34 – Self Titled EP

34 Promo Pic  _RingMasterReview

Grouchier than a stoked up hornet nest and just as damaging, the sound of Kansas City hailing 34 leaves no hiding place for the senses and imagination on the band’s debut EP. The five-track self-titled offering is a rabid and ravenous fusion of hardcore, noise, and metal, all honed into an assault with a sonic sting just as merciless as its rhythmic and vocal bite, and both incidentally constantly veering towards irresistible.

Formed in 2015, 34 features current and former members of bands such as Sisters Of…, Eighteen Visions, At The Left Hand of God, David Hasselhoff On Acid, and Maps For Travelers. It has taken little time for the band to make a potent mark, their live ferocity acclaimed and devoured with shows alongside the likes of Black Breath, Motograder, 68, and Norma Jean adding to the quintet’s rising reputation. Now it is the EP preparing to stir things up further, a success hard to see failing with its impressive and seriously solid introduction to a wider landscape to the band.

The release leaves a lingering and memorable mark with its first two confrontations alone; the EP’s best tracks setting the tone and creative stature of the release with Alpha Blade starting things off. Fair to say we were hooked straight away by the dulled yet anthemic lure of drums which opens up the track. Their flat and compelling resonance easily has ears and appetite attentive, both further gripped as the wiry grooves and sonic animosity of the guitars winds around the senses before allowing the pulsating bassline of Erich Thomas and Jason Shrout’s increasingly addictive beats to lay their magnetic bait. With the throat raw snarls escaping vocalist Brett Carter taking their share of attention too, in no time the song shares a raw magnetism, showing itself a belligerent and aggressive beast with sinews sculpted in virulent noise and biting hooks. Like Unsane meets Pigs with the caustic catchiness of a Coilguns or Shevils, the tracks seduces as it corrodes the senses, every twist and turn within its unpredictable body enjoyably toxic.

34band_LOGO _RingMasterReviewThe following Stick Em Up is just as imposing and thrilling. It opens with chunky scarred riffs which need little time to persuade, their hint of repetitive temptation soon revealed to be one riveting texture in the grooved and rhythmic provocation of the track. As with the first though, things are soon evolving and shifting as melodically fiery and sonically scathing passages entwine with adventurously bruising endeavour within the track’s rock ‘n’ roll. The guitars of Phil Wolf and RL Brooks persistently nag and entice, stirring up the imagination and psyche as Carter vocally and lyrically savages with the backing of the similarly aggressive and potent tones of Brooks.

The final trio of tracks within the EP do not quite live up to the first pair, such their might, but with T.S.Y.T first, all only add to a thickly enjoyable and striking introduction to 34. The third track is as irritable and uncompromising as those before; bullying and arousing the senses with spiky grooves and predacious rhythms as vocals blaze while its successor, Flatliners, springs a Quicksand spicing across its scorched canvas and in its sonic causticity. The song is probably the most adventurous of the five, exploring different creative scenery which swiftly comes and goes, then returns with greater dexterity and imagination as new ear exciting twists become involved.

The EP closes with Machines, a furious tempest and web of emotional and sonic tempestuousness riding on the whiplash effect of Shrout’s and Thomas’ predatory rhythms. It is a forceful and fiercely satisfying end to a great first look at 34. It is easy to see and hear why the band has made such a potent impact already, and to expect, as their sound and imagination grow bolder, they are going to be a potent force in the driving of hardcore/noise ahead.

The 34 EP is released digitally and on limited edition clear red vinyl May 20th via Fountain City Records @ https://34kcmo.bandcamp.com/releases

https://www.facebook.com/34kcmo    https://www.instagram.com/34kcmo/

Pete RingMaster 20/05/2016

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Hells – Paradise EP

Hells_RingMasterReview

Corrosion is generally a gradual often unstoppable process but in the hands of US fury Hells, it is the swiftest undermining of the senses and emotions. Their attrition comes courtesy of their savage hardcore blend, a voracious sound making the band’s new debut EP, Paradise, one of the most punishing and thrilling things to hit the year so far. At the opposite end of the spectrum to the impression of its title, the six track release is aural and emotional dissonance fuelled by voracious anger and sonic spite. It is also a virulently addictive and rousing assault which asphyxiates and intoxicates the senses from start to finish.

