct. The Austin hailing foursome of Andy, Trent, Steven, and Polo are about to release their second EP, II. Like its title, musically the band gets to the point without fuss. There is no beating around the bush in sound and intent, just raw and intensive examinations of the senses and emotions; a trespass which is merciless, abrasive, and increasingly tasty.

There is no mistaking the admitted influence of bands such as Every Time I Die, Norma Jean, and The Chariot in the Gnarwolf sound, essences which fuelled last year’s debut EP. Abandon was a formidable introduction to the band and it seems quickly picked up a whole new flood of fans the way of the quartet. It is success easy to imagine II finding as a bare minimum. There is a new wealth of inventive hostility and unpredictable imagination to their sophomore release without defusing any of the venomous causticity and cacophony of antagonism which enhanced its predecessor, as well as the potential of even bolder things nestling in its stirring body.

It starts with Harold: The Hero where straight away beats rap at the door before ravenous metal seeded riffs and senses slamming beats join throat scarring spite flavoured vocals in breaking through the defences. It is an instant punk roar to get off on, the technical dance of the guitars enhancing rather than distracting from the instinctive belligerent holler. That unpredictability is already at play, adding an almost schizophrenic hue to the dirty frenzy gripping ears and a quickly awoken appetite.

Its persuasive challenge is followed by that of Jessie: The Sheriff, an even more agitated and concussive affair veined by toxically spicy grooves and mixed vocal uproar. For a minute and a half it bullies, ravages, and invigorates body and satisfaction, hitting the sweet spot in noisy discontent and ferocity before Mr. And Mrs Jenkins: The Mayor And His Wife unleashes its own infectiously irritable clamour of sound and heart where sonic ire twists and turns with increasing corrosive seduction.

Anne: The Widow entwines ears in its own intoxicating but fearsome hooks next; the flirtation of a citric melody quickly accompanied by vocal exasperation and in turn a gloriously predatory bassline. It all merges into something harsher and filthier within a few more seconds, a brawling cloud of ill-content eventually losing its shape as that first sonic lure frees itself again with vocal harmonics as raw as they are warmly enticing in tow. The song is pure captivation eventually leaving lingering wounds on emotionally and sonically scoured flesh and senses.

From there Hector: The Foreigner simply throws its mordant might at the listener, guitars and vocals a scalding scourge as rhythms prowl with their own dark intent. For personal tastes, some of the twists do not come off as well as elsewhere within the release but are fleeting moments in another highly bracing and pleasurable assault.

The EP concludes with The Dodge Brothers: The Cowboys, a maelstrom of spiralling guitar incitement, rhythmic blitzing, and vocal acrimony but also a theatre of melody woven drama as keys court thoughts and emotions from within the turmoil to brew a haunting epilogue.

There seems to be an exciting wave of noise-mongers emerging right now, new and those finally seeing some attention from their place within the underground. Gnarwolf seal their place to the fore of that outbreak with II, a release as punk and metal as it is noise and hardcore, and more and more one thrilling invasion of the psyche.

The II EP is released April 8th.

For more info check out…

https://www.facebook.com/gnarlywerewolf   https://twitter.com/gnarlywerewolf   https://gnarlywerewolf.bandcamp.com/

Pete RingMaster 31/03/2017

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Bokassa – Divide & Conquer

The recent release of their single Walker Texas Danger suggested that the debut album from Norwegian punks Bokassa might be something a little bit special. The track was a relentless nag of their self-proclaimed stoner punk, a breath-taking tirade of sound and attitude simply demanding attention and lustful reactions. Its potential and promise is more than lived up to by Divide & Conquer, even left looking pale at times by the album’s unbridled tempest of hardcore ferocity, punk belligerence, and stoner bred grooving. Beyond being special, it is one of the essential listens of 2017 from a band you still feel is only just starting out on their creative journey.