Formed around two years ago, the Philadelphia hailing quartet of vocalist Larry Ragone, guitarist Brad Wallace, bassist Scott Signorino, and drummer Steve DiCicco, former members of bands such as Orchid, Transistor Transistor, Brain Dead, Wolves, Sore Saints, Psychic Teens, and Heathen Reign, soon earned the reputation of being one hellacious live experience. November of 2014 saw the release of a three track demo, a well-received platform for what now violates and thrills ears through Paradise.

The EP opens with its title track, Paradise an immediate wall of sonic and vocal abuse driven by vicious beats and an instinctively swinging groove. It has to be said that for all the punishing and creative antipathy conjured throughout the EP, it also has some of the most addictive and lively grooves and hooks heard in a long while. The outstanding track continues to ravage and incite as the rhythms become more imposing and tenacious with Ragone’s throat spilled scowls even more belligerent as they hang on twisted and venomous tendrils of guitar.

Paradise_RingMasterReview1-800-Shitfit shows itself just as intensive and irritable as it unleashes its emotive and creative animus next. A slab of barbarous punk ‘n’ roll, it grumbles and thrashes across two minutes of aural antipathy with the guitars as angry as the vocals and their roared words, while the bass is as anthemically pissed off as the scything trespass of DiCicco’s beats. Its savaging quickly makes way for that of Weather Report, which from its first breath again leaves nothing in the locker as it lashes into the listener. Grooves flirt and lacerate the senses as rhythms threateningly impose, Ragone’s raw squalls spilling irritancy with every ire drenched syllable; a combination which again simply ignites ears and an eager appetite for the threat.

As gripping and invigorating as things have been to date, the EP hits another plateau of tempting with firstly Tribute. The track is a cauldron of emotional and sonic animosity bound in the most salaciously catchy acidic grooving aligned to predatory riffs with matching rhythms.  It nags and badgers with a venomous glint in its creative eye, living up to its threat yet creating a maelstrom which is littered with the most addictive bait.

It is no different with Bad Apple, the track creating its own individual breakdown of the senses with a fluid blend of intensively assaultive and scavenging tempos around an equally unpredictable rhythmic gait stalking the listener from beginning to end. There is no escaping the hate of the song, or a wish to, though it is soon overshadowed by the brilliant EP closing enmity of Night Creeps. From its initial drone nagging of the senses, the track is rancorous alchemy, a bad-blooded proposal to brew thick lust for. Within that initial sonic niggle, DiCicco’s sticks rise to create a rousing shuffle before settling a touch as short grooves and melodic toxicity joins Ragone at his least hostile on the EP, though there is no mistaking the bitterness lining his prowling delivery. The song is hypnotic, a stylish yet bestial challenge which grinds down the defences while creating webs of contagious enterprise. At the time, it is also brewing a boldly simmering in intensity and jaundice, that growing into a fiercer rabid beast by its close.

The track is a brilliant end to a seriously arousing encounter from a band placing themselves aside certainly the likes of Pigs, Sofy Major, and Brutal Truth in one foul swoop. A must for all hardcore/noise abuse fans.

The Paradise EP is out now via Seeing Red Records @ https://hells-band.bandcamp.com/album/paradise or https://seeingredrecords.bandcamp.com/album/paradise-ep

https://www.facebook.com/givethemhells/

Pete RingMaster 17/05/2016

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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Cute Cute Death – Vessels

Cute Cute Death Promo Shot_RingMasterReview

With a name which certainly sparks intrigue, Cute Cute Death back it up with a sound just as attention grabbing and now an album which climbs over the senses, trespasses their boundaries, and leaves fierce satisfaction in its wake. Vessels though is a slightly curious affair for personal tastes, an album which for its first third certainly pleases yet without sparking much more whilst its remainder is a different type of protagonist sparking real excitement about itself and the band’s future.

The seeds of Cute Cute Death began in 2008 when drummer Wayne Kopman and guitarist Johnny Correia relocated from their home city of Johannesburg, South Africa to the UK. Settling in London, the pair met and subsequently linked up with vocalist Niko Forster. After a few line-up changes, guitarist Ricky Gurung and bassist Robert Pipe were enlisted, at which point the band properly emerged, initially under the name Set The Air On Fire. They were soon lighting up stages with their American Metal/hardcore influenced post hardcore endeavours, taking to their growing sound inspirations from the likes of Lower Definition, Alexisonfire, Gallows, Finch, Refused, Deftones, and Glass Jaw, who especially come to mind at times listening to Vessels. The subsequent time since starting has seen the band play across the UK with bands such as Broadway, Atlantis, Flood of Red, They Say Fall, Confessions of a Traitor, and Rival State, all the time adding to their potent reputation which is now pushed again by their debut album.

Produced by Joseph Grouse with Justin Hill (Sikth) mixing, mastering, and co-producing, Vessels opens up with its title track; a song needing little time to get a firm hand on ears and attention. The guitar prowess of Correia and Gurung quickly casts a web of enterprise that lures the imagination, their sonic touch soon wrapping the impressive clean tones of Forster. Straightaway he impresses, increasingly so as his delivery springs rawer, dirtier, and grouchier roars to equally fine success. As the rhythms rumble and prowl the resourceful landscape of the song, there is no escaping the lure and vibrancy of the encounter yet, and we emphasize for personal ears and tastes, it never quite taps into something which really stirs up the passions.

Cute Cute Death Cover Artwork_RingMasterReviewAll the same it is a powerful and dramatic start to Vessels continued by the Sikth meets Incubus personality of Alarm. Once again, the guitars dance with invention and craft as rhythms crowd the senses with their hungry shadows, all colluding to burn fiercely around the equally inflamed and rousing tones of Forster. The track enjoyably blisters on the ear before seamlessly evolving into the rawer antipathy of Pockets. Sonic tendrils and band shouts bring fresh drama to the album whilst the bass of Pipe borders on predatory as it robustly swings through the web of unpredictable and intoxication grooves and scything hooks. There is something extra about the track, if indefinable, which its predecessors lacked, an essence which and hints at the adventure waiting to escape the album further on.

Red Lights makes a calmer entrance next, though walls of bruising rhythms led by the tenacious swings of Kopman amidst intimidating riffs are soon descending on the senses before the song grows into another skilled and magnetic blend of contrasting textures and intensity, as ever echoed in the vocal enterprise of Forster. From its success the brief instrumental of Interlude looms upon ears with electronic suggestiveness on board, it drawing the listener into the awaiting revelry of DMT. It is from here that Vessels suddenly triggers a lustier reaction, though again it is hard to say exactly why, the major differences between the qualities and invention of songs before and after the melodic break not an open reason. With persistently twisting grooves and unpredictable rhythms aligned to writhing tendrils of sonic imagination adding to its temptation, there is no denying that the song simply enthrals and sparks a new breed of pleasure.

There is certainly greater diversity across the songs from hereon in on the album, starting with the warm caress of Statues. The song is an emotive melodic hug and vocal croon with the guitars spellbinding and Forster bordering on majestic with his again wonderfully varied tones. Taking best song honours, the track almost alone tells you all you need to know about the potential and already established invention of Cute Cute Death and that is without sharing any invasive trespass, which they have already proven to be equally adept at.

Leave This City follows and quickly holds courts as its web of spidery grooves and melodic acidity lies magnetically upon the rapier like thrusts of Kopman and another darkly juicy bassline from Pipe. There is a theatre to the hooks and the lively invention which grips the imagination as forcibly as the song’s underlying rhythmic rumble and fiery catchiness takes the body. It is an almost imposingly persuasive proposal matched by that of the enjoyably volatile and often irritable Glass Eyes and eclipsed by the closing might of Dinosaur. The final track is a tempest of anthemic hardcore, rebellious punk rock, and psyche infesting noise rock persistently involved with progressive and melodic ingenuity. The song is rebel rousing, a spirit igniting finale to the album offering a creative call to arms for the impressive invention and presence of Cut Cute Death.

Vessels is an excellent first full-length from the band; one which, even with that odd impact initially, left us thrilled and eager to recommend all fans check out what is a fresh breath in the post and hardcore scene.

Vessels is out now through all outlets on Friday 13th May.

http://www.cutecutedeath.com   https://www.facebook.com/cutecutedeath/     https://twitter.com/cutecutedeath

Pete RingMaster 13/05/2016

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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Bailer – Shaped By The Landscape

BAILER_RingMasterReview

There is a new bruiser in town, a creative bully as at ease turning the senses and ears to mush as it is breeding a dervish like reactions in the body. That uncompromising assailant is Irish quartet Bailer and its choice of irresistible weapon, debut EP, Shaped By The Landscape. The band’s striking introduction is a fiercely irritable groove fest of demands and rewards; a caustic fusion of groove metal and hardcore which leaves body and soul wasted and spirit and emotions ignited.