Hailing from Trondheim, the trio of vocalist/guitarist Jørn Kaarstad, drummer Olav Dowkes, and bassist Bård Linga took little time in sparking eager ears and local bordering national support with the release of the three track strong EP, The Great Northern Roadkill in 2014. It was the following year though through a couple of singles and the War On Everything EP that their presence really began breaking borders, success enabling Bokassa to tour across their homeland with the likes of Hold Fast, The Dogs, Frk. Fryd, Johndoe, Exploding Head Syndrome, and Warp Riders. Released on Record Day 2016, the single Make Music Great Again pushed things again, with Walker Texas Danger their biggest triumph and pull yet. It is now easy to think and expect Divide & Conquer to be a game changer for the band, the trigger to bigger, even the biggest spotlights to pay dues to one of the truly exciting prospects around.

A lone melody brings opener Impending Doom into view, its rich coaxing soon seeing stormier clouds gathering above it as riffs and rhythms join its enticing groove. Its slow stroll and portentous air subsequently slips into the waiting tempest of Last Night (Was a Real Massacre). Instantly energy and aggression is turned right up; spiralling grooves and rabid riffs grabbing ears as rhythms angrily thump. Like a raw and dirty collusion from Red Tape and Fu Manchu, the track devours the senses, feverishly crawling over them with plague like hunger to powerfully feed the thick anticipation triggered by the band’s previous single.

It is that song which comes next, Walker Texas Danger slamming its bruising qualities upon the listener from its first breath. Kaarstad is a squall of vocal attitude and discontent backed with matching antipathy by the band in voice and sound. Grooves though spin an infectious web as rhythms give a primal examination and Linga’s bass provides a grumbling lilt to the song’s stoner fuelled swing. The whole mix is glorious, a reason to welcome exhaustion before Crocsodile Dundee shows no mercy with its antagonistic rumble. Metal seeded acidic melodies court the song’s punk ‘n’ roll catchiness whilst its heart is pure hardcore pushing a magnetic bluster lying somewhere between Ghost of a Thousand and fellow Norwegians Shevils.

After its rousing assault, Genocidal Tendencies brings greater restraint in its own raid though weight and spite is as full and unbridled as in its predecessors. Equally, the song shows more of the variety at the heart of the Bokassa sound and songwriting as dark harmonies and wiry grooves conspire with the inevitably punishing rhythmic and sonic incursion also escaping the band. As magnetic as it is merciless, the track is a tenderiser of the senses, their ravaging provided by Five Finger Fuckhead with its scourge of hardcore truculence bound in mouth-watering grooves as vocal dexterity plays within the band.

As each song’s final breath becomes the next track’s first, the album just flies by, never allowing the listener to regain balance or composure. Here Goes Nothing rises from its predecessor with a head-rush of violent tenacity and creative adventure. Arguably the album’s grooviest, most kindly catchy proposal, it still offers a cauldron of intensity in its emotive onslaught while any ‘lighter’ tones are boldly absent on the punk rock salvo unleashed by Retaliation straight after, the song an one minute ambush of appetite’s sweet spot.

The album is closed by the raw captivation of Immortal Space Pirate (The Stoner Anthem). The album’s longest proposition by a mile, the track is a volatile smoulder threatening to erupt with every passing second. It never really does but there is no lightweight essence to its groove woven canter and rhythmic swing, its scuzzy air and cosmic filth as much manna for a passion for raw rock ‘n’ roll as its melodic escapades and uncompromising tide of intensity. Across its seven minutes, Bokassa merge acoustic and harmonic prowess into their instinctive sonic blitz and stoner punk ferociousness, the song alone revealing the width and depth to the band’s imagination and potential.

The bottom-line is that Divide & Conquer is superb, a bewitching brute of an encounter only leaving sheer pleasure and a hunger for plenty more.

Divide & Conquer is out now digitally and on Ltd Ed vinyl via All Good Clean Records through http://www.allgoodcleanrecords.com/onlinestore/ or https://bokassaband.bandcamp.com/album/divide-conquer

https://www.facebook.com/BokassaBand

Pete RingMaster 28/03/2017

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Hometruths – Open Your Eyes

As the world persistently sails towards greater degeneration in respect and real equality for all, British metallers Hometruths send a ferocious shot across its bow with their debut EP. The Manchester band is a tempest of rage and defiance; one socially, politically, and sonically antagonistic to the inequalities, intolerances, and lack of compassion now seemingly the main fuel of the modern world. The Open Your Eyes EP is their reaction; one that is part reflection, part call to arms, and an advocate of hope all rolled up into an impressive scourge of raging sound and emotion.

Coming forward in the early throes of 2016, Hometruths merge groove honed metal hostility with raw passion driven hardcore. It is a fierce roar with a freshness defusing any recognisable traits, a sound matching virulent infectiousness to its senses trespassing incitement of sound and anger. They pull no punches lyrically and musically and indeed emotionally, every syllable and note incendiary. Familiar essences are part of the mix, hues which are suggested compare to the likes of While She Sleeps, Stray From The Path, and Madball, but also there are the early seeds and rich potential of uniqueness, all striking traits within Open Your Eyes.

The EP opens up with Embers, a minute of rising sonic discord and vocal ire creating a climate of raw discontent in a wake-up call triggering the just as unruly tempest of Feral. With sound and emotion living up to its title in moments, the track imposes on ears with agitated rhythms and caustic riffs, the similarly natured birth of grooves and fury laden vocals involved before it all twists into a seriously catchy incitement. As vocalist Gaz Davies spews frustration and contempt, grooves get instinctively funky, winding venomously around viciously swung beats from Alex Mac and a great grumbling bassline from Dan Hancox with his vocal potency backing up and aligning with the cantankerous prowess of Davies. It is irresistible stuff, the song just growing in strength and persuasion with every corrupted second.

Barely a breath is taken between the outstanding encounter and the equally impressive Divide, a twitch of ears and you miss the moment but not the fresh character of craft and intent quickly confronting ears. The track, even with its own unchained ferociousness and emotion, is more is a predator than its predecessor, sizing up and lunging at the jugular time and time again. Again steely grooves enslave and incite body and appetite, Antony Costello and Jack Day creating a senses eroding web of enterprise and infection while the diversity of spiteful vocals more than fully satisfy.

Successor Vigilante looms out of the dissipating mist of the song, its atmosphere claustrophobic but bearing rousing rhythmic bait from Mac swiftly courted by toxic grooves and intrusive voice. Riffs and rhythms snarl and bruise even as the track shares its own addictive swing in its imagination bred adventure and rancor. Again it is impossible to evade being hooked in by the tenacious landscape of the song though arguably it does not quite go far enough, at times seeming to hold back as things appear poised to detonate to greater creative heights and friction.

WMD stomps in next, its tension racked prowl like a fusion of Die Krupps and Prong, picking its spots before unveiling a slightly friendlier canvas of piercing hooks, magnetic vocals, and mercurial energy; and when we say slightly we mean just that. The track still gnaws and pulls at the senses, beats scything across their surface as guitars and bass twist and turn with a vengeance.

Just stealing best track honours it moves over for the closing despite of Genocide. Its heart is more a hardcore bred animus but just as rich in the metallic and grooves woven assets of those before it and though it lacks their final lethal punch makes a stirring end to an excellent and impressing debut.

Open Your Eyes is a formidable and exciting introduction to a band beginning to really kick up a buzz around themselves, a fuss which can only get bigger as Hometruths bring just that in surely even bolder propositions ahead.

Open Your Eyes is out now through CI Records.

https://www.facebook.com/hometruthsu

Pete RingMaster 06/03/2017

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Primal Age – A Silent Wound

photo-promo_RingMasterReview

Four years after their 3 way split with Mostomalta and Cherish on Deadlight Entertainment, French outfit Primal Age return with a new EP again through the Foix based label. A Silent Wound is a caustic roar of the band’s hardcore infested metal giving evidence that the time between releases has been spent bringing a fresh air and touch as well as malice to their invasive sound.