Formed in the January of 2015, Bailer has been a welcome scourge through its local and Irish underground scene, sharing stages with the likes of Red Enemy, Novelists, The Colour Line, Shields and more as well as playing main support to Murdock on tour. Aidan Cunningham from that fellow Irish band recorded, mixed, and mastered the Shaped By The Landscape, and fair to say if describing the distinct Bailer sound, Murdock would be used as a kind of reference as well as maybe Gacys Threads and The Dillinger Escape Plan. There is no escaping the sonic and vocal, let alone emotional, animosity fuelling and shaping the band’s first poke at the broadest attention, or that it is one of the most punishingly thrilling debuts in the hardcore scene for quite a while.

Artwork_RingMasterReviewThe EP opens with Failsafe and immediately has ears enticed with its spicy guitar coaxing and then under siege by a wall of hungry riffs and barbarous rhythms. It is all conducted by the ferocious tones of vocalist Alex O’Leary, his searing squalls almost visibly scarring his throat as they enjoyably abrase ears. There is equally a swing to his delivery, a devilish catchiness which is even stronger in the web of fiery grooves that entangle ears and appetite amidst the rampant aggression of Paul Cashman’s rhythmic swings. The carnivorous growl of David Cleere’s bass is simply delicious in the mix as too the wonderfully nagging tapestry of metal and punk grooves and riffs cast by guitarist Chris Harte. The track is a glorious start to the release, and maybe the most virulently infectious slab of abuse heard in a long time.

It is not a one off though, being swiftly matched by The Binding. It starts off in the same vein as its predecessor but soon reveals its own nefarious twists and turns as O’Leary again shares rancor with the air. Everything about the song is also ridiculously catchy; the body and imagination is soon caught up in its hostile groove almost unaware of being battered and bruised, sonically and emotionally tossed around. Its sensational onslaught is followed by Anti-Venom and its own animus of spite and infectiousness. Grooves squirm with the tempest of noise and irritability, the snarling lure of the bass as seductive as ever whilst vocals rage and almost gloat over the victim, in the shape of the senses, crippled by the rhythmic battering alone. Not that the listener realises when being manipulated by an infestation of grooves and stirring hooks shared with similar zeal and power.

The Benefit Of Doubt is an even darker and more predatory proposal; venom toning every rhythmic strike and scything flash of guitar while all the time the bass adds a grouchy nag linking it all up. Maybe the least openly catchy song on the EP, though not by much, the track is as bold and majestic in craft and invention as it is in highly persuasive animosity. It is a formidable and stirring end to what is simply a killer and monumental debut from Bailer.

The CD version of Shaped By The Landscape actually comes with bonus tracks Call Of The Unknown and Animosity, and the cause of the only issue with the release; the fact that we were not sent those songs to cover too, though it is easy to assume they will live up to the other quartet. Already we are greedy for the Bailer incitement and it is hard to imagine we will be on our own once it is out there playing havoc with ears and the passions.

The self-released Shaped By The Landscape EP is released 29th April digitally and on CD @ https://bailerofficial.bandcamp.com/

https://www.facebook.com/bailerofficial/

Pete RingMaster 27/04/2016

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

For more exploration of the independent and promotional services check out http://www.zykotika.com

BarCreeps – The Hour Between Dog And Wolf

Dog and Wolf_RingMasterReview

As to who BarCreeps are is a mystery and will remain so with the UK based band presenting themselves anonymously; set to represented by a generic ‘BarCreep’ in a challenge to “the current fragmentation of music into ‘writer/programmer’ and ‘celebrity personality as singer’ and [their]feeling that this process is syphoning the artistry out of culture.” What is no secret going by debut single The Hour Between Dog And Wolf though, is that the band creates one seriously enjoyable and raw punk rock incitement.

Roaring out of London, BarCreeps is said to consist of a quartet of members from all over the world united by a love of record labels such as Fat Wreck, Epitaph, Touch and Go, Jade Tree, and Dischord. Their individual histories seem to include bassist Railgrind formerly being in The Pipettes who toured the world with the likes of Amy Winehouse and The Beastie Boys. As for vocalist Bannister and fellow guitarist Hendricks, they “started the Hong Kong loft show scene” and shared a stage with Fugazi whilst the former has also been in The Young Playthings whilst the latter put on ‘Refugee Rock’ last year, where the Wedding Present headlined a gig that helped raise over £3,000 for the immigrants in the Calais jungle. With a line-up completed by drummer Campari, who played in Italian band Cream Pie as well as Italy’s premier Ramones tribute act, BarCreeps is a proposition that has a lively background but revealing little about themselves at the same time.

Bands should always let their sound do the talking of course, and BarCreeps certainly do that in The Hour Between Dog And Wolf. Their first single opens on a group howl and proceeds to entwine ears in catchy tendrils of guitar and ripe hooks framed by heftily landing rhythms. The equally raw and dirty tones of Bannister add a further easy to take up invitation to a caustic slice of joy which, with its uncomplicated yet potent melodic hardcore scented roar, becomes increasingly magnetic as it breeds a NOFX meets Propagandhi like rousing of ears and attention.

It is only one song heard so far, so too early to say how unique the band’s sound is though The Hour Between Dog And Wolf suggests that such an essence is still in the brewing stage. Fair to say though, that the single hits all the right spots with its uncompromising and highly satisfying punk rock and in return we eagerly await the band’s next offering.

The Hour Between Dog And Wolf is released April 15th on BCHR Records.

Upcoming Live BarCreeps Dates:

April 23rd – The Barfly Camden, London

May 14th – The Queen’s Arms, Reading

August 27th – Sea Change Festival, Totnes

https://www.facebook.com/BarCreeps   https://twitter.com/barcreepsband

Pete RingMaster 15/04/2016

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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Humans The Size Of Microphones – Human Crop Circles

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Human Crop Circles is an album which just highlights how difficult it is to be noticed in the music scene. Released by SuperFire Records in conjunction with De Graanrepubliek, the album comes from Humans The Size Of Microphones, a British hardcore/noise rock band around in the first years of this new century. Their reputation and presence did not carry too far outside of the South coast area of the UK it is fair to say and maybe without any expectations of success at some point called it a day, a disbandment we are assuming as no search came up with anything active from the band or, to be honest, about them at all. As Human Crop Circles quickly reveals, this is a crying shame as its songs simply provide one furiously thrilling and rousing incitement of ears and imagination.

At one point slated to do a split with Electric Wizard, it is hard to imagine that HTSOM did not make some major impressions on someone somewhere. An early self-released five-track demo did appear in 2002, though it too probably got lost in the mists of criminal neglect. Recorded by the band’s drummer John T Baptist in his own studio, where the likes of Electric Wizard, No, Facel Vega, Hunting Lodge, and Field Boss have also recorded, Human Crop Circles has thankfully been uncaged to right some wrongs and introduce a new wealth of ears to the rather wonderful and mercurial tempest of sound that is Humans The Size Of Microphones.

The album bursts into life with Pissing Like A Racehorse where climactic guitars and tenacious rhythms crowd ears for an incendiary start which is soon an even more enjoyably volatile affair as vocals cries and a bedlamic character expose themselves in the mix. The early urgency settles a touch without defusing the now psychotic maelstrom and air of the song, but rises again as seriously addictive bass and guitar enterprise casts a web of sonic psychosis which in turn breeds greater ferocity in the noise punk tempest. It is glorious stuff, like a mix of Melvins, Neurosis, Halfling’s Leaf, and Dope Body; the kind of comparisons which occur often across the release.

The brilliant start is as potently backed up by No One Gets Out Of Here Alive, another magnetic slice of noise imagination and punk attitude as raw and seductive as it is magnetically and antagonistically inflamed. From the first pair of sonically intricate yet bullishly demanding songs alone it is hard to know how the band escaped attention but equally just an example of so many other stories of now lost to the world special bands.

The post-hardcore textured Middle England (Eats it’s Young) steps up next, its initial emotive wash the prelude to a tantalising weave of mystique soaked grooves and bolshie yet anthemic group vocal tempting amidst muscularly tenacious rhythms and mesmeric sonic devilment. It is more than a match for the already established pinnacles of the album and almost equalled by the following flirtatious seducing shared by The Smell of Wet Leaves. Sludgy and predatory but also alive with veins of sultry melodic grooving, the track shares an early dark and catchy lure which subsequently gets turned on its head by caustic energy and creative ferocity before re-establishing itself in another smouldering passage within the eventful encounter. Without quite having the final spark to turn personal tastes lusty, the track still leaves pleasure full in its presence before being over shadowed by the outstanding Fucking Tsunami.

The fifth track just grips and thrills ears from its first bestial bassline and swiping rumble of beats; bass and drums becoming puppeteer of body and passions whilst leading both into the concussive and hellacious exploits of the song’s full body and heart. The sonic and emotive turbulence is exhausting and breath-taking, as too the twisted melodic resourcefulness which lines every twist in the track’s dervish like shuffle. As in all songs, drama comes with every moment and unpredictable turn too; here devilishly enhancing the punk meets post punk meets noise rock triumph of the song. The bass and rhythmic unity of James Hasbeen and Baptist respectively ensures the track has instincts involved, the almost corrosive sonic endeavour of guitarist Pete Sake (all names as fun as the sounds fair to say) just reinforcing the persuasion.