Given in tribute to Mika “Bleu” Adjennian who passed away last summer, the manager at Customcore Records who remained a close friend after the label released the band’s album A Hell Romance in 2007, A Silent Wound opens up with The Whistleblowers VS World Health Organization. From the first rally of drum enticement, the track explodes into a furious surge of riffs and bone rapping beats, their animosity echoed in vocal growls and the raging heart of the song itself. The incessant pressure and assault of the track is a viciously compelling infection, the senses blasted emotionally and physically as the band pull no punches with their scathing political/social outpouring. Fusing thrash and classic metal elements with raw punk ferocity, the track is an exhausting, almost crippling onslaught and quite exhilarating.

ep-cover_RingMasterReviewThe EP’s title track steps forward next, its charge less vicious energy wise but a still as imposing and predatory trespass of the senses as its predecessor. Featuring Felipe Chehuan from Brazil metalcore outfit Confronto, the tempest careers across the senses like a violent tango, hardcore animosity and rigour surrounding metal bred grooves and riffs. Already appetite for the encounter is becoming greedy and only urged on by the almost tribalistic, certainly rhythmically, Counterfeiters of the Science. With thrash bred riffs and wiry grooves entangling rampant rhythms and listener alike, things are swiftly and uncompromisingly catchy and increasingly antagonistic. Another buffeting of the senses ensues, one hungrily welcomed especially as the song twists and turns through a web of swinging beats, grumbling basslines, and vocal incitement as the rousing defiant soaked encounter challenges the opener for best track honours.

The EP is completed by To Jeff, a tribute to Slayer guitarist Jeff Hanneman featuring a medley of the thrasher’s songs. Primal Age are aided by guests in vocalists Julien Truchan of Benighted and Hiroyuki ‘Koba’ Kobayashi from Loyal To The Grave and offer a fine homage to the man and pleasure for the ears.

What comes next from Primal Age metal and hardcore fans will eagerly await especially as A Silent Wound suggests it will be something to savour as itself is.

A Silent Wound is out March 3rd through Deadlight Entertainment @ https://deadlight.bandcamp.com/album/a-silent-wound

https://www.facebook.com/PRIMALAGE/

Pete RingMaster 03/03/2017

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Czar – Life Is No Way To Treat An Animal

cover-front_RingMasterReview

Finding something which stands out from the crowd let alone presents something truly unique gets harder and harder but Czar and their new album Life Is No Way To Treat An Animal easily tick both boxes. Creating a compelling experimental, bordering on psychotic, brew of sound bred in the raw essences of anything from progressive metal, hardcore, and grind to mathcore, post punk and more, all woven with avant-garde tendencies, the Tacoma, Washington based Czar infest ears and infect the psyche with relish. Certainly it is a challenge not all will take to, yet every intrusive assault, off-kilter trespass found within their album has an instinctive infectiousness which rewards as it devours. Like a mix of Dillinger Escape Plan, Mr. Bungle, and Psyopus, yet as suggested creating its own individual character, sound and indeed Life Is No Way To Treat An Animal is one of those times when you really feel something special is in the making.

The album makes a subdued entrance with the beginning of Owls, etc; electronic throbs and melodic coaxing a minimalistic but potent lure. Soon the enjoyably strained and captivating tones of vocalist Dr. Landon Jared Wonser join in with lively beats and a brooding bassline alongside. The track is still restrained but smouldering greater volatility in its belly. With the funk of Red Hot Chili Peppers and the progressive lilt of The Fall of Troy laced into its Every Time I Die like swing, the song never does explode and only benefits from that teasing of expectations for a thrilling start to the release.

Too Many Yetis quickly follows; its agitated heart and enterprise a caustic invasion as the guitar of Nicholas J. McManus drizzles sonic psychosis upon the rhythmic battering of drummer David Joseph Dorran Jr. and Peter Joseph Ruff’s throbbing bass meandering. Its brief but potent escapade further whets an already awoken appetite before Arachnochondriac casts its unhinged waltz on the senses, guitars a web of irrational melody and bass a roaming grumble as the keys of Christopher Duenas intensely sizzle. It is a frenzied ear twisting affair as magnetic as those before it with its unstable yet skilfully nurtured trespass.

Antelope Mask steps to the fore next, it’s extremely short hunt the perfect appetiser for Beware the Flies, Orestes and its unleashing of a post punk woven landscape littered with cold stabbing riffs, steely grooves, and vocal predation. The eye of its tempest sees keys sharing a classical beauty as harmonies float behind the corrosive squalls of Wonser, the combination as riveting as it is enjoyably testing as it leads ears into the Latin kissed melodic festivity of Vultures Never Eat In Peace. This is a hot bed of unpredictability and cracked emotional turbulence hugged by the toxic sonic craft of guitar and the perpetual imposing enticement of rhythms; drama soaking every twist, sinister deceit each throat spewed syllable.

With a psychedelic lining, The Worm Enters the Moon prowls the listener next, its theatre of sound and imagination sharing attributes found in UK band Japanese Fighting Fish and indeed Dillinger Escape Plan. The open variety of the flavours making up the band’s sound and individual songs is already clear and only reinforced by Canine, No Eyes Just Teeth, spoken word nestling in raw lo-fi sound and straight after the ferocious punk and metal bedlam of Shark Cancer, a track suffocating and igniting the senses simultaneously. Its mordant assault is then matched by that of The Golden Calf, its breath scathing and touch scalding yet equally captivating as it fluidly shifts from venomous pattern to corrosive irritability; and even when the movement is more of a clunky sidestep it works perfectly.

Through the creative surf hued snare of Mister Reindeer and the melodic calm of Domesticated Wolves, ears and imagination are effortlessly reeled in with the rest of the body disturbed into compliance by the predatory jazz infested mania of the exceptional first and the poetic serenade of the second. That track is an oasis in the certifiable invention and nature of the album, a gripping dementia fuelling the crumbling climate and emotional erosion of You Were a Comatose Lion and in turn the jazzily bipolar Wine Hog, both revealing an array of crazed facets to their attention demanding personalities.

So often a nineteen track release is sharing a filler or four along the way but there is no such moment within Life Is No Way To Treat An Animal, the celestially bent x̌ʷiqʷadiʔ provoking grateful reactions while Blind Mice provides a bewitching espionage of twisted enterprise and haunted frenzy with interruptions of dark repose with their successors in Prawn and after that RxABBITS invasively exploring and stretching the psyche respectively. The later of the songs is especially striking with its incendiary fusion of raw and composed sonic belligerence.

Concluded by the minimalistic lure of Taking Roadkill to the Vet, a track warming up to the task of seducing the listener with sonic malignancy through every second of its low key but haunting  electronically spun three minutes,  Life Is No Way To Treat An Animal is a rare gem as creatively murderous as it is formidably tempting. Czar themselves are a fresh breath which you will not have to go searching for; their music and talent will do the hunting.

Life Is No Way To Treat An Animal is out now @ https://czar.bandcamp.com/album/life-is-no-way-to-treat-an-animal

http://czarband.com/   https://www.facebook.com/czartheband

Pete RingMaster 08/02/2017

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Grabbing the throat of attention with Chasing Sounds

chasing-sounds_RingMasterReview

Uncaging their own individual punk fuelled snarl from the heart of Austria, Chasing Sounds is a band with a sound as young and fresh as its existence and already beginning to stir up real attention. We recently seized upon the chance to find out more in interview with the rising band, taking a look at their origins, debut album, and what drives them forward…

Can you first introduce the band and give us some background to the band’s beginnings?

We are Chasing Sounds a melodic HC/Punk band based in Vienna, Austria.