The final quintet of tracks come from that aforementioned demo, each a harsher and more abrasive proposal but all carrying the inventive and multi-flavoured traits that give character to all tracks. Not Exactly Rocket Science is a rousing affair of aurally poisonous punk rock whilst Limitless Stupidity is an insatiable deluge of barbarous rhythms aligned to hostility flamed riffs and vocals further blessed with spicy hooks. The pair ensures ears and appetite continue to be well fed though maybe not as dramatically as the outstanding sonic invasion of I See The World Through Rose Coloured Testicles, an uncompromising and bewitching instrumental that just gets the tongue licking lips.

The pair of Dying For An Audience and Not In Our Name bring the album to a close; the first a fibrous net of riffs and acidic grooves which wraps ears before closing ranks for another bruising and inhospitable storm of hardcore whilst its successor with matching sonic antipathy, spews a tangle of punk hooks and spiky grooves around a battlefield of rhythms. With vocals just as agreeably rancorous, the duo provides a fine end to a great and welcome surprise introduction to a band we had no idea existed.

Maybe they will again as Human Crop Circles invades more and more ears but even if that optimistic hope is not realised, punk and noise rock enthusiasts need to have Humans The Size Of Microphones somewhere in their historical landscapes.

Human Crop Circles is out now via SuperFi / De Graanrepubliek and available @ http://superfirecords.bandcamp.com/album/human-crop-circles-lp or https://graanrepubliekrecords.bandcamp.com/album/human-crop-circles

Pete RingMaster 08/04/2016

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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Nervous Mothers /Art Of Burning Water – Split 7”

cover_RingMasterReview

Creating a union of ferocity sure to see walls tumble and bodies scarred, SuperFire and Vleesklak Records are joint unleashing a Split 7” featuring the raw hardcore animosity of Nervous Mothers and Art Of Burning Water. It is a four track fury taking no prisoners as it rages and abrases the senses. It is also a thoroughly agreeable slab of carnal punk from two bands not too hard to fancy hear plenty more from.

The first three tracks upon the split come from Belgian quartet Nervous Mothers. More about the Antwerp hailing quartet of Bart, Hans, Jim, and Rik we cannot find but opener Op Nul reveals all needed to keenly welcome the band to ears. A sonic wash with intimidating hues opens the track, a vocal sample soon wrapped in steely tendrils of guitar as beats prowl within the brewing animus. There is also a great resonance within the stalking of ears, a dulled yet throbbing essence from the bass which sparks the appetite even more before spiteful voice and song descend with raw animosity on ears.

Following track, Born is similarly set up but swifter into its sludgy punk infestation of the senses with vocals and vicious rhythms to the demanding fore. Though the opener remains the band’s pinnacle, its successor is a rapacious and invigorating trespass as it leads into the thirty second tempest of Waves. The grizzly growl of the bass steals the show but with a frenzy of rapier beats, flesh scorching riffs, and sheer vocal spite, the song is a short, blunt, incitement of punishment and pleasure.

The final song is provided by UK based Art Of Burning Water, a trio described in its bio as “a steroided immigrant noise punk outfit that does not need to be loved to live.” Being musically liked is probably not on the agenda either but as Oppressor soon prompts, embracing their sound is not too hard as Geith, Kunal, and Mike craft it to worm under the skin and venomously blister the senses. Rhythms are hypnotic, the guitars toxic, whilst vocals spill rancor with every syllable; a blend which just hits the spot as it nags, intimidates, and stirs up another twang of hunger in the appetite.

Both bands are new to our ears and now the source of plenty of retrospective attention via their bandcamp profiles. As for their Split, that is another infestation of punk violence to heartily recommend.

The Nervous Mothers /Art Of Burning Water – Split 7” is out now via SuperFi / Vleesklak @ https://superfirecords.bandcamp.com/album/split-7-11

https://www.facebook.com/nervousmothers   http://nervousmothers.bandcamp.com

https://www.facebook.com/aobwmusic   http://artofburningwater.bandcamp.com

Pete RingMaster 08/04/2016

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

For more exploration of the independent and promotional services check out http://www.zykotika.com/