I’m Attila one of the founding members, I play bass and try to “sing” harsh backing vocals in the band. I’m the songwriter, and since I compose mainly on guitar, I record all the guitars and bass in the studio as well. The band was ”officially” formed by Mate (drums) and me on Aug. 8th 2013 which means; it was the day when we put together our very first song ‘Knock Out which later became our first single along with a music video to it as well. Mate and I knew each other since elementary school, and we’ve been in our first garage band together back in 2005. We managed to break up before we even had a singer or a gig. We remained friends though, hung out and knew it way before that we were gonna end up in a real band together. The only question was when. It took us ”only” 8 years to get our shit together. So everything was planned, it wasn’t just a lucky coincidence. In early 2015 Florian (singer) and Mate K. (guitar) finalized our line-up, so I moved backed to my beloved bass. This was the original plan, and it seemed to work for a while

So you were in other bands before; how has those experiences impacted on what you are doing now?

Myself (Attila) have played in a lot of other bands before, the latest was a now defunct progressive punk band (or however should I label the genre) called Good Reason. In that band I had the challenge to keep up with 3 very talented amazing musicians. I learned a lot from those guys.

I was in another HC/Metal band before and a shitty metalcore band too. Mate (drums) was in 2 progressive metal bands Dysentery and Disconcrete. They’re both defunct now, but released great music, you can find them somewhere on the internet I guess…

What inspired the band name?

That’s an awesome story, we had the band name way before we had any material written or we even went to jam under the name Chasing Sounds. It was one of those average high school night outs, me (Attila) Mate and another friend of ours were hanging out drinking and smoking at Mate’s Grandma’s basement; our usual spot to hang out after going thru all the bars in Bratislava. We were pretty drunk and under the influence of other substances, listening to some weird electro music, playing around with words Mate spat out Chasing Sounds. We knew it at that very moment that this will be our band name if we ever manage to put a band together. I remember this like it was yesterday. This was around 2010.

cs3_RingMasterReviewWas there any specific idea behind the forming of the band and also in what you wanted it and your sound to offer?

I wanted to combine all the styles of music which I love. Most of the songs are heavily guitar driven, I like fast punk rock parts, great grooves and sing-a-longs. I knew it from the start how I wanted my band to sound like, and I think we’re on the right path and even the people seem to get it. Sometimes we get these crowd responses that “dude you guys totally sound like Ignite, Rise Against or Strike Anywhere” which is really sweet to hear and is a huge compliment. Even tho’ I don’t really hear it this way, but for sure those bands influenced us as well.

Do the same prime things still drive the band when it was fresh-faced or have they evolved over time?

I always set goals for us. When it was only the 2 of us it was about writing songs, getting a singer and a guitar player so I could switch to bass, and have a line-up and start playing gigs. Then it was time to record an album, make videos, tour, and the same thing over and over again. Now of course we want to play bigger and better shows, play more in general, do another record. We are searching for a Booking Agency or Promoter who would help us with the booking of our gigs and bigger tours. So if you’re reading this, give us a hint or spread the word. Thx!

How would you say your sound has evolved since it began?

Since the band itself is really not that old, the sound is pretty much the same. We use the same equipment we did 2 years ago, and everything sounds pretty much the same, when we play live. I’m gonna experiment with new sounds and different songs on our next record, so if you guys will still follow us, you can expect something different, but again, it’s not gonna be a radical departure, I mean we’re not gonna start playing bluegrass or something like that…

Any progression within the band and your music is more of an organic movement or more the band deliberately wanting to try new things?

It was all organic, once we compose a new song and we like it, we will keep it even if it’s not exactly what the rest of the songs sound like. I think this is one of the best parts about creating music, you’re basically unlimited in what you’re doing; you can play the same melody, chord progression or whatever in a million ways, you just have to pick one you like the most.

Most of the songs we write are not planned. When I say to myself that now I’m gonna sit down and write a great song, it’s not gonna work that way.

Presumably across the band there is a wide range of inspirations; are there any in particular which have impacted not only on the band’s music but your personal approach to creating and playing music?

Since I’m the songwriter most of the times, things that happen to me personally, things I see happening in my near and own experiences and after hearing a great song from somebody if it kicks me in.

Is there a particular process to your songwriting?cs-art_RingMasterReview

I’ll just sit down with my guitar and noodle around. If something catches my attention I’ll try to build a structure around the main riff, and turn it into a song. Then I record it on my phone, and will bring it to band practice. If it’s not total bullshit and Mate’s feeling it too, we jam on it add or take away parts and will go back to it. If we like it we keep it in mind and will work on it the next week. This is the usual writing process we follow. Sometimes we just come in, take our instruments and start from zero. If the musical chemistry hits at that point, something magical can come out. This is the unusual side of how we write music, and how our best songs were made. See Yesterday’s no Different.

Are you a band which goes into the studio with songs pretty much in their final state or prefer to develop as you record?

Since it’s really not affordable to go into any studio, get stoned or drunk, and just jam on a riff and call it a song we don’t do that. I think nowadays 90% of the bands won’t to that, because it’s just a waste of a lot of money. The times when record labels gave 1 million dollar recording budgets to bands are over. It just makes no sense to do it in my opinion unless you have your own studio.

Give us some background to your latest release.

Our debut album Elektrobioscope came out on December 3rd 2015 so as your reading this, it’s gonna be one year old in around two weeks. I think there is a little bit of everything on this album; people who listen to Hardcore, Metal, Punk or any other sub-genre of this music will find, at least one song which they will like. Just take the opening song Here we Are, it’s an instant throwback to the 90’s skate punk scene, fans of fast paced bands like Pennywise, No Use For a Name  and similar will probably like it. Another song Spirit of AC is again very pop/punk driven like late 90’s Blink 182 it’s got that Dude Ranch feel to it. An album which created a musical milestone in my life, and if anyone wonders what does ”AC” stands for its Atlantic City, the place where we hung out and got the inspiration for this song. Moving on to other songs on the album; Corrupted Bullshit, Knock Out, and False Flag Attack are straight up old school hardcore songs, with a great portion of NYHC vibe. Fans of Madball, H2O, Biohazard, Agnostic Front should check them out. Especially when we perform them live, that’s where all the energy comes out, and if the crowd is feeling it those are the best moments of our shows. Then we got the title track Elektrobioscope and Yesterday’s no Different which are the more serious songs, and definitely the best ones on the whole record. Judge it yourself and give it a go, the album is on our Bandcamp page you can download it for FREE!

Can you give us some insight to the themes and premise behind it and its songs.

The topics of the songs are mixed. Everyday life feelings, anger, various events happening in the world, motivation, abstract, love, break-up…

Flo writes the lyrics based on what he wants to write about or after listening to the instrumentals. Or, when Attila writes a riff or the basics of a song he gives them a working title or brings an idea for a song name – Flo can relate to this and might write lyrics to that title.

Tell us about the live side to the band, presumably the band’s favourite times?

As mentioned above, you will like us playing live because there is so much energy going on stage that you either enter that bubble and forget everything outside of it or you stand still, which means something is wrong with you. This isn’t positive or negative energy. It can be both, but most importantly, it’s fun!

cs2_RingMasterReviewIt is not easy for any new band to make an impact regionally let alone nationally and further afield. How have you found it your neck of the woods? Are there still the opportunities to make a mark if the drive is there for bands?

There are hundreds of bands coming and going in a matter of couple of years. A band might start with something huge which gives them attention at start but nobody cares if they break up in a year or two. It’s more about staying stable, keeping your fans up-to date, being productive and never get bored pushing what you like to do the most.

How has the internet and social media impacted on the band to date?

The internet is a powerful tool which connects people. Social media has levels which allow smaller bands to stay connected easily with their fans on a daily basis. Of course it can be used at a much bigger scale.

Once again a big thanks for sharing time with us; anything you would like to add?

We sell two type of T-shirts as merch and some more designs are about to come. They look great so get you some and support us haha. We ship for free!

https://www.facebook.com/chasingsoundsband   https://chasingsounds.bandcamp.com/releases

Pete RingMaster 28/12/2016

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Yugal – Chaos & Harmony

Yugal_RingMasterReview

We have had a little bit of a wait for their debut album, having been impressed and increasingly hooked on the Yugal sound through previous EP Enter the Madness, but anticipation has been forcibly rewarded by one richly enjoyable confrontation in the shape of Chaos & Harmony.

Carrying an organic continuation of their earlier sound but with the more unique surprises and elements its predecessors lacked, Chaos & Harmony is a fierce and imposing tapestry of contrasting and conflicting textures spun from the seeds of hardcore, death, and thrash metal. Its sound reflects the disparity yet balance suggested by the album’s title and the band’s Tibetan language derived name, both a representation of “the concept of universal duality” where two antagonistic constituents are indivisible.

Hailing from Vannes in Brittany, the 2010 formed Yugal lured awareness the following year with the demo From Pain to Pleasure before six track EP Illusion of Time two years later sparked concentrated attention upon the quartet which Enter The Madness reinforced and pushed on in 2014. The time between EP and album has seen the band hone their sound and songwriting to new heights and though at times it feels like Yugal are still on the way to rather than having found their final sound, Chaos & Harmony has replaced any ‘deficiencies’ before with a new individual and fresh forged imagination boldness.

The album opens with the gorgeous enticement of Khamsin, a Middle Eastern flavoured lure of guitar within seconds leading a seduction equally hinting at the entangling musical dissidence to come. The instrumental’s melodic romance and exotic charms are courted by shadows and the portentous thump of anthemic beats; a union which entices but with an element of intimidation before Once Upon a Lie rises up to consume ears with rapacious riffs and bludgeoning rhythms. Wiry grooves are soon entangling the song as the throbbing bait of the bass grips ears as potently as the throaty growl of vocalist Guillaume. A commanding fusion of death and thrash, the song is quickly a potent proposal but truly comes into its own as suggestive melodies and psychotic twists begin to emerge; each more glimpses than song changing elements but all adding drama and unpredictability to the song.

cover_RingMasterReviewHeavy Mental follows devouring the senses with vicious riffs and senses whipping beats as grooves taunt and the bass subsequently spins its own threat loaded magnetic dance. Drops into reserved but more predatory passages surprise and thrill as too the variety of voice and melodic enterprise; it all an absorbing web spun again by From This Day I Will Rise in its own individual design. Opening with a Breed 77 like coaxing, again as exotic as it is welcoming, the song looms up around that continuing lure with a wall of imposing rhythms and grouchy riffs. It is a threat which never fully lands but evolves into an invasive and invigorating trespass again still cored by the Eastern elegance and mystique the track started with.

From one superb offering to another as Dogma prowls and taunts the senses; its muscular rhythms and choleric intensity almost bestial but again an aggressor on a leash which allows clarity to the elements within and their infectious union. A further momentary pull on its reins allows a calmer attack opens the flood gates to thrash inspired riffs and an energy which alone invades and excites, though that in turn only leads to another twist in the song’s mercurial and relentlessly impressing landscape.

The imagination and cantankerous aggression already lighting the album continues as Illusion of Time stalks and flies at the listener with open fury, though a respite from the enterprising hostility is forthcoming through the brief instrumental Interlude. A close relation and in many ways continuation of the opener and an echo of the melodic beauty lying within the tempest of the previous track, it seduces ears and imagination before they are again under siege, this time from the barbarous attack of Silence is Golden. It too is an uncompromising tapestry woven with animosity and a virulent catchiness which is as venomous as it is addictive; each further bound in spicy melodic strands.

Another stirring moment within Chaos & Harmony, its quality and success is matched by the punk infused Lost Mind, the band’s hardcore influences at their most vocal but sublimely countered by the wires of Eastern promise which circle them and the variety of vocal imagination, something the band should definitely explore more ahead.

The album’s title track closes up Chaos & Harmony, a proposition which more than lives up to its name in tone and sound as it relentlessly courses through ears. Raw and rugged it ensures the album leaves with force and though it does not live up to what came before, the song  confirms Yugal as a band coming of age and ready to grant global attention.

Chaos & Harmony is out now on iTunes and through other stores.

https://www.facebook.com/Yugalofficial

Pete RingMaster 07/12/2016

